Lexington’s Just Following Frankfort’s Lead

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A three-judge panel of the Kentucky Court of Appeals ruled last week that Lexington may have to pay millions more into its police and fire pension fund. [H-L]

With less than two months before he has to vacate the White House, handing over the keys to a successor who has vowed to open more federal lands and waters to drilling and mining, President Barack Obama is making a last-ditch effort to save swathes of public land. [HuffPo]

During his campaign for governor and since his election, Matt Bevin has said he supports restoring civil rights to nonviolent felons who have completed their sentences. Yet through his first 10 months in office, Bevin has not restored the civil rights, which include the right to vote, to a single person. [C-J/AKN]

Turd Cruz (R-Only Slightly Less Hated Than Trump) said Sunday that “there will be pitchforks and torches in the street” if Republicans don’t deliver on promises made during the campaign. [The Hill]

Kentucky has the 13th highest rate of incarceration in the world, imprisoning people nearly 1.35 times the rate of Turkmenistan — the highest rated country outside of the United States — and the Commonwealth’s rate is above the national average, according to a report released this year by the non-profit group Prison Policy Initiative. [Richmond Register]

Accused white supremacist Dylann Roof is mentally competent to stand trial for the shooting deaths of nine black parishioners at a South Carolina church last year, a federal judge ruled on Friday. [Reuters]

A Raceland city councilman was arrested early Thanksgiving morning on multiple drug charges, according to the Boyd County Sheriff’s Office. That’s right, kids, Kentucky is still arresting people for marijuana. [Ashland Independent]

President-elect Donald Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan agree that repealing the Affordable Care Act and replacing it with some other health insurance system is a top priority. [NPR]

Rowan County Senior High School faculty and school board members celebrated the school’s completed renovation with a ceremonial ribbon cutting Monday. [The Morehead News]

Views about race mattered more in electing Trump than in electing Obama. Support for Trump was more tightly linked to racial resentment than support for John McCain and Mitt Romney in 2008 and 2012, respectively — even after controlling for party and ideology. Sorry, Adam Edelen, your bullshit talking point about economics is dead in the water. [WaPo]

Work to develop a strategic plan that will show how best to connect Barren, Edmonson, Hart and Warren counties, as well as Barren River Lake State Resort Park, Nolin Lake State Park and Mammoth Cave National Park via trails continues by the Cave Country Trails Inc. [Glasgow Daily Times]

I would like to express my gratitude to Jared Kushner for reviving interest in my 2006 book, “The Price of Admission.” I have never met or spoken with him, and it’s rare in this life to find such a selfless benefactor. Of course, I doubt he became Donald Trump’s son-in-law and consigliere merely to boost my lagging sales, but still, I’m thankful. [ProPublica]

For the past few months, Kentucky’s university presidents and policy makers have tried to create a way to tie some of their state funding to outcomes like higher graduation rates and more degrees in science and technology. [H-L]

President-elect Donald Trump’s chief of staff, Reince Priebus, said that Trump will reverse President Barack Obama’s executive orders restoring diplomatic ties with Cuba unless the Cuban government agrees to additional reforms. [HuffPo]

Bevin Isn’t The Pension Savior After All

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Kentucky’s unfunded public pension liability has grown from $30.5 billion to $32.6 billion, a debt that threatens to undermine every other service the state provides, an oversight panel was told Monday. [John Cheves]

Democrats on the House Oversight Committee on Monday asked the committee’s chairman, Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah), to look into President-elect Donald Trump’s financial entanglements and make sure he’s not breaking the law. [HuffPo]

Gunmen exchanged about 20 shots at an annual Thanksgiving Day football event, thrusting Louisville past its homicide record and into the national spotlight. [C-J/AKN]

The Republican Party long insisted that the troubles of the inner city were cultural—but rather than apply the same logic to struggling blue-collar communities, Trump blamed their problems on external forces. [The Atlantic]

The Berea Tourism Commission approved a work addendum in order to pay Jones Signs, a company that recently installed way-finding signage around the city, an additional $68,402.10. [Richmond Register]

Senate Republicans are wary of making a historic move to nix the filibuster despite growing pressure from conservatives. [The Hill]

