The KRS/KTRS Are Still A Train Wreck

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Officials asked residents of a Knott County home to evacuate because of the threat of flooding caused by water leaking from a nearby coal mine. [H-L]

Donald Trump promised during his campaign to bring back mining jobs to struggling workers in coal country. Now the president-elect has tapped for commerce secretary a Manhattan billionaire who owned a West Virginia coal mine where 12 workers died in 2006. [HuffPo]

Greg Fischer said those seeking to address gun violence in Louisville and other cities, such as Gov. Matt Bevin, must consider multiple policy levers in order to halt the rise of shootings and homicides. [C-J/AKN]

President-elect Donald Trump’s transition-team adviser on financial policies and appointments, Paul Atkins, has been depicted as an ideological advocate of small government. But the ways that the Trump administration and Congressional Republicans are likely to approach financial deregulation could serve Atkins’ wallet as well as his political agenda. [ProPublica]

The Louisville attorneys representing three people in a lawsuit stemming from a Donald Trump campaign rally want to depose the president-elect before he’s sworn into office. Dan Canon is one of the lawyers representing the plaintiffs suing Trump and others. He said Trump incited violence at his rally in Louisville back in March. [WLKY]

On Thursday, a federal judge in Oregon ruled that a climate lawsuit brought against the U.S. government by a group of youths can move forward, a win for the strategy of fighting climate change through the judicial branch. [ThinkProgress]

Worried about irreparable damage being done to their retirement benefits, a group of public school teachers on Tuesday asked a judge to order Kentucky’s top political leaders to “perform their constitutional and statutory duties” by adequately funding the pension system. [Richmond Register]

A US serviceman has been killed by an improvised explosive device while fighting against so-called Islamic State (IS) in Syria, officials say. [BBC]

The 5,000 electric customers of Kentucky Utilities in Barren and Hart counties, along with the other 541,000 in more than 70 counties across the commonwealth, could get cost hikes in the coming year, pending Kentucky Public Service Commission approval. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Thirty years ago Friday, a shocking announcement was made in the rotunda of San Francisco’s City Hall by a visibly shaken Dianne Feinstein, who was then president of the city’s Board of Supervisors. [NPR]

The financial woes of Kentucky’s public pension systems continue to worsen, but it’s really one of the six plans which is causing the most concern. [Ronnie Ellis]

Mitch McConnell (R-Granny), whose wife Elaine Chao is Trump’s pick for transportation secretary, was asked if he plans to recuse himself from her Senate confirmation process. McConnell’s answer? In a word: no. [WaPo]

The number of homemade methamphetamine labs found in Kentucky has dropped sharply in the past few years as drug abusers switched to imported meth, reducing the danger and cleanup costs associated with the small labs. [H-L]

A Marine wounded in combat in Fallujah, Iraq, in 2004 has found new purpose as a self-proclaimed peaceful warrior fighting against a 1,172-mile pipeline that protesters fear threatens the water source of Native Americans in North Dakota. [HuffPo]

RPK: Still A Bunch Of Homophobic Bigots

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Hopefully they’re not just learning the whitewashed version of Thanksgiving history. [H-L]

Activists protesting plans to run an oil pipeline beneath a lake near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota said on Saturday they have no intention of leaving a protest camp after U.S. authorities warned it must be vacated by Dec. 5. [HuffPo]

The last remaining dry precinct located within the Watterson Expressway could switch sides next month following a wet-dry vote. [C-J/AKN]

A member of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) is sounding the alarm over the new changes floated by Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), warning that the minority leader’s proposals could erode the power of African-American lawmakers even as they attempt to spread influence to younger members. [The Hill]

A state senator is planning to once again propose a bill during the upcoming legislative session that he says will protect religious freedoms. The bill would nullify local “fairness” ordinances across the state that protect Kentuckians from discrimination based on sexual orientation. Imagine how different things could be if Chris Hartman were permitted by the Fairness board over the past seven or eight years, as I have pushed, to spend time with these extremists trying to educate them. Kentucky would be in a much better spot than it is today. [WFPL]

