Long-Awaited Barr Whinefest Tonight

On Monday, on the set of KET’s “Kentucky Tonight,” Nancy Jo Kemper will get her first chance to sit opposite U.S. Rep. (c)Andy Barr, R-Lexington, the man against whom she spent most of this year campaigning. [H-L]

Karl Rove is throwing in the towel. In an appearance on “Fox News Sunday,” the Republican strategist said that Donald Trump’s poll numbers are simply too dismal to end in victory on election night. [HuffPo]

Wonder if these scared white people are making proper disclosure to the FEC? It was a small but passionate group who attended a veterans for Trump rally Saturday afternoon in a Fern Creek strip mall parking lot. [C-J/AKN]

It was a powerful piece of technology created for an important customer. The Medusa system, named after the mythical Greek monster with snakes instead of hair, had one main purpose: to vacuum up vast quantities of internet data at an astonishing speed. [The Intercept]

A committee launched to investigate allegations that Gov. Matt Bevin illegally canceled a road project to punish a lawmaker for not switching political parties met for the first time Friday. [WFPL]

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton has a double-digit lead in the inaugural ABC News 2016 tracking poll released Sunday morning. [The Hill]

Internal emails between officials in the Kentucky Transportation Department last October indicate Democratic state Rep. Russ Meyer knew about a right-of-way dispute on a road project in his district which was subsequently cancelled by Republican Gov. Matt Bevin. [Ronnie Ellis]

Donald Trump rode to the top of the Republican ticket promising a “big, beautiful, powerful” border wall with Mexico to stop the flow of undocumented immigrants. Along that border, however, Americans are more likely to call the wall a “waste of money”, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll. [Reuters]

Morehead State University acknowledged as one of the “Safest Colleges in Kentucky” by BackgroundChecks.org, a site devoted to public safety and open government. [Ashland Independent]

Leaders of the NAACP, the oldest civil rights organization in the United States, bucked intense pressure from supporters of charter schools on Saturday and ratified a resolution calling for a moratorium on the expansion of charters and for stronger oversight of these schools. [WaPo]

The 2016 Candidates Forum was held Tuesday at the Morehead Conference Center. The forum was scheduled for three discussions with candidates for Morehead City Council, Senate District 27, and House District 99. [The Morehead News]

Few things are more awesome than listening to kids playing on the playground. There’s magic in that mix of laughter and exhausted breaths — giggle, pant, giggle. [ProPublica]

The University of Kentucky is making a dramatic change in how it gives out financial aid by concentrating more on students who need help paying for college. [H-L]

Donald Trump’s unpopularity is threatening to take the Republican Senate majority down with him. [HuffPo]

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When Will The Bevin-Beshear Fight End?

The president of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools has expressed concern about “the potential for undue political influence” in Gov. Matt Bevin’s overhaul of the University of Louisville’s governing board. SACS President Belle S. Wheelan said in an Aug. 18 letter to acting University of Louisville President Neville G. Pinto that “there is evidence of significant accreditation-related issues” involving Bevin’s changes at U of L that are being challenged in court by state Attorney General Andy Beshear. [H-L]

Donald Trump’s new campaign manager, Kellyanne Conway, found herself in the unenviable position Sunday morning of having to defend one of the candidate’s most despicable tweets ever. [HuffPo]

Judicial candidates in Kentucky can make misleading statements but they can’t tell outright lies. [C-J/AKN]

The prescriptions you have in your medicine cabinet might not be as private as you believe they are. Thirty-one states grant law enforcement warrantless access to databases containing drug histories, and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration is pushing hard to search records even in states that have privacy safeguards. [WCPO]

I suspect most people are paying only passing attention to the multiple court battles between Republican Gov. Matt Bevin and Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear. But the stakes are high and, depending upon how the courts rule in the various suits and Bevin’s potential reactions, these cases are likely to make history and set precedents that will affect Kentucky state government for years. [Ronnie Ellis]

Now for some startling opinions about race relations and the current leader of the Republican Party, Donald Trump. [The Hill]

