Bevin: Northerner WATB Still Being WATB

Lexington’s minimum wage will roll back to $7.25 an hour after the state Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Kentucky cities do not have the authority to raise the minimum wage. [H-L]

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump opened a rally on Thursday by mocking widespread concerns that he may not accept the results of November’s presidential election. [HuffPo]

The University of Louisville’s real-estate foundation voted Friday to approve a paper transaction that will restore $29 million to the books of the university’s endowment. [C-J/AKN]

The drug industry’s answer to opioid addiction: more pills. [WaPo]

Homeownership is a dream not only of U.S. born citizens but of many who arrive here from other countries. In Kentucky, more than 26,000 immigrants own their homes. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama may be plotting a return to his community organizing roots. When he leaves the White House, Obama wants to create a “platform” to train the next generation of leaders and activists, he said during a town-hall event broadcast on ESPN Tuesday evening. [Politico]

While access to oral health care for children in Kentucky has increased since 2001, more still face urgent dental needs, according to a new study. [Richmond Register]

As Election Day approaches and the polls continue to look dire for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, he is pinning the blame on everything except himself. [ThinkProgress]

Matt Bevin’s attorneys were back in Franklin Circuit Court on Wednesday asking Judge Phillip Shepherd to reconsider his ruling that the governor cannot abolish and re-create the University of Louisville Board of Trustees. [Ronnie Ellis]

Global health officials are racing to better understand the Zika virus behind a major outbreak that began in Brazil last year and has spread to almost 60 countries. [Reuters]

Voters will decide early next year whether to allow the sale of packaged alcoholic beverages in Monroe County. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Ohio Gov. John Kasich has a grave warning for the GOP. “If the Republican Party does not evolve, the Republican Party is going to die,” Kasich said in an interview with Business Insider published Saturday. [The Hill]

The wife of the alleged ringleader in the theft of more than $100,000 worth of bourbon from Central Kentucky distilleries has accepted a plea deal on a couple of drug-related charges. [H-L]

It was a tacky, hostile and personal insult, but for Trump, it was actually a euphemism of sorts. Women around the world instantly knew what he was really saying. [HuffPo]

Surprise! The Beshears Hate Transparency & Accountability In Kentucky

A longtime champion of Kentucky’s government transparency laws retired Wednesday from Attorney General Andy Beshear’s office after she was reprimanded for speaking with a journalist. [John Cheves]

The 10,000th Syrian refugee to resettle in the U.S. this fiscal year arrived on Monday, the White House announced, following through on an ambitious plan by President Barack Obama to welcome more people from the country. [HuffPo]

U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth and Lexington Mayor Jim Gray, the Democratic nominee for U.S. Senate, are calling for the federal government to help deal with the burgeoning heroin epidemic. And they’re blaming U.S. Sen. Rand Paul for supporting a drug treatment bill that included no money to pay for it. [C-J/AKN]

The State Department said Monday it is concerned about Iran state media reports that the country has deployed an advanced missile defense system around its Fordow underground uranium facility. [The Hill]

This has got to be one of the dumbest moves yet from someone with the surname Beshear! Assistant Attorney General Amye Bensenhaver has retired “under considerable duress” after being reprimanded for speaking to a journalist without permission, creating yet another public relations issue for a government agency that has had more than its share in recent months. [Roger Alford]

Last year 35,092 people died in traffic crashes in the United States, a 7.2 percent year-on-year increase that runs counter to a five-decade trend of declining fatalities, the U.S. Transportation Department said. [Reuters]

Coal-producing states are preparing for arguments next month in the federal appeals court case known as West Virginia v. EPA, challenging the Obama Administration’s Clean Power Plan to limit greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. [WFPL]

Despite yet more evidence of trouble with the Red Cross’ disaster response — this time to floods in Louisiana — Apple, Amazon, T-Mobile, and many others have made the venerable charity the exclusive conduit for helping victims. [ProPublica]

