Karpf Finally Gets Pushed Out While There’s Next To No Media Focus On Him

One of the most scandalous people to ever work at UK is finally biting the dust. Michael Karpf, who led UK HealthCare as it mushroomed in size over the past 13 years, has announced he will retire next year. [H-L]

Republican vice presidential nominee Mike Pence said Sunday he wants to be like Dick Cheney. [HuffPo]

The University of Louisville Foundation has officially accepted the resignation of President James Ramsey. Foundation chairman Bob Hughes said Ramsey offered his resignation from the foundation on his own and will not receive additional compensation. Hughes also resigned as chairman of the board on Friday. [C-J/AKN]

President Obama highlighted the world’s oceans Thursday as both a unique victim of climate change and a key resource in the fight against it. [The Hill]

When looking at her son Grant McMaine as a child, longtime Richmond resident Martina Hackworth never could have thought he would become an addict. The bright, intelligent boy was always kind to others, was close to his mother and sister, and was somewhat of a dreamer. [Richmond Register]

Ford Motor Co’s 2017 financial performance will decline from this year as it increases spending on “emerging opportunities” like self-driving cars and other costs rise, the No. 2 U.S.-based automaker said on Wednesday. [Reuters]

Despite area job losses in recent months, Brad Hall, manager external affairs at AEP, delivered good news to those attending Monday’s Rotary Club meeting. [Ashland Independent]

In all but four states, private citizens can challenge someone’s right to cast a ballot on or before Election Day. In most places, the burden of proof then falls on the voter. [ProPublica]

City council members approved on first reading an ordinance Monday night to take the compensating tax rates for real and personal property for 2016. The new tax rate for both real and personal property is .086 cents per $100 of assessed value, making the tax on a $100,000 home $86, said Dawn Devore, deputy city clerk. [Glasgow Daily Times]

For months, the official talking point of the Trump campaign has been that Donald Trump would be happy to release his tax returns but cannot because they are under audit. [ThinkProgress]

The entire full-time University of Kentucky journalism faculty is calling for UK President Eli Capilouto to drop his suit against the school’s student newspaper and apologize for criticism leveled at the paper and its editor at a Board of Trustees meeting last Friday. [Ronnie Ellis]

Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities have long lobbied for Hollywood to not only include, but portray, characters that identify as LGBT+ in a realistic way. [BBC]

Only 6 percent of Kentuckians lacked health insurance in 2015, a drop of 8.3 percentage points since 2013, according to fresh data from the U.S. Census Bureau. [H-L]

A powerful web video released by Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign on Friday ― National Prisoners of War Remembrance Day ― features an emotional World War II veteran urging Americans to reject real estate mogul Donald Trump. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets! [CLICK HERE]

Bevin, Too, Sells Popular Board Seats

PEE ALERT! Andy Barr says people are poor because they receive assistance. The fact that the Kentucky Democratic Party can’t rustle up someone to beat this halfwit is a searing indictment of the Party’s inability to do anything other than conduct insurance fraud schemes these days. If you think Candy Barr isn’t out of his league and just as terrible as people like Tim Longmeyer, take a look at his anti-poverty proposal. It involves gutting public education and ending the requirement that financial advisers disclose conflicts of interest to their clients. [John Cheves]

Despite the world’s string high-profile terror attacks this year, the economy remains at the top of American voters’ minds, a new HuffPost/YouGov survey finds. A 45 percent plurality name the economy as one of the two issues most important to them, ranking it first on a list of 10 topics. [HuffPo]

Surprise! A Kentucky Newspaper has finally realized heroin has taken over Eastern Kentucky. Growing up in the hardscrabble hills of Appalachia, Bobby Vaughn began popping painkillers at 15-years-old, sneaking them from his injured coal miner dad. That was the start of a three-decade-long addiction to any drug available: OxyContin, cocaine, meth – and beginning a year ago, heroin. [C-J/AKN]

Advisers say Donald Trump has lately been sullen and erratic in private and easily rattled by perceived slights, according to The New York Times. [The Hill]

After nine years of serving as director of the annual Ashland Independent School safety patrol trip, Maj. Mark McDowell is handing the reins over to Lt. Jason Moore. [Ashland Independent]

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration on Thursday denied requests to stop classifying marijuana as a dangerous drug with no medical use, leaving users and businesses in limbo after many states have legalized it for medical or recreational purposes. [Reuters]

