Don’t Ignore The Bevin Threat Mess

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Individual Kentucky counties could adopt right-to-work laws under a decision handed down Friday by a federal appeals panel. At least Republicans will finally have to put their money where there mouthes are and it won’t pay off for them. [H-L]

Donald Trump is a whiny ass titty baby. President-elect Donald Trump, who is just two months away from his inauguration, woke up Saturday morning with a pressing concern on his mind. [HuffPo]

Democratic State Rep. Kevin Sinnette testified Friday that Republican Gov. Matt Bevin threatened him and his district last December at a meeting in the Governor’s Mansion after Sinnette rejected Bevin’s request that he change his political parties. [C-J/AKN]

President-elect Donald Trump has selected two anti-net neutrality advisers to shape the future administration’s telecom policy strategy at the Federal Communications Commission, Recode reported. [ThinkProgress]

Bill Mike Runyon led Paintsville High School’s basketball team for 29 years — now he’ll lead the city. [Ashland Independent]

Senators are pledging to take a firm line with Russia next year, setting up a potential conflict with incoming President Donald Trump. [The Hill]

Only one of three Democratic lawmakers who claim Republican Matt Bevin threatened them with political retaliation after they declined to switch parties showed up to testify Friday before a special House committee looking into the allegations. [Ronnie Ellis]

Semi-retired Wisconsin pig farmer John Lader does not think much of Donald Trump as a messenger, but voted for what he described as the Republican president-elect’s message of change and economic hope for America. [Reuters]

It appears Morehead City Council will soon have the first reading of an ordinance to allow mobile food vendors within city limits. [The Morehead News]

Four years after a Massachusetts crime lab chemist confessed to tainting evidence, more than 20,000 defendants still don’t know if their drug convictions will stand. [ProPublica]

Matt Bevin moved Monday to appeal a Franklin Circuit Court ruling that he exceeded his authority by abolishing the University of Louisville Board of Trustees and replacing it with a new, smaller board. [Ronnie Ellis]

Donald Trump’s decision to nominate Sen. Jeff Sessions as attorney general is being met with alarm at the Justice Department’s civil rights division and could trigger an exodus there, former officials said Friday. [Politico]

Rep. Fitz Steele, D-Hazard, was in Frankfort on Friday but he wasn’t going anywhere near the special panel appointed by House Speaker Greg Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg, to investigate Gov. Matt Bevin’s alleged threats of retaliation against Democratic lawmakers. [H-L]

In a 2006 speech on the floor of the U.S. Senate, Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.), President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee to be the next attorney general, castigated a subset of Latino immigrants as useless to American society. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin Finally Caved On Education

The $14.9 billion Kentucky Retirement Systems plans to end its controversial investments in hedge funds. [John Cheves]

Projection is fun. Donald Trump suggested that he and Democratic rival Hillary Clinton should undergo a drug test before their third and final debate on Oct. 19. [HuffPo]

A Jefferson Circuit Court judge Friday denied motions to release five inmates from jail on the grounds that district judges refused to consider their financial status in setting bonds or consider granting them bail credit for each day they spent behind bars. [C-J/AKN]

It is time someone got to the bottom of everything that people say about Hillary Clinton. Who is she? More importantly, WHAT is she? [WaPo]

In the end, Gov. Matt Bevin decided not to ask the state Supreme Court to reconsider its 5-2 ruling that Bevin exceeded his executive power when he unilaterally reduced funding to state universities and community colleges. [Ronnie Ellis]

First lady Michelle Obama’s speech this week slamming Donald Trump’s comments about women was “the most effective political speech since Ronald Reagan,” according to right-wing commentator Glenn Beck. [The Hill]

Car horns rang out along U.S. 23 in South Shore on Saturday as residents slowed down and waved to show their support for United Steelworkers Local 133. [Ashland Independent]

Americans traveling to Cuba will be allowed to bring home more of the communist-ruled island’s coveted cigars and rum under new measures announced by the U.S. government on Friday to further ease trade, travel and financial restrictions that have been in place for decades. [Reuters]

Election Day is right around the corner in November, but your chance to hear your local candidates running for local office is next week. [The Morehead News]

The nation’s opioid epidemic shows no signs of abating—and in fact may be headed in a far more dangerous direction. [ProPublica]

