Now Granny Mitch Fears Trump?

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has never had much to say about Donald Trump. But lately, he has fallen completely silent. [H-L]

Former Secretary of State Colin Powell is supporting Hillary Clinton in November’s presidential election. [HuffPo]

A bipartisan task force dedicated to preventing child abuse and exploitation met for the first time Tuesday in Frankfort, where Attorney General Andy Beshear encouraged lawmakers to develop a comprehensive proposal to better protect children throughout Kentucky. [C-J/AKN]

White people are the worst. Three men have been charged with plotting to bomb Somali immigrants at an apartment building and mosque in the US state of Kansas. [BBC]

As a shortage of primary care physicians looms across the nation and Kentucky, state lawmakers are considering whether to expand the role of physician assistants by allowing them to prescribe controlled substances. [WFPL]

While the impact of fracking operations on the health of people living nearby was once uncertain, several studies in recent years have found that living near fracking sites — which are known to release carcinogenic compounds, as well as greenhouse gases — heightens the risk of asthma and other respiratory ailments. [ThinkProgress]

It is estimated that 1 percent of the world’s fly species, or approximately 1,500, are found on the tiny island nation of Madagascar, off the southeast coast of Africa. [Richmond Register]

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has disparaged “flat-chested” women, mocked a Miss Universe for her weight gain and bragged about groping women because he’s famous. [ProPublica]

A project replacing sewer lines along a southern section of the city is probably going to take a half to one-third of the original time expected, said Scott Young, general manager of Glasgow Water Co. [Glasgow Daily Times]

A federal judge on Thursday sided with women’s health provider Planned Parenthood in a lawsuit aiming to block a Mississippi law that barred medical providers that perform abortions from participating in the state’s Medicaid program. [Reuters]

The Tuesday morning announcement that Boyd County and Greenup County have been certified as AEROready was almost like a launch party. [Ashland Independent]

Donald Trump’s presidential campaign is facing a fundraising scandal after a Telegraph investigation exposed how key supporters were prepared to accept illicit donations from foreign backers. [Telegraph]

Andy Barr, R-Lexington, and Democratic challenger Nancy Jo Kemper sharply disagreed Monday on KET’s Kentucky Tonight about whether the United States is on the right track under President Obama. [H-L]

Hillary Clinton criticized Donald Trump on Monday over allegations that an employee at one of his golf courses was fired because he was gay. [HuffPo]

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Does Anyone Believe Gray Will Win?

Bill Ball has handled multiple whiskey-making tasks in his 47 years at Jim Beam, but on Saturday he took on an unexpected role — joining colleagues on a picket line outside a Beam distillery in Kentucky. [H-L]

Television viewers across the country have been treated to some scary advertisements about the future of Social Security. [HuffPo]

Republican vice presidential candidate Mike Pence began Friday supporting Donald Trump’s statements denying he had sexually assaulted women and promising evidence that would prove Trump’s innocence. [C-J/AKN]

Hillary Clinton’s campaign on Saturday criticized Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump for claiming the election is being rigged. [The Hill]

Parents and guardians gathered around tables in Eastern Kentucky University’s Perkins Building Thursday night as several first responders, and government/health officials instructed them on the many ways drugs can be hiding in “plain sight.” [Richmond Register]

It will be difficult for future U.S. administrations to undo President Barack Obama’s policy of easing trade and travel restrictions with Cuba because of the benefits associated with the measures, a senior U.S. official said on Friday. [Reuters]

Jim Gray spent Saturday criss-crossing a swath of Kentucky between Louisville and Ashland looking for votes in his uphill battle to unseat Republican U.S. Sen. Rand Paul. [Ronnie Ellis]

To understand how Donald Trump’s comments and alleged mistreatment of women are stoking the anxiety of other Republicans, look no further than the private appeal sent Wednesday to a billionaire from a super PAC backing Pennsylvania Sen. Pat Toomey. [ProPublica]

Kentuckians are one step closer to learning what changes will be made to their Medicaid benefits. [WFPL]

A major evangelical college campus organization is allegedly instituting a policy that would result in firing employees who support same-sex marriage. [ThinkProgress]

The Barren County Schools district is finishing up some school improvement projects and getting ready to begin some new ones. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Donald Trump’s efforts to build a small-donor fundraising machine late in the presidential race have come at a steep cost. [WaPo]

The race for Kentucky’s U.S. Senate seat features two self-proclaimed foreign policy realists who have vastly different opinions about how the U.S. should engage in the world. [H-L]

Donald Trump’s troubled campaign has seen an incredible exodus in support over the past week. After footage released last week showed him bragging about groping women, more than a dozen members of Congress withdrew their endorsements. Others, who’d previously stayed neutral in the race, called for the Republican presidential nominee to drop out. [HuffPo]

