Rand Paul Is Still Just A Tiny Texan Troll

Rand Paul is the reason so many miners are suffering, their pensions are disappearing and they have no hope. Twats like the Miniature Texan and his drunken, DUI-prone spokesperson are why Kentucky can’t have nice things. Because you can’t fix that kind of stupid. [H-L]

UK has been pooping its pants for years. Not nearly as badly as UofL but pretty damn close. The University of Kentucky’s ongoing lawsuit against its student newspaper prompted a dramatic split among the 21-member UK Board of Trustees Friday, with one trustee saying he was told President Eli Capilouto would resign if he brought the issue to a vote. [More H-L]

Thick, massive cakes of smelly green toxic algae bubbled up along beaches and rivers in South Florida’s coastal communities this summer. It was so serious, authorities declared a state of emergency. [HuffPo]

The University of Kentucky’s lawsuit against its student newspaper, the Kentucky Kernel, over an open records dispute is on the UK Board of Trustees’ radar as the group continues to meet in Bowling Green on Friday. [C-J/AKN]

Under the leadership of University of Louisville Foundation President James Ramsey, the value of the university’s foundation – adjusted for inflation – dropped 19 percent, or $131 million, from 2006 through April this year. [More C-J/AKN]

Republican incumbents are leading their Democratic Senate challengers in four crucial swing states, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Friday. [The Hill]

You should check out the crazy lady Matt Bevin campaigned for in Morehead. Matt Bevin came to Morehead Thursday to campaign for Wendy Fletcher, Republican candidate for state representative in the 99th District. [The Morehead News]

The notes are handwritten on a legal pad and provide a verbatim account of the shock, pain and grim determination aboard Air Force One on Sept. 11, 2001. [Reuters]

You can bet both parties are doing a lot of polling in the contest for control of the state House of Representatives. [Ronnie Ellis]

As soon as Stewart Anderson stepped foot inside the Lorton Reformatory, a Virginia prison, he knew he’d have to work for negligible pay in order to endure his 20-year sentence. [ThinkProgress]

Things are looking up for some Kentucky workers. That’s according to a new report from the left-leaning Kentucky Center for Economic Policy. [WFPL]

Donald Trump’s broadside against the top military brass is drawing warnings of a crisis in civilian-military relations should he become commander in chief and begin bypassing generals and admirals now serving under President Barack Obama. [Politico]

The Madison County Cooperative Extension Board has the lowest property tax rate of any local entity, but it will go up slightly for 2016. [Richmond Register]

Once upon a time, in New York City in the 1950s, a little boy didn’t like his second-grade music teacher, Charles Walker. So, the boy later boasted, he slugged Mr. Walker, giving him a black eye. [NY Times]

University of Louisville trustees are threatening to sue the school’s foundation for what they see as a lack of accountability in the university’s fundraising arm. [H-L]

A major ruling expected Friday from a federal judge could derail construction of a controversial oil pipeline in North Dakota. [HuffPo]

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Heroin Hell Has Hit The Commonwealth

House Speaker Greg Stumbo raised the possibility of impeaching Gov. Matt Bevin Saturday after CNHI News Service reported that a Democratic state lawmaker said he was threatened by Bevin’s chief of staff for refusing to switch political parties. If true, the governor’s actions “are criminal in nature and in my judgment rise to the level of an impeachable offense.” [H-L]

Donald J. Trump is causing some high anxiety inside the military. He has suggested carpet-bombing Syrian cities, assassinating the families of Islamic State fighters and torturing detainees, all illegal under international or U.S. law. He has proposed withdrawing troops from South Korea (a similar troop withdrawal helped ignite the 1950 Korean War), advocated disengaging from NATO, and declared that Japan would be “better off” with its own nuclear weapons. And he has famously bragged, “I know more about ISIS than the generals!” [HuffPo]

Authorities have reported more than 200 overdoses in the region over the past two weeks. [C-J/AKN]

