The KRS/KTRS Are Still A Train Wreck

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Officials asked residents of a Knott County home to evacuate because of the threat of flooding caused by water leaking from a nearby coal mine. [H-L]

Donald Trump promised during his campaign to bring back mining jobs to struggling workers in coal country. Now the president-elect has tapped for commerce secretary a Manhattan billionaire who owned a West Virginia coal mine where 12 workers died in 2006. [HuffPo]

Greg Fischer said those seeking to address gun violence in Louisville and other cities, such as Gov. Matt Bevin, must consider multiple policy levers in order to halt the rise of shootings and homicides. [C-J/AKN]

President-elect Donald Trump’s transition-team adviser on financial policies and appointments, Paul Atkins, has been depicted as an ideological advocate of small government. But the ways that the Trump administration and Congressional Republicans are likely to approach financial deregulation could serve Atkins’ wallet as well as his political agenda. [ProPublica]

The Louisville attorneys representing three people in a lawsuit stemming from a Donald Trump campaign rally want to depose the president-elect before he’s sworn into office. Dan Canon is one of the lawyers representing the plaintiffs suing Trump and others. He said Trump incited violence at his rally in Louisville back in March. [WLKY]

On Thursday, a federal judge in Oregon ruled that a climate lawsuit brought against the U.S. government by a group of youths can move forward, a win for the strategy of fighting climate change through the judicial branch. [ThinkProgress]

Worried about irreparable damage being done to their retirement benefits, a group of public school teachers on Tuesday asked a judge to order Kentucky’s top political leaders to “perform their constitutional and statutory duties” by adequately funding the pension system. [Richmond Register]

A US serviceman has been killed by an improvised explosive device while fighting against so-called Islamic State (IS) in Syria, officials say. [BBC]

The 5,000 electric customers of Kentucky Utilities in Barren and Hart counties, along with the other 541,000 in more than 70 counties across the commonwealth, could get cost hikes in the coming year, pending Kentucky Public Service Commission approval. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Thirty years ago Friday, a shocking announcement was made in the rotunda of San Francisco’s City Hall by a visibly shaken Dianne Feinstein, who was then president of the city’s Board of Supervisors. [NPR]

The financial woes of Kentucky’s public pension systems continue to worsen, but it’s really one of the six plans which is causing the most concern. [Ronnie Ellis]

Mitch McConnell (R-Granny), whose wife Elaine Chao is Trump’s pick for transportation secretary, was asked if he plans to recuse himself from her Senate confirmation process. McConnell’s answer? In a word: no. [WaPo]

The number of homemade methamphetamine labs found in Kentucky has dropped sharply in the past few years as drug abusers switched to imported meth, reducing the danger and cleanup costs associated with the small labs. [H-L]

A Marine wounded in combat in Fallujah, Iraq, in 2004 has found new purpose as a self-proclaimed peaceful warrior fighting against a 1,172-mile pipeline that protesters fear threatens the water source of Native Americans in North Dakota. [HuffPo]

RPK: Still A Bunch Of Homophobic Bigots

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Hopefully they’re not just learning the whitewashed version of Thanksgiving history. [H-L]

Activists protesting plans to run an oil pipeline beneath a lake near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota said on Saturday they have no intention of leaving a protest camp after U.S. authorities warned it must be vacated by Dec. 5. [HuffPo]

The last remaining dry precinct located within the Watterson Expressway could switch sides next month following a wet-dry vote. [C-J/AKN]

A member of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) is sounding the alarm over the new changes floated by Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), warning that the minority leader’s proposals could erode the power of African-American lawmakers even as they attempt to spread influence to younger members. [The Hill]

A state senator is planning to once again propose a bill during the upcoming legislative session that he says will protect religious freedoms. The bill would nullify local “fairness” ordinances across the state that protect Kentuckians from discrimination based on sexual orientation. Imagine how different things could be if Chris Hartman were permitted by the Fairness board over the past seven or eight years, as I have pushed, to spend time with these extremists trying to educate them. Kentucky would be in a much better spot than it is today. [WFPL]

Sales and traffic at U.S. brick-and-mortar stores on Thanksgiving Day and Black Friday declined from last year, as stores offered discounts well beyond the weekend and more customers shopped online. [Reuters]

Unhappy with Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear’s refusal to file criminal charges against those responsible for illegally dumping 1,200 tons of low-level radioactive fracking waste at a landfill near Irvine, an Estill County citizens group is suing to obtain the investigative records of Beshear and two state regulatory cabinets. [Richmond Register]

Falwell says he couldn’t afford to work at a Cabinet-level job for longer than that. That’s $205,000 per year, FYI. He couldn’t afford to live on $205K per year. That’s the New Fascist Party for you. [Politico]

