Rand Paul: Still An Itty Bitty Little Man

Occupants of a silver car allegedly made a racial slur and threw water on a female student walking on campus, prompting a safety alert from University of Kentucky police. [H-L]

A sexual-assault victim who is critical of Hillary Clinton and who appeared alongside Donald Trump before Sunday night’s debate was paid $2,500 by a political action committee founded by Trump ally Roger Stone. [Boston Globe]

The Columbus Dispatch broke from a centurylong tradition of endorsing Republican presidential nominees on Sunday when it announced its support for Democrat Hillary Clinton in this year’s election. [HuffPo]

Performing the sad task of cleaning out her husband’s chambers after his death last year, U.S. District Judge John G. Heyburn II’s widow made an extraordinary discovery. [C-J/AKN]

In the closing weeks of the presidential race, Hillary Clinton’s campaign says it is stepping up its efforts to court white working-class men, with whom support for Republican Donald Trump, as well as dislike of the Democratic nominee, runs deep. [WaPo]

The City of Morehead took a step further on Tuesday in acquiring just more than an acre near Don Greenhill City Park. [The Morehead News]

This was no apology – it was projection of epic proportions. If you support this despicable manbaby, you’re him. [Reuters]

Turns out Rand Paul is still a tiny little man and his integrity gets smaller by the day. One will have to do – that was the message incumbent Republican U.S. Sen. Rand Paul delivered Tuesday about debating his Democratic challenger, Lexington Mayor Jim Gray. [Ronnie Ellis]

The Republican nominee for President of The United States, Donald Trump, has been caught on video bragging about sexually assaulting women. [ThinkProgress]

Roughly 640 state government employees earn $100,000, which is slightly frightening. [Business First]

Former Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush condemned vulgar comments made in 2005 by GOP nominee Donald Trump, whose crude remarks were captured on video and first published by the Washington Post. [Politico]

At Monday’s regular Glasgow City Council meeting, one councilman plans to address the group regarding the possibility of reducing the number of representatives in the city’s legislative body from 12 to seven. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The Food and Drug Administration’s approval of a new insulin delivery system for people with Type 1 diabetes is a big deal. [NPR]

This doesn’t smell scandalous at all. Rep. David Floyd, R-Bardstown, has declined to serve on a panel created to examine whether Gov. Matt Bevin delayed a Jessamine County road project as political retribution. Floyd, who announced in February that he would not run for re-election because of family concerns, cited those same concerns for why he can’t participate in the panel. [H-L]

Donald Trump had a hot mess of a weekend, after the Friday release of a video that caught him talking about how he likes to grope women. While the hot mic moment is threatening to sink the GOP nominee’s campaign, here’s yet another reason we should all be concerned about him: his terrible record on climate change. [HuffPo]

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Louisville Has A Big Pollution Problem

Fayette County Public Schools would start the school year almost a week later in 2017-18 under a proposal presented to the school board Monday night. [H-L]

Without significant policy reform in America, it would take 228 years for black families to amass the wealth that white families have today, according to a new study. [HuffPo]

Tighter federal clean-air rules could save the lives of at least 48 people a year in the Louisville metro area over a year, according to a new study released Wednesday morning by a medical association. [C-J/AKN]

Waste people. Rubbish. Clay-eaters. Hillbillies. Two new books that reckon with the long, bleak history of the country’s white poor suggest their plight shouldn’t have caught the rest of the country off guard. [ProPublica]

A western Kentucky man who spent several days in jail for posting violent song lyrics to Facebook has settled a lawsuit against the county where he was jailed. [WLKY]

One of Obamacare’s major provisions — which is bitterly opposed by most Republicans — has helped improve patients’ insurance coverage, financial situation, and overall quality of life, according to a new study. [ThinkProgress]

A study of drinking water systems found 6 million Americans, including people in West Virginia, Kentucky, and Ohio, are living with drinking water containing chemicals linked to a host of health problems. [WFPL]

Remember this guy? A U.S. federal judge on Tuesday upheld the 14-year prison sentence for ex-Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich despite his emotional plea for leniency after an appeals court set aside part of his public corruption conviction. [Reuters]

Surprise! The thing we’ve been writing about for a decade is still happening! The $14.9 billion Kentucky Retirement Systems lost money on its pension investments during the fiscal year that ended June 30. [John Cheves]

