Don’t Forget About Bevin’s Blunders

Almost 45 years after the former Old Taylor distillery stopped producing bourbon, it might be only about a month away from making spirits again. [Janet Patton]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) has endorsed presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton for president. [HuffPo]

The 20 candidates who Gov. Matt Bevin passed over for the University of Louisville Board of Trustees include a Metro Council member, the CEO of Churchill Downs Inc., partners at two large law firms – both of them Republicans – and a retired veteran who touted his “traditional American values.” [C-J/AKN]

Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Jeh Johnson said Sunday that the shootings in Dallas that left five police officers dead are not reflective of movements like Black Lives Matter. [The Hill]

The first public hearing for the Medicaid transformation proposed by Gov. Matt Bevin was held on Tuesday at the Knicely Conference Center at Western Kentucky University. [Glasgow Daily Times]

President Barack Obama pledged on Saturday to seek ways to calm racial tensions and reduce divisions between police and minorities during his final months in office, but he warned that easy access to guns nationwide exacerbated the problem. [Reuters]

Dr. Susan Harkema became the face of one of the University of Louisville’s splashiest research successes the moment one of her paralyzed patients wiggled his toe. Her name was in Time Magazine. She was interviewed on “Good Morning America” and CNN. The notoriety brought more funding and patients to U of L with hopes that revolutionary studies would help the paralyzed walk again. But in March, a federal agency took the unusual and drastic move of withdrawing its funding from one of her studies, citing concerns about the validity of the data and unresolved problems with oversight. Meanwhile, the federal Office for Human Research Protections is also conducting its own review, a spokeswoman confirmed. [WFPL]

Tens of thousands of people every year are sent to jail based on the results of a $2 roadside drug test. Widespread evidence shows that these tests routinely produce false positives. Why are police departments and prosecutors still using them? [ProPublica]

Twenty oral history projects will receive about $55,000 in grants to support work on topics ranging from the Kentucky Chili Bun Trail in eastern Kentucky to the African-American experience in Hopkinsville. [WKYT]

Global support for US President Barack Obama appears to have lasted through his two terms in office, a survey of 18,000 people for the BBC suggests. [BBC]

When Louisville restaurateur Ivor Chodkowski began looking for cheeses to be used in his Harvest Restaurant he looked to his friend Kenny Mattingly, owner of Kenny’s Farmhouse Cheese in Austin. [BGDN]

Unless they have a book to sell, Supreme Court justices rarely give interviews. Even then, they diligently avoid political topics. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg takes a different approach. [NY Times]

During their working years, women tend to earn less than men, and when they retire, they’re more likely to live in poverty. [H-L]

The Republican Party nationally has decided that pornography is a greater threat to public health than guns. [HuffPo]

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A Long Moment Of Silence For The H-L

Welp, readers of the Herald-Leader can now look forward to a much poorer experience. The Lexington Herald-Leader announced on Monday that it will transfer its printing and packaging operations to Louisville starting in August, and that the company will put its downtown Lexington building on the market. [H-L]

Donald Trump appeared to shift his position on a blanket ban on all Muslims entering the United States, saying on Saturday he wouldn’t be bothered if a Muslim from Scotland or Great Britain entered, according to reporters from CBS and CNN. [HuffPo]

Because they haven’t been a disaster everywhere else? As Kentucky’s prison population rises and county jails become overcrowded, the state may reopen a pair of private prisons to temporarily take in more than 1,600 inmates. [C-J/AKN]

Democratic strategist James Carville said on Sunday that he doubts voters are flocking to the Libertarian Party because of their political views. [The Hill]

More than 350 couples have married after being issued licenses in Barren County since June 26, 2015. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The Pentagon plans to announce the repeal of its ban on openly serving transgender service members next month, U.S. defense officials said. [Reuters]

