The KRS/KTRS Are Still A Train Wreck

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Officials asked residents of a Knott County home to evacuate because of the threat of flooding caused by water leaking from a nearby coal mine. [H-L]

Donald Trump promised during his campaign to bring back mining jobs to struggling workers in coal country. Now the president-elect has tapped for commerce secretary a Manhattan billionaire who owned a West Virginia coal mine where 12 workers died in 2006. [HuffPo]

Greg Fischer said those seeking to address gun violence in Louisville and other cities, such as Gov. Matt Bevin, must consider multiple policy levers in order to halt the rise of shootings and homicides. [C-J/AKN]

President-elect Donald Trump’s transition-team adviser on financial policies and appointments, Paul Atkins, has been depicted as an ideological advocate of small government. But the ways that the Trump administration and Congressional Republicans are likely to approach financial deregulation could serve Atkins’ wallet as well as his political agenda. [ProPublica]

The Louisville attorneys representing three people in a lawsuit stemming from a Donald Trump campaign rally want to depose the president-elect before he’s sworn into office. Dan Canon is one of the lawyers representing the plaintiffs suing Trump and others. He said Trump incited violence at his rally in Louisville back in March. [WLKY]

On Thursday, a federal judge in Oregon ruled that a climate lawsuit brought against the U.S. government by a group of youths can move forward, a win for the strategy of fighting climate change through the judicial branch. [ThinkProgress]

Worried about irreparable damage being done to their retirement benefits, a group of public school teachers on Tuesday asked a judge to order Kentucky’s top political leaders to “perform their constitutional and statutory duties” by adequately funding the pension system. [Richmond Register]

A US serviceman has been killed by an improvised explosive device while fighting against so-called Islamic State (IS) in Syria, officials say. [BBC]

The 5,000 electric customers of Kentucky Utilities in Barren and Hart counties, along with the other 541,000 in more than 70 counties across the commonwealth, could get cost hikes in the coming year, pending Kentucky Public Service Commission approval. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Thirty years ago Friday, a shocking announcement was made in the rotunda of San Francisco’s City Hall by a visibly shaken Dianne Feinstein, who was then president of the city’s Board of Supervisors. [NPR]

The financial woes of Kentucky’s public pension systems continue to worsen, but it’s really one of the six plans which is causing the most concern. [Ronnie Ellis]

Mitch McConnell (R-Granny), whose wife Elaine Chao is Trump’s pick for transportation secretary, was asked if he plans to recuse himself from her Senate confirmation process. McConnell’s answer? In a word: no. [WaPo]

The number of homemade methamphetamine labs found in Kentucky has dropped sharply in the past few years as drug abusers switched to imported meth, reducing the danger and cleanup costs associated with the small labs. [H-L]

A Marine wounded in combat in Fallujah, Iraq, in 2004 has found new purpose as a self-proclaimed peaceful warrior fighting against a 1,172-mile pipeline that protesters fear threatens the water source of Native Americans in North Dakota. [HuffPo]

You Should Probably Read That H-L Editorial

Pee alert! Jeff Hoover has named Julian Carroll to his fake transition team. Meet thew new good old boy, same as the old good old boy. [Hoover Nonsense]

Anyone thinking of illegally using Kentucky to dump radioactive fracking waste from other states will no doubt reconsider in light of fines announced this week by the Bevin administration. [H-L]

More than a dozen women have accused President-elect Donald Trump of sexual misconduct, ranging from forcible kissing to assault. Many Americans who did not support Trump’s candidacy have grappled with shock since his election. But for these women, his win is also deeply personal. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin gleefully said “good riddance” to House Speaker Greg Stumbo last week, and Stumbo made clear on Wednesday that the not-so-warm feelings are mutual. [C-J/AKN]

The protests in major U.S. cities against Republican Donald Trump’s surprise presidential election victory have been impromptu affairs, quickly organized by young Americans with a diverse array of backgrounds and agendas. [Reuters]

City of Ashland workers will pump 24 million gallons of water back into a drained reservoir later this week. [Ashland Independent]

If President-elect Trump follows through on his campaign promises, millions of individuals — immigrants, religious minorities, people of color — face a very grim four years. One of the worst hit groups will be Americans with significant health costs. The Trump transition team published a brief summary of the incoming president’s health plan on its website, and the news is not good for the elderly, the poor, and millions of Americans with preexisting conditions. [ThinkProgress]

A 19-year-old Berea man, who was charged with arson Tuesday morning, told investigators he set the blaze because people “needed to die.” [Richmond Register]

Children and teenagers of Mexican descent make up one of the fastest-growing populations in the nation’s public schools. [NPR]