Rowan County soon could be host to Eastern Kentucky’s first microbrewery. That’s according to local businessman Steve Williams, who says he plans to have Scoreboard Pub and Microbrewery at 101 West Main Street open by next spring. [The Morehead News]

Courts are scrambling to rule on state election laws in time for the elections being held later this year. [ProPublica]

When Kentuckyana “Tuck” Jones, who seeks out rare treasures, collectibles and antiquities across the country, decided to open a museum featuring artifacts from across the world in a building on Mammoth Cave Road, he had less than $50 to his name. To raise money to fund the opening of the museum, he began trading collectibles. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Republican insiders are more convinced than Democrats that Donald Trump is so far behind Hillary Clinton that he can’t win in November. [Politico]

GE Lighting announced Thursday that it plans to close its Lexington Lamp Plant and Somerset Glass Plant by August 2017. [WKYT]

Donald Trump believes that running for president has been good for his bottom line. He said so under oath during a deposition he gave in a lawsuit stemming from a dispute over his soon-to-open Washington luxury hotel. [WaPo]

Matt Bevin appointed three people Friday to the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees, including one of Kentucky’s top Republican fundraisers. [H-L]

Some Republicans have argued that conservatives skeptical of Donald Trump should vote for him anyway, if only to prevent Hillary Clinton from nominating liberals to the Supreme Court. But the right’s leading legal scholars reject that idea: the risks of a President Trump would outweigh his influence on the high court. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. [CLICK HERE]

Which News Dumps Will Hit Today?

This is what you call good old boy butthurt. Officials with the Bluegrass Area Development District said Tuesday they will continue to pay staff through July as they fight the state’s attempt to take away millions of dollars in federal and state funding for aging and workforce programs by Friday. [H-L]

Robert Murray, owner of the country’s largest private coal company, wasted no time pointing the finger when he announced plans earlier this week to lay off as many as 4,400 workers, or 80 percent of his workforce. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin’s halfwit staffers spent years attacking Steve Beshear for not appointing enough minorities for the University of Louisville’s board. So what do they do? They don’t find any minority appointees. Fascinating how these people operate. Dumber than you could have ever imaged. Not corrupt – dumb. Deeply, deeply dumb. [C-J/AKN]

A review of campaign finance records by The Hill shows that the practice of skirting or openly flouting the contractor ban has become widespread in both congressional and presidential politics. [The Hill]

Any hopes for a better reception for Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed changes to expanded Medicaid in Kentucky vanished pretty quickly at a second public hearing here Wednesday. [Ronnie Ellis]

South Carolina fire officials decided to make sprinklers mandatory in new homes. Homebuilders overturned the rule with help behind the scenes from Gov. Nikki Haley. It was one more win for an industry that has spent millions of dollars in state capitals to block a life-saving upgrade included in the nation’s model building code. [ProPublica]

Liberal state lawmakers have for 16 years pushed for a bill that would amend Kentucky’s civil rights code to protect people from discrimination in the workplace, housing and other areas based on their sexual orientation. [WFPL]

According to experts, white supremacy has experienced a renaissance in the last two years, reaching levels of popularity and influence not seen since the late-1960s. [ThinkProgress]

The Eastern Kentucky Veterans Center in Hazard was presented with a $2,500 check from the County Clerk’s Association on Monday to help the center fund an Independence Day celebration for citizens who truly represent our nation’s liberty and patriotic pride; our veterans. [Hazard Herald]

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump on Wednesday rejected criticism of his campaign tactics, in a wide-ranging speech defending his team’s use of a Jewish star and his own praise of the late Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein. [Reuters]

The Bank of Harlan has been acquired by Monticello Bankshares Inc. in a deal that will see the merger of the two financial institutions. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Donald Trump has to be one of the dumbest people in history. [Politico]

State alcohol regulators prepared a new map a couple of months ago showing Kentucky’s jumble of legally dry, wet and partially wet cities and counties, but it’s already out of date. [H-L]

The Iraqi man who was filmed attacking Saddam Hussein’s statue with a sledgehammer when U.S. troops stormed into Baghdad in 2003 said Iraq was in a better shape under his rule and George W. Bush and Tony Blair should be put on trial “for ruining” it. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. [CLICK HERE]

Reminder: Matt Bevin Has No Concept Of Ethics… Or Anything, Really

Just when you thought Matt Bevin and his people couldn’t get more ignorant? Matt Bevin has signed an executive order that effectively gives him control over all appointments to the Executive Branch Ethics Commission without any input from the state attorney general and state auditor. Almost as funny as the Personnel Secretary begging folks to help them dig through Beshear data to uncover corruption because they don’t know anything about Kentucky. HAHAHA. You can’t fix the kind of stupid these people possess. [H-L]