Incumbent Glasgow City Council candidate Ben Bucher has decided not to run for a second term after all. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Donald Trump on Friday intimated a woman who accused him of sexually assaulting her was not attractive enough to have drawn his interest—just as a new accuser was coming forward. [Politico]

A billionaire coal operator who wants to be governor of West Virginia is paying off delinquent property taxes in Eastern Kentucky but has a big debt to whittle down. [H-L]

Patriot Majority USA, a progressive advocacy group, is accusing the Republican vice presidential nominee of suppressing voter registration in a new advertising campaign launched on Saturday. [HuffPo]

Of Course Mitch Is Afraid Of The Donald

Mitch McConnell says the country must not turn its back on the nation’s coal miners — but that’s exactly what those miners say the Republican Senate Majority Leader is doing. [H-L]

A former aide on Donald Trump’s presidential campaign now says he regrets working for the Republican nominee and cannot vote for him for president. [HuffPo]

The Kentucky Department of Education is stepping in to review and intervene at two low-performing Jefferson County Public Schools elementaries that would have been named priority schools this year if it were not for the state’s moratorium on that label. [C-J/AKN]

A new Department of Labor report says cuts to state workers’ comp systems have left injured workers with inadequate benefits and raises the specter of federal oversight [ProPublica]

Bounty of the Barrens Farmers Market is making use of a $30,000 grant it was awarded this summer to determine the feasibility and develop a preliminary design of a facility that would allow it to remain in the same location all year. [Glasgow Daily Times]

In 1990, a group of four black teens and one Latino teen were convicted of the brutal assault and rape of a jogger. The April 1989 attack came amid rising crime rates in New York City and a wave of violence in Central Park itself. [ThinkProgress]

Widening of US 25N in Berea to three lanes from Ellipse Street to the Berea Bypass has run into another delay. [Richmond Register]

Drugmaker Mylan N.V. announced Friday that it had reached a $465 million settlement with the U.S. Justice Department and other government agencies to resolve questions over rebates required by the Medicaid program. [NPR]

A new report shows that the number of small businesses in Kentucky that offer employee health insurance dropped sharply from 2012 to 2015. Only 26.6 percent of small businesses in the state offered health insurance last year, down from 36.4 percent in 2012, according to the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky. [Business First]

One of the most popular items at this year’s Republican National Convention was a navy blue T-shirt that at first glance looked terribly out of place. [Mother Jones]

Paul Ryan immediately came under fire from Donald Trump after declaring he’ll no longer defend or campaign for his party’s bombastic nominee. Mitch McConnell, on the other hand, went mum, privately sharing advice with vulnerable Republican Senate candidates on how to handle Trump’s vulgar sex talk — and publicly telling those interested in his take to take a hike. [Politico]

Some evangelical leaders stood by Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump even after a video was released on Friday containing his lewd remarks about women. [WaPo]

On Friday, the state Supreme Court will hear arguments on whether panhandlers have a legally protected right to ask motorists and pedestrians for money and if Lexington’s city-wide ban violates panhandlers’ First Amendment right to free speech. [H-L]

Donald Trump’s lewd comments about women present him with a tough challenge roughly one month before Election Day, and it’s also landed House Republicans in trouble. [HuffPo]

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Heroin Hell Has Hit The Commonwealth

House Speaker Greg Stumbo raised the possibility of impeaching Gov. Matt Bevin Saturday after CNHI News Service reported that a Democratic state lawmaker said he was threatened by Bevin’s chief of staff for refusing to switch political parties. If true, the governor’s actions “are criminal in nature and in my judgment rise to the level of an impeachable offense.” [H-L]

Donald J. Trump is causing some high anxiety inside the military. He has suggested carpet-bombing Syrian cities, assassinating the families of Islamic State fighters and torturing detainees, all illegal under international or U.S. law. He has proposed withdrawing troops from South Korea (a similar troop withdrawal helped ignite the 1950 Korean War), advocated disengaging from NATO, and declared that Japan would be “better off” with its own nuclear weapons. And he has famously bragged, “I know more about ISIS than the generals!” [HuffPo]

Authorities have reported more than 200 overdoses in the region over the past two weeks. [C-J/AKN]

Three Congressional leaders on Monday asked top federal environmental and safety officials to extend by 60 days the public comment period on new vehicle emissions and fuel economy standards. [Reuters]

Two of the wilder caves at Carter Caves State Resort Park have been reopened to limited public use, a park official said. [Ashland Independent]