CNN media reporter Brian Stelter said that Fox News arranged for a young staffer to date him in order to collect information while he was in college. [The Hill]

LG&E is closing its coal ash ponds at its power plants in Louisville and Trimble County. [WDRB]

You can’t fix this kind of awful. Donald Trump has hinted at the assassination of Hillary Clinton by supporters of gun rights. [The Guardian]

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin is giving people more time to comment on his proposal to overhaul the state’s Medicaid program that insures more than 25 percent of the state’s population. [H-L]

Sinking precipitously in national polls, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump on Monday promoted a conspiracy tying Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton to the state execution of an Iranian nuclear scientist. [HuffPo]

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A Long Moment Of Silence For The H-L

Welp, readers of the Herald-Leader can now look forward to a much poorer experience. The Lexington Herald-Leader announced on Monday that it will transfer its printing and packaging operations to Louisville starting in August, and that the company will put its downtown Lexington building on the market. [H-L]

Donald Trump appeared to shift his position on a blanket ban on all Muslims entering the United States, saying on Saturday he wouldn’t be bothered if a Muslim from Scotland or Great Britain entered, according to reporters from CBS and CNN. [HuffPo]

Because they haven’t been a disaster everywhere else? As Kentucky’s prison population rises and county jails become overcrowded, the state may reopen a pair of private prisons to temporarily take in more than 1,600 inmates. [C-J/AKN]

Democratic strategist James Carville said on Sunday that he doubts voters are flocking to the Libertarian Party because of their political views. [The Hill]

More than 350 couples have married after being issued licenses in Barren County since June 26, 2015. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The Pentagon plans to announce the repeal of its ban on openly serving transgender service members next month, U.S. defense officials said. [Reuters]

On Friday, June 17, the Kentucky State Police held their annual awards ceremony at the Lexington Convention Center. [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump said last week he hasn’t really started campaigning in the general election. It shows in his poll numbers. [Politico]

An Ashland man jailed for an alleged burglary now faces a felony assault charge after he was accused of biting the Boyd County jailer, according to Boyd Commonwealth’s Attorney David Justice. [Ashland Independent]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! What is white privilege – and do white Americans believe they benefit from it? [BBC]

New rules made by the Kentucky Department of Corrections earlier this year will force Rowan County to make some changes in its detention center currently under construction. [The Morehead News]

A short-handed Supreme Court on Monday struck down a Texas law that tightens abortion clinic requirements in a way that critics say unduly restricts women’s access. [McClatchy DC]

Kentucky is paying $190,000 in attorney fees to the Christian group that won a tourism tax benefit for a Noah’s ark attraction that will open soon in central Kentucky. [H-L]

Britain plunged deeper into political crisis on Sunday after its vote to leave the European Union last Thursday, leaving world officials and financial markets confused about how to handle the political and economic fallout. [HuffPo]

Everyone Has Bevin Ignorance Fatigue

Aren’t you glad the most important newspaper in the state didn’t die in a fire? [H-L]

Donald Trump’s presidential campaign paid more than $1 million last month to companies controlled by the presumptive GOP presidential nominee, according to reports the Trump campaign filed late Monday with the Federal Election Commission. [HuffPo]

The new executive director of Kentucky’s Office of Highway Safety was charged with child endangerment in 2007 after she allegedly smoked crack cocaine in her car in front of her two-month-old daughter. [C-J/AKN]

An openly gay candidate for the White House is still a long shot, but voters under 40 are a lot more enthusiastic about the prospect than their elders are. [Rasmussen Reports]

A man who police say escaped from a Georgia prison in 1979 and eluded authorities for nearly four decades has been arrested in eastern Kentucky. [Richmond Register]

A few years ago, I was in the middle of an interview with Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., when President Barack Obama called. Then the minority leader, McConnell walked across his spacious office in the United States Capitol to his desk and picked up the phone. [James R. Carroll]

Children bounced on inflatables and screamed on carnival rides as Stephen Salyers entertained a large crowd Friday evening at Russell Railroad Days. The annual festival, on its 6th year after a hiatus, had a crowd Friday evening as performers took to the stage and children ran around playing games and ate cotton candy. [Ashland Independent]

“Students and taxpayers have paid the price” for the failures of the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools, she wrote in an accompanying letter to the U.S. Secretary of Education. Warren urged the Department of Education to take “strong, aggressive action to hold ACICS accountable.” [ProPublica]