Senate Republicans have never made it easy for President Barack Obama to put judges on federal courts. But now, with just months left in his term, they’re not even pretending to try to let judicial nominees through. [HuffPo]

Isn’t it fun watching Kentucky’s half-literate governator claim “God” has sanctioned his extreme Medicaid cuts? That’s what Jesus would do – choke even more out of the working poor, deny access to dental and vision, claim it’s helping them. [C-J/AKN]

The coal industry is slated to lose clout in the next Congress, with term limits set to force out a chairman who has frequently battled with the Obama administration on behalf of mining companies. Rep. Hal Rogers (R-Keeping Eastern Kentucky Impoverished) will relinquish the gavel of the House Appropriations Committee in January, after having led the powerful panel for six years, which is the maximum allowed under GOP rules. [The Hill]

A deadly shooting took place in the South Fork community of Breathitt County on Saturday. One person was pronounced deceased at the scene and two others seriously injured. [Hazard Herald]

Reverberations from the U.S. Supreme Court’s major ruling backing abortion rights were felt on Tuesday as the justices rejected bids by Mississippi and Wisconsin to revive restrictions on abortion doctors matching those struck down in Texas on Monday. [Reuters]

The Harlan Fiscal Court discussed a situation concerning the safety of a much-used bridge on U.S. 119 in Cumberland during a special-called meeting on Monday. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

The children of Vietnam vets describe how they believe their fathers’ exposure to Agent Orange during the war has impacted their families and their health. [ProPublica]

All members of the Madison Fiscal Court took turns June 14 criticizing the Madison County and Berea school boards for paying the sheriff a 1.5 percent fee for collecting its property taxes instead of the 4.25 percent paid by all other local taxing entities except the ambulance board. [Richmond Register]

Local communities are increasingly passing laws to control crime and nuisances on rental properties. They do so mostly by limiting the number of times police can be called to a residence. But it turns out that crime victims — especially victims of domestic abuse — are often the ones who end up being penalized. [NPR]

Republican Gov. Matt Bevin proclaims the days of “pay to play” ended with his arrival in Frankfort. But some House Democrats say if you’re not willing to play, Bevin isn’t reluctant to make you pay. [Ronnie Ellis]

On Tuesday night, 128 members of Congress weighed in to urge a federal appeals court to protect against sexual orientation-based discrimination under existing civil rights laws. [BuzzFeed]

Massie’s ideas about “sovereignty” are an extreme example of the naïve thinking that fueled the Brexit vote, has propelled Trump’s candidacy and energizes Tea Party activists. It is our inner 4-year-old screaming, “You can’t tell me what to do!” [H-L]

The draft of the 2016 Democratic Party platform endorses abolishing the death penalty, a break with the views of its presumptive presidential nominee. [HuffPo]

Coal Shills Hate The Jim Justice Story

Kentucky Education Commissioner Stephen Pruitt on Friday named Raymond A. Daniels to fill the vacant spot on the Fayette County Board of Education. [H-L]

House Speaker Paul Ryan’s endorsement of Donald Trump Thursday commits him to five months of supporting a Republican presidential candidate who he’s spent a great deal of time condemning. Not 24 hours had passed after Ryan finally said he’d vote for the businessman, following weeks of holding out, before he found himself in a position he’ll surely come to find familiar: Trump said something offensive — and Ryan had to find some way to distance himself from it without being seen to go against the candidate. [HuffPo]

Kentucky environmental regulators spent the weekend and Monday investigating a mudslide at a Pike County surface mine owned by West Virginia coal baron Jim Justice that they say contributed to local, damaging flooding last week. [C-J/AKN]

Democrats are preparing to use Donald Trump’s business career against him in the general election, following the playbook used against Mitt Romney in 2012. The complaints about Trump University could be used in similar ads, said Lis Smith, an Obama 2012 staffer who worked as Martin O’Malley’s deputy campaign manager in 2016. [The Hill]

A California-based organization’s findings in a south central Kentucky park could offer insight into the decline of one of nature’s revered music makers. [Richmond Register]

Regulators are wrangling with bankrupt coal companies to set aside enough money to clean up Appalachia’s polluted rivers and mountains so that taxpayers are not stuck with the $1 billion bill. The regulators worry that coal companies will use the bankruptcy courts to pay off their debts to banks and hedge funds, while leaving behind some of their environmental cleanup obligations. [NY Times]

