Matt Bevin Is Still Ruining Everything

The Affrilachian Poets, a diverse Lexington-based collective of writers directly or indirectly connected to Appalachia, has rejected its 2016 Governor’s Award in the Arts, citing Gov. Matt Bevin’s positions on education, the humanities and other issues. [H-L]

This past Monday was supposed to be a turning point for Donald Trump. That was the day many Republicans hoped their presidential nominee, who was giving a speech at the Detroit Economic Club, would make his long-awaited pivot to the general election. More teleprompter, less Trump. [HuffPo]

The NCAA has not finished interviewing people in its investigation of the University of Louisville’s men’s basketball program. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump is in danger of losing his grip on the Republican Party as fears grow that he’s headed for a landslide defeat in November that will wipe out GOP majorities in Congress. [The Hill]

Findings of a city probe into revelations about a Frankfort police major appear to conflict with some witness testimony in a Franklin County Sheriff’s Office investigation and a resulting court case. The State Journal’s attempts for more than a month to review information used by the city to reach its conclusions also leave some remaining questions about how the internal investigation was launched and how it was conducted. [State Journal]

Here’s Matt Bevin wasting your taxpayer dollars in favor of discrimination. Texas and a dozen other states asked a U.S. judge on Friday to block Obama administration guidance to public schools that transgender students must be allowed to use bathrooms of their choice, saying it usurps the authority of school districts nationwide. [Reuters]

The Republican leader of the U.S. Senate, Sen. Mitch McConnell, said this past week that maintaining his party’s control over the chamber is looking “dicey.” That’s primarily the product of an unfriendly 2016 map: 24 Republican senators are on this year’s ballot while Democrats must defend only 10 seats. Donald Trump isn’t making it any easier for McConnell either. [Ronnie Ellis]

New polls released Friday show Hillary Clinton with significant leads over Donald Trump in three key battleground states. [Politico]

Environmental attorney Tom Fitzgerald, founder and director of the Kentucky Resources Council, will address the Madison County branch of the Women’s Network at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 16, at Gillum’s in the Richmond Mall. [Richmond Register]

Hillary Clinton has released her tax returns, adding to the pressure on her Republican rival for the White House, Donald Trump, to do the same. [BBC]

His English is a little slow for now, but his bashful-seeming smiles come quickly and easily. Kohichi Haneda, 14, arrived in the United States from Japan on July 21 as part of the Labo International Exchange program with which 4-H youth organizations across the country team. The Labo students who are visiting around Kentucky stayed together for the first day or so, with a trip to the grocery to introduce them to American foods and a Louisville Sluggers baseball game. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The first nationwide study to ask high school students about their sexuality found that gay, lesbian and bisexual teenagers were at far greater risk for depression, bullying and many types of violence than their straight peers. [NY Times]

Former Bardstown police officer Nick Houck was served a search warrant Thursday afternoon in connection with the case of a missing local woman, Crystal Rogers. [H-L]

A spokesperson for Donald Trump’s presidential campaign has blamed President Barack Obama for invading Afghanistan ― a foreign policy decision he never made. [HuffPo]

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Does Frankfort Care About Homeless Kids? Or Will What’s Happened In Lexington Continue To Occur?

The number of homeless students in Lexington schools has nearly doubled in the past three years, according to a new report that recommends more money and attention to schools with the highest percentage of homeless students. [H-L]

Two prominent scholars are calling B.S. on a popular conservative argument about poverty. [HuffPo]

Lawyers for Gov. Matt Bevin and Attorney General Andy Beshear disagreed in court Monday on whether the governor could make new appointments to the University of Louisville board of trustees to fix a political representation issue. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump appeared to question Hillary Clinton’s mental fitness for the presidency on Saturday, calling her “unstable” and saying she had suffered a “short-circuit in the brain.” [The Hill]

George Griffiths remembers a different Louisville. Originally from Kingston, Jamaica, Griffiths moved to the city from New York after his job transferred him 28 years ago. He’s lived in the United States since 1970. [WFPL]

The United States has taken in 8,000 Syrian refugees since October and is on track to meet President Barack Obama’s goal of resettling 10,000 by the end of the fiscal year, a U.S. State Department official told reporters on Friday. [Reuters]