Democratic House Speaker Greg Stumbo said if Republican Gov. Matt Bevin threatened a Democratic lawmaker for refusing to switch parties he could be guilty of criminal behavior or an impeachable offense. [Ronnie Ellis]

Way to go, Appalachia. New analysis from the Clean Air Task Force shows that by 2025 America’s children will experience 750,000 asthma attacks each summer that will be directly attributable to the oil and gas industry. [ThinkProgress]

The battle for the last legislative chamber in the South still controlled by Democrats escalated over the weekend as Republicans announced they would boycott a special meeting this week, while the House Speaker publicly threatened to impeach the state’s Republican governor. [Richmond Register]

In 1988, a small-time drug dealer became the first man charged under a new, harsh drug law signed by then-President Ronald Reagan. Almost 30 years later, President Barack Obama granted a sentence commutation to Richard Van Winrow, a literal posterboy for the history of America’s drug war. [BBC]

A state environmental response team began taking more extensive soil samples Tuesday to test for higher-than-normal arsenic levels along a rural Montgomery County road. [H-L]

Taco trucks on every corner!? SIGN US UP! [HuffPo]

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Edelen & Trump Are On The Same Page

Matt Bevin doesn’t know how to stop running face-first into scandals. And they’re not even the good kind of scandals that involve corruption – they’re just embarrassing and dumb. Matt Bevin’s administration on Friday named a retired Texas official who oversaw a controversial 2008 raid on a polygamist sect, seizing more than 400 children without a court order, to run Kentucky’s troubled Department of Juvenile Justice. [John Cheves]

Emily Graeber sat on a plane, her long hair falling over her face, and pressed her nose against the window. Then she leaned back in her seat, trying not to cry. [HuffPo]

Jim Ramsey and his crew have been pulling these corrupt open records stunts for a decade. Want to find out former University of Louisville President James Ramsey’s new phone number and email address at the university’s foundation? Hope you have better luck than we did. [C-J/AKN]

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton is marking the 53rd anniversary of the March on Washington with a call to action, saying too many Americans still face systemic racism and “constant assaults on their franchise.” [The Hill]

U.S. Senate candidate Jim Gray told a flock of rural Democrats on Saturday he’d deploy a four-point plan that would help rejuvenate a diminishing eastern Kentucky economy if elected. [Ashland Independent]

The turbulent months after the 9/11 attacks were notable for something that did not happen. Even though al-Qaeda had killed thousands of people and scored a direct hit on the Pentagon, hardly anyone in either political party blamed the Bush Administration for failing to defend the homeland. [ProPublica]

In another display of the changing political tides in Kentucky, only Republican office-holders spoke from the stage Thursday morning at the Kentucky Farm Bureau Country Ham Breakfast, while Democrats found themselves on the outside, both figuratively and literally. [Ronnie Ellis]

President Barack Obama’s former campaign manager on Sunday called Donald Trump “a psychopath.” [Politico]

Late Friday afternoon, Glasgow Electric Plant Board Superintendent Billy Ray said that after an all-afternoon meeting with TVA, there was little new to report in the wake of receipt of two documents Thursday from the Kentucky Office of the Attorney General. [Glasgow Daily Times]

It’s a common sight at public events – a long line for the the ladies’ loos and a short one for the men’s. [BBC]

As the district’s only Leader in Me school, Glenn Marshall Elementary School’s first school assembly focused on, naturally, leadership. The assembly explored how students in all grades can find the leaders in themselves this school year. [Richmond Register]

Emboldened by Donald J. Trump’s struggles in the presidential race, Democrats in Congress are laying the groundwork to expand the list of House Republicans they will target for defeat as part of an effort to slash the Republicans’ 30-seat majority and even reclaim control if Mr. Trump falls further. [NY Times]

One of the biggest investments held by the $14.9 billion Kentucky Retirement Systems is a hedge fund that’s also one of its worst performers — and yet the financially troubled agency is doubling down. [John Cheves]

Adam Edelen and Donald Trump are apparently birds of a feather. Surprise! [HuffPo]

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Matt Bevin Is Still Ruining Everything

