Everybody Has Donald Trump Regret

Students’ posting of a Black Lives Matter sign in Bryan Station High School fits with the Fayette County Public Schools’ values, officials said on Wednesday. [H-L]

As the saying goes, birds of a feather flock together. So it’s only fitting that within hours of being named Donald Trump’s vice presidential pick, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence (R) pulled one of his running mate’s favorite moves. [HuffPo]

What’s your risk of avoidable hospital death? Thousands of lives could be saved if more hospitals were as safe as those that received an A grade in a recent round of grading by a watchdog group that found no top scorers in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

Centrist Democrats appear reluctant to join their party’s embrace of a public option for ObamaCare. [The Hill]

Kentucky Power Co. is moving its corporate headquarters back to Ashland after more than a decade in the capital city. [Ashland Independent]

Last week, two lawmakers introduced a bill to put new limits on what debt collectors can take from debtors’ paychecks and bank accounts. It is the first legislation to address the issue in decades and follows a series of ProPublica stories about the widespread practice of garnishment. [ProPublica]

A year later, Smith and his wife Serena, who was also deeply involved in Davis-support rallies, are working the “third shift” at Walmart. Smith said he quit his job last year in order to more fully devote himself to the cause of supporting Davis. [Richmond Register]

Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy (D) and Ohio Congresswoman Marcia Fudge (D) introduced a bill this week that aims to help public schools become more racially diverse by providing grants for school districts to create voluntary school desegregation plans. [ThinkProgress]

A brief hearing in Barren Circuit Court on Tuesday settled a scheduling conflict in the lawsuit Glasgow police Lt. Col. Guy Turcotte has against the city and James Duff, former interim chief. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The last year has shined a harsh light on two distressing realities of American life. Mass shootings are becoming more common. And more Americans are killing themselves. These disturbing trends share something in common, obvious in the first case and less so in the second: guns. [WaPo]

Officials in Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration did not directly answer whether they plan to notify users of a problem-plagued state benefits system that they should reapply for services such as Medicaid and food assistance. [WFPL]

“The Art of the Deal” made America see Trump as a charmer with an unfailing knack for business. Tony Schwartz helped create that myth – and regrets it. [The New Yorker]

Curiosity finally got the best of me. I had to drive up I-75 and see Noah’s Ark. I found the ark to be an impressive piece of woodcraft, which made me feel better about paying $40 to see it. (It cost an additional $10 to park in the 4,000-space parking lot, which was only a fraction full.) [H-L]

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence (R-Gay Panicked), Donald Trump’s vice presidential pick, opposed a successful effort in 2007 to raise the federal minimum wage to $7.25 an hour over two years. [HuffPo]

Funtimes At The New Ark Park?

If you worry the Creation Museum and its new Noah’s Ark theme park will cause outsiders to think Kentuckians are a bunch of anti-science rubes, at least take comfort in this: Lexington was home to perhaps America’s greatest evolutionary biologist. [H-L]

Two separate attempts to recognize lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals in the Republican Party platform ― a statement of its core ideas and principles ― were voted down by GOP delegates on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

Just wait til the gays wake up to the reality that Bevin has turned UofL into Six Flags Over Jesus University. The University of Louisville Faculty Senate approved a statement Wednesday saying that Gov. Matt Bevin’s recent orders abolishing the Board of Trustees and appointing his own in its place “compromise” the board’s independence and “may affect the institutional ideal of democratically-shared governance at the university.” [C-J/AKN]

The phone would ring almost every week with fundraising appeals from a super PAC called Voters for Hillary. Margo Marquess and her husband, Amitava Gupta, backed the presidential campaign of the former Secretary of State, so they were happy to write checks. In all, they gave $6,000. [ProPublica]

Metcalfe County magistrates opened bids for three bridge projects on Monday, and awarded contracts two companies. Judge-Executive Greg Wilson explained that the county had two bridges, one on Pine Hill Road and another on Jack Shaw Road, that were washed out in 2015 during heavy rainfalls. [Glasgow Daily Times]

It sure is easy for uptight white guys to minimize the African American experience because it makes them uncomfortable. [The Hill]