Three Morehead Fire Department firefighters did not report any injuries after multiple oxygen cylinders exploded inside a residence in which they were preparing to suppress a fire. [The Morehead News]

One of the most important phases of the transition to power for President-elect Donald Trump includes briefings on U.S. intelligence capabilities and secret operations as well as separate descriptions of the extraordinary powers he will have over the military, especially contingency plans to use nuclear weapons, according to officials. [WaPo]

Area tourism officials came together Tuesday morning, along with representatives of local, state and federal governments, for the Caveland Marketing Association’s legislative luncheon. [Glasgow Daily Times]

No, Bernie Sanders could not have won. So calm the eff down, Bernie Bros. Donald Trump won whether we like it or not. [BBC]

Dozens of students marched through the University of Kentucky’s campus Friday to protest rape culture and how the university handles sexual assault cases. [H-L]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) voiced concerns Tuesday that President-elect Donald Trump is breaking a core campaign promise of keeping special interests out of Washington ― “draining the swamp.” [HuffPo]

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It’s Friday, So Better Start Drinking!

Don’t get too full of yourself, Jeff. Because I’ve spent the past decade surrounding you while the Democrats sat around twiddling their thumbs. Jeff Hoover, a Jamestown attorney who has been in the state House since 1997, will be elected Kentucky’s first Republican speaker of the House of Representatives in 95 years and only the third in Kentucky’s history. [H-L]

And so, the so-called “unthinkable” has happened. Donald Trump, the racist, sexist, xenophobic candidate of the Republican alt-right, has been elected President of the United States. [HuffPo]

It took Angel Cruz Rodriguez three tries to escape gangs and hopelessness in El Salvador. [Chris Kenning]

For all of the ways the 2016 presidential election was extraordinary – particularly Donald Trump’s repeated assertion that the vote was being “rigged” – the actual balloting on Tuesday was largely without serious incident. [ProPublica]

It didn’t take long for the new Republican state House majority to choose their Speaker, turning to the man who led them in the political wilderness for 16 years — Jeff Hoover of Jamestown. [Ronnie Ellis]

The world gasped in collective disbelief on Wednesday following the victory of Donald Trump in the U.S. presidential race, with apprehensive allies seeking to put a brave face on a result they had dreaded and American adversaries exulting in an outcome they see as a potential turning point in global affairs. [WaPo]

From now until Nov. 18 the Ashland Police Department will be accepting canned foods as currency to pay for parking tickets. [Ashland Independent]

Donald Trump’s presidency is going to be a disaster for the white working class. Thank goodness half of them are too stupid (you voted for him) to realize it. [Vox]

Last Saturday night, dozens of people showed up with flowers, balloons and to lend a helping hand at the United Airlines terminal at Louisville International Airport. They came to show support for Abraham Aluel. [WFPL]

The Russian government had contact with advisers to Donald J. Trump during the American presidential campaign, one of the country’s top diplomats said Thursday. [NY Times]

Burley tobacco producers are in full-swing stripping this year’s crop, but finding the right time to start stripping tobacco has been a difficult thing to do because of the dry weather the area has had. [Glasgow Daily Times]

US President-elect Donald Trump has said it was a “great honour” to meet President Barack Obama for transition talks at the White House. [BBC]

Protesters and supporters of Donald Trump tangled on Western Kentucky University’s campus as demonstrations against the president-elect were held in Kentucky. [H-L]

“What should I say to my students after the election if Trump wins?” a principal asked me recently. Good question. What should we tell our children? [HuffPo]

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Long-Awaited Barr Whinefest Tonight

On Monday, on the set of KET’s “Kentucky Tonight,” Nancy Jo Kemper will get her first chance to sit opposite U.S. Rep. (c)Andy Barr, R-Lexington, the man against whom she spent most of this year campaigning. [H-L]

Karl Rove is throwing in the towel. In an appearance on “Fox News Sunday,” the Republican strategist said that Donald Trump’s poll numbers are simply too dismal to end in victory on election night. [HuffPo]

Wonder if these scared white people are making proper disclosure to the FEC? It was a small but passionate group who attended a veterans for Trump rally Saturday afternoon in a Fern Creek strip mall parking lot. [C-J/AKN]

It was a powerful piece of technology created for an important customer. The Medusa system, named after the mythical Greek monster with snakes instead of hair, had one main purpose: to vacuum up vast quantities of internet data at an astonishing speed. [The Intercept]

A committee launched to investigate allegations that Gov. Matt Bevin illegally canceled a road project to punish a lawmaker for not switching political parties met for the first time Friday. [WFPL]

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton has a double-digit lead in the inaugural ABC News 2016 tracking poll released Sunday morning. [The Hill]