Three Congressional leaders on Monday asked top federal environmental and safety officials to extend by 60 days the public comment period on new vehicle emissions and fuel economy standards. [Reuters]

Two of the wilder caves at Carter Caves State Resort Park have been reopened to limited public use, a park official said. [Ashland Independent]

States that voted against President Obama twice are more dependent on the federal government, according to an analysis of new data released by the Pew Charitable Trusts on Monday. [The Hill]

The Rowan County Board of Education voted unanimously Aug. 24 to set the tax rates for real and personal property. [The Morehead News]

The National Labor Relations Board decided in two separate cases last week that — as far as federal labor law is concerned — charter schools are not public schools but private corporations. [WaPo]

Kentucky public high school graduates held steady in meeting the state’s college-readiness benchmarks on the ACT college-entrance exam in reading and English, but lost ground in meeting the state mathematics benchmark. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The planet is warming at a pace not experienced within the past 1,000 years, at least, making it “very unlikely” that the world will stay within a crucial temperature limit agreed by nations just last year, according to Nasa’s top climate scientist. [The Guardian]

Even with the assistance of detoxification and rehabilitation programs, 80 percent of people attempting recovery from opioid addiction will relapse. [Richmond Register]

The United States admitted its 10,000th Syrian refugee this week in a resettlement program announced by President Obama last fall, according to The White House. [NY Times]

After giving a speech critical of the Obama Administration and Democrats in Congress, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said politics in Washington aren’t as polarizing as they seem. [H-L]

The producers of EpiPen will offer a generic version of the emergency allergy treatment following outrage last week over price increases, the company announced Monday. [HuffPo]

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UK Is Run By A Bunch Of Assholes

Eastern Kentucky needs your love. She died alone in the middle of the night, and her body was swiftly autopsied, embalmed and carted 135 miles to a remote Kentucky county where she had been raised. [H-L]

The Department of Justice made a landmark decision last week when it announced it would direct the Bureau of Prisons to let its contracts with private prison companies lapse. But last week’s change in policy left the U.S. Marshals Service untouched, even though that agency is also under DOJ control and keeps nearly as many people locked in privatized jails as the Bureau of Prisons. [HuffPo]

You know, like Jim Ramsey took the high road when attacking ON TELEVISION anyone questioning Robert Flener, who went to prison. “Chairman Benz needs to keep his comments on the high road and work with all of the UL staff, its affiliated boards and their leadership, and the media to promote harmony,” said Hughes, who also serves on the Board of Trustees. [C-J/AKN]

A bipartisan quartet of lawmakers is circulating a letter that seeks to delay a pending arms sale to Saudi Arabia. [The Hill]

With just less than six weeks before a countywide election to determine whether legal alcohol sales will be allowed in Barren County, election officers are seeking some temporary polling places. [Glasgow Daily Times]

North Carolina’s university system must allow two transgender students and a transgender employee to use bathrooms matching their gender identity, a U.S. judge ruled on Friday, in a partial victory for those fighting the state’s restrictive restroom law. [Reuters]

The first guy was believable but Russ Meyer doesn’t carry the same credibility. That’s problematic, sure. His ties to Adam Edelen and the the Cormans also do not help him. But that doesn’t mean what he’s saying is in any way untrue. Thankfully for him, Sinnette’s story went public first, establishing a pattern. It’s clear that the Bevin team is attempting to retaliate against ANYONE holding them accountable. A second Democratic state lawmaker now claims Republican Gov. Matt Bevin tried to persuade him to switch parties and that the governor’s chief of staff threatened to punish him politically when he refused. [Ronnie Ellis]

Physicians whose state boards have sanctioned them for harming patients, unnecessarily prescribing addictive drugs, bilking federal insurance programs and even sexual misconduct nonetheless continue to receive payments for consulting, giving talks about products, and more. [ProPublica]

Louisville can’t stop killing everybody. Two vigils were held for three different victims of homicides near Shelby Park this week. [WDRB]