Doug Cobb, the Louisville businessman who drew recent attention for sharing political opinions on Twitter that are far outside the mainstream, has declined an appointment to the University of Louisville Board of Trustees, according to Gov. Matt Bevin’s office. By “outside the mainstream”? They mean jacked up, homophobic and backwater. [WFPL]

At the theme park Ark Encounter, which opened last week in Williamstown, Kentucky, thousands of visitors can step inside a recreation of Noah’s Ark—built to spec as detailed in the Bible. Inside, exhibits attempt to explain how two of each animal might have fit on the boat, while visitors can pick up souvenirs at the gift shop or eat at a 700-person restaurant on the ship. [FastCo]

Addia Wuchner loves to preach the bullshit of compassionate conservatism but she wouldn’t know what was right for Kentucky’s Medicaid program if it hit her square in her xenophobic face. She’s part of the reason so many Kentuckians remain impoverished, under educated and afraid. [HEAD-DESK]

How American politics went insane. It happened gradually – and until the U.S. figures out how to treat the problem, it will only get worse. [The Atlantic]

I participated in this program something like 20 years ago and think everyone in Eastern Kentucky should get involved. Each September, hundreds of Appalachian citizen leaders travel to Berea College to participate in the Brushy Fork Annual Institute. Widely recognized as one of the premier leadership and networking conferences in Appalachia, the Institute helps residents explore regional issues and develop skills to strengthen their organizations and communities. [Hazard Herald]

The violence in Dallas last week is intensifying worries in Cleveland about visitors and protesters taking firearms downtown during the Republican National Convention, where thousands of people plan to demonstrate. [NY Times]

Central Kentucky religious leaders and Democrats spoke against presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump at Blue Grass Airport Monday afternoon, just hours before he landed in Lexington for a private fundraiser. [H-L]

A black doctor who treated shooting victims of a Dallas attack that left five police officers dead spoke out Monday on the fraught relationship between people of color and law enforcement. [HuffPo]

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Don’t Forget About Bevin’s Blunders

Almost 45 years after the former Old Taylor distillery stopped producing bourbon, it might be only about a month away from making spirits again. [Janet Patton]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) has endorsed presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton for president. [HuffPo]

The 20 candidates who Gov. Matt Bevin passed over for the University of Louisville Board of Trustees include a Metro Council member, the CEO of Churchill Downs Inc., partners at two large law firms – both of them Republicans – and a retired veteran who touted his “traditional American values.” [C-J/AKN]

Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Jeh Johnson said Sunday that the shootings in Dallas that left five police officers dead are not reflective of movements like Black Lives Matter. [The Hill]

The first public hearing for the Medicaid transformation proposed by Gov. Matt Bevin was held on Tuesday at the Knicely Conference Center at Western Kentucky University. [Glasgow Daily Times]

President Barack Obama pledged on Saturday to seek ways to calm racial tensions and reduce divisions between police and minorities during his final months in office, but he warned that easy access to guns nationwide exacerbated the problem. [Reuters]

Dr. Susan Harkema became the face of one of the University of Louisville’s splashiest research successes the moment one of her paralyzed patients wiggled his toe. Her name was in Time Magazine. She was interviewed on “Good Morning America” and CNN. The notoriety brought more funding and patients to U of L with hopes that revolutionary studies would help the paralyzed walk again. But in March, a federal agency took the unusual and drastic move of withdrawing its funding from one of her studies, citing concerns about the validity of the data and unresolved problems with oversight. Meanwhile, the federal Office for Human Research Protections is also conducting its own review, a spokeswoman confirmed. [WFPL]

Tens of thousands of people every year are sent to jail based on the results of a $2 roadside drug test. Widespread evidence shows that these tests routinely produce false positives. Why are police departments and prosecutors still using them? [ProPublica]

Twenty oral history projects will receive about $55,000 in grants to support work on topics ranging from the Kentucky Chili Bun Trail in eastern Kentucky to the African-American experience in Hopkinsville. [WKYT]

Global support for US President Barack Obama appears to have lasted through his two terms in office, a survey of 18,000 people for the BBC suggests. [BBC]