Is Your Head Spinning Yet? Probably

A federal jury on Tuesday convicted Paintsville Mayor Robert Porter on charges of misappropriating city funds and bribery, according to U.S. Attorney Kerry B. Harvey. [H-L]

Donald Trump, the Republican nominee for president, has a peculiar way of dealing with criticism. [HuffPo]

The judge handling the case of the former University of Kentucky board chairman charged with rape has recused himself. [C-J/AKN]

Hillary Clinton unloaded on Donald Trump’s criticism of former Miss Universe Alicia Machado on Friday, including his late-night tweet urging people to check out her “sex tape.” [The Hill]

Barren County voters said “YES” to legalizing the sale of packaged alcoholic beverages on Tuesday in a countywide local option election. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The Obama administration on Thursday finalized rules requiring federal contractors to provide paid sick leave to employees and expanding the type of data employers must provide on their pay practices. [Reuters]

Chronic overcrowding at the Madison County Detention Center continues, and no solution is in sight, Jailer Doug Thomas told the fiscal court Tuesday. [Richmond Register]

Whaaaat? This seems like something Matt Bevin would try. Federal law mandates that school districts provide special education services to students with disabilities–physical, emotional or developmental. [ProPublica]

The sweat equity accrued by a spirited crew of local volunteers determined to “build Ashland” has transformed city eyesores into sources of pride. [Ashland Independent]

Donald Trump’s campaign manager appeared to unwittingly confirm an explosive Newsweek story on Thursday, telling ABC’s The View that a Trump company did indeed spend money in Cuba in 1998, in violation of a longstanding U.S. embargo that Trump has vociferously defended. [ThinkProgress]

A Morehead State University student and downtown resident is concerned about public parking spots near his home. [The Morehead News]

Everyone but Donald Trump and his most ardent supporters recognize that Donald Trump lost Monday night’s debate. And because of the candidate’s stubborn disbelief in his ability to do anything but win, Trump lost the post-debate period too. [Politico]

Attorney General Andy Beshear’s victory at the state Supreme Court last week might have been good news for Kentucky’s colleges and universities, but it could eventually hurt the state’s credit rating, according to one major ratings agency. [H-L]

Roy Moore, the Alabama Supreme Court’s chief justice, has been suspended for the remainder of his term as punishment for instructing state judges to flout federal orders legalizing same-sex marriage, a state court ruled Friday. [HuffPo]

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Karpf Finally Gets Pushed Out While There’s Next To No Media Focus On Him

One of the most scandalous people to ever work at UK is finally biting the dust. Michael Karpf, who led UK HealthCare as it mushroomed in size over the past 13 years, has announced he will retire next year. [H-L]

Republican vice presidential nominee Mike Pence said Sunday he wants to be like Dick Cheney. [HuffPo]

The University of Louisville Foundation has officially accepted the resignation of President James Ramsey. Foundation chairman Bob Hughes said Ramsey offered his resignation from the foundation on his own and will not receive additional compensation. Hughes also resigned as chairman of the board on Friday. [C-J/AKN]

President Obama highlighted the world’s oceans Thursday as both a unique victim of climate change and a key resource in the fight against it. [The Hill]

When looking at her son Grant McMaine as a child, longtime Richmond resident Martina Hackworth never could have thought he would become an addict. The bright, intelligent boy was always kind to others, was close to his mother and sister, and was somewhat of a dreamer. [Richmond Register]

Ford Motor Co’s 2017 financial performance will decline from this year as it increases spending on “emerging opportunities” like self-driving cars and other costs rise, the No. 2 U.S.-based automaker said on Wednesday. [Reuters]

Despite area job losses in recent months, Brad Hall, manager external affairs at AEP, delivered good news to those attending Monday’s Rotary Club meeting. [Ashland Independent]

In all but four states, private citizens can challenge someone’s right to cast a ballot on or before Election Day. In most places, the burden of proof then falls on the voter. [ProPublica]

City council members approved on first reading an ordinance Monday night to take the compensating tax rates for real and personal property for 2016. The new tax rate for both real and personal property is .086 cents per $100 of assessed value, making the tax on a $100,000 home $86, said Dawn Devore, deputy city clerk. [Glasgow Daily Times]

For months, the official talking point of the Trump campaign has been that Donald Trump would be happy to release his tax returns but cannot because they are under audit. [ThinkProgress]

The entire full-time University of Kentucky journalism faculty is calling for UK President Eli Capilouto to drop his suit against the school’s student newspaper and apologize for criticism leveled at the paper and its editor at a Board of Trustees meeting last Friday. [Ronnie Ellis]

Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities have long lobbied for Hollywood to not only include, but portray, characters that identify as LGBT+ in a realistic way. [BBC]

Only 6 percent of Kentuckians lacked health insurance in 2015, a drop of 8.3 percentage points since 2013, according to fresh data from the U.S. Census Bureau. [H-L]

A powerful web video released by Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign on Friday ― National Prisoners of War Remembrance Day ― features an emotional World War II veteran urging Americans to reject real estate mogul Donald Trump. [HuffPo]

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When Will The Bevin-Beshear Fight End?