States that voted against President Obama twice are more dependent on the federal government, according to an analysis of new data released by the Pew Charitable Trusts on Monday. [The Hill]

The Rowan County Board of Education voted unanimously Aug. 24 to set the tax rates for real and personal property. [The Morehead News]

The National Labor Relations Board decided in two separate cases last week that — as far as federal labor law is concerned — charter schools are not public schools but private corporations. [WaPo]

Kentucky public high school graduates held steady in meeting the state’s college-readiness benchmarks on the ACT college-entrance exam in reading and English, but lost ground in meeting the state mathematics benchmark. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The planet is warming at a pace not experienced within the past 1,000 years, at least, making it “very unlikely” that the world will stay within a crucial temperature limit agreed by nations just last year, according to Nasa’s top climate scientist. [The Guardian]

Even with the assistance of detoxification and rehabilitation programs, 80 percent of people attempting recovery from opioid addiction will relapse. [Richmond Register]

The United States admitted its 10,000th Syrian refugee this week in a resettlement program announced by President Obama last fall, according to The White House. [NY Times]

After giving a speech critical of the Obama Administration and Democrats in Congress, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said politics in Washington aren’t as polarizing as they seem. [H-L]

The producers of EpiPen will offer a generic version of the emergency allergy treatment following outrage last week over price increases, the company announced Monday. [HuffPo]

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Clay Co: Back To Being Awful Again

Clay County Judge-Executive Joe Lewis Asher and county road foreman Buford Jarvis have pleaded not guilty to charges related to public corruption. [H-L]

A secretive super-court system called ISDS is threatening to blow up President Barack Obama’s highest foreign policy priority. [HuffPo]

Taxes in Bullitt County will increase in order to fund teacher raises and additional staff positions, Bullitt County Board of Education narrowly decided Monday night, despite opposition from local property owners. [C-J/AKN]

With a vigorous national debate underway on whether Sweden should enter a military partnership with NATO, officials in Stockholm suddenly encountered an unsettling problem: a flood of distorted and outright false information on social media, confusing public perceptions of the issue. [NY Times]

It’s cold and dark for thousands of Appalachians, even on the brightest summer days. Depression runs more rampant in the mountains than anywhere else in the United States, according to a recent study by the Appalachian Regional Commission. [Ashland Independent]

Donald Trump and his new team think they have 71 days to turn this campaign around. They’re wrong. [Politico]

Morehead State University needs a president who is willing to get involved in the community, focus on the needs of staff and students and utilize advanced technology. [The Morehead News]

The ignorance of Mitch McConnell and his new staffers is harming women in areas affected by Zika. [Rewire]

The number of dairy producers across Kentucky has steadily decreased over the years. At the beginning of 2005, there were around 1,350 dairy farms in the state, but as of Aug. 1, there were only 628. [Glasgow Daily Times]

An African-American pastor who has become a prominent surrogate for Donald Trump on Monday shared a cartoon of Hillary Clinton in blackface. [The Hill]

Hikers of The Pinnacles Indian Fort Mountain Trail might begin noticing some changes next to the trail’s parking lot as workers have started to clear and fence off a site to make way for the new Berea College Forest Outreach Center, which will soon be under construction. [Richmond Register]

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security will study whether to discontinue using privately run detention centers, which the Justice Department recently called unsafe, for migrants and shares of private prison operators fell on Monday after the news. [Reuters]

A Kentucky oil train terminal illustrates a persistent gap between the risks posed by increasing volumes of crude oil moving by rail and the training available to local first responders specifically for it. [H-L]

The dramatic nationwide drop in private-sector union membership has lowered pay for non-union workers over the past four decades. [HuffPo]

Is Yarmuth The Only KY Democrat?

One year ago, Michael Todd was getting ready for a doctor’s appointment when his phone was flooded with messages from relatives. [H-L]

Iraqi forces recaptured the last district held by Islamic State militants in the city of Falluja on Sunday and the general commanding the operation declared the battle complete after nearly five weeks of fighting. [HuffPo]

The Kentucky Democrat who helped orchestrate this week’s historic shutdown of the U.S. House to demand action on gun violence said his involvement began with a voice mail. [C-J/AKN]

Former Democratic presidential candidate Martin O’Malley on Sunday called Donald Trump a racist bigot who appeals to the worst instincts in people. [The Hill]