Sales and traffic at U.S. brick-and-mortar stores on Thanksgiving Day and Black Friday declined from last year, as stores offered discounts well beyond the weekend and more customers shopped online. [Reuters]

Unhappy with Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear’s refusal to file criminal charges against those responsible for illegally dumping 1,200 tons of low-level radioactive fracking waste at a landfill near Irvine, an Estill County citizens group is suing to obtain the investigative records of Beshear and two state regulatory cabinets. [Richmond Register]

Falwell says he couldn’t afford to work at a Cabinet-level job for longer than that. That’s $205,000 per year, FYI. He couldn’t afford to live on $205K per year. That’s the New Fascist Party for you. [Politico]

They’re official: the state Board of Elections certified the results of the Nov. 8 election in Kentucky Tuesday. [Ronnie Ellis]

On Tuesday, the director of the National Security Agency, Admiral Michael Rogers, was asked about the WikiLeaks release of hacked information during the campaign, and he said, “This was a conscious effort by a nation-state to attempt to achieve a specific effect.” [Mother Jones]

The civil lawsuit filed by a former police chief against the City of Glasgow and the subsequent interim chief has been set for trial in March. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The education gap among whites this year wasn’t about education. It was about race. There are, of course, several plausible reasons for this growing education gap. No one factor explains everything. That said, a major factor was racial attitudes. Sorry, Adam Edelen, your bullshit talking point about economics is dead in the water. [WaPo]

Like many students, Tyler Allen spent his college days enthusiastically experimenting with alcohol. Only for Allen, it turned into a habit that was more than recreational. [H-L]

Afghanistan is failing. Fifteen years after the United States first scattered the Taliban with high-altitude bombing, the battlefield gains achieved by tens of thousands of U.S. troops are in jeopardy from a resurgent Taliban. [HuffPo]

RPK: Finally More Racist Than The KDP

Fun fact: The Republican Party of Kentucky doesn’t actually care about racism, homophobia or anything like that. Look at who runs the Party and speaks on its behalf and you’ll have all you need to know. Republican Dan Johnson posted messages on Facebook that displayed prejudice toward black people, Muslims and others during his campaign for a seat in the Kentucky House of Representatives. [John Cheves]

Americans are overwhelmingly surprised by Donald Trump’s victory, a new HuffPost/YouGov survey finds, with a narrow majority saying they’re unhappy with the results of the election. [HuffPo]

As a busy working mother with four children — three with autism — Jennifer Adams-Tucker said it’s hard enough managing school schedules, after-school activities, doctor’s appointments, therapy sessions and other events. [C-J/AKN]

A battle is brewing between the GOP foreign policy establishment and outsiders over who will sit on President-elect Donald Trump’s national security team. [The Hill]

Morehead State University can be a force to improve life in northeast Kentucky by working through its regional campus here to enhance education, economic development and public health, said respondents at a forum Tuesday. [Ashland Independent]

For several years, transgender U.S. Army Captain Julia Harrison shunned military social events, anxious at the thought of having to wear the pants and coat of male service members despite identifying as a woman. [Reuters]

Madison County is a regional “economic engine,” and a 21st century airport is a key to maximizing the county’s potential, Charles “Chuck” Conley of the Central Kentucky Regional Airport Board said Monday after a presentation to leaders of the county’s three local governments. [Richmond Register]

Just down the street from the Trump Hotel and six blocks from President-elect Donald Trump’s soon-to-be White House, the alt-right movement gathered on Pennsylvania Avenue and declared victory Saturday. [Politico]

The Morehead Utility Plant Board says its water is safe to drink and utilize for other needs after a few residents have complained that their water tasted bad. [The Morehead News]

Donald J. Trump met in the last week in his office at Trump Tower with three Indian business partners who are building a Trump-branded luxury apartment complex south of Mumbai, raising new questions about how he will separate his business dealings from the work of the government once he is in the White House. [NY Times]