Hillary Clinton and Paul Ryan don’t agree on much — but both are lending their support to an anti-poverty proposal that cuts across racial and party lines. [Politico]

The University of Kentucky could soon be taking legal action against its own school newspaper. [WHAS11]

Hillary Clinton has launched a full broadside against Donald Trump, accusing her Republican opponent of issuing a “steady stream of bigotry” and espousing policies that would “put prejudice into practice”. [BBC]

State Rep. John Short, whose name surfaced this year in a federal vote-buying investigation in Magoffin County that led to several convictions, said Tuesday that he doesn’t want to discuss the case. [John Cheves]

A massive crack in one of Antarctica’s largest ice shelves has grown exponentially in recent months, and scientists worry a break-off could destabilize the entire structure. [HuffPo]

Eastern Kentucky Just Cannot Win

Is anyone holding their breath on this one? Should we? Two prominent Kentucky Democrats on Tuesday launched a nonprofit organization, the New Kentucky Project, to cultivate the next generation of political leaders. [H-L]

Emergency medical services scrambled in a West Virginia city after 26 people overdosed on heroin in a span of just four hours. Thanks to a fast response time and an overdose reversal drug, everyone survived. [HuffPo]

James Ramsey, who was forced to resign last month as president of the University of Louisville, apparently plans to stay awhile at its foundation, where he is still president. The foundation is constructing new offices at its building at 215 Central Ave., for Ramsey and Kathleen Smith, his chief of staff, according to a university official and several tradesmen who were busy working Friday on the space. [C-J/AKN]

The Pentagon warned the Syrian government Friday not to strike U.S. and coalition personnel in Syria, a day after the regime carried out airstrikes in an area near American special operations forces, prompting the U.S. to scramble jets to protect them. [WSJ]

More than a year after introducing a multimillion-dollar body camera system, the Louisville Metro Police Department isn’t keeping track of how the cameras are being used. [WFPL]

Donald Trump on Friday predicted he would get 95 percent of the black vote after four years as president. [The Hill]

Richmond police officers, along with all city employees, received a 4-percent cost-of-living raise for the 2016-17 fiscal year. However, a proposal to create a 10-step pay scale that would provide most officers with a raise every two years for 20 years remains before the city commission. [Richmond Register]

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton leads Republican rival Donald Trump by 8 percentage points among likely voters, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll released on Friday. [Reuters]

OF COURSE some wingnut pastor is trying to stop alcohol sales. Circuit Judge David Hagerman will hear the case of the City of Ashland and a local pastor against the Boyd County Clerk and Board of Elections on Monday, a day before the scheduled “wet” election. [Ashland Independent]

You’d think Donald Trump would love the Olympics: The flag-waving pageantry, the pure, unbridled patriotism—and, my god, the winning. So much winning you almost get tired of the winning. [Politico]

The Rowan County Board of Education will hold a public hearing in the board’s meeting room in the old Rowan County Middle School on Wednesday, Aug. 24, at 6 p.m. [The Morehead News]

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has made a direct appeal to African-American voters, saying “What do you have to lose?” [BBC]

We’ve been yelling about it for years and here you go. Many people in Lexington who see doctors at University of Kentucky HealthCare write checks to the Kentucky Medical Services Foundation. [H-L]

The Justice Department plans to stop using privately run prisons that typically house undocumented federal inmates following a report finding they are less safe than those that are federally run, Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates said Thursday. [HuffPo]

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King Coal Is Still In Severe Denial

You already know Friends of Coal and the Kentucky Coal Association exist only to make a handful of people wealthy. They use far-right Republican extremists as spokespeople (like the Coal Association used RPK’s Tres Watson for years). They decimate Appalachia, take from the poor and ignore Kentucky. It’s all bullshit hype and panicked, worried people fall for it without fail. [H-L]

Donald Trump restructured his campaign leadership Tuesday in a desperate attempt to turn around his flagging presidential bid. [HuffPo]