For someone who a year ago said the raucous, rowdy tradition of Fancy Farm Picnic political speaking is “literally celebrating the very worst elements of the political process,” Republican Gov. Matt Bevin embraced his time on the stage Saturday. [Ronnie Ellis]

Hillary Clinton’s surge in the polls over the past week has widened her path to victory in November and put Donald Trump in a deeper hole than recent losers Mitt Romney, John McCain or John Kerry faced at this phase of the campaign. [Politico]

Construction is on schedule for the $10 million rebuild of KY 519 between Clack Mountain and the Morgan County line. [The Morehead News]

Black Lives Matter activist DeRay Mckesson is suing the police and city of Baton Rouge over mass arrests during protests against police killings. [BBC]

There are fewer coal jobs in Kentucky than there have been in more than 115 years, a report said as politicians in the state look for other opportunities for their constituents. [Richmond Register]

During a 33-year career at the Central Intelligence Agency, I served presidents of both parties — three Republicans and three Democrats. I was at President George W. Bush’s side when we were attacked on Sept. 11; as deputy director of the agency, I was with President Obama when we killed Osama bin Laden in 2011. [NY Times]

Some leading Kentucky Republicans seem unconcerned that Donald Trump’s foibles will undermine their campaign to flip control of the Democratic-led state House. They see the GOP presidential nominee as an asset in their quest to complete their takeover of Kentucky government. [H-L]

A vastly underappreciated legacy of Barack Obama’s presidency is one that neither his conservative opponents nor his liberal allies like to mention: He’s presided over a historically unprecedented reduction in government employees. [HuffPo]

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Where’s The Statue Of Tina Conner?

Former Gov. Paul Patton joked Tuesday that while supporters don’t usually put up statues of people before they die, he might not have been able to make sure a likeness of him was done correctly if they had waited. [H-L]

Donald Trump on Wednesday said he hopes Hillary Clinton’s deleted emails have fallen into the hands of Russian hackers. [HuffPo]

This little birdy is singing a really long song. The sentencing date for former Kentucky Personnel Cabinet Secretary Tim Longmeyer has been rescheduled for 2 p.m. Sept. 22 in federal court in Lexington. [C-J/AKN]

President Obama said in an interview broadcast Sunday he’s “hopeful” about race relations improving in the country. [The Hill]

A new board to develop strategies for agricultural water use in Kentucky is closer to its first meeting. [WFPL]

California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law on Friday a bill to require anyone planning to build a homemade firearm to first obtain a serial number for the weapon and submit to a background check, his office said in a statement. [Reuters]

Messy hands happily smeared strips of paper across large sized figures as creatures began to take form Wednesday morning at a camp hosted by Berea Art House. [Richmond Register]

President Barack Obama charged Sunday that divisive rhetoric from Donald Trump on Muslims and terrorism is “ultimately helping do ISIL’s work.” [Politico]

Boyd County will spend $80,000 for a one-question “wet” election on packaged alcohol sales — three months before it spends another $90,000 on the presidential election. [Ashland Independent]

Virginia Senator Tim Kaine has attended his first rally as Hillary Clinton’s vice presidential running mate, saying: “America was not built on fear”. [BBC]

Rowan Fiscal Court has agreed that the Tri-County Animal Shelter is for dogs and cats only and the feline capacity is limited to 30. [The Morehead News]

Donald Trump made clear this weekend that he has not rolled back his proposal to ban Muslims from entering the United States, despite top allies insisting that he had. [WaPo]

Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes used her speech Tuesday at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia to paint Hillary Clinton as caring and inquisitive and “a fighter for every single thing Donald Trump is against.” [H-L]

A quarter-century after winning his party’s nomination for the presidency, Bill Clinton took the Democratic National Convention stage to tell a story on the night his wife officially won it herself… [HuffPo]

Bevin’s Ignorance Parade Continues

Matt Bevin unveiled details Wednesday of his plan to overhaul Medicaid in Kentucky, saying it will impose monthly premiums of $1 to $15 and save taxpayers $2.2 billion over the next five years. Adding premiums to the Medicaid program concerns public health advocate Sheila Schuster, who said after the news conference that when out-of-pocket expenses are upped for Medicaid users, they drop out of the program. [H-L]

Democrats literally sat down on the floor of the House chamber on Wednesday — and forced the House into a temporary recess — as part of an effort to compel Republican leadership to vote on gun control legislation. [HuffPo]