The president of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools has expressed concern about “the potential for undue political influence” in Gov. Matt Bevin’s overhaul of the University of Louisville’s governing board. SACS President Belle S. Wheelan said in an Aug. 18 letter to acting University of Louisville President Neville G. Pinto that “there is evidence of significant accreditation-related issues” involving Bevin’s changes at U of L that are being challenged in court by state Attorney General Andy Beshear. [H-L]

Donald Trump’s new campaign manager, Kellyanne Conway, found herself in the unenviable position Sunday morning of having to defend one of the candidate’s most despicable tweets ever. [HuffPo]

Judicial candidates in Kentucky can make misleading statements but they can’t tell outright lies. [C-J/AKN]

The prescriptions you have in your medicine cabinet might not be as private as you believe they are. Thirty-one states grant law enforcement warrantless access to databases containing drug histories, and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration is pushing hard to search records even in states that have privacy safeguards. [WCPO]

I suspect most people are paying only passing attention to the multiple court battles between Republican Gov. Matt Bevin and Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear. But the stakes are high and, depending upon how the courts rule in the various suits and Bevin’s potential reactions, these cases are likely to make history and set precedents that will affect Kentucky state government for years. [Ronnie Ellis]

Now for some startling opinions about race relations and the current leader of the Republican Party, Donald Trump. [The Hill]

Louisville-based GE Appliances, part of the Haier Group, plans to close a water heater manufacturing line that it launched in 2012 at Appliance Park. [Business First]

Nearly a third of U.S. counties will likely be served by only one insurer that participates in an Affordable Care Act (ACA) marketplace in 2017, according to an analysis published Sunday by the Kaiser Family Foundation. [Reuters]

Brenda Stamm will face a familiar challenger this fall as she seeks another term on the Rowan County Board of Education. [The Morehead News]

The U.S. Department of Justice announced that it would phase out its use of private prisons. While significant, the move will not put an end to the booming immigrant detention industry. Private prison companies will continue to receive millions in government contracts to detain unauthorized immigrants. [ProPublica]

Officials in several states are scrambling to deal with a series of heroin overdose outbreaks affecting dozens of people and involving at least six deaths. [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump made a direct pitch to Iowa’s farmers in a speech here Saturday — and then pivoted back to his appeal for support from African-Americans, even though there were virtually none in the audience. [Politico]

How do you document Kentucky history that has been mostly hidden and, until 1992, was technically illegal? [Tom Eblen]

Someone using an email address connected to Harold Bornstein, Donald Trump’s doctor, apparently doesn’t want to miss out on the opportunity to cash in on the GOP presidential nominee’s campaign. [HuffPo]

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UK Is Run By A Bunch Of Assholes

Eastern Kentucky needs your love. She died alone in the middle of the night, and her body was swiftly autopsied, embalmed and carted 135 miles to a remote Kentucky county where she had been raised. [H-L]

The Department of Justice made a landmark decision last week when it announced it would direct the Bureau of Prisons to let its contracts with private prison companies lapse. But last week’s change in policy left the U.S. Marshals Service untouched, even though that agency is also under DOJ control and keeps nearly as many people locked in privatized jails as the Bureau of Prisons. [HuffPo]

You know, like Jim Ramsey took the high road when attacking ON TELEVISION anyone questioning Robert Flener, who went to prison. “Chairman Benz needs to keep his comments on the high road and work with all of the UL staff, its affiliated boards and their leadership, and the media to promote harmony,” said Hughes, who also serves on the Board of Trustees. [C-J/AKN]

A bipartisan quartet of lawmakers is circulating a letter that seeks to delay a pending arms sale to Saudi Arabia. [The Hill]

With just less than six weeks before a countywide election to determine whether legal alcohol sales will be allowed in Barren County, election officers are seeking some temporary polling places. [Glasgow Daily Times]

North Carolina’s university system must allow two transgender students and a transgender employee to use bathrooms matching their gender identity, a U.S. judge ruled on Friday, in a partial victory for those fighting the state’s restrictive restroom law. [Reuters]