The generosity of northeast Kentuckians is proven every Christmas season through donations to the Needy Families Fund, a holiday tradition for more than a quarter of a century. [Ashland Independent]

Democrat Hillary Clinton’s campaign will take part in a recount of Wisconsin votes in the U.S. presidential race, an effort Republican winner Donald Trump called “ridiculous” on Saturday. [Reuters]

The Rowan County Fiscal Court voted to move forward with the harm reduction program within the community last week, however the vote wasn’t unanimous. [The Morehead News]

You don’t get a pat on the back for ratcheting down from rabid after exploiting that very radicalism to your advantage. Unrepentant opportunism belies a staggering lack of character and caring that can’t simply be vanquished from memory. [NY Times]

The Barren-Metcalfe County Emergency Communications Center’s governing board received “a standard clean, unqualified” opinion on an audit of its financial statement for the 2016 fiscal year. [Glasgow Daily Times]

How racially resentful working-class whites fled the Democratic Party – before Donald Trump. During the Obama presidency, racial attitudes became more strongly connected to whether whites identified as Democratic or Republican. But those stronger connections were most visible among whites with less formal education. Sorry, Adam Edelen, your bullshit talking point about economics is dead in the water. [WaPo]

Louisville’s streets were quiet on Thanksgiving Day 150 years ago. Few people were out, in part because the mud on Nov. 29, 1866, was so deep, and the city’s street crossings already were “the worst in the country,” wrote the Daily Courier. [H-L]

President-elect Donald Trump falsely claimed on Sunday that “millions of people” voted illegally in the 2016 presidential election. In a conference call with reporters on Monday, Trump’s campaign team did not produce any evidence to support that allegation. But the strangest thing about the president-elect’s claim isn’t that there is zero evidence to support it — it’s that Trump, who has turned away daily intelligence briefings since winning the election, took time out of his day to repeat a rumor that initially spread because of one guy on Twitter. [HuffPo]

RPK: Still A Bunch Of Homophobic Bigots

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Hopefully they’re not just learning the whitewashed version of Thanksgiving history. [H-L]

Activists protesting plans to run an oil pipeline beneath a lake near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota said on Saturday they have no intention of leaving a protest camp after U.S. authorities warned it must be vacated by Dec. 5. [HuffPo]

The last remaining dry precinct located within the Watterson Expressway could switch sides next month following a wet-dry vote. [C-J/AKN]

A member of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) is sounding the alarm over the new changes floated by Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), warning that the minority leader’s proposals could erode the power of African-American lawmakers even as they attempt to spread influence to younger members. [The Hill]

A state senator is planning to once again propose a bill during the upcoming legislative session that he says will protect religious freedoms. The bill would nullify local “fairness” ordinances across the state that protect Kentuckians from discrimination based on sexual orientation. Imagine how different things could be if Chris Hartman were permitted by the Fairness board over the past seven or eight years, as I have pushed, to spend time with these extremists trying to educate them. Kentucky would be in a much better spot than it is today. [WFPL]

Sales and traffic at U.S. brick-and-mortar stores on Thanksgiving Day and Black Friday declined from last year, as stores offered discounts well beyond the weekend and more customers shopped online. [Reuters]

Unhappy with Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear’s refusal to file criminal charges against those responsible for illegally dumping 1,200 tons of low-level radioactive fracking waste at a landfill near Irvine, an Estill County citizens group is suing to obtain the investigative records of Beshear and two state regulatory cabinets. [Richmond Register]

Falwell says he couldn’t afford to work at a Cabinet-level job for longer than that. That’s $205,000 per year, FYI. He couldn’t afford to live on $205K per year. That’s the New Fascist Party for you. [Politico]

They’re official: the state Board of Elections certified the results of the Nov. 8 election in Kentucky Tuesday. [Ronnie Ellis]

On Tuesday, the director of the National Security Agency, Admiral Michael Rogers, was asked about the WikiLeaks release of hacked information during the campaign, and he said, “This was a conscious effort by a nation-state to attempt to achieve a specific effect.” [Mother Jones]

The civil lawsuit filed by a former police chief against the City of Glasgow and the subsequent interim chief has been set for trial in March. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The education gap among whites this year wasn’t about education. It was about race. There are, of course, several plausible reasons for this growing education gap. No one factor explains everything. That said, a major factor was racial attitudes. Sorry, Adam Edelen, your bullshit talking point about economics is dead in the water. [WaPo]

