Fun Times At UK & UofL Lately

Tuition and salaries will increase at the University of Kentucky next year. Next week, the UK Board of Trustees is expected to pass a 5 percent tuition increase for in-state students and a 2 percent raise for employees. Tuition for out-of-state students will increase 8.5 percent. [H-L]

What we do know — what I’ve known my entire life — is that the sight of two men kissing is a stunning, terrifying thing. A dangerous thing. A thing that inspires fury and fear and violence and, yes, murder. [HuffPo]

A leading University of Louisville surgeon says that staffing cuts by KentuckyOne Health at U of L Hospital have rendered it “unsafe” for the care of seriously ill and injured patients. [C-J/AKN]

CIA director John Brennan said on Saturday that he expects 28 redacted pages of a congressional report on 9/11 to be published and that he supports their release. [The Hill]

In its search for a new superintendent, Glasgow Independent Schools is using Phil Eason, of the Kentucky Association of School Administrators (KASA), as superintendent search consultant. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Key members of the U.S. Congress said Friday they had reached a compromise to shift more than $1 billion to try to keep struggling families together, including those with babies born dependant on opioids. [Reuters]

If the Richmond City Commission adopts the police department’s proposed pay scale, it would get a greater return on the $59,000 it invests in training a new officer for nearly a year, according to Acting Police Chief Robert Mott. [Richmond Register]

Mergers have become commonplace as hospital mega-chains increasingly dominate the American health-care market. But these deals often go unscrutinized by state regulators, who fail to address potential risks to patients losing access to care, according to a new report released today. [ProPublica]

For several residents of Hardburly, life suddenly changed without warning last week, when a mudslide completely devastated their community. On the evening of May 28, folks living near Salyers Lane prepared to enjoy the Memorial Day weekend. On the morning of May 29, they were joining together in cleanup efforts and trying to recover from the aftermath of an avalanche. [Hazard Herald]

Rousing tributes have been paid to boxing legend Muhammad Ali at a memorial service in his home city of Louisville, Kentucky. [BBC]

The Kentucky Supreme Court will decide the fate of local minimum wage laws. On Friday, the court heard arguments over whether Louisville’s minimum wage ordinance violates state law by going beyond the scope of Kentucky’s minimum wage, which is tied to the federal rate of $7.25 per hour. [WFPL]

A secret report warned that British spies may have put lives at risk because their surveillance systems were sweeping up more data than could be analyzed, leading them to miss clues to possible security threats. [The Intercept]

It was a violation of the Kentucky Open Meetings Act for Gov. Matt Bevin to send state police to a May 19 meeting of the Kentucky Retirement Systems board of trustees and threaten to arrest the board chairman if he participated, Attorney General Andy Beshear said in an opinion released Tuesday. [H-L]

Donald Trump ramped up his earlier call to ban Muslims from entering the country in a high-profile national security address on Monday — and made clear he believes he can do it with or without congressional approval. [HuffPo]

Bevin Budget Is Killing Education In KY

Morehead State University will furlough without pay all of its faculty and staff during the school’s spring break, March 21-25, because of ongoing and expected economic woes, President Wayne Andrews announced Thursday. [H-L]

Looks like yet another person has had the misfortune of experiencing Kim King’s veiled bigotry. Rather, her controlling husband’s bigotry. [HuffPo]

Lawmakers from eastern Kentucky and an industry representative say the dumping of radioactive waste from out-of-state oil and gas drilling has put a black eye on the region. [C-J/AKN]

Connectivity is a path to greater opportunity. In today’s world, broadband and fluency with technology fuel economic growth, provide access to the world’s knowledge, promote skill development, and build stronger and more connected communities. [White House]

A Kentucky resident has tested positive for Zika virus disease after traveling in a Central American country where the virus is circulating, the Kentucky Department for Public Health (DPH) is reporting. Tests results were reported on March 9, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which has been testing samples from across the United States. [Press Release]

Friday, August 30, 2013, the day the feckless Barack Obama brought to a premature end America’s reign as the world’s sole indispensable superpower—or, alternatively, the day the sagacious Barack Obama peered into the Middle Eastern abyss and stepped back from the consuming void—began with a thundering speech given on Obama’s behalf by his secretary of state, John Kerry, in Washington, D.C. The subject of Kerry’s uncharacteristically Churchillian remarks, delivered in the Treaty Room at the State Department, was the gassing of civilians by the president of Syria, Bashar al-Assad. [The Atlantic]