Discussion about the federal indictment of a Cave City businessman who requested grant funds from the Cave City Tourist and Convention Commission in August led to talk earlier this week of possible changes to the commission’s grant request application. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Mitch McConnell, like Matt Bevin, is really into backing racists. A person close to Sessions said that Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Enables Bigots), the majority leader, spoke directly to his colleague and said he would give his strong and full support for his confirmation as attorney general. [WaPo]

Lexington Realtors announced Friday a $16,500 program that will help pay deposits and the first month’s rent for people struggling with homelessness. [H-L]

Donald Trump and Republican leaders in Congress have made clear they are serious about repealing Obamacare, and doing so quickly. But don’t assume their dismantling of government health insurance programs will stop there. [HuffPo]

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The EBEC Still Has Absolutely No Teeth

The Executive Branch Ethics Commission says that it and unnamed law enforcement agencies are investigating people who may have helped former Kentucky Personnel Secretary Tim Longmeyer to illegally solicit campaign donations from state employees under his supervision from 2011 to 2015. [H-L]

In a testament to humanity’s willingness to take on the most futile tasks imaginable without regard to sanity, it was announced Tuesday that outgoing Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) has put forward legislation that would scrap the Electoral College in favor of electing the president of the United States by popular vote. [HuffPo]

Often, when conducting a routine eye exam, Louisville optometrist Dr. Aaron McNulty discovers that a patient has diabetes but doesn’t know it. [C-J/AKN]

Questions are swirling about whether President-elect Donald Trump will follow through on suggestions during the campaign that he might allow other countries to develop nuclear weapons. [The Hill]

Surprise! The WFPL folks have noticed Eastern Kentucky again. At least that Brendan jackass isn’t trying to tag poor people like cattle this time. (How is he still employed there after the mass exodus of employees?) For Freida Lockaby, an unemployed 56-year-old woman who lives with her dog in an aging mobile home in Manchester, Ky., one of America’s poorest places, the Affordable Care Act was life altering. [WFPL]

A work crew began to dismantle a Confederate monument in Louisville, Kentucky on Saturday, the mayor said, in the latest move to take down or relocate symbols of the slaveholding Southern Confederacy from the American Civil War. [Reuters]

Bill Langley, senior pastor of an Elizabethtown church with a strong reputation for supporting missions, has been elected president of the 750,000-member Kentucky Baptist Convention. [Ashland Independent]

It was supposed to be a big, beautiful infrastructure bill. But President-elect Donald Trump’s pitch for a $1 trillion upgrade of the nation’s roads, bridges, tunnels and airports is already running into potholes as it meets reality in Washington. [Politico]

Richmond police officers may drive their city vehicles home after work only if they live within Madison County. [Richmond Register]

Making sense of this presidential election requires figuring out what happened in rural places across the country. This is especially true in the upper Midwest, where there were sharp swings toward Donald Trump that helped produce surprising victories in states such as my home state of Wisconsin. [WaPo]

City council members agreed Monday night to amend the city’s alcohol ordinance, making several changes. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Safety pins have again become a symbol of solidarity with victims of racist, religious or homophobic abuse, following alleged attacks in the US in the wake of Donald Trump’s election win. [BBC]

Matt Bevin couldn’t find a Kentucky vendor? This should end really well and will likely cost way more than suggested. $583,000 seems unbelievably low. Big Brother may be watching the next time you visit Kentucky’s Capitol. [H-L]

Europe needs to think about developing its own nuclear deterrent strategy given concerns that U.S. President-elect Donald Trump could scale back U.S. military commitments in Europe, a senior member of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s conservatives said. [HuffPo]

You Should Probably Read That H-L Editorial

Pee alert! Jeff Hoover has named Julian Carroll to his fake transition team. Meet thew new good old boy, same as the old good old boy. [Hoover Nonsense]

Anyone thinking of illegally using Kentucky to dump radioactive fracking waste from other states will no doubt reconsider in light of fines announced this week by the Bevin administration. [H-L]