On Friday, June 17, the Kentucky State Police held their annual awards ceremony at the Lexington Convention Center. [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump said last week he hasn’t really started campaigning in the general election. It shows in his poll numbers. [Politico]

An Ashland man jailed for an alleged burglary now faces a felony assault charge after he was accused of biting the Boyd County jailer, according to Boyd Commonwealth’s Attorney David Justice. [Ashland Independent]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! What is white privilege – and do white Americans believe they benefit from it? [BBC]

New rules made by the Kentucky Department of Corrections earlier this year will force Rowan County to make some changes in its detention center currently under construction. [The Morehead News]

A short-handed Supreme Court on Monday struck down a Texas law that tightens abortion clinic requirements in a way that critics say unduly restricts women’s access. [McClatchy DC]

Kentucky is paying $190,000 in attorney fees to the Christian group that won a tourism tax benefit for a Noah’s ark attraction that will open soon in central Kentucky. [H-L]

Britain plunged deeper into political crisis on Sunday after its vote to leave the European Union last Thursday, leaving world officials and financial markets confused about how to handle the political and economic fallout. [HuffPo]

Everyone Has Bevin Ignorance Fatigue

Aren’t you glad the most important newspaper in the state didn’t die in a fire? [H-L]

Donald Trump’s presidential campaign paid more than $1 million last month to companies controlled by the presumptive GOP presidential nominee, according to reports the Trump campaign filed late Monday with the Federal Election Commission. [HuffPo]

The new executive director of Kentucky’s Office of Highway Safety was charged with child endangerment in 2007 after she allegedly smoked crack cocaine in her car in front of her two-month-old daughter. [C-J/AKN]

An openly gay candidate for the White House is still a long shot, but voters under 40 are a lot more enthusiastic about the prospect than their elders are. [Rasmussen Reports]

A man who police say escaped from a Georgia prison in 1979 and eluded authorities for nearly four decades has been arrested in eastern Kentucky. [Richmond Register]

A few years ago, I was in the middle of an interview with Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., when President Barack Obama called. Then the minority leader, McConnell walked across his spacious office in the United States Capitol to his desk and picked up the phone. [James R. Carroll]

Children bounced on inflatables and screamed on carnival rides as Stephen Salyers entertained a large crowd Friday evening at Russell Railroad Days. The annual festival, on its 6th year after a hiatus, had a crowd Friday evening as performers took to the stage and children ran around playing games and ate cotton candy. [Ashland Independent]

“Students and taxpayers have paid the price” for the failures of the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools, she wrote in an accompanying letter to the U.S. Secretary of Education. Warren urged the Department of Education to take “strong, aggressive action to hold ACICS accountable.” [ProPublica]

Nineteen law enforcement officers from all across the world made the trek to Morehead this week to participate in a National Tactical Officers Association (NTOA) active shooter training. [The Morehead News]

Charles Koch, facing questions about his commitment to political spending, late last month donated $3 million to a super PAC spending heavily to protect the Republican Senate majority, according to a Federal Election Commission report set to be filed in the coming days. [Politico]

Officials with one of the four counties that had a contract with the Edmonson County Animal Shelter in the Bee Springs community of Edmonson County have agreed to enter into a contract with the Barren River Animal Welfare Association to bring their dogs to Glasgow. [Glasgow Daily Times]

For example, while 72 percent of Republicans believe that discrimination against whites has become as bad as discrimination against blacks and other minority groups, among Trump supporters the number is 81 percent. [WaPo]

The board of the Bluegrass Area Development District voted Wednesday to pursue appealing the state’s decision to yank its designation as an area agency on aging. [H-L]

Donald Trump reported on Monday night that his campaign is virtually broke. Having raised roughly $3 million in the month of May, he retained just $1.28 million in cash on hand — a sum better suited for a competitive House race than a run for the presidency. [HuffPo]

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Letcher Co Lives Up To EKY Stereotypes