They’re official: the state Board of Elections certified the results of the Nov. 8 election in Kentucky Tuesday. [Ronnie Ellis]

On Tuesday, the director of the National Security Agency, Admiral Michael Rogers, was asked about the WikiLeaks release of hacked information during the campaign, and he said, “This was a conscious effort by a nation-state to attempt to achieve a specific effect.” [Mother Jones]

The civil lawsuit filed by a former police chief against the City of Glasgow and the subsequent interim chief has been set for trial in March. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The education gap among whites this year wasn’t about education. It was about race. There are, of course, several plausible reasons for this growing education gap. No one factor explains everything. That said, a major factor was racial attitudes. Sorry, Adam Edelen, your bullshit talking point about economics is dead in the water. [WaPo]

Like many students, Tyler Allen spent his college days enthusiastically experimenting with alcohol. Only for Allen, it turned into a habit that was more than recreational. [H-L]

Afghanistan is failing. Fifteen years after the United States first scattered the Taliban with high-altitude bombing, the battlefield gains achieved by tens of thousands of U.S. troops are in jeopardy from a resurgent Taliban. [HuffPo]

RPK: Finally More Racist Than The KDP

Fun fact: The Republican Party of Kentucky doesn’t actually care about racism, homophobia or anything like that. Look at who runs the Party and speaks on its behalf and you’ll have all you need to know. Republican Dan Johnson posted messages on Facebook that displayed prejudice toward black people, Muslims and others during his campaign for a seat in the Kentucky House of Representatives. [John Cheves]

Americans are overwhelmingly surprised by Donald Trump’s victory, a new HuffPost/YouGov survey finds, with a narrow majority saying they’re unhappy with the results of the election. [HuffPo]

As a busy working mother with four children — three with autism — Jennifer Adams-Tucker said it’s hard enough managing school schedules, after-school activities, doctor’s appointments, therapy sessions and other events. [C-J/AKN]

A battle is brewing between the GOP foreign policy establishment and outsiders over who will sit on President-elect Donald Trump’s national security team. [The Hill]

Morehead State University can be a force to improve life in northeast Kentucky by working through its regional campus here to enhance education, economic development and public health, said respondents at a forum Tuesday. [Ashland Independent]

For several years, transgender U.S. Army Captain Julia Harrison shunned military social events, anxious at the thought of having to wear the pants and coat of male service members despite identifying as a woman. [Reuters]

Madison County is a regional “economic engine,” and a 21st century airport is a key to maximizing the county’s potential, Charles “Chuck” Conley of the Central Kentucky Regional Airport Board said Monday after a presentation to leaders of the county’s three local governments. [Richmond Register]

Just down the street from the Trump Hotel and six blocks from President-elect Donald Trump’s soon-to-be White House, the alt-right movement gathered on Pennsylvania Avenue and declared victory Saturday. [Politico]

The Morehead Utility Plant Board says its water is safe to drink and utilize for other needs after a few residents have complained that their water tasted bad. [The Morehead News]

Donald J. Trump met in the last week in his office at Trump Tower with three Indian business partners who are building a Trump-branded luxury apartment complex south of Mumbai, raising new questions about how he will separate his business dealings from the work of the government once he is in the White House. [NY Times]

Discussion about the federal indictment of a Cave City businessman who requested grant funds from the Cave City Tourist and Convention Commission in August led to talk earlier this week of possible changes to the commission’s grant request application. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Mitch McConnell, like Matt Bevin, is really into backing racists. A person close to Sessions said that Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Enables Bigots), the majority leader, spoke directly to his colleague and said he would give his strong and full support for his confirmation as attorney general. [WaPo]

Lexington Realtors announced Friday a $16,500 program that will help pay deposits and the first month’s rent for people struggling with homelessness. [H-L]

Donald Trump and Republican leaders in Congress have made clear they are serious about repealing Obamacare, and doing so quickly. But don’t assume their dismantling of government health insurance programs will stop there. [HuffPo]

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Eastern Kentucky Ignored Again In 3, 2…

Of all the lies politicians have told struggling Eastern Kentuckians over the years, few are more cruel than the “war on coal” myth. [Tom Eblen]

Donald Trump’s transition team is nearing a state of stasis, causing concern among both Democrats and Republicans in Washington that his White House will be woefully ill-prepared once he is inaugurated. [HuffPo]

In more than three decades of practicing medicine, Dr. Barbara Casper said she has never witnessed a better time than the present for the patients she treats at the University of Louisville medical school clinic. [C-J/AKN]

President-elect Donald Trump won over millions of Americans with promises of change and even some controversial proposals. Now, Trump will be under pressure over the next four years to follow through on many of the promises he’s made since his June 2015 entry into the race — especially in the first 100 days of his administration. [The Hill]

Barely five months since its inception, the Kentucky Dual Credit Scholarship Program is already yielding dramatic results across the Commonwealth. [Ashland Independent]