Of the 87 who died in an accident involving motorcycles, 57 were not wearing a helmet, and neither were any of 19 who died while on an ATV. [Floyd County Times]

Donald Trump’s presidential campaign appears to be soliciting foreign donations despite multiple warnings and a criminal complaint filed with the Department of Justice. [The Hill]

Two of the victims at the heart of a sexual assault and harassment case against an associate professor are angry and say UK is protecting the professor at the expense of his victims, other students and the public. [Kentucky Kernel]

When it comes to the substance of Donald Trump’s speech proposing “extreme vetting” of immigrants to the United States, retired Navy Adm. James Stavridis on Tuesday indicated that the Republican nominee lacked specifics. [Politico]

Hal Rogers joined members of the Chamber of Commerce in touring the Somerset coworking center — billed as being a space for small businesses or those striking out on their own to “connect, create and collaborate.” [Commonwealth Journal]

With hopes of landing the U.S. Senate candidates and high-profile surrogates to represent the presidential candidates, plans are in place for the sixth annual Brushy Fork Forum in Vine Grove. [News-Enterprise]

Facing allegations from former city firefighter Jeffrey Queen that he was subjected to a hostile work environment during his five years in the Bowling Green Fire Department, the city of Bowling Green on Friday acknowledged the existence of a video showing a firefighter burning the Quran, one of many accusations of misconduct in a lawsuit filed by Queen earlier this week. [BGDN]

Over the past decade, the news about Kentucky’s coal industry has been reliably bad. The latest numbers show the state is mining the smallest amount of coal since about 1934, and there are fewer coal miners employed here than anytime in the 20th century. [WFPL]

Those following the Powell Scandal(s) will likely want to keep an eye on this. A school district is hoping voters will help replace what might be the most out-of-shape high and middle schools in Kentucky. [WAVE3]

This is what happens when an illegally-hired former superintendent’s wife heads south. We hear it’s motivating the OAG to seek restitution on behalf of the Montgomery County Board of Education. [Page One]

On Thursday, a Northern Kentucky woman was sentenced to almost 19 years in prison for providing illegal drugs to her daughter in prison; her daughter subsequently died of an overdose. [H-L]

Donald Trump is doing a great job of making the case against his own presidential candidacy, President Barack Obama said at a fundraiser for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton on Monday. [HuffPo]

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Trump Chickens Come Home To Roost

The Lexington Humane Society is inundated with cats every summer, and this August it’s using its “Purrgressive Pricing” program to help them alleviate some of the overcrowding. [H-L]

Aetna Inc, the No. 3 U.S. health insurer, on Monday said that due to persistent financial losses on Obamacare plans, it will sell individual insurance on the government-run online marketplaces in only four states next year, down from the current 15 states. [HuffPo]

GLI is part of what’s wrong with Louisville and it’s beyond time for everyone to recognize it. An organization like that is not necessary in the modern era. Louisville’s first heat-management plan is flawed and should not be used as the basis for any new regulatory programs aimed at reducing temperatures, the city’s chamber of commerce said. [C-J/AKN]

Boeing Co’s KC-46A refueling plane has been approved for production, with work underway for the first two low-rate initial production lots to be awarded in the next 30 days, the U.S. Air Force said on Friday. [Reuters]

On Friday, Gov. Matt Bevin made several appointments to Kentucky’s Universities and College Boards including two to the Eastern Kentucky University Board of Regents. [Richmond Register]

Federal health regulators have announced plans to crack down on nursing home employees who take demeaning photographs and videos of residents and post them on social media. [ProPublica]

Mayor Chuck Charles said the city of Ashland faces a “no-win” situation prior to the Aug. 23, county-wide election on alcohol sales. On Election Day, all registered voters in Boyd County, Ashland and Catlettsburg can vote to turn the county “wet.” The status would expand alcohol sales in convenience stores, gas stations, grocery stores and other businesses. [Ashland Independent]