Louisville-based GE Appliances, part of the Haier Group, plans to close a water heater manufacturing line that it launched in 2012 at Appliance Park. [Business First]

Nearly a third of U.S. counties will likely be served by only one insurer that participates in an Affordable Care Act (ACA) marketplace in 2017, according to an analysis published Sunday by the Kaiser Family Foundation. [Reuters]

Brenda Stamm will face a familiar challenger this fall as she seeks another term on the Rowan County Board of Education. [The Morehead News]

The U.S. Department of Justice announced that it would phase out its use of private prisons. While significant, the move will not put an end to the booming immigrant detention industry. Private prison companies will continue to receive millions in government contracts to detain unauthorized immigrants. [ProPublica]

Officials in several states are scrambling to deal with a series of heroin overdose outbreaks affecting dozens of people and involving at least six deaths. [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump made a direct pitch to Iowa’s farmers in a speech here Saturday — and then pivoted back to his appeal for support from African-Americans, even though there were virtually none in the audience. [Politico]

How do you document Kentucky history that has been mostly hidden and, until 1992, was technically illegal? [Tom Eblen]

Someone using an email address connected to Harold Bornstein, Donald Trump’s doctor, apparently doesn’t want to miss out on the opportunity to cash in on the GOP presidential nominee’s campaign. [HuffPo]

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Fun Times At UK & UofL Lately

Tuition and salaries will increase at the University of Kentucky next year. Next week, the UK Board of Trustees is expected to pass a 5 percent tuition increase for in-state students and a 2 percent raise for employees. Tuition for out-of-state students will increase 8.5 percent. [H-L]

What we do know — what I’ve known my entire life — is that the sight of two men kissing is a stunning, terrifying thing. A dangerous thing. A thing that inspires fury and fear and violence and, yes, murder. [HuffPo]

A leading University of Louisville surgeon says that staffing cuts by KentuckyOne Health at U of L Hospital have rendered it “unsafe” for the care of seriously ill and injured patients. [C-J/AKN]

CIA director John Brennan said on Saturday that he expects 28 redacted pages of a congressional report on 9/11 to be published and that he supports their release. [The Hill]

In its search for a new superintendent, Glasgow Independent Schools is using Phil Eason, of the Kentucky Association of School Administrators (KASA), as superintendent search consultant. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Key members of the U.S. Congress said Friday they had reached a compromise to shift more than $1 billion to try to keep struggling families together, including those with babies born dependant on opioids. [Reuters]

If the Richmond City Commission adopts the police department’s proposed pay scale, it would get a greater return on the $59,000 it invests in training a new officer for nearly a year, according to Acting Police Chief Robert Mott. [Richmond Register]

Mergers have become commonplace as hospital mega-chains increasingly dominate the American health-care market. But these deals often go unscrutinized by state regulators, who fail to address potential risks to patients losing access to care, according to a new report released today. [ProPublica]

For several residents of Hardburly, life suddenly changed without warning last week, when a mudslide completely devastated their community. On the evening of May 28, folks living near Salyers Lane prepared to enjoy the Memorial Day weekend. On the morning of May 29, they were joining together in cleanup efforts and trying to recover from the aftermath of an avalanche. [Hazard Herald]

Rousing tributes have been paid to boxing legend Muhammad Ali at a memorial service in his home city of Louisville, Kentucky. [BBC]

The Kentucky Supreme Court will decide the fate of local minimum wage laws. On Friday, the court heard arguments over whether Louisville’s minimum wage ordinance violates state law by going beyond the scope of Kentucky’s minimum wage, which is tied to the federal rate of $7.25 per hour. [WFPL]

A secret report warned that British spies may have put lives at risk because their surveillance systems were sweeping up more data than could be analyzed, leading them to miss clues to possible security threats. [The Intercept]

It was a violation of the Kentucky Open Meetings Act for Gov. Matt Bevin to send state police to a May 19 meeting of the Kentucky Retirement Systems board of trustees and threaten to arrest the board chairman if he participated, Attorney General Andy Beshear said in an opinion released Tuesday. [H-L]