Under proposed changes announced Wednesday by Gov. Matt Bevin, many Kentuckians covered by Medicaid would… Here’s your chance to watch poor Kentuckians suffer. As well as your chance to watch the Republican Party of Kentucky’s drunken, delusional leadership foam at the mouth about how wonderful this is. Such a shame the KDP has no guts. [C-J/AKN]

Senators rejected dueling proposals on blocking suspected terrorists from being able to buy a gun Monday, approximately a week after the worst mass shooting in U.S. history. [The Hill]

Eastern Kentucky University’s employee wellness program titled “Healthy You at EKU” is focusing on bringing wellness opportunities to campus for all of their employees. And now that summer is about to begin, that means vegetables are beginning to turn ripe and the return of the Madison County Farmer’s Market to EKU’s grounds on Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. [Richmond Register]

Who among us has not been in the position where what he means to say is something wise and temperate and what actually comes out of his mouth is a garbage fart? [WaPo]

Pathways will continue to shine a light of hope as it launches two new outreach programs designed for youth and young adults. [Ashland Independent]

The political battle between President Barack Obama and presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump is now fully joined. [BBC]

Local public agencies and private entities are looking to take to the skies with the area’s first-ever drone school. [The Morehead News]

Dozens of delegates to the Republican National Convention have launched an effort to dislodge Donald Trump as the GOP’s presidential nominee next month. [Politico]

Cave City City Council members met in a special-called session Wednesday afternoon to approve on second reading two ordinances — one adopting the city’s amended 2015-16 budget and another adopting the city’s 2016-17 budget. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Republicans need to start worrying about losing their majority in the House of Representatives. [Bloomberg]

Two members of the former Kentucky Retirement Systems Board of Trustees are suing Gov. Matt Bevin, claiming Bevin did not have the authority to remove board chairman Thomas Elliott of Jefferson County from the panel. [H-L]

Just like himself and most Americans… Presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump on Tuesday questioned the faith of Hillary Clinton and President Barack Obama, insinuating that neither may really be a Christian. [HuffPo]

That Suntory Story Is A Great Read

University of Louisville President James Ramsey’s announced departure on Friday means that half of Kentucky public university presidents have either announced their resignations or have already stepped down since January. [H-L]

Iraqi government-run camps struggled on Sunday to shelter people fleeing Fallujah, as the military battled Islamic State militants in the city’s northern districts. [HuffPo]

LGBT-related graffiti discovered at Humana’s Waterside building downtown earlier this week prompted the FBI to step in on a joint investigation with Louisville police. [C-J/AKN]

Presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump said “it would be nice if the Republicans stuck together” but he believes he can “win either way,” according to an interview. [The Hill]

While Republicans and Democrats differ wildly on firearms issues in Congress, opposition to gun control measures transcends political parties in Kentucky. [WFPL]

Democrats pushing for gun curbs after the latest mass shooting in the United States are co-opting a Republican mantra to build public support and defang opposition: it’s time to get tough on national security. [Reuters]

More than half a million Kentucky students eat meals at school for free or at a reduced price. However, only one in 13 low-income children who need a summer meal is receiving it, according to a recently released study. [Richmond Register]

Just months after Suntory’s $16bn takeover of US spirits maker Beam in 2014, the chief executive of the Japanese whisky group dropped a bombshell. The quality of the Kentucky-made Jim Beam bourbon could be improved, he suggested, if its distillers employed a Japanese process called kaizen. Matt Shattock, the chief executive of Beam, cringed at the proposal made by his counterpart, Takeshi Niinami. It was seen as a direct affront to the formula perfected by the Jim Beam family over two centuries. [Financial Times]

Matt Bevin late Friday afternoon issued an executive order abolishing the existing board for the Kentucky Retirement System and creating a new one that will have a membership at odds with the existing statute governing the board. [Ronnie Ellis]

Investigators have recovered graphic video footage from security cameras at the Orlando nightclub where a gunman Sunday morning killed 49 people and injured 53 others. [Orlando Sentinel]

An estimate of the city’s carryover funds for next budget year had many on Morehead City Council worried about the finances of the municipality. A second look by a management accountant relieved some of that stress, revealing that about $1 million had not been allocated. [The Morehead News]