Back in April, there were already early signs in this quiet Michigan town of the rural American discontent that helped propel Donald Trump to election victory, even if it was underestimated by the Washington establishment, pollsters and Hillary Clinton’s campaign. [Reuters]

The Berea City Council voted four to three to table the land management development ordinance until the next meeting, after the suggestion was made by Councilman Steve Caudill to do so. [Richmond Register]

Supporters of President Barack Obama’s energy agenda are scrambling to adjust to the looming Donald Trump era — with climate activists girding for battle while some green industry groups hope to appeal to the president-elect’s love of commerce. [Politico]

Morehead State University’s Kentucky Folk Art Center will host its annual Appalachian Holiday Arts and Crafts Fair at the Laughlin Health Building on Saturday, Dec. 3, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. [The Morehead News]

As he sat next to an Army veteran in an open-air jeep during the Veterans Day parade in a northern California town, U.S. Rep. Jared Huffman had his attention caught by a sight. [WaPo]

Barren County Fiscal Court backtracked on a previous position and decided to change the county’s regulatory fee on gross alcohol sales to 5 percent. That choice was unanimous among the six members present out of the eight total members. [Glasgow Daily Times]

While Wells Fargo was creating millions of fraudulent bank accounts to collect falsified fees and boost its sales, another financial firm was creating a checking account with zero mandatory fees (including ATM fees) and a rarely seen 1.00% interest rate. [ThinkProgress]

What was startling about a visit to Bradley Picklesimer’s house outside of Paintsville was the contrast of driving down a fairly remote country road on a sunny fall morning, pulling up in the driveway and, suddenly, having Picklesimer come out to greet you in glamorous drag befitting a big city night club. [H-L]

An architect of anti-immigration efforts who says he is advising President-elect Donald Trump said the new administration could push ahead rapidly on construction of a U.S.-Mexico border wall without seeking immediate congressional approval. [HuffPo]

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The Bevin Fun Train Won’t Slow Down

Matt Bevin has raised more than $325,000 for his 2015 election since he was elected a year ago, according to finance reports he filed Monday. Although the ballots were counted Nov. 3, 2015, Bevin did not follow the customary practice of closing his campaign accounts and turning full-time to the business of governing. Instead, he attended a series of fund-raising events for his 2015 campaign that were held throughout 2016. [John Cheves]

Former Attorney General Eric Holder called for an end to the electoral college voting system on Friday. [HuffPo]

Granny Mitch is finally admitting that all the coal hype is just that. Mitch McConnell hedged on Friday about when and if Republicans would be able to bring coal mining jobs to Kentucky, saying that is a “private sector activity.” [C-J/AKN]

This is the white supremacist Donald Trump named his Chief Strategist. This is the guy people like Scott Jennings and Julie Raque Adams are supporting and allowing to lead their political party. [Media Matters]

“Tourism provides a significant amount of economic impact for Madison County,” said Kerri Hensley, Berea Tourism director, during a Wednesday night Berea Tourism Commission meeting. [Richmond Register]

Chanting “Not my president” and “love trumps hate,” thousands of demonstrators took the streets in cities across the United States at the weekend to protest against President-elect Donald Trump, who they say threatens their civil and human rights. [Reuters]

Commercial prices will rise at Big Run Landfill, but odor reports have plummeted since the last “trash train” rolled into Coalton. [Ashland Independent]

The bitter infighting that plagued Donald Trump’s campaign during the Republican presidential primary is starting to spill over into his team’s efforts to establish an administration and political operation, according to more than half a dozen sources familiar with the planning efforts. [Politico]

The Office of the State Climatologist and the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet, in coordination with the Kentucky Drought Mitigation Team, are issuing a Level I drought declaration for 117 counties in Kentucky, including Rowan. [The Morehead News]

So what do we do now? By “we” I mean all those left, center and even right who saw Donald Trump as the worst man ever to run for president and assumed that a strong majority of our fellow citizens would agree. [NY Times]

It didn’t take long for the new Republican state House majority to choose their Speaker, turning to the man who led them in the political wilderness for 16 years — Jeff Hoover of Jamestown. [Ronnie Ellis]

Behind the barber’s chair where Claude Rasnake diagnoses many of the world’s problems, he charted the to-do list of the Trump administration. [WaPo]

Boone County’s prosecutor wants a thumb drive back. And it’s not just any thumb drive. What’s on the digital storage device could free a convicted murderer in a high-profile Northern Kentucky case, one featured on the national TV show “Dateline.” [H-L]

I’m not going to sugarcoat this at all. We are in for a full-blown assault on LGBTQ rights the likes of which many, particularly younger LGBTQ people, have not seen. Progress will most certainly be halted completely, likely rolled back. And it’s already underway. [HuffPo]