Donald Trump ramped up his earlier call to ban Muslims from entering the country in a high-profile national security address on Monday — and made clear he believes he can do it with or without congressional approval. [HuffPo]

Bevin: KY’s Embarrassing Tea Grifter

We weren’t joking – are you interested in buying The ‘Ville Voice? [The ‘Ville Voice]

Matt Bevin has been in office for six months, and I still don’t know what to make of the selfie governor. Every time he says something that almost makes sense, the next thing out of his mouth is a cuckoo-clock bird. In one breath he will lecture people about the state motto being “United We Stand, Divided We Fall,” and in the next breath take a petty swipe at a political opponent. The irony seems completely lost on him. [Tom Eblen]

Donald Trump would respect limits on his authority if he’s elected president, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Grandmother) said Monday. [HuffPo]

Billionaire coal baron and West Virginia gubernatorial candidate Jim Justice’s required mine reclamation projects in Kentucky are missing deadlines and dragging on, nearly two years after a crackdown by state environmental regulators. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump lashed out at the press over scrutiny of the money he raised to donate to veterans groups, in one instance pointing to a reporter and calling him a “sleaze.” [The Hill]

The Madison County Board of Education approved a tentative working budget for 2016-2017 that anticipates a slight dip in revenues. Chief Financial Officer Debbie Frazier presented the spending plan at a Thursday work session. [Richmond Register]

Police do not need a warrant to obtain a person’s cellphone location data held by wireless carriers, a U.S. appeals court ruled on Tuesday, dealing a setback to privacy advocates. [Reuters]

Federal funding will pump oxygen more efficiently into the masks of firefighters when clean air is limited, deputy chief Greg Ray said. Ray told the Ashland Board of City Commissioners on Thursday the Ashland Fire Department received a $221,000 award to replenish its air pack supply. [Ashland Independent]

Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., the ranking member of the congressional committee that oversees the Red Cross, sent a three-page letter to the charity’s CEO on Monday demanding that she explain why the Red Cross struggled to respond to record flooding in Mississippi this spring. [ProPublica]

Lower gas prices yielded additional funding for the Ashland Police Department to add two new vehicles to its aging fleet. [Ashland Independent]

Donald Trump claims a net worth of more than $10 billion and an income of $557 million. But he appears to get there only by overvaluing properties and ignoring his expenses. [Politico]

Community leaders have undertaken an exercise meant to improve traffic flow and safety over the next two decades as part of a Kentucky Transportation Cabinet small urban area study. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Illegal immigrants in the US often get better care than the nation’s military veterans, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has said. [BBC]

Rand Paul’s Political Action Committee paid vendors that were also used by his failed presidential campaign. Which comes as a surprise to absolutely no one. [John Cheves]

Islamic State militants fought back vigorously overnight and parried an onslaught by the Iraqi army on a southern district of the city of Fallujah, the group’s bastion near Baghdad, officers said on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

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People Are Probably Less Excited For The McConnell Book Than They Are About Louisville’s Murder Rate

The U.S Department of Labor has funded a grant worth $3.4 million to help retrain out-of-work coal miners in Kentucky. [H-L]

Donald Trump scorns traditional presidential candidate standards. The Donald doesn’t do what’s expected. And he certainly doesn’t do what he tells other candidates they must do. [HuffPo]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who learned an early lesson about the value of patience and persistence during a childhood bout with polio, has some advice for Republicans alarmed about the prospect of having presidential candidate Donald Trump at the top of the ticket and in the White House. [C-J/AKN]

After a rampage that left 14 people dead in San Bernardino, key U.S. lawmakers pledged to seek a law requiring technology companies to give law enforcement agencies a “back door” to encrypted communications and electronic devices, such as the iPhone used by one of the shooters. [Reuters]

The more than 400,000 people who received health insurance from Kentucky’s expanded Medicaid program will likely not have to pay monthly premiums under Republican Gov. Matt Bevin’s reforms, but they could have reduced benefits, the state’s Medicaid commissioner said Friday. [Richmond Register]