More than a dozen women have accused President-elect Donald Trump of sexual misconduct, ranging from forcible kissing to assault. Many Americans who did not support Trump’s candidacy have grappled with shock since his election. But for these women, his win is also deeply personal. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin gleefully said “good riddance” to House Speaker Greg Stumbo last week, and Stumbo made clear on Wednesday that the not-so-warm feelings are mutual. [C-J/AKN]

The protests in major U.S. cities against Republican Donald Trump’s surprise presidential election victory have been impromptu affairs, quickly organized by young Americans with a diverse array of backgrounds and agendas. [Reuters]

City of Ashland workers will pump 24 million gallons of water back into a drained reservoir later this week. [Ashland Independent]

If President-elect Trump follows through on his campaign promises, millions of individuals — immigrants, religious minorities, people of color — face a very grim four years. One of the worst hit groups will be Americans with significant health costs. The Trump transition team published a brief summary of the incoming president’s health plan on its website, and the news is not good for the elderly, the poor, and millions of Americans with preexisting conditions. [ThinkProgress]

A 19-year-old Berea man, who was charged with arson Tuesday morning, told investigators he set the blaze because people “needed to die.” [Richmond Register]

Children and teenagers of Mexican descent make up one of the fastest-growing populations in the nation’s public schools. [NPR]

Three Morehead Fire Department firefighters did not report any injuries after multiple oxygen cylinders exploded inside a residence in which they were preparing to suppress a fire. [The Morehead News]

One of the most important phases of the transition to power for President-elect Donald Trump includes briefings on U.S. intelligence capabilities and secret operations as well as separate descriptions of the extraordinary powers he will have over the military, especially contingency plans to use nuclear weapons, according to officials. [WaPo]

Area tourism officials came together Tuesday morning, along with representatives of local, state and federal governments, for the Caveland Marketing Association’s legislative luncheon. [Glasgow Daily Times]

No, Bernie Sanders could not have won. So calm the eff down, Bernie Bros. Donald Trump won whether we like it or not. [BBC]

Dozens of students marched through the University of Kentucky’s campus Friday to protest rape culture and how the university handles sexual assault cases. [H-L]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) voiced concerns Tuesday that President-elect Donald Trump is breaking a core campaign promise of keeping special interests out of Washington ― “draining the swamp.” [HuffPo]

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West Liberty Waste Dumpers: PAY UP!

PEE ALERT! Former Kentucky Personnel Secretary Tim Longmeyer must pay a $5,000 civil fine after settling 45 counts of ethics violations with the Executive Branch Ethics Commission, officials said Monday. [John Cheves]

Planned Parenthood is reporting a spike in donations and demand for long-acting contraceptives since Donald Trump’s election as U.S. president while abortion foes hope to gain momentum in their quest to cut public funding to the women’s health organization. [HuffPo]

Kentucky’s Department for Public Health is seeking millions of dollars of penalties from companies blamed for bringing radioactive drilling waste into Kentucky last year. [C-J/AKN]

Transportation advocates are excited by the prospect of an infrastructure package passing under President-elect Donald Trump next year, but there are a number of other transportation issues that could see action during the lame duck session of Congress. [The Hill]

A century of weather records show there’s no escape in Louisville from the fingerprints of climate change, as local temperatures climb and seasons are altered, research at the University of Louisville has found. [WHAS11]

Hillary Clinton blamed FBI director James Comey for her stunning defeat in Tuesday’s presidential election in a conference call with her top campaign funders on Saturday, according to two participants who were on the call. [Reuters]

The first significant change proposed to Grayson’s alcohol laws met with initial resistance from Mayor George Steele, although he ultimately agreed to the proposal early this week. [Ashland Independent]

Hillary Clinton and the Democrats were playing with fire when they effectively wrote off white workers in the small towns and cities of the Rust Belt. [ProPublica]

Officials of Morehead State University along with members of its Board of Regents, local and state legislators held a dedication ceremony Friday, Nov. 11, for Padula Hall at the Derrickson Agricultural Complex. [The Morehead News]