More than 70 Republicans have signed a letter to the party’s National Committee head urging him to stop helping Donald Trump’s campaign. [BBC]

Watching AT&T buy favors from Rocky Adkins… AT&T Kentucky Tuesday donated $20,000 to the Rowan County Board of Education to be used for college and career readiness programs. [The Morehead News]

Republican strategists say time is running out on Donald Trump. Though there are more than 80 days to go before the election, GOP skeptics believe the party’s nominee has little time left to straighten out his campaign in order to defeat Hillary Clinton for the presidency. [The Hill]

The State Medical Examiner’s Office in Madisonville has determined that the cause of death for a Butler County couple found Tuesday in their home is homicide, according to a Kentucky State Police release. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Peter Greathouse, a Republican from Utah, says he’s not “comfortable” with Donald Trump as his party’s nominee. Jane Lynch, a GOP veteran from Arizona, says she’ll likely cast her personal vote for libertarian Gary Johnson or a write-in candidate. Loren Byers, a Texas Republican, calls Trump “a loose cannon.” [Politico]

If you’re the state’s most important newspaper, you could do a better job and have some common sense when covering suicide. At a bare minimum, provide links and numbers for resources. At a bare minimum. [H-L]

When Donald Trump unveiled his council of economic advisors earlier this month, observers were quick to note some of the team’s unorthodox attributes: all of its 13 members are men, six are named Steve and only one has an advanced degree in economics. [HuffPo]

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Mitch McConnell Is Apparently Hilarious

Coal is dying and there’s nothing the Republican Party of Kentucky can do about it. Although the state’s coal industry continued to shed jobs from April through June, the decline was not as steep as in the first three months of the year, according to a report released Monday. [H-L]

Retired Marine Gen. John Allen warned on Sunday that if Donald Trump were elected president, there would be mass unrest among the military rank and file over the policies that he would implement and pursue. [HuffPo]

Senate Bill 11 – signed into law earlier this year – took effect July 15 and is now allowing alcohol-related businesses statewide to receive new and increased privileges that are meant to support tourism and advance production. [C-J/AKN]

The U.S. Navy will name one of its new class of oil tankers after Harvey Milk, an activist who became one of the first openly gay people to be elected to public office in the United States before his assassination in 1978, officials said on Friday. [Reuters]

Local leaders and advocates for the hungry joined State Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles on Tuesday to discuss what is being done at the local level to combat food insecurity in the area. [The Morehead News]

Some restaurants have secret menus, special items that you can only get if you know to ask. New Jersey’s student loan program has secret options, too — borrowers may be able to get help from the agency, but only if they know to ask. [ProPublica]

Revelations about lucrative perks doled out to former University of Louisville president James Ramsey’s top deputies brought outrage Friday from faculty members and taxpayers, but was of no concern to two top trustees. [WFPL]

Unlike every other major party nominee since 1976, Donald Trump has not released his tax returns. [ThinkProgress]

Opponents of a plan to let an aging pipeline carry natural gas liquids through Kentucky continue to call on federal regulators to conduct a more thorough review of the project. [WDRB]

The US economy grew at a much slower pace than expected in the second quarter and GDP was revised down in the first three months of the year. [BBC]

Perry County lost a beloved citizen on July 26. Danny Rose passed away at the age of 56. Rose served as an attorney in Hazard for many years, with his office located downtown. [Hazard Herald]

Donald Trump is pushing back on a key Democratic argument against him: that he’s dangerous and too erratic to be commander in chief. [Politico]

Pee alert… Out with a new book this year, U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell signaled on Sunday that he’s far from reaching the epilogue of his long political career. The Kentucky Republican said there’s a “great likelihood” he’ll seek a seventh Senate term in 2020. [H-L]

Donald Trump appears either unfamiliar with Russia’s annexation of Crimea or directly supportive of the intrusion that began in the winter of 2014, further chilled U.S.-Russian relations and has left thousands dead. [HuffPo]

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