Internal emails between officials in the Kentucky Transportation Department last October indicate Democratic state Rep. Russ Meyer knew about a right-of-way dispute on a road project in his district which was subsequently cancelled by Republican Gov. Matt Bevin. [Ronnie Ellis]

Donald Trump rode to the top of the Republican ticket promising a “big, beautiful, powerful” border wall with Mexico to stop the flow of undocumented immigrants. Along that border, however, Americans are more likely to call the wall a “waste of money”, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll. [Reuters]

Morehead State University acknowledged as one of the “Safest Colleges in Kentucky” by BackgroundChecks.org, a site devoted to public safety and open government. [Ashland Independent]

Leaders of the NAACP, the oldest civil rights organization in the United States, bucked intense pressure from supporters of charter schools on Saturday and ratified a resolution calling for a moratorium on the expansion of charters and for stronger oversight of these schools. [WaPo]

The 2016 Candidates Forum was held Tuesday at the Morehead Conference Center. The forum was scheduled for three discussions with candidates for Morehead City Council, Senate District 27, and House District 99. [The Morehead News]

Few things are more awesome than listening to kids playing on the playground. There’s magic in that mix of laughter and exhausted breaths — giggle, pant, giggle. [ProPublica]

The University of Kentucky is making a dramatic change in how it gives out financial aid by concentrating more on students who need help paying for college. [H-L]

Donald Trump’s unpopularity is threatening to take the Republican Senate majority down with him. [HuffPo]

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Bevin: Northerner WATB Still Being WATB

Lexington’s minimum wage will roll back to $7.25 an hour after the state Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Kentucky cities do not have the authority to raise the minimum wage. [H-L]

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump opened a rally on Thursday by mocking widespread concerns that he may not accept the results of November’s presidential election. [HuffPo]

The University of Louisville’s real-estate foundation voted Friday to approve a paper transaction that will restore $29 million to the books of the university’s endowment. [C-J/AKN]

The drug industry’s answer to opioid addiction: more pills. [WaPo]

Homeownership is a dream not only of U.S. born citizens but of many who arrive here from other countries. In Kentucky, more than 26,000 immigrants own their homes. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama may be plotting a return to his community organizing roots. When he leaves the White House, Obama wants to create a “platform” to train the next generation of leaders and activists, he said during a town-hall event broadcast on ESPN Tuesday evening. [Politico]

While access to oral health care for children in Kentucky has increased since 2001, more still face urgent dental needs, according to a new study. [Richmond Register]

As Election Day approaches and the polls continue to look dire for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, he is pinning the blame on everything except himself. [ThinkProgress]

Matt Bevin’s attorneys were back in Franklin Circuit Court on Wednesday asking Judge Phillip Shepherd to reconsider his ruling that the governor cannot abolish and re-create the University of Louisville Board of Trustees. [Ronnie Ellis]

Global health officials are racing to better understand the Zika virus behind a major outbreak that began in Brazil last year and has spread to almost 60 countries. [Reuters]

Voters will decide early next year whether to allow the sale of packaged alcoholic beverages in Monroe County. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Ohio Gov. John Kasich has a grave warning for the GOP. “If the Republican Party does not evolve, the Republican Party is going to die,” Kasich said in an interview with Business Insider published Saturday. [The Hill]

The wife of the alleged ringleader in the theft of more than $100,000 worth of bourbon from Central Kentucky distilleries has accepted a plea deal on a couple of drug-related charges. [H-L]

It was a tacky, hostile and personal insult, but for Trump, it was actually a euphemism of sorts. Women around the world instantly knew what he was really saying. [HuffPo]

Surprise! The Beshears Hate Transparency & Accountability In Kentucky

A longtime champion of Kentucky’s government transparency laws retired Wednesday from Attorney General Andy Beshear’s office after she was reprimanded for speaking with a journalist. [John Cheves]

The 10,000th Syrian refugee to resettle in the U.S. this fiscal year arrived on Monday, the White House announced, following through on an ambitious plan by President Barack Obama to welcome more people from the country. [HuffPo]

U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth and Lexington Mayor Jim Gray, the Democratic nominee for U.S. Senate, are calling for the federal government to help deal with the burgeoning heroin epidemic. And they’re blaming U.S. Sen. Rand Paul for supporting a drug treatment bill that included no money to pay for it. [C-J/AKN]

The State Department said Monday it is concerned about Iran state media reports that the country has deployed an advanced missile defense system around its Fordow underground uranium facility. [The Hill]

This has got to be one of the dumbest moves yet from someone with the surname Beshear! Assistant Attorney General Amye Bensenhaver has retired “under considerable duress” after being reprimanded for speaking to a journalist without permission, creating yet another public relations issue for a government agency that has had more than its share in recent months. [Roger Alford]