Southeast Kentucky Economic Development (SKED) will partner with Morehead State University’s Small Business Development Center (SBDC) to bring its Entrepreneurial SMARTS course to the Johnson County area in April. [The Morehead News]

The Senate is struggling to find a path forward on a medical innovation bill that could be crucial for White House priorities such as the “moonshot” to cure cancer. The bill is being held up by disagreements over funding for medical research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). [The Hill]

After a month of exhaustive testing, interviews with patients and collaborating with state and local health officials, the salmonella outbreak that sickened much of Estill County is almost over. [Richmond Register]

Major U.S. hedge fund managers are on pace this year to more than double the amount they gave in the 2012 election campaign, with independent fundraising groups backing Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton and Republican rival Ted Cruz receiving the most so far. [Reuters]

King’s Daughters Health Foundation is accepting applications for scholarships from high school seniors. [Ashland Independent]

Rand Paul took a stand Thursday — and he wasn’t alone. In his latest move to buck his party leadership on the floor, Sen. Paul (R-Cookie Tree) invoked an obscure 1970s law to force the Senate to vote on selling $700 million worth of fighter jets to Pakistan. While the Kentucky Republican got his debate on the floor and a roll-call vote, the Senate scuttled his effort, 71-24, on a procedural vote. [Politico]

Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear has lost his bid to defend a state law designed to protect life insurance benefits. [H-L]

President Barack Obama unleashed Thursday on Republicans who blame him for the rise of Donald Trump, noting that they are the ones who have fed the anger and worst instincts of their base throughout this administration. [HuffPo]

A pro-Donald Trump super PAC has tapped Jesse Benton, a veteran Republican operative with ties to Rand Paul and Mitch McConnell, to serve as its chief strategist. [More Politico]

Rough Weekend For Damon Thayer?

Kentucky’s Supreme Court has set some conditions on what types of political comments judicial candidates can make when running for judgeships. [H-L]

Donald Trump comfortably defeated his Republican presidential rivals on Saturday in South Carolina’s GOP primary. [HuffPo]

Kentucky Senate Majority Leader Damon Thayer threatened to use his power to retaliate against his former fiancé, according to a lawsuit filed last week in Scott County. [C-J/AKN]

President Obama has begun to consult with key senators from both parties on nominating a successor to the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, the White House said Friday. [The Hill]

Congratulations to Lenna Wilson of Lexington for being a part of the Spring 2016 White House Internship Program. [Press Release]

The legal showdown over U.S. demands that Apple Inc unlock an iPhone used by San Bernardino shooter Rizwan Farook might have been avoided if his employer, which owns the device, had equipped it with special mobile phone software it issues to many workers. [Reuters]

WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! One teenager in Morgan County has overcome unimaginable obstacles and is now taking care of himself during his senior year of high school. [WLEX18]

Six months after Kentucky borrowed millions to build a 3,400-mile broadband network, the state is having to rethink one of the revenue sources it had expected to be available to pay off the bonds. [Bloomberg]

There will be more court-appointed attorneys available to represent poor people in court under Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed budget. [WFPL]

We started getting some clarity in the Republican and Democratic races Saturday night. Hillary Clinton squeaked out a win in Nevada — but did so in a way that suggests she has, despite Bernie Sanders’s strength, maintained her national advantage. Marco Rubio’s strong showing in South Carolina helped push Jeb Bush out of the race, giving Mr. Rubio a chance to unify the mainstream of the Republican Party and bring about a true three-way race. [NY Times]

Some family court proceedings might soon be opened to public view under a bill passed by the state Senate Friday. [Ronnie Ellis]

The Republican presidential campaigns furiously traded accusations of dirty tricks Saturday as voters cast their ballots in South Carolina. [Politico]

Three large “quasi-public” agencies have asked to exit the Kentucky Retirement Systems, which is struggling with $16.6 billion in unfunded pension liabilities because of a long history of inadequate state funding. [John Cheves]