The man who killed 49 people and wounded 53 at an LGBT nightclub in Florida on Sunday was dismissed from the state department of corrections in 2007 after joking about bringing a gun to a training class, according to records released on Friday. [The Guardian]

Oh, now Valerie Honeycutt Spears cares about the Education Professional Standards Board. Dollars to doughnuts that she still doesn’t comprehend the problems EPSB faces in attempting to hold corrupt educators accountable and never will. [H-L]

As President Barack Obama approaches the end of his second term, there’s been much discussion of what his legacy will be. While much of that debate focuses on his foreign policy or his sweeping domestic policies, such as the Affordable Care Act, there’s another area where the 44th president has left a significant mark: making life easier for millions of working parents. [HuffPo]

Workers’ Comp: A Hotbed Of Corruption

What Kentucky’s mountains need, even more than that good ol’ federal money, is human capital — smart, passionate young people who have high aspirations for where they live, because if the region has a future, they are it. But don’t worry – youth will never be taken seriously in Eastern Kentucky. No way, no how, not going to happen. Unless you’re neck-deep in the good old boy world, you’re doomed. [H-L]

Contrary to those in the media and elsewhere who claimed he was “far more accepting” on LGBT issues than other GOP candidates, Donald Trump is proving that he very much will be a force against LGBT equality if elected president. And he’s doing it in a more insidious, under-the-radar way than any previous GOP presidential nominee. [HuffPo]

Sooner or later the feds have to start investigating workers’ comp fraud from the Beshear Era, right? Because it’s not like Bevin’s people are competent enough to figure anything out. Franklin Circuit Court on Wednesday put a hold on Gov. Matt Bevin’s order reorganizing the Kentucky Workers’ Compensation Nominating Commission. [C-J/AKN]

When bigotry is more important than one’s faith, apparently. Donald Trump was held up as the only choice for evangelical voters this November at a high-profile conference where faith leaders gave the presumptive Republican nominee their stamp of approval. [The Hill]

It is impossible to realize fully the significance of a time or events as one lives them. It’s only in looking back from a distance of time and perspective that you might be able to understand. [Ronnie Ellis]

Muhammad Ali was extolled on Friday as a boxer of incomparable grace, a magnetic entertainer and a man of conviction who gave a voice to the oppressed, as a two-day celebration of “The Greatest” came to a rousing end in his Kentucky hometown. [Reuters]

Paul C. Goodpaster, chair of the Morehead State University’s Board of Regents, has named a nine-member presidential search and screening advisory committee to help conduct a national search for the next MSU president. [The Morehead News]

Why do many school districts fail to meet the needs of their students? One commonly cited response is our country’s disparate school funding system: because most districts rely heavily on local property tax for funding, schools in poor districts are often left with fewer resources than schools in wealthier areas. [ProPublica]

The southeast Kentucky hospital chain accused in federal court of filing fraudulent prescriptions that were used by staffers and others is asking a judge to throw out the lawsuit. [Ashland Independent]

A gunman wielding an assault-type rifle and a handgun took hostages and opened fire inside a crowded Florida nightclub, killing approximately 20 people and wounding 42 others before dying in a gunfight with SWAT officers, police said Sunday. [Politico]

Logan Calhoun says it was not easy for him to juggle getting a nursing degree from Hazard Community and Technical College while working full time and seeing a new baby join his family, but he was able to handle all those demands. Reflecting on his success, Logan appreciates the effort he undertook to fulfill the dreams for his career. [Hazard Herald]

The Trump Plaza Casino and Hotel is now closed, its windows clouded over by sea salt. Only a faint outline of the gold letters spelling out T-R-U-M-P remains visible on the exterior of what was once this city’s premier casino. Not far away, the long-failing Trump Marina Hotel Casino was sold at a major loss five years ago and is now known as the Golden Nugget. [NY Times]

The scenes blend like images from a kaleidoscope. A woman, blond, jubilant in a white dress, shown magnified on a convention center screen in San Francisco. It is Geraldine A. Ferraro in 1984 accepting the Democratic nomination that made her the first woman in the nation to be tapped by a major party to run for vice president. [H-L]

Donald Trump is starting the general election match-up against Hillary Clinton in a precarious financial position. [HuffPo]