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KDP Is Finally Dead & Now It’s Time For Actual Progressives To Take Over From The Beshears, The Edelens, The Good Old Boys

If you want to see how all the races played out last night, check out the most important newspaper in the Commonwealth. [H-L]

There are no adjectives to describe what happened on Tuesday night, at least none that seem appropriate for an election result as unfathomable as what transpired. [HuffPo]

It’s alarming that people truly believed Jim Gray could beat Rand Paul. Here’s a little tip: When a candidate’s consultants are more interested in taking ME out for drinks than working on the race? The candidate has no shot. [C-J/AKN]

General Electric Co is seeking to remove an engine part from service after an American Airlines jet erupted in flames last week, it told air carriers in a letter seen by Reuters on Saturday. [Reuters]

Madison County and fighting fire are in Jim Cox’s blood. The county he has called home most of his life, now, trusts him everyday to keep them safe as chief of the Madison County Fire Department. [Richmond Register]

Four members of the Congressional Black Caucus wrote Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg telling him that the company should stop allowing advertisers to exclude people by race. [ProPublica]

Local residents who are stricken by an addiction to drugs or alcohol but dream of winning their internal battle can now surround themselves with like-minded individuals in a new home — a “sober house.” [Ashland Independent]

In early October, Time.com published a story accusing InterVarsity Christian Fellowship USA — a campus organization that runs evangelical student groups at 667 colleges across the country — of adopting a policy of firing employees who openly support marriage equality. [ThinkProgress]

Bill Goodman, a native of Glasgow and host and managing editor of the Emmy award winning public affairs series “Kentucky Tonight” on KET, has taken a position as executive director of the Kentucky Humanities Council. [Glasgow Daily Times]

If you missed this shit yesterday, DIG IN! It is high humor. A judge quickly and somewhat angrily dismissed a lawsuit filed by the GOP candidate’s campaign seeking to put some early ballots on hold for no discernible reason. [WaPo]

Jim Gray carried Rowan County, apparently. That’s the home of heinous witch Kim Davis. [The Morehead News]

You did this, Republicans, with the hatred and fear you’ve fomented for years. Donald John Trump was elected the 45th president of the United States on Tuesday in a stunning culmination of an explosive, populist and polarizing campaign that took relentless aim at the institutions and long-held ideals of American democracy. [NY Times]

Bye Greg! Have a nice life in Florida. [H-L]

When Barack Obama was elected in 2008, many assumed a “post-racial” America was upon us. They were fiercely wrong. [HuffPo]

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Go Read Tom Eblen’s Latest Column

Dearly beloved, we are gathered here today to mark the passing of Kynect.ky.gov, Kentucky’s health insurance exchange. WATB Matt Bevin killed it, not because it wasn’t working, but because it was working too well. [H-L]

City officials in Orlando, Florida, on Monday released recordings of mass shooter Omar Mateen’s conversations with police during his standoff at a gay nightclub in June. [HuffPo]

Democratic nominee Jim Gray kept the pressure on U.S. Sen. Rand Paul during the first and only debate in this year’s U.S. Senate race Monday, at one point accusing him of having “wild-ass philosophies.” [C-J/AKN]

For years, police and prosecutors have used special presentations to sell judges on the ​​​​​reliability of drug tests that help convict thousands. [ProPublica]

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray accused U.S. Sen. Rand Paul of having “wild-ass philosophies and theories” in their first and only face-to-face debate of the election year. The at times freewheeling event underscored the candidates’ differences on foreign policy and economic values. [WFPL]

Opening arguments in the trial of a former University of Cincinnati police officer charged with murdering a black Ohio man during a traffic stop focused Tuesday on whether the victim tried to flee from police, putting the officer’s life in danger. [Reuters]

Candidates for the U.S. Senate squared off Monday night on Kentucky Education Television but mostly stuck to the same talking points of their campaigns. [Ronnie Ellis]

Marijuana legalization could spread to five new states next Tuesday. Another four are weighing access to medical marijuana. [ThinkProgress]

The needle exchange program at The Neighborhood will have a change in hours of operation in November. [Ashland Independent]

Two decades ago, Muslim refugees fleeing Bosnia arrived in St Louis and became a crucial part of the city. Now anti-immigrant fervour might lead the Bosnians of St Louis to become more politically active. [BBC]

An outside Republican group, the Republican State Leadership Committee, has poured more money into broadcast ads targeting Democratic state House Speaker Greg Stumbo of Prestonsburg. [Ronnie Ellis]

Mobilizing the voters who are with you is far more important than persuading new ones to support you at this point. [WaPo]

The Clay County judge executive has resigned following charges related to public corruption. [H-L]

Shortly before the 1990 election, at least 150,000 postcards were sent to North Carolina voters in predominantly black precincts. [HuffPo]