The U.S. Department of Justice filed a motion on Friday seeking to compel Apple Inc to comply with a judge’s order to unlock the encrypted iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernardino shooters, portraying the tech giant’s refusal as a “marketing strategy.” [HuffPo]

Pro-Pipeline Crowd Is Going Crazy Now

A legislative committee has bet on a longshot bill to provide tax relief for Kentucky’s horse industry. [H-L]

Sen. Turd Cruz (R-Turd) is out with a deceptive new mailer that masquerades as official government business and promises people there’s a “check enclosed” when it’s actually asking for money instead. [HuffPo]

The Kentucky Supreme Court has let an appeals court decision stand that only regulated utilities can use the power of eminent domain to get land for pipelines. [C-J/AKN]

The United States and India have held talks about conducting joint naval patrols that a U.S. defense official said could include the disputed South China Sea, a move that would likely anger Beijing, which claims most of the waterway. [Reuters]

On Feb. 2, Pine Branch Coal announced more than 150 employees will be laid off in April. Three Pine Branch sites are the focus of these layoffs, two of which are located in Perry County, with one operation located in Leslie County. [Hazard Herald]

A federal court had ordered the VA to reassess its policy denying Agent Orange benefits to Navy sailors who served in the Vietnam War. The VA’s conclusion: They still don’t qualify. [ProPublica]

Eliminating the Common Core standards from Kentucky’s educational accountability requirements may be the highest-profile provision of legislation currently before the state Senate, but some educators worry that the bill will marginalize programs in music, art, theater and dance because it all but eliminates them from the accountability process. [Ashland Independent]

A year and a half after it started spending money and time to screen welfare applicants for drug use, Tennessee still hasn’t found many poor people who are “getting all potted up on weed“. Out of 39,121 people who have applied for Families First in Tennessee benefits since the state instituted drug tests in mid-2014, just 65 have tested positive for narcotics. [ThinkProgress]

The Rowan County Board of Education at its last board meeting approved the 2016-17 school calendar. The first day for students is set for Thursday, Aug. 11. But a bill pending in the Kentucky Senate would push the start date back another two weeks. [The Morehead News]

How does it feel to give up your nationality, to renounce the country you were born in, potentially forfeiting the chance to ever return? [BBC]

Glasgow Independent Schools Board of Education held a regular board meeting Monday night at South Green Elementary. Site-based councils were also in attendance and discussed student achievement in their respective schools. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump on Wednesday retweeted a user named “WhiteGenocideTM” before deleting the message. [The Hill]

Although they are on different political sides, first lady Glenna Bevin and Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear announced Tuesday a statewide training program aimed at protecting Kentucky’s children from sexual abuse. [H-L]

A federal appeals court on Monday ruled it is not unconstitutional for law enforcement to set up a camera on a public utility pole and record a suspect’s moves for 10 weeks straight. [HuffPo]

RPK Back In Hands Of The Mega-Wealthy

Kentucky Supreme Court Chief Justice John Minton Jr. urged state lawmakers Friday to raise the salaries of justices and judges, saying they have not had “a measurable increase” in pay for 10 years. [H-L]

Oh, now Rand Paul has a black friend or something. It’s probably Ben Carson or some other person who has no concept of white privilege. [HuffPo]

State Rep. Jim Wayne says he continues to recover – slowly but steadily – in his battle with cancer and plans to return to Frankfort next week for the first time since the spring. He also said he expects to be able to return to the Capitol for the 2016 legislative session. [C-J/AKN]

During his first full week as Speaker, Paul Ryan gave a glimpse of how he’ll run the House differently than his predecessor, John Boehner. [The Hill]

From last week but more relevant today. Just a reminder – the people screaming about alleged voting machine rigging have no clue what they’re talking about. They’re the folks who get everything they know about politics from MSNBC and have no concept of what goes on in Kentucky. [Page One]

When they were kids, Simon Cherry and Ramsey Badawi both wanted to be astronomers, unlocking mysteries in far off galaxies. That didn’t work out for them. The pair still plan on unlocking mysteries but this time inside the human body. [Reuters]

In an effort to help Kentucky farmers, the University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture, Food and Environment is getting into the wholesale market. Their goal though is not to compete with local farmers, but to be able to provide training to allow those farmers to enter the market themselves. [Richmond Register]