When Louisville restaurateur Ivor Chodkowski began looking for cheeses to be used in his Harvest Restaurant he looked to his friend Kenny Mattingly, owner of Kenny’s Farmhouse Cheese in Austin. [BGDN]

Unless they have a book to sell, Supreme Court justices rarely give interviews. Even then, they diligently avoid political topics. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg takes a different approach. [NY Times]

During their working years, women tend to earn less than men, and when they retire, they’re more likely to live in poverty. [H-L]

The Republican Party nationally has decided that pornography is a greater threat to public health than guns. [HuffPo]

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Tuesday Morning Dept Of Nonsense

This is terrible news for Matt Bevin. For Kentucky workers who have health insurance through their employers, the number enrolled in high-deductible plans has risen sharply over the last eight years. [H-L]

A photo of an unnamed protester at a Black Lives Matter demonstration in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, has become a powerful image of the ongoing struggle between law enforcement and black Americans. [HuffPo]

Ethics? What ethics? Matt Bevin doesn’t know how to spell “ethics”, let alone what it means. [C-J/AKN]

Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Jeh Johnson said Sunday he has had “unpleasant” experiences with law enforcement in the past, but praised the work of police officers serving their communities. [The Hill]

Some may think the illegal dumping of about 2,000 tons of radioactive fracking sludge at Blue Ridge Landfill near Irvine as mainly Estill County’s problem. [Richmond Register]

Three countries have warned their citizens to stay on guard when visiting U.S. cities rocked by sometimes violent protests that erupted after a string of police shootings of black Americans. [Reuters]

A new program to encourage students interested in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) will launch in the fall at Lawrence County middle schools and high school. [Ashland Independent]

Evidence is mounting that doctors who receive as little as one meal from a drug company tend to prescribe more expensive, brand-name medications for common ailments than those who don’t. [ProPublica]

Members of the Cave City Tourism and Convention Commission voted in a special-called meeting Monday to replace an air handler that stopped cooling for the West Hall of the Cave City Convention Center. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Donald Trump’s video statement at the end of a week of national turmoil was a good start, the Rev. Jesse Jackson indicated Sunday. But, he said, the presumptive Republican nominee bears some of the blame for his past rhetoric. [Politico]

Kentucky’s political leaders responded to Thursday’s shootings in Dallas, Texas with grief, sympathy and a hint of the debates to come on gun control and police-involved violence. [WFPL]

The US economy created 287,000 jobs in June, rebounding strongly from disappointing growth in May. [BBC]

Mary Love says she “got caught in the trap” a decade ago when she needed help to pay the rent on her apartment. [John Cheves]

According to presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump, former Indiana University basketball coach Bobby Knight will be a key figure at the upcoming Republican National Convention ― where he will presumably hurl Clint Eastwood’s 2012 convention chair at an underperforming point guard, or something. [HuffPo]

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ICYMI: Comer Is Under Investigation

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is wrestling with an unenviable, arguably impossible task this election year: protecting Senate Republicans from the political upheaval caused by Donald Trump’s presidential candidacy. [H-L]

A graphic video shows a Baton Rouge police officer shooting and killing Alton Sterling, a 37-year-old black man who was selling CDs in front of a convenience store early Tuesday morning. [HuffPo]

SURPRISE! Bevin’s proposal to reshape the state’s Medicaid program ran into a buzzsaw of criticism at its first public hearing since the governor announced it last Wednesday. [C-J/AKN]

A regulatory effort by the Obama administration to crack down on tax deals is facing backlash from business groups and lawmakers on both sides of the aisle. [The Hill]

Charles Gabbard, who is accused of stealing donations from volunteers meant for Kentucky River Regional Animal Shelter (KRRAS) and a volunteer’s cellphone was indicted this month on charges relating to the incident. [Hazard Herald]

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch said on Tuesday fighting economic espionage was a priority for the Department of Justice. [Reuters]

Access Fund, the national advocacy organization that protects America’s climbing, is excited to announce that Breaks Interstate Park, which sits across the southwest Virginia/southeast Kentucky line, is now officially open to rock climbing. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