The new president may merit a brief honeymoon in governing while he figures out what his policies will be and how he will implement them. But we should not wait one nanosecond to lay out the unprecedented set of conflicts of interests he and his family bring to the presidency, to compare his campaign rhetoric with his post-election decisions, and to chronicle post-election moves made by state and local governments where authorities may feel emboldened to push the boundaries of their power and our laws. [CJR]

A recanvass of the 43rd district judicial race in Barren and Metcalfe counties changed nothing about the unofficial election tally, leaving Gabe Pendleton as the winner by 36 votes. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The potential conflicts of interest facing Donald Trump are so unprecedented that U.S. ethics laws weren’t even written to account for them. [Politico]

The 26 soldiers of the Kentucky National Guard’s 149th Military Engagement Team said goodbye to their families Saturday for a nearly yearlong mission overseas. [John Cheves]

President-elect Donald Trump, who took to Twitter Thursday to blast demonstrations against his victory as “very unfair,” had a different view of post-election distress four years earlier, when he called for a march on Washington “to stop this great and disgusting injustice.” [HuffPo]

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The Rand Paul Crew Sure Is Fun

Jesse Benton, a former campaign manager for Republican U.S. Senators Rand Paul and Mitch McConnell, is active in Kentucky’s U.S. Senate contest this fall even though he was convicted in May on felony political corruption charges and was accused by a British newspaper this week of trying to funnel illicit donations from a foreign source into the presidential race. [John Cheves]

Perfect illustration of that presidential ticket. A plane carrying U.S. Republican vice presidential nominee Mike Pence skidded off the runway after landing in the rain at New York City’s LaGuardia Airport on Thursday, halting flights for at least an hour, officials said. [HuffPo]

Joe Biden is at the top of the internal short list Hillary Clinton’s transition team is preparing for her pick to be secretary of state. [Politico]

Donald Trump said he received a $17 million insurance payment for 2005 hurricane damage at his private Florida resort — and pocketed some of it instead of spending it on repairs, according to a new report. [The Hill]

For all his unpopularity in increasingly red Kentucky, Barack Obama has for the second time this year come to the assistance of a Democratic candidate. [Ronnie Ellis]

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s employees are having a “tremendous problem” with health plans they don’t actually have. Trump himself doesn’t make much use of a health plan that he also doesn’t have. And all of this is a “disaster” for the American people. Confused? Don’t worry. So is Mr. Trump. [ThinkProgress]

Madison County Board of Education members received a report Thursday evening on the recent 2016 Unbridled Learning data for the district from Chief Academic Officer and Assistant Superintendent David Gilliam. [Richmond Register]

At three large rental buildings emblazoned with gold letters spelling out T-R-U-M-P P-L-A-C-E on the Upper West Side, the lobby rain mats embossed with the same name are being replaced, tenants say. The new versions, they have been told, will proclaim the buildings’ addresses, 140, 160 or 180 Riverside Boulevard. [NY Times]

Could Democratic House Speaker Greg Stumbo really be facing a serious electoral challenge in his Floyd County district? [Ronnie Ellis]

In case you needed more proof that Trump is a lunatic loose cannon… Donald Trump warned in an interview Tuesday that Hillary Clinton’s policies as president to address the Syrian conflict would lead to World War III, arguing the Democratic nominee would draw the US into armed confrontation with Russia, Syria and Iran. [CNN]

A new master plan created for the Kentucky Exposition Center outlines $200 million in improvements to enhance the facility. [Business First]

As his poll numbers have declined in the closing weeks of the presidential race, Donald J. Trump has begun to engage in barely veiled promotions of his business brand off the campaign trail, dragging reporters to his marquee properties in between his campaign events. [More NY Times]

Matt Bevin’s administration has banned flip-flops and exposed midriffs in a new dress code for Kentucky’s more than 31,000 executive branch employees. [H-L]

Republicans these days are disgusting. Illinois Republican Sen. Mark Kirk made an ill-advised jab about the birthplace and ancestry of his Democratic opponent, Rep. Tammy Duckworth, during a debate on Thursday. [HuffPo]

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