Nineteen law enforcement officers from all across the world made the trek to Morehead this week to participate in a National Tactical Officers Association (NTOA) active shooter training. [The Morehead News]

Charles Koch, facing questions about his commitment to political spending, late last month donated $3 million to a super PAC spending heavily to protect the Republican Senate majority, according to a Federal Election Commission report set to be filed in the coming days. [Politico]

Officials with one of the four counties that had a contract with the Edmonson County Animal Shelter in the Bee Springs community of Edmonson County have agreed to enter into a contract with the Barren River Animal Welfare Association to bring their dogs to Glasgow. [Glasgow Daily Times]

For example, while 72 percent of Republicans believe that discrimination against whites has become as bad as discrimination against blacks and other minority groups, among Trump supporters the number is 81 percent. [WaPo]

The board of the Bluegrass Area Development District voted Wednesday to pursue appealing the state’s decision to yank its designation as an area agency on aging. [H-L]

Donald Trump reported on Monday night that his campaign is virtually broke. Having raised roughly $3 million in the month of May, he retained just $1.28 million in cash on hand — a sum better suited for a competitive House race than a run for the presidency. [HuffPo]

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Bevin’s Ignorance Parade Continues

Matt Bevin unveiled details Wednesday of his plan to overhaul Medicaid in Kentucky, saying it will impose monthly premiums of $1 to $15 and save taxpayers $2.2 billion over the next five years. Adding premiums to the Medicaid program concerns public health advocate Sheila Schuster, who said after the news conference that when out-of-pocket expenses are upped for Medicaid users, they drop out of the program. [H-L]

Democrats literally sat down on the floor of the House chamber on Wednesday — and forced the House into a temporary recess — as part of an effort to compel Republican leadership to vote on gun control legislation. [HuffPo]

Under proposed changes announced Wednesday by Gov. Matt Bevin, many Kentuckians covered by Medicaid would… Here’s your chance to watch poor Kentuckians suffer. As well as your chance to watch the Republican Party of Kentucky’s drunken, delusional leadership foam at the mouth about how wonderful this is. Such a shame the KDP has no guts. [C-J/AKN]

Senators rejected dueling proposals on blocking suspected terrorists from being able to buy a gun Monday, approximately a week after the worst mass shooting in U.S. history. [The Hill]

Eastern Kentucky University’s employee wellness program titled “Healthy You at EKU” is focusing on bringing wellness opportunities to campus for all of their employees. And now that summer is about to begin, that means vegetables are beginning to turn ripe and the return of the Madison County Farmer’s Market to EKU’s grounds on Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. [Richmond Register]

Who among us has not been in the position where what he means to say is something wise and temperate and what actually comes out of his mouth is a garbage fart? [WaPo]

Pathways will continue to shine a light of hope as it launches two new outreach programs designed for youth and young adults. [Ashland Independent]

The political battle between President Barack Obama and presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump is now fully joined. [BBC]

Local public agencies and private entities are looking to take to the skies with the area’s first-ever drone school. [The Morehead News]

Dozens of delegates to the Republican National Convention have launched an effort to dislodge Donald Trump as the GOP’s presidential nominee next month. [Politico]

Cave City City Council members met in a special-called session Wednesday afternoon to approve on second reading two ordinances — one adopting the city’s amended 2015-16 budget and another adopting the city’s 2016-17 budget. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Republicans need to start worrying about losing their majority in the House of Representatives. [Bloomberg]

Two members of the former Kentucky Retirement Systems Board of Trustees are suing Gov. Matt Bevin, claiming Bevin did not have the authority to remove board chairman Thomas Elliott of Jefferson County from the panel. [H-L]

Just like himself and most Americans… Presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump on Tuesday questioned the faith of Hillary Clinton and President Barack Obama, insinuating that neither may really be a Christian. [HuffPo]

Andy Beshear’s Big Conflict Remains Hot

The University of Kentucky will lose $12.6 million next year thanks to a 4.5 percent cut in state funding. At the same time, student financial aid and scholarships will increase by more than $20 million, and fixed costs for things such as utilities and employee health insurance are on the rise. [H-L]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) has not been shy about his disdain for the mainstream media. But the Democratic presidential hopeful has rarely, if ever, articulated it as bluntly as he did in an interview that aired on MSNBC’s “The Rachel Maddow Show” on Friday night. Sanders called out the network for its corporate character in a novel exchange with host Rachel Maddow. [HuffPo]