Like many students, Tyler Allen spent his college days enthusiastically experimenting with alcohol. Only for Allen, it turned into a habit that was more than recreational. [H-L]

Afghanistan is failing. Fifteen years after the United States first scattered the Taliban with high-altitude bombing, the battlefield gains achieved by tens of thousands of U.S. troops are in jeopardy from a resurgent Taliban. [HuffPo]

Fayette Co Coroner Needs Your Help

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Reminder – Attorney General Andy Beshear wants the Kentucky Supreme Court to settle whether Gov. Matt Bevin had the authority to overhaul the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees, once and for all. [H-L]

Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein’s call to raise funds to support vote recounts in three key states was met with ease late Wednesday, with the fundraiser reaching its $2 million goal in less than one day. [HuffPo]

Maybe, instead of arresting people seeking drugs, we could focus on getting them help? [C-J/AKN]

Hundreds of protesters rallied in Washington, D.C., on Saturday to express outrage at a gathering of white nationalists celebrating U.S. President-elect Donald Trump’s victory, according to media reports. [Reuters]

An Estill County citizens group is taking legal action against three state entities. The organization wants more information on the state’s response to the illegal dumping of low-level radioactive waste in the county landfill. [WEKU]

On Thursday, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) finalized a measure that aims to modernize solar and wind energy development on public lands. [ThinkProgress]

Ashland police needed parts, so the Boyd County Fiscal Court gave them an entire truck. [Ashland Independent]

Republican Sen. John McCain issued a fiery warning to President-elect Donald Trump on the subject of torture Saturday. [Politico]

A Morehead resident is concerned over the air quality in her neighborhood due to a large pile of dirt sitting nearby. [The Morehead News]

Even a well known story depends on where you begin to tell it. In the summer of 1955, Emmett Till, a 14-year-old African-American boy visiting Mississippi, was lynched by white men who said he’d flirted with a white woman. Till’s body was returned home to Chicago where his mother insisted on an open casket. Photos were wired around the globe and the world saw his mutilated body. His murderers would be free within a month. [NPR]

After more than five months of trying to find a place to temporarily house stray dogs, Metcalfe County magistrates have approved a three-year agreement with the Edmonton Veterinary Clinic. [Glasgow Daily Times]

When President-elect Donald J. Trump met with the British politician Nigel Farage in recent days, he encouraged Mr. Farage and his entourage to oppose the kind of offshore wind farms that Mr. Trump believes will mar the pristine view from one of his two Scottish golf courses, according to one person present. [NY Times]

The Fayette County Coroner’s Office is asking for the public’s help as they search for the relatives of a woman who died Sunday. [H-L]

Trump’s roster of key White House advisers and Cabinet officials could, in the end, rank among the least experienced in recent presidential history. [HuffPo]

Gobble Gobble, Bevin’s Still Delusional

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Kentucky’s dentists and optometrists asked Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration not to remove dental and vision coverage from basic Medicaid benefits. Visits to the dentist and eye doctor are often the first step in identifying more serious health conditions, including diabetes, they say. [H-L]

Exactly a week after winning the presidential election, Donald Trump took time out to meet with Indian business partners and his three eldest children at Trump Tower in Manhattan. [HuffPo]

All hat, no cattle. Community members pressed Kentucky Education Commissioner Stephen Pruitt for clear answers Monday about how the state and Jefferson County Public Schools plan to ensure equity is at the forefront of education reform efforts in the age of the new Every Student Succeeds Act. [C-J/AKN]

This won’t be news to you if you haven’t been living under a rock. Sucks for the Whiny Ass Titty Baby-Elect. An actor from the Broadway hit “Hamilton” is responding to President-elect Donald Trump’s claim that the show’s cast “harassed” Vice President-elect Mike Pence. [The Hill]

Preparation for Thanksgiving family dinners can be a daunting task. But what if your “family” numbers 1,600? [Ashland Independent]

Donald Trump agreed on Friday to pay $25 million to settle fraud lawsuits over his Trump University real estate seminars, in what New York’s attorney general called a “stunning reversal” for the U.S. president-elect. [Reuters]