The Affrilachian Poets, a diverse Lexington-based collective of writers directly or indirectly connected to Appalachia, has rejected its 2016 Governor’s Award in the Arts, citing Gov. Matt Bevin’s positions on education, the humanities and other issues. [H-L]

This past Monday was supposed to be a turning point for Donald Trump. That was the day many Republicans hoped their presidential nominee, who was giving a speech at the Detroit Economic Club, would make his long-awaited pivot to the general election. More teleprompter, less Trump. [HuffPo]

The NCAA has not finished interviewing people in its investigation of the University of Louisville’s men’s basketball program. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump is in danger of losing his grip on the Republican Party as fears grow that he’s headed for a landslide defeat in November that will wipe out GOP majorities in Congress. [The Hill]

Findings of a city probe into revelations about a Frankfort police major appear to conflict with some witness testimony in a Franklin County Sheriff’s Office investigation and a resulting court case. The State Journal’s attempts for more than a month to review information used by the city to reach its conclusions also leave some remaining questions about how the internal investigation was launched and how it was conducted. [State Journal]

Here’s Matt Bevin wasting your taxpayer dollars in favor of discrimination. Texas and a dozen other states asked a U.S. judge on Friday to block Obama administration guidance to public schools that transgender students must be allowed to use bathrooms of their choice, saying it usurps the authority of school districts nationwide. [Reuters]

The Republican leader of the U.S. Senate, Sen. Mitch McConnell, said this past week that maintaining his party’s control over the chamber is looking “dicey.” That’s primarily the product of an unfriendly 2016 map: 24 Republican senators are on this year’s ballot while Democrats must defend only 10 seats. Donald Trump isn’t making it any easier for McConnell either. [Ronnie Ellis]

New polls released Friday show Hillary Clinton with significant leads over Donald Trump in three key battleground states. [Politico]

Environmental attorney Tom Fitzgerald, founder and director of the Kentucky Resources Council, will address the Madison County branch of the Women’s Network at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 16, at Gillum’s in the Richmond Mall. [Richmond Register]

Hillary Clinton has released her tax returns, adding to the pressure on her Republican rival for the White House, Donald Trump, to do the same. [BBC]

His English is a little slow for now, but his bashful-seeming smiles come quickly and easily. Kohichi Haneda, 14, arrived in the United States from Japan on July 21 as part of the Labo International Exchange program with which 4-H youth organizations across the country team. The Labo students who are visiting around Kentucky stayed together for the first day or so, with a trip to the grocery to introduce them to American foods and a Louisville Sluggers baseball game. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The first nationwide study to ask high school students about their sexuality found that gay, lesbian and bisexual teenagers were at far greater risk for depression, bullying and many types of violence than their straight peers. [NY Times]

Former Bardstown police officer Nick Houck was served a search warrant Thursday afternoon in connection with the case of a missing local woman, Crystal Rogers. [H-L]

A spokesperson for Donald Trump’s presidential campaign has blamed President Barack Obama for invading Afghanistan ― a foreign policy decision he never made. [HuffPo]

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Does Frankfort Care About Homeless Kids? Or Will What’s Happened In Lexington Continue To Occur?

The number of homeless students in Lexington schools has nearly doubled in the past three years, according to a new report that recommends more money and attention to schools with the highest percentage of homeless students. [H-L]

Two prominent scholars are calling B.S. on a popular conservative argument about poverty. [HuffPo]

Lawyers for Gov. Matt Bevin and Attorney General Andy Beshear disagreed in court Monday on whether the governor could make new appointments to the University of Louisville board of trustees to fix a political representation issue. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump appeared to question Hillary Clinton’s mental fitness for the presidency on Saturday, calling her “unstable” and saying she had suffered a “short-circuit in the brain.” [The Hill]

George Griffiths remembers a different Louisville. Originally from Kingston, Jamaica, Griffiths moved to the city from New York after his job transferred him 28 years ago. He’s lived in the United States since 1970. [WFPL]