A life spent in Boyd or Greenup counties is expected to be longer than one spent in neighboring Kentucky counties. [Ashland Independent]

One leading pain advocacy group, the Pain Care Forum, is funded and largely controlled by Purdue Pharma, the makers of OxyContin. According to a report from the Associated Press, the Pain Care Forum organized a lobbying campaign last year to defeat the CDC guidelines. [The Intercept]

Tyler Blevins, 19, said it is time for Rowan Fiscal Court to intervene in the Rowan County Farmers’ Market. He presented his case to the court at a special meeting held Wednesday, May 18. [The Morehead News]

One of the most severely tortured men in the history of Guantánamo Bay presented his case for freedom on Thursday. [The Guardian]

The Glasgow Electric Plant Board discussed in concept, but took no official action at its Thursday meeting, a resolution from the Glasgow City Council asking it to make exceptions to the current electric power rate plan. [Glasgow Daily Times]

On the morning of May 29, 2014, an overcast Thursday in Washington, DC, the general counsel of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Robert Litt, wrote an email to high-level officials at the National Security Agency and the White House. [VICE]

The Kentucky Department of Corrections has dropped a policy that allowed prison wardens to ban incoming mail for inmates if they believed the items would “promote homosexuality.” Citing free speech and free press rights guaranteed by the First Amendment, the ACLU of Kentucky challenged the policy in March after it discovered that Eastern Kentucky Correctional Complex — a medium-security prison in West Liberty — banned personal letters and magazines such as Out and The Advocate because they mentioned homosexuality, even if they did not contain sexually explicit images. [H-L]

A third veteran was dumped by Donald Trump because of his military service. [HuffPo]

Bevin: KY’s Embarrassing Tea Grifter

We weren’t joking – are you interested in buying The ‘Ville Voice? [The ‘Ville Voice]

Matt Bevin has been in office for six months, and I still don’t know what to make of the selfie governor. Every time he says something that almost makes sense, the next thing out of his mouth is a cuckoo-clock bird. In one breath he will lecture people about the state motto being “United We Stand, Divided We Fall,” and in the next breath take a petty swipe at a political opponent. The irony seems completely lost on him. [Tom Eblen]

Donald Trump would respect limits on his authority if he’s elected president, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Grandmother) said Monday. [HuffPo]

Billionaire coal baron and West Virginia gubernatorial candidate Jim Justice’s required mine reclamation projects in Kentucky are missing deadlines and dragging on, nearly two years after a crackdown by state environmental regulators. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump lashed out at the press over scrutiny of the money he raised to donate to veterans groups, in one instance pointing to a reporter and calling him a “sleaze.” [The Hill]

The Madison County Board of Education approved a tentative working budget for 2016-2017 that anticipates a slight dip in revenues. Chief Financial Officer Debbie Frazier presented the spending plan at a Thursday work session. [Richmond Register]

Police do not need a warrant to obtain a person’s cellphone location data held by wireless carriers, a U.S. appeals court ruled on Tuesday, dealing a setback to privacy advocates. [Reuters]

Federal funding will pump oxygen more efficiently into the masks of firefighters when clean air is limited, deputy chief Greg Ray said. Ray told the Ashland Board of City Commissioners on Thursday the Ashland Fire Department received a $221,000 award to replenish its air pack supply. [Ashland Independent]

Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., the ranking member of the congressional committee that oversees the Red Cross, sent a three-page letter to the charity’s CEO on Monday demanding that she explain why the Red Cross struggled to respond to record flooding in Mississippi this spring. [ProPublica]

Lower gas prices yielded additional funding for the Ashland Police Department to add two new vehicles to its aging fleet. [Ashland Independent]

Donald Trump claims a net worth of more than $10 billion and an income of $557 million. But he appears to get there only by overvaluing properties and ignoring his expenses. [Politico]

Community leaders have undertaken an exercise meant to improve traffic flow and safety over the next two decades as part of a Kentucky Transportation Cabinet small urban area study. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Illegal immigrants in the US often get better care than the nation’s military veterans, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has said. [BBC]

Rand Paul’s Political Action Committee paid vendors that were also used by his failed presidential campaign. Which comes as a surprise to absolutely no one. [John Cheves]

Islamic State militants fought back vigorously overnight and parried an onslaught by the Iraqi army on a southern district of the city of Fallujah, the group’s bastion near Baghdad, officers said on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. [CLICK HERE]