It turns out that a big chunk of Trump’s speaking fees revolve around ACN, a controversial multilevel marketing company that’s been accused of bilking people out of millions of dollars. If presented in proper context by the press, Trump’s long-running and lucrative relationship with ACN would essentially eliminate questions about Clinton’s speeches. And if queries persisted, the press would have to demand Trump also release nearly a decade worth of transcripts. [MMFA]

Most schools in Kentucky have bully prevention programs, but not all top school administrators have received training in prevention of bullying, according to a study by the Kentucky Center for School Safety. [Ashland Independent]

Former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder says Edward Snowden performed a “public service” by triggering a debate over surveillance techniques, but still must pay a penalty for illegally leaking a trove of classified intelligence documents. [CNN]

Jobs, jobs, jobs – listen to Kentucky politicians from either party and you quickly learn his or her “top priority is good jobs and more good jobs.” [Ronnie Ellis]

For years, Zofran was the most popular morning-sickness medication in the U.S. Now it’s being accused of causing birth defects. The larger issue is a drug-safety system that excludes women from clinical trials, potentially putting them and their babies at risk. [ProPublica]

Way to go, Morehead. A man is behind bars after police say he stabbed another during a confrontation at the Community Soup Kitchen. [The Morehead News]

Donald Trump could have taken a victory lap last week. Instead, he went on a grudge tour. [WaPo]

Hotel and motel stays in Fayette County will cost more this fall. On Thursday, the Urban County Council voted unanimously to increase the Fayette County hotel and motel tax by 2.5 percentage points to pay for a nearly $250 million overhaul and expansion of the Lexington Convention Center. That means hotel taxes will rise to 9.5 percent. [H-L]

As the nation once again honors American war dead on Memorial Day, instead of spouting the usual nationalistic platitudes that that U.S. soldiers fought to keep the country “safe and free,” perhaps we should analyze whether that is really true. [HuffPo]

A Puppies & Rainbows Monday Morning

Over the last year, U.S. Rep. Andy Barr, R-Lexington, spent nearly $32,000 on tickets to the Kentucky Derby and Breeders Cup, plus $300 to hire handicapper Ellis Starr to provide betting tips for his racetrack guests. “Nobody was even talking politics. It was just entertainment for everyone,” Starr recently recalled. [John Cheves]

The United States has killed the leader of the Afghan Taliban in an air strike in a remote border area just inside Pakistan, Afghanistan said on Sunday, in an attack likely to dash any immediate prospect for peace talks. [HuffPo]

Billionaire coal baron and West Virginia gubernatorial candidate Jim Justice’s required mine reclamation projects in Kentucky are missing deadlines and dragging on, nearly two years after a crackdown by state environmental regulators. [C-J/AKN]

Barack Obama on Friday became the first incumbent U.S. president to visit Hiroshima, site of the world’s first atomic bombing, in a gesture Tokyo and Washington hope will showcase their alliance and reinvigorate efforts to rid the world of nuclear arms. [Reuters]

Kentucky State Fair Board chairman Mark Lynn has appointed a search committee to find a replacement for Clifford “Rip” Rippetoe, the former fair board president and CEO, who recently departed to take a job in San Diego. [Business First]

The U.S. government’s loose supervision has spawned many problems with super PACs, but helping to tout shares worth a fraction of a cent would be a new one. [ProPublica]

Almost all of the Glasgow City Council approved a slightly amended version of a somewhat impromptu resolution Monday requesting that the Glasgow Electric Plant Board consider alternates to its rate structure that began Jan. 1 and has been met with protests from several members of the community. [Glasgow Daily Times]

A constant stream of changes and scuffles are unsettling Donald J. Trump’s campaign team, including the abrupt dismissal this week of his national political director. A sense of paranoia is growing among his campaign staff members, including some who have told associates they believe that their Trump Tower offices in New York may be bugged, according to three people briefed on the conversations. [NY Times]