It symbolizes how cavalier we were in 20th century America – a hole dug next to a drinking water source where businesses sent hazardous waste to be buried out of sight and out of mind. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump says he thinks he can win the general election, even if the Republican Party does not unify to support his candidacy. [ABC News]

Andy Beshear says he has no reason to recuse himself from the Longmeyer case so let us break it down for him. Here are the conflicts: LONGMEYER WAS HIS DEPUTY! He’s a longtime friend of Longmeyer’s. Longmeyer worked directly for his daddy. Longmeyer raised/laundered cash for him. Longmeyer is going to prison. Jesus H at the stupid. Someone file a bar complaint against the man posthaste! [Ronnie Ellis]

On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, the presidency of George W. Bush changed instantly. In a new collection of never-before-seen photographs from that day, the president can be seen responding to the worst terrorist attack in United States history — an event that would redefine his time in office and propel the nation into two wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. [PBS]

When it came down to it, John Bland was unhappy and growing desperate. He was 65 years old, had led a life of watching in awe as his grandmother and aunt tried on dresses, mourned the realization that he would never bear a child and spent each day hating the body he had been given. [The News-Enterprise]

President Obama can’t wait to take on Donald Trump. Obama has been largely sidelined in the presidential contest, a last-year officeholder with high approval ratings who has repeatedly shown he likes to spar with political foes. [The Hill]

We think what Greg Stumbo really means is he wants a forensic accounting because an audit is way too random and easy to manipulate. Kentucky House Speaker Greg Stumbo is asking Auditor Mike Harmon if the General Assembly can authorize an audit of another branch of government. [WKMS]

FBI requests for customer records under a secretive surveillance order increased by nearly 50 percent in 2015, according to a U.S. government transparency report published this week. [Reuters]

Supt. Marvin Moore said the relocation of the Rowan County Board of Education’s central office from East Second Street to the old middle school on West Sun Street went better than anticipated. [The Morehead News]

Including a Kentuckian from Henderson. President Barack Obama commuted the sentences of 58 more federal prisoners Thursday, seeking to add momentum to his drive to allow earlier releases of men and women serving lengthy terms for drug offenses. [Politico & Press Release]

Lexington’s push to increase internet speeds will be delayed a few months as the city studies the cost of providing ultra high-speed internet access to Fayette County’s rural areas. [H-L]

Bernie Sanders has said that Hillary Clinton is not a “true progressive” and many of his supporters seem to agree. It’s one reason that Sanders keeps performing well in primaries and caucuses, prolonging the campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination. [HuffPo]

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Not A Good Look For Damon Thayer

Hey, Damon Thayer, better call your office cause you just got burned. YA BURNT!

From the Herald-Leader editorial board comes this glory:

The news earlier this week about Sen. Damon Thayer’s failed attempt to get a job at the Kentucky Horse Park reinforces the need to put all his proposed “reforms” at the park on hold.

Thayer has been throwing around accusations against the current management to promote his bill to dissolve the 17-member commission that oversees the park and replace it with a smaller body that would be appointed exclusively by his fellow Republican, newly elected Gov. Matt Bevin.


One of the foundation’s fundraisers is a hospitality tent at the Rolex. Typically, people contribute at least $1,500 to get tickets for one day and pay more for additional days. According to Alston Kerr, recently removed as chair of the Horse Park commission by Bevin, Thayer regularly asked for and received, at no cost, four tickets to the hospitalty tent for each of the four days of the Rolex from former director John Nicholson. Nicholson contributed twice to Thayer campaigns while executive director and last year, after his departure, gave $1,000.

When Link arrived, Kerr said, he insisted things be done “by the book,” and limited Thayer’s free tickets to one day. “It became a bone of contention,” she said.

With this history, it’s reasonable to wonder what’s behind Thayer’s attacks which, Kerr said, are alarming people who actually ante up to support the Horse Park.

Really, you’ve got to read it all.

And Damon? Careful who you’re trashing. Your Republican colleagues are spilling all the tea behind the scenes. It’s not pretty.

It’s time for you to step aside. Time for Senator Jimmy Higdon to take your spot in leadership.