At a time when Democrats and Republicans in Congress can’t agree on just about anything, there is one issue that unites them: the urgent need for criminal justice reform. [ProPublica]

Bobby Paisley’s health insurance covers his vision and dental care. He knows, because he and his wife pay for it. “I don’t have to do community service, I don’t have to earn points and I don’t have to wait,” he said. But that’s exactly what some 400,000 Kentuckians would have to do if they need an eye exam or a tooth pulled under Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposal to overhaul the state’s Medicaid program. [Richmond Register]

In his final State of the Union address in January, President Obama made an ambitious pledge to overhaul the management of fossil fuels on America’s public lands in his final year, focusing, in particular, on the antiquated and little-known federal coal program. [ThinkProgress]

Beginning this fall, the Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS) will offer a free dual credit class to Kentucky public high school juniors, allowing them to earn high school and college credit at the same time. [Ashland Independent]

If you missed it, Jamie Comer and his crew are under investigation by the Office of the Attorney General. [Page One]

Giant coal producer Murray Energy has issued notices that it could lay off up to 4,400 coal mine workers in six states come September. A news release from the St. Clairsville, Ohio, company says it issued the notices for its operations in Ohio, West Virginia, Illinois, Kentucky, Utah and Pennsylvania. [H-L]

A Texas man who sued the federal government because it wouldn’t approve his application to manufacture a machine gun doesn’t have a constitutional right to possess the automatic weapon, an appeals court ruled. [HuffPo]

Ditch Your Overpriced Mobile Provider

Several people have written in to ask questions about Cricket, so I’ll break down the basics for you. We use Cricket (and Ting, in some circumstances) for sources out in the state who can’t afford to maintain a phone line to send us data and tips. It’s worked out really well the past couple years.

Cricket is owned by AT&T and operates on the AT&T network. If you have AT&T signal where you spend most of your time, it will likely work for you. There’s no contract, so you can come and go as you please.

You can use just about any unlocked GSM phone and you can use any phone that works on AT&T. That means you can use your AT&T iPhone on Cricket even if it’s not unlocked. If you don’t know what that means, fire up yer googler.

You get unlimited talk and text for $35 per month. That includes 2.5gigs of high-speed data. Once you’ve exhausted that allotment, you get unlimited data at slower speeds – fine for sending MMS (think iMessage or Hangouts messages), sending an email, checking Twitter. There are other plans but that’s the cheapest. Group plans get even cheaper – 5 lines for $20 each.

When you sign up via my referral link (CLICK HERE FOR THAT), you’ll get $25-$50 in credits for signing up (or more than $100 if you’re switching from T-Mobile at the moment) and I’ll get a kickback to help cover the plans we have. No, if you use the referral, I will not find out who you are. I’ll just know someone used the referral. Once you sign up, you’ll go back to the referral to verify and after about a month of active service, the credit will be applied to your account.

Just buy a SIM kit online or at a store like GameStop, Target, Walmart, Best Buy. Right now, the best deal is on Amazon for $2.99 (Cricket SIM Kit on Amazon). They’re usually $10 in a store. Avoid going to a physical Cricket store, as you’ll have to pay an activation fee – something you don’t have to pay when activating online. If you aren’t an Amazon Prime member, sign up for a free trial by clicking here. Cancel when you’re finished with the trial if you don’t want to keep it. Or just click through using our Amazon referral link on this page to throw us an anonymous commission on anything you buy. Ordering a TV or computer anyway? Click through our link and throw us an anonymous buck or two.

This is a spammy post but is the easiest way to help those with questions. The added benefit for Page One is getting a kickback to help pay for sources in Montgomery and Franklin Counties, for example, to have connectivity so they may continue providing information. Unsurprisingly, not everyone has a computer, access to the internet or even phone service with long distance. Temporarily dropping used or cheap smartphones into peoples’ hands in Mt. Sterling and Morganfield made the past three years possible. There’s no way all the material from court records and open records requests would have been obtainable otherwise.

Note: If there are media folks out there who need assistance setting up a data retrieval program like this, send me an email. If you have a shoestring budget and aren’t doing something like this for your longterm projects, you’re crazy.