The first guy was believable but Russ Meyer doesn’t carry the same credibility. That’s problematic, sure. His ties to Adam Edelen and the the Cormans also do not help him. But that doesn’t mean what he’s saying is in any way untrue. Thankfully for him, Sinnette’s story went public first, establishing a pattern. It’s clear that the Bevin team is attempting to retaliate against ANYONE holding them accountable. A second Democratic state lawmaker now claims Republican Gov. Matt Bevin tried to persuade him to switch parties and that the governor’s chief of staff threatened to punish him politically when he refused. [Ronnie Ellis]

Physicians whose state boards have sanctioned them for harming patients, unnecessarily prescribing addictive drugs, bilking federal insurance programs and even sexual misconduct nonetheless continue to receive payments for consulting, giving talks about products, and more. [ProPublica]

Louisville can’t stop killing everybody. Two vigils were held for three different victims of homicides near Shelby Park this week. [WDRB]

Hillary Clinton and Paul Ryan don’t agree on much — but both are lending their support to an anti-poverty proposal that cuts across racial and party lines. [Politico]

The University of Kentucky could soon be taking legal action against its own school newspaper. [WHAS11]

Hillary Clinton has launched a full broadside against Donald Trump, accusing her Republican opponent of issuing a “steady stream of bigotry” and espousing policies that would “put prejudice into practice”. [BBC]

State Rep. John Short, whose name surfaced this year in a federal vote-buying investigation in Magoffin County that led to several convictions, said Tuesday that he doesn’t want to discuss the case. [John Cheves]

A massive crack in one of Antarctica’s largest ice shelves has grown exponentially in recent months, and scientists worry a break-off could destabilize the entire structure. [HuffPo]

Bevin Still Stiffs The Working Poor

The city of Lexington must pay federal environmental regulators $16,800 for failing to keep paperwork of employee training and other safety records at the West Hickman Wastewater Treatment Plant. [H-L]

For all that Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has talked about immigration, the specifics of his deportation policies can be difficult to parse. The biggest question: Trump has said he wants to “round up” and deport all undocumented immigrants, but how, exactly, would he do it, if at all? [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin’s administration unveiled its long-awaited plan to reshape the state’s Medicaid program Wednesday, and while it restores some benefits Bevin proposed be cut two months ago, it retains the most controversial components of the governor’s approach to overhauling the federal-state health plan for low-income and disabled Kentuckians. [C-J/AKN]

Middle- and lower-income children don’t visit eye doctors as often as wealthier kids, and as a result, thousands of them may have undiagnosed sight-threatening conditions, U.S. researchers say. [Reuters]

Several changes could be coming to Grayson’s rules regarding sale of alcoholic beverages. During last Tuesday’s meeting, the City Council heard proposals from ABC Coordinator Willis Johnson on behalf of the alcohol retailers in the city. [Ashland Independent]

Republican racists – which is most of them in Frankfort these days – are freaking out that the Obama Administration is actually trying to help Eastern Kentucky. [White House]

The future of a road leading to one of Rowan County’s most popular recreation hangouts is up in the air. [The Morehead News]

Yet more embarrassing homophobic/transphobic news that’s gone national, courtesy Matt Bevin. Way to go, Republicans, for spreading hate. [NBC News]

What now? That is a question that can apply in several instances in relation to the closing of the Monroe County Jail. [Glasgow Daily Times]

High school graduates from Northeastern states score highest on a key standardized test for college admissions, while students in Southern and Western states struggle most to meet educational benchmarks. [The Hill]

Greg Stumbo had his LRC staffers come up with a column about special education teachers. Maybe he could learn something by digging into the Montgomery County mess we’ve uncovered the past few years. [Floyd County Times]

Donald Trump may be “softening” his incendiary language on immigration, but those versed in the complexities of immigration law say his plan has gone from unrealistic to downright incomprehensible. [Politico]

Federal labor officials have sided with the Bluegrass Area Development District in an ongoing dispute with the state over a multimillion-dollar federal workforce training program that serves 12,000 out-of-work or underemployed people in Central Kentucky. [H-L]

I started working at the county jail in 1995 as a correctional officer ― just your basic entry level position. I became sergeant there, where I supervised staff and an entire shift. And then I took a position called a ‘Correction Specialist One,’ which dealt with mental health issues within the facility. [HuffPo]

Way to go, Montgomery County. Maybe your corrupted sheriff’s department can some day work to help addicts instead of just cleaning up after them when they’re dead. Twelve heroin overdoses were reported Wednesday in Mount Sterling and surrounding Montgomery County, police and the sheriff’s department said. [More H-L]

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