The United States has taken in 8,000 Syrian refugees since October and is on track to meet President Barack Obama’s goal of resettling 10,000 by the end of the fiscal year, a U.S. State Department official told reporters on Friday. [Reuters]

For someone who a year ago said the raucous, rowdy tradition of Fancy Farm Picnic political speaking is “literally celebrating the very worst elements of the political process,” Republican Gov. Matt Bevin embraced his time on the stage Saturday. [Ronnie Ellis]

Hillary Clinton’s surge in the polls over the past week has widened her path to victory in November and put Donald Trump in a deeper hole than recent losers Mitt Romney, John McCain or John Kerry faced at this phase of the campaign. [Politico]

Construction is on schedule for the $10 million rebuild of KY 519 between Clack Mountain and the Morgan County line. [The Morehead News]

Black Lives Matter activist DeRay Mckesson is suing the police and city of Baton Rouge over mass arrests during protests against police killings. [BBC]

There are fewer coal jobs in Kentucky than there have been in more than 115 years, a report said as politicians in the state look for other opportunities for their constituents. [Richmond Register]

During a 33-year career at the Central Intelligence Agency, I served presidents of both parties — three Republicans and three Democrats. I was at President George W. Bush’s side when we were attacked on Sept. 11; as deputy director of the agency, I was with President Obama when we killed Osama bin Laden in 2011. [NY Times]

Some leading Kentucky Republicans seem unconcerned that Donald Trump’s foibles will undermine their campaign to flip control of the Democratic-led state House. They see the GOP presidential nominee as an asset in their quest to complete their takeover of Kentucky government. [H-L]

A vastly underappreciated legacy of Barack Obama’s presidency is one that neither his conservative opponents nor his liberal allies like to mention: He’s presided over a historically unprecedented reduction in government employees. [HuffPo]

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Where’s The Statue Of Tina Conner?

Former Gov. Paul Patton joked Tuesday that while supporters don’t usually put up statues of people before they die, he might not have been able to make sure a likeness of him was done correctly if they had waited. [H-L]

Donald Trump on Wednesday said he hopes Hillary Clinton’s deleted emails have fallen into the hands of Russian hackers. [HuffPo]

This little birdy is singing a really long song. The sentencing date for former Kentucky Personnel Cabinet Secretary Tim Longmeyer has been rescheduled for 2 p.m. Sept. 22 in federal court in Lexington. [C-J/AKN]

President Obama said in an interview broadcast Sunday he’s “hopeful” about race relations improving in the country. [The Hill]

A new board to develop strategies for agricultural water use in Kentucky is closer to its first meeting. [WFPL]

California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law on Friday a bill to require anyone planning to build a homemade firearm to first obtain a serial number for the weapon and submit to a background check, his office said in a statement. [Reuters]

Messy hands happily smeared strips of paper across large sized figures as creatures began to take form Wednesday morning at a camp hosted by Berea Art House. [Richmond Register]

President Barack Obama charged Sunday that divisive rhetoric from Donald Trump on Muslims and terrorism is “ultimately helping do ISIL’s work.” [Politico]

Boyd County will spend $80,000 for a one-question “wet” election on packaged alcohol sales — three months before it spends another $90,000 on the presidential election. [Ashland Independent]

Virginia Senator Tim Kaine has attended his first rally as Hillary Clinton’s vice presidential running mate, saying: “America was not built on fear”. [BBC]

Rowan Fiscal Court has agreed that the Tri-County Animal Shelter is for dogs and cats only and the feline capacity is limited to 30. [The Morehead News]

Donald Trump made clear this weekend that he has not rolled back his proposal to ban Muslims from entering the United States, despite top allies insisting that he had. [WaPo]

Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes used her speech Tuesday at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia to paint Hillary Clinton as caring and inquisitive and “a fighter for every single thing Donald Trump is against.” [H-L]

A quarter-century after winning his party’s nomination for the presidency, Bill Clinton took the Democratic National Convention stage to tell a story on the night his wife officially won it herself… [HuffPo]