Bernie Sanders’ presidential campaign is requesting a recanvass in Kentucky’s presidential primary, where he trails Hillary Clinton by less than one-half of 1 percent of the vote. [WFPL]

Leave it to the backwater yokels of Eastern Kentucky to be dumb enough to pull a stunt like this. The Letcher County Fiscal Court is getting involved in the national debate over whether transgender citizens should be allowed to use bathroom facilities that match their gender identities. [H-L]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A new species of horned dinosaur has been unearthed by scientists in southern Utah. [HuffPo]

We’re looking at you, Montgomery County Schools, for failing to report potential child abuse while Joshua Powell was superintendent and his illegally-hired wife was running the show. [C-J/AKN]

Presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump has been accused of dog-whistling to white nationalists ever since he kicked off his campaign in the summer of 2015 and warned against “criminal” Mexican immigrants. [TPM]

After she completes a few other steps, Jaclyn West has big ideas she wants to implement that are partly inspired by her experience during the past three months. [Richmond Register]

This is one of the most disgusting stories you’ll ever read. [Reuters]

Blaine was once a town living off the fruits of a plentiful Ashland Oil production site. Now it consists of about 100 people, and a basically defunct city government. What happened to Blaine? [Ashland Independent]

I’ve written about tax loopholes for decades. But recently, I wrote about Schlupflöcher for the first time, in a venture that shows how journalists can be as multinational as investment banks. We just make a lot less money. [ProPublica]

A newly constituted workers’ compensation nominating committee will hold off on making recommendations for six vacant administrative law judges pending a court decision on Gov. Matt Bevin’s authority to revamp the commission. [Ronnie Ellis]

Donald Trump has dominated polling among Republicans for the better part of a year, as he has delighted in reminding people. But there’s one poll that you probably haven’t heard about and that he doesn’t talk about. [NY Times]

Unlike Vanmeter Contracting Inc., Scotty’s Contracting and Stone LLC was not successful in its attempt to be removed as a party in a wrongful death lawsuit against several employees of the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet. [Glasgow Daily Times]

More From the Department of Things Ken Ham wouldn’t understand… A tiny stone flake from north-western Australia is a remnant of the earliest known axe with a handle, archaeologists have claimed. [BBC]

One irony of Kentucky’s presidential primary election was that the only candidate with a specific plan for helping Appalachian coal country transition to a 21st century economy was trounced in that part of the state. [Tom Eblen]

Way to go, Republicans! A Louisiana lawmaker apparently keen on wasting people’s time and skeeving everyone out killed two birds with one stone during a Wednesday state House session by suggesting an age and weight limit for strippers. [HuffPo]

KCTCS Freakout Now Well Under Way

It’s been reported for a couple years that McCall was receiving those funds (consulting $) – that is not new news. It’s also not news that educators get paid out for their vacation days, is it? If so, how on earth have these folks reported on education in Kentucky? Matt Bevin’s administration is publicly questioning the leadership of Kentucky Community and Technical College System President Jay Box and plans a comprehensive review of operations in the system’s central office. [H-L]

Senate Democrats tried and failed Wednesday to expedite emergency funds to combat the Zika virus, stymied by Republicans who objected and tried to extract cuts to Obamacare as a condition for their agreement. [HuffPo]

You can’t call Minton an asshole and be accused of being a racist but CAN (not this guy but others) be a straight-up racist asshole and be a cabinet secretary? Nice moves, Bevin Shitshow. [C-J/AKN]

When the ball dropped in Times Square on Jan. 1 of this year, more than half of the country disapproved of the job that President Obama was doing, according to Gallup. That boded poorly for the Democrats over the course of the year; presidential approval correlates to both how his party fares in the presidential race (even if he’s not on the ticket) but also to the results of Senate races. An unpopular Obama suggested a less popular whoever-was-about-to-win-the-Democratic-nomination. [WaPo]