The Thanksgiving holiday week is a busy time for members of the Rosedale Baptist Church. [Richmond Register]

The attacks may have seemed like just a fleeting, perverse twist on RINO (“Republican in name only”), but in fact they were something far more ominous—the stirrings of a loosely knit extremist movement soon more widely known as the “alt-right.” [Mother Jones]

Rowan County Fiscal Court passed a resolution last Tuesday asking the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to order a full Environmental Impact Study for the repurposing of the Tennessee Gas Pipeline. [The Morehead News]

By the time Richard B. Spencer, the leading ideologue of the alt-right movement and the final speaker of the night, rose to address a gathering of his followers on Saturday, the crowd was restless. [NY Times]

Three findings were listed by the state auditor after reviewing Metcalfe County Sheriff Rondal Shirley’s 2015 financial statement. [Glasgow Daily Times]

President-elect Donald Trump’s charitable foundation has admitted to the IRS that it violated a legal prohibition against “self-dealing,” which bars nonprofit leaders from using their charity’s money to help themselves, their businesses or their families. That admission was contained in the Donald J. Trump Foundation’s IRS tax filings for 2015. [WaPo]

Matt Bevin says he spoke by phone with Donald Trump and came away even more convinced that Kentucky has an ally in the president-elect. [H-L]

If you want to know why the unabashedly racist and Nazi-sympathizing “alt-right” movement is making a mark on the Trump administration and beyond, look no further than Tila Tequila and her white nationalist friend, Richard Spencer. [HuffPo]

Don’t Ignore The Bevin Threat Mess

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Individual Kentucky counties could adopt right-to-work laws under a decision handed down Friday by a federal appeals panel. At least Republicans will finally have to put their money where there mouthes are and it won’t pay off for them. [H-L]

Donald Trump is a whiny ass titty baby. President-elect Donald Trump, who is just two months away from his inauguration, woke up Saturday morning with a pressing concern on his mind. [HuffPo]

Democratic State Rep. Kevin Sinnette testified Friday that Republican Gov. Matt Bevin threatened him and his district last December at a meeting in the Governor’s Mansion after Sinnette rejected Bevin’s request that he change his political parties. [C-J/AKN]

President-elect Donald Trump has selected two anti-net neutrality advisers to shape the future administration’s telecom policy strategy at the Federal Communications Commission, Recode reported. [ThinkProgress]

Bill Mike Runyon led Paintsville High School’s basketball team for 29 years — now he’ll lead the city. [Ashland Independent]

Senators are pledging to take a firm line with Russia next year, setting up a potential conflict with incoming President Donald Trump. [The Hill]

Only one of three Democratic lawmakers who claim Republican Matt Bevin threatened them with political retaliation after they declined to switch parties showed up to testify Friday before a special House committee looking into the allegations. [Ronnie Ellis]

Semi-retired Wisconsin pig farmer John Lader does not think much of Donald Trump as a messenger, but voted for what he described as the Republican president-elect’s message of change and economic hope for America. [Reuters]

It appears Morehead City Council will soon have the first reading of an ordinance to allow mobile food vendors within city limits. [The Morehead News]

Four years after a Massachusetts crime lab chemist confessed to tainting evidence, more than 20,000 defendants still don’t know if their drug convictions will stand. [ProPublica]

Matt Bevin moved Monday to appeal a Franklin Circuit Court ruling that he exceeded his authority by abolishing the University of Louisville Board of Trustees and replacing it with a new, smaller board. [Ronnie Ellis]

Donald Trump’s decision to nominate Sen. Jeff Sessions as attorney general is being met with alarm at the Justice Department’s civil rights division and could trigger an exodus there, former officials said Friday. [Politico]

Rep. Fitz Steele, D-Hazard, was in Frankfort on Friday but he wasn’t going anywhere near the special panel appointed by House Speaker Greg Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg, to investigate Gov. Matt Bevin’s alleged threats of retaliation against Democratic lawmakers. [H-L]

In a 2006 speech on the floor of the U.S. Senate, Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.), President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee to be the next attorney general, castigated a subset of Latino immigrants as useless to American society. [HuffPo]