Toward the end of the inaugural Metcalfe County Proud Festival, several members of the Hornets’ Nest Pickers gathered on Saturday afternoon behind the stage that was built on the Metcalfe County Courthouse lawn. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Hawaii’s governor signed a bill making it the first state to place its residents who own firearms in a federal criminal record database and monitor them for possible wrongdoing anywhere in the country, his office said. [Reuters]

One of the toughest ways to make a living is undoubtedly being a standup comedian. The comedian goes onstage with nothing but a microphone to face a crowd of people smugly sitting back with the attitude, “Make us laugh, if you can.” [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump claimed he was a “much better friend to the gays” than Hillary Clinton after the mass shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando earlier this month. On Sunday, it was Clinton who showed up to show she was the better friend of the LGBT community. [Politico]

After 70 weeks on the picket line near the entrance of the old fire brick plant in Grahn, United Steelworkers Local 857 President Donald Frazier sums up negotiations in a few simple words. [Ashland Independent]

Ralph Stanley, the singer, banjo player and guardian of unvarnished mountain music who was also a pivotal figure in the recent revival of interest in bluegrass, died on Thursday. He was 89. [NY Times]

Supt. Marvin Moore received an “exemplary” evaluation Tuesday from the Rowan County Board of Education. [The Morehead News]

With Dwight D. Eisenhower’s signature, the government fired thousands of federal employees for being gay or lesbian, and Francis wants the department to release the internal memos, documents and communications surrounding it. [Roll Call]

You already knew this guy was a pandering lunatic. Rep. Thomas Massie thinks it’s time for “amexit.” [H-L]

Longtime conservative columnist George Will is wiping his hands clean of the Republican Party. [HuffPo]

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Yesterday Was A Flustercuck For Kentucky

Tim Longmeyer, a former secretary of the state Personnel Cabinet under former Gov. Steve Beshear, pleaded guilty in federal court Tuesday to bribery. [H-L]

If you run a business, are employed by one, care about the stability of the financial system, or would prefer that the U.S. economy not be needlessly thrown into disarray — a group that seems like a pretty broad coalition of voters — Cruz’s economic policy is not OK. [HuffPo]

The Independent Pilots Association, the collective bargaining unit for UPS pilots, is turning up the heat on the shipping giant by opening a strike operations center in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

Pope Francis says a brief meeting with Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders just “good manners” and not political interference. [BBC]

Five hours after the Ashland Police Department posted a Facebook status about a recent spike in theft and burglary, officers were on the hunt for a robber downtown. [Ashland Independent]

Mitch McConnell is “increasingly optimistic that there actually may be a second ballot” at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland this summer, the Senate majority leader told a Kentucky ABC affiliate over the weekend. [Politico]

People in rural areas of Appalachia are more likely to die early deaths than in other parts of the country. A big reason, researchers say, is that people in places such as Leslie County, Kentucky, or Boone County, West Virginia – both part of coalfield regions – die from drug overdoses at greater rates than the rest of the country. [Glasgow Daily Times]

If you’re a gay person surprised by the reality that most Republicans, and many Democrats, are ignoring you or politicizing you? You’re screwed up. [ThinkProgress]

Fried mushrooms, mushroom soup, mushroom hunting, and a Fungus 5K, will be just a few of the mushroom-themed items and activities sporing downtown at the City of Irvine’s 26th annual Mountain Mushroom Festival. [Richmond Register]

The Associated Press won the Pulitzer Prize for public service for reporting on abuse in the seafood industry that helped free 2,000 slave laborers, and Reuters and The New York Times shared the breaking news photography award for images of the European refugee crisis. [Reuters]

A Morehead woman was shot by accident by her son on Wednesday. [The Morehead News]

The Obama administration has made a concerted effort to improve its relationship with Mexico following Donald Trump’s call for a massive border wall and his criticism of undocumented immigrants in the United States. [The Hill]

They cover this sort of crap but ignore Montgomery County. Clark County Superintendent Paul Christy, and George Rogers Clark High School baseball coach Matt Ginter and principal David Bolen all have to take three hours of training from the Kentucky Department of Education on accounting procedures for school activity funds, according to a final report from the Kentucky Office of Education Accountability dated March 30. [H-L]

An eight-member Supreme Court appeared skeptical on Monday that President Barack Obama’s decision to defer deportation for millions of undocumented immigrants could be subject to a multi-state legal challenge in a court of law. [HuffPo]