There is never a bad time to visit the commonwealth, but when it comes to tourism, it’s hard to beat the month of May. Those few weeks between the Kentucky Derby and Memorial Day are arguably when we look our best. [Greg Stumbo]

Donald Trump has dominated polling among Republicans for the better part of a year, as he has delighted in reminding people. But there’s one poll that you probably haven’t heard about and that he doesn’t talk about. [NY Times]

Metcalfe County magistrates have awarded bids for various supplies for the 2016-17 fiscal year. [Glasgow Daily Times]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham wouldn’t understand… Stone tools and bones from a butchered mastodon, found at the bottom of a river in Florida, are shaking up the known history of humans in the region. [BBC]

Slinging mud, beautiful scenery and more than 100 miles of trails were just some of the words used to describe Rush Off Road at Rotary on Monday. [Ashland Independent]

Most urban lungs around the world are breathing harmful air, according to a new World Health Organization (WHO) report. [ThinkProgress]

Justin Schmidt grabbed some pizza and took a seat against the wall. It felt good to rest his legs. [WFPL]

Leading U.S. universities are pushing back against a proposed State Department rule that would bar foreign students from more research projects and classes involving information seen as vital to national security. [Reuters]

Matt Bevin had legal authority to make mid-year budget cuts to Kentucky’s public universities and colleges this spring, a judge has ruled. [H-L]

Truck driver Dana Logan tried on Wednesday to recount a crash that decapitated two fathers and two children, hoping to convince Congress to stop weakening rules that require truckers to get rest. [HuffPo]

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Not Many Think Gray Has A Chance

This is a story that begins with cries for help from a small town school district and ends with justice. You’ll want to read all of this. [Page One]

Four Clark County Fiscal Court magistrates say Judge-Executive Henry Branham unilaterally approved pay increases for county employees, and they want a circuit court judge to declare that only fiscal court can authorize such action. [H-L]

It’s official: The 2016 presidential election is already a 10-figure affair. Household names such as Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, Donald Trump and Ted Cruz account for much of this spending. But a gaggle of obscure and moneyed super PACs have likewise helped rocket campaign expenditures to mesospheric levels — ones unthinkable even four years ago. [HuffPo]

If the Democratic frontrunner for U.S. Senate wants to compete with Rand Paul on the debate stage leading up to the November election, he’d better hone his skills. [C-J/AKN]

The Republican National Committee (RNC) Rules Committee meets here on Thursday amid calls for changes to convention rules that could make it easier for a new Republican presidential candidate to emerge to take on Donald Trump and Ted Cruz. Discussion of the rules has created a political firestorm, with Trump, the GOP front-runner, accusing the RNC for rigging the nomination process against him. [The Hill]

Kentucky State Police (KSP) along with the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) is hosting a collaborative effort to remove potentially dangerous controlled substances from home medicine cabinets, according to a release. [Richmond Register]

Transgender Americans may find greater acceptance in the future, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll that shows young adults and women more open to people using public bathrooms matching their gender identity. [Reuters]

The Daily Independent will host its first mayoral debate in Ashland on Thursday at the Transportation Center. [Ashland Independent]

Bernie Sanders shows no sign of dropping out of the presidential race anytime soon, but the vultures are already circling over his email list — perhaps the most coveted and valuable catalog of potential voters and donors in the Democratic Party at the moment. [Politico]

Attorneys for Gov. Matt Bevin and Attorney General Andy Beshear agreed Thursday to set aside $18 million in funding Bevin is withholding from universities and community colleges until the courts rule on Bevin’s authority to unilaterally reduce funding for higher education. [Ronnie Ellis]

The head of the Republican National Committee implored leaders of his sharply divided party on Friday to rally behind their eventual presidential nominee, suggesting that they ignore Donald J. Trump’s assault on the nominating process. [NY Times]