Hillary Clinton’s win in Kentucky’s May 17 Democratic presidential primary was confirmed by a statewide recanvass of votes Thursday. [Ronnie Ellis]

A bipartisan measure that would overhaul the nation’s chemical safety laws seemed destined for the president’s desk this week — until Sen. Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) put a hold on it Thursday. [WaPo]

Once again, Louisville — a city that prides itself on its park system — has landed near the bottom of a ranking of parks. Probably because the city’s cheerleader electeds consistently ignore reality and focus on hype. [WFPL]

A provision snuck into the still-secret text of the Senate’s annual intelligence authorization would give the FBI the ability to demand individuals’ email data and possibly web-surfing history from their service providers without a warrant and in complete secrecy. [The Intercept]

The state will terminate its contract with the Bluegrass Area Development District to provide services to unemployed and underemployed workers in a 17-county region on June 30 because of financial problems at the district, state officials said Wednesday. [H-L]

At least four anti-government protesters were killed and 90 injured when security forces ejected them from Baghdad’s heavily fortified Green Zone, hospital sources said on Saturday. [HuffPo]

OxyContin Is Still A Kentucky Nightmare

The drugmaker Purdue Pharma launched OxyContin two decades ago with a bold marketing claim: One dose relieves pain for 12 hours, more than twice as long as generic medications. [H-L]

In a blow to congressional transparency, the House Appropriations Committee voted against publicly releasing highly informative, taxpayer-funded reports that members use to educate themselves on the issues before Congress. [HuffPo]

Louisville’s Coalition for the Homeless announced Monday that the overall number of homeless people in the city has dropped for the third year in a row — but those numbers don’t change local agencies’ disappointment in the federal government’s decision to cut their funds by 11 percent this year. [C-J/AKN]

A new study by the Pew Research Center spurred a rash of headlines last week about “the dying middle class.” But the word “dying” might be more appropriate if we were watching the regrettable-but-inevitable effects of natural forces at work. We’re not. We’re seeing the fruits of deliberate action – and sometimes of deliberate inaction – at the highest levels of power. The great American middle was never large enough, even at its height. It always excluded too many people – sometimes, shamefully, merely for their skin color. And now, instead of growing and becoming more inclusive, it’s fading away instead. [Bill Moyers]

The debate continues over whether Gov. Matt Bevin has the authority to replace the chair of the Kentucky Retirement Systems board before his term expires. [WFPL]

On Friday afternoon, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a new rule regarding the implementation of nondiscrimination protections under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). It guarantees that transgender people cannot be denied health care by professionals that receive federal funding, and also that it is discriminatory to refuse them access to transition-related services. [ThinkProgress]

With their legs folded in the yoga stance called Lotus pose, sisters Anayia and Armani Happy sat knee-to-knee on Anayia’s hospital bed, tapping the silver cylinders on sets of Indonesian xylophones. [Richmond Register]

The overdose death toll from opioids, both prescription drugs and heroin, has almost quadrupled since 1999. In 2014 alone, 28,000 people died of opioid overdoses, more than half from prescription drugs. [ProPublica]

The government wants to move the federal trial for Ashland cardiologist Richard Paulus to another city, and says it would be impossible to find a fair and impartial jury in Ashland. [Ashland Independent]

A powerful array of the Republican Party’s largest financial backers remains deeply resistant to Donald J. Trump’s presidential candidacy, forming a wall of opposition that could make it exceedingly difficult for him to meet his goal of raising $1 billion before the November election. [NY Times]

Painful meetings were underway this week at Morehead State University as several employees were notified that their jobs were being eliminated. [The Morehead News]

The Intercept’s first SIDtoday release comprises 166 articles, including all articles published between March 31, 2003, when SIDtoday began, and June 30, 2003, plus installments of all article series begun during this period through the end of the year. [The Intercept]

Kentucky officials are seeking proposals from local leaders for projects that will attract new industry and more jobs to Appalachia. [H-L]

House Republicans appear determined to advance an aggressive rollback of a program credited with helping low-income children get free school lunches. [HuffPo]