Last year 35,092 people died in traffic crashes in the United States, a 7.2 percent year-on-year increase that runs counter to a five-decade trend of declining fatalities, the U.S. Transportation Department said. [Reuters]

Coal-producing states are preparing for arguments next month in the federal appeals court case known as West Virginia v. EPA, challenging the Obama Administration’s Clean Power Plan to limit greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. [WFPL]

Despite yet more evidence of trouble with the Red Cross’ disaster response — this time to floods in Louisiana — Apple, Amazon, T-Mobile, and many others have made the venerable charity the exclusive conduit for helping victims. [ProPublica]

Democratic House Speaker Greg Stumbo said if Republican Gov. Matt Bevin threatened a Democratic lawmaker for refusing to switch parties he could be guilty of criminal behavior or an impeachable offense. [Ronnie Ellis]

Way to go, Appalachia. New analysis from the Clean Air Task Force shows that by 2025 America’s children will experience 750,000 asthma attacks each summer that will be directly attributable to the oil and gas industry. [ThinkProgress]

The battle for the last legislative chamber in the South still controlled by Democrats escalated over the weekend as Republicans announced they would boycott a special meeting this week, while the House Speaker publicly threatened to impeach the state’s Republican governor. [Richmond Register]

In 1988, a small-time drug dealer became the first man charged under a new, harsh drug law signed by then-President Ronald Reagan. Almost 30 years later, President Barack Obama granted a sentence commutation to Richard Van Winrow, a literal posterboy for the history of America’s drug war. [BBC]

A state environmental response team began taking more extensive soil samples Tuesday to test for higher-than-normal arsenic levels along a rural Montgomery County road. [H-L]

Taco trucks on every corner!? SIGN US UP! [HuffPo]

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Edelen & Trump Are On The Same Page

Matt Bevin doesn’t know how to stop running face-first into scandals. And they’re not even the good kind of scandals that involve corruption – they’re just embarrassing and dumb. Matt Bevin’s administration on Friday named a retired Texas official who oversaw a controversial 2008 raid on a polygamist sect, seizing more than 400 children without a court order, to run Kentucky’s troubled Department of Juvenile Justice. [John Cheves]

Emily Graeber sat on a plane, her long hair falling over her face, and pressed her nose against the window. Then she leaned back in her seat, trying not to cry. [HuffPo]

Jim Ramsey and his crew have been pulling these corrupt open records stunts for a decade. Want to find out former University of Louisville President James Ramsey’s new phone number and email address at the university’s foundation? Hope you have better luck than we did. [C-J/AKN]

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton is marking the 53rd anniversary of the March on Washington with a call to action, saying too many Americans still face systemic racism and “constant assaults on their franchise.” [The Hill]

U.S. Senate candidate Jim Gray told a flock of rural Democrats on Saturday he’d deploy a four-point plan that would help rejuvenate a diminishing eastern Kentucky economy if elected. [Ashland Independent]

The turbulent months after the 9/11 attacks were notable for something that did not happen. Even though al-Qaeda had killed thousands of people and scored a direct hit on the Pentagon, hardly anyone in either political party blamed the Bush Administration for failing to defend the homeland. [ProPublica]

In another display of the changing political tides in Kentucky, only Republican office-holders spoke from the stage Thursday morning at the Kentucky Farm Bureau Country Ham Breakfast, while Democrats found themselves on the outside, both figuratively and literally. [Ronnie Ellis]

President Barack Obama’s former campaign manager on Sunday called Donald Trump “a psychopath.” [Politico]

Late Friday afternoon, Glasgow Electric Plant Board Superintendent Billy Ray said that after an all-afternoon meeting with TVA, there was little new to report in the wake of receipt of two documents Thursday from the Kentucky Office of the Attorney General. [Glasgow Daily Times]

It’s a common sight at public events – a long line for the the ladies’ loos and a short one for the men’s. [BBC]

As the district’s only Leader in Me school, Glenn Marshall Elementary School’s first school assembly focused on, naturally, leadership. The assembly explored how students in all grades can find the leaders in themselves this school year. [Richmond Register]

Emboldened by Donald J. Trump’s struggles in the presidential race, Democrats in Congress are laying the groundwork to expand the list of House Republicans they will target for defeat as part of an effort to slash the Republicans’ 30-seat majority and even reclaim control if Mr. Trump falls further. [NY Times]

One of the biggest investments held by the $14.9 billion Kentucky Retirement Systems is a hedge fund that’s also one of its worst performers — and yet the financially troubled agency is doubling down. [John Cheves]

Adam Edelen and Donald Trump are apparently birds of a feather. Surprise! [HuffPo]

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