Glasgow High School was recently ranked as the sixth-best high school in Kentucky, according to a 2016 Best High Schools rankings published by U.S. News and World Report. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Out on the campaign trail, Donald Trump relishes his feud with his own party. He threatened to sue the Republican National Committee. He called its nominating system “rigged,” “deceptive” and “a disgrace.” And he has suggested he might try to depose the party chairman. [WaPo]

At 9 p.m. on April 15, with just three hours to go before the 2016 legislative session would adjourn for the year, Rep. James Kay, D-Versailles, grabbed a just-printed version of the state budget and noticed something very amiss. [H-L]

“In the Army, we do more before 9 a.m. than most people do all day” is a standard bit of military bravado. It’s as much about the discipline instilled in soldiers as it is about the fact that their strenuous training takes place under less-than-ideal health conditions — like waking up before dawn to exercise, which can create a cycle of sleep deprivation. [HuffPo]

KEHP Needs Way More Than An Audit

An audit?! How about a full-scale forensic accounting?! Federal allegations that a high-ranking official in the Beshear administration misused the public employees health insurance plan to pocket $200,000 in kickbacks should spur an audit of the plan that covers 300,000 employees and their dependents. [H-L]

The biggest question of the political season is whether Donald Trump will get enough delegates to win the GOP presidential nomination before the convention. Prediction markets, which allow people to bet on future events using real money, estimate an average 61 precent chance of a contested Republican convention with two or more votes required. The chance Trump will fail to get to the required 1,237 delegates before the convention, they estimate, is 69 percent. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin on Thursday ordered state finance and budget officials to cut 4.5 percent off the quarterly funding allotments that the state sends out to universities and community colleges on April 1. [C-J/AKN]

There are currently more foreign intelligence operatives in the United States than at any point in the country’s history, the former head of the House Intelligence Committee claimed on Wednesday. [The Hill]

From late Friday Afternoon… “The governor’s unilateral action in cutting the appropriated funding of colleges, universities and community colleges was outside of his authority. The law on budget reductions is straightforward. It requires a declared shortfall that does not exist. If it did, the last budget bill that was passed and signed into law dictates the steps that must be taken. We are therefore requesting the governor withdrawal his order. We are confident he will comply.” [Attorney General Andy Beshear]

President Barack Obama will have the chance to decide on whether to increase the number of U.S. forces in Iraq in the “coming weeks,” the top U.S. general said on Wednesday. [Reuters]

The Warren County Downtown Economic Development Authority is considering hiring a consulting firm to help ensure the area is getting all the state TIF revenue it is entitled to receive. [BGDN]

Donald Trump’s proposal to temporarily ban all Muslims from the United States has proved popular from the beginning. When he first articulated it following the Paris terrorist attacks in November, he surged in the polls and hasn’t slumped since. And while progressives might want to believe the appeal of Trump’s divisive idea is limited to a small subset of conservatives, a new poll indicates Islamophobia actually runs deep across the spectrum of the American electorate. [ThinkProgress]

Thousands of Kentuckians have erroneously received letters notifying them that they would no longer receive state benefits like Medicaid or food stamps. [WFPL]

US presidential hopeful Donald Trump has withdrawn a call for women who have abortions to be punished, only hours after suggesting it. [BBC]

A legal dispute between the four daughters of late Louisville real estate developer Al J. Schneider focuses on a belief by two of those daughters that the trustees for the estate want to quickly liquidate the company’s millions in real estate assets — to a point that beneficiaries would not receive the fair value for those properties. [Business First]

NPR’s Audie Cornish talks with Greg Simon, executive director of the Obama administration’s Cancer Moonshot Task Force, about the barriers to advancements in treating cancer. [NPR]

A community health provider in southeastern Kentucky and several pharmacies took part in billing the federal government inflated prices for prescription drugs, two people have charged in a federal lawsuit. [H-L]

As tensions continue to escalate between Russia and the West, the Pentagon has announced plans to deploy U.S. troops, armed with modern equipment and heavy artillery, full time along NATO’s eastern borders. [HuffPo]