When William T. Riley III became the police chief of this small city west of Detroit this summer, he found a department that bore little resemblance to the city it served. Nearly three-fourths of Inkster’s 25,000 residents are black. Its mayor and all six City Council members are, too. Yet in a newly released Justice Department survey, it was listed among the nation’s least representative police forces, with 21 white officers and five black officers. [NY Times]

Governor Steve Beshear announced on Thursday that Barren County Clerk Joanne London has received a grant totaling $20,280 from the Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives (KDLA) to preserve and manage local government records. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Former secretary of state Hillary Clinton, who is running for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination, was campaigning in South Carolina this weekend and sat down with journalist Roland Martin for an interview in which she talked about a number of topics, including one that has not featured in any of the Republican and Democratic debates: charter schools. [WaPo]

Officials of Morehead State University along with members of its Board of Regents, local and state legislators held a dedication ceremony Thursday, Nov. 5, for Lundergan Hall at the Derrickson Agricultural Complex on KY 377 north of Morehead. [The Morehead News]

Everything in Frankfort is corrupt as hell and there is no such thing as integrity there. [WFPL & Center for Public Integrity]

In case you thought the Republican Party of Kentucky was going to actually accomplish something? It no longer has a full-time chairman. A wealthy figurehead does not a functioning party make. Mac Brown is the next chairman of the Republican Party of Kentucky. [H-L]

Prescription drugs kill more people in the U.S. than any other drug, but heroin overdose deaths have exploded, leading the Drug Enforcement Administration to declare both as the most threatening drugs. [HuffPo]

Democrats Still Playing The Blame Game

SurveyUSA has finally been kicked to the curb! [H-L & C-J/AKN]

Letcher Circuit Judge Sam Wright III defeated Court of Appeals Judge Janet Stumbo in the race for Eastern Kentucky’s 7th District Supreme Court seat. [H-L]

If France can do it, the United States can do it. France will end its ban on blood donations by gay men, its health minister said Wednesday, calling the move the end “of a taboo and discrimination.” [HuffPo]

Republican Matt Bevin has scheduled no press conference or public events on the day after his huge victory in the governor’s election that raises implications for every major issue facing the state, including healthcare, education and pensions. But the transition process is already taking shape in Frankfort. [C-J/AKN]

A few hours before their afternoon shift at the Marshall County Mine last spring, hundreds of coal miners were summoned to a mandatory meeting with their new boss, Bob Murray, CEO of Murray Energy Corp. At a training facility in Moundsville, West Virginia, the chief executive of the nation’s No. 1 underground coal producer sported his signature sweater vest and struck a confrontational tone. [IBT]

Opinions issued by a federal appeals court Monday will allow two major air pollution-related lawsuits in Louisville to move forward. [WFPL]

This is basically why everyone is skeptical of whatever it is the U.S. Justice Action Network is doing in D.C. with the Koch money. It’s a story political journalists couldn’t resist. Reporters at the New York Times, Politico, Yahoo News, and other outlets have been rhapsodizing lately about how the ultra-conservative billionaire Koch brothers are “braving the spotlight” and joining forces with “tree-hugging liberals” to dedicate themselves to the cause of ending America’s over-incarceration crisis. Meanwhile, however, Koch money continues to finance election-year efforts that promote tough-on-crime politics. [The Intercept]

It has been two months since a head on crash destroyed Scott County Habitat for Humanity’s only pickup and delivery truck. [WKYT]

Instead of thanking Barack Obama, as these outsiders suggest, Matt Bevin should be thanking Kentucky Democrats for being to the right of national Republicans. It’s always some asshole outsider pontificating on Kentucky as if they’ve been here more than twice in their life. [WaPo]

The votes have all been counted, and Harlan County’s choice for circuit court clerk is incumbent Democrat Wendy Flanary. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

It is rare to hear a candidate for the United States Senate so earnestly quote rock lyrics. Rarer still, lyrics from a Canadian progressive-rock band. But Rand Paul quoted “The Spirit of Radio” by Rush — a group whose members were similarly influenced by the writings of Ayn Rand — everywhere he went during the Republican primary in Kentucky in 2010. [NY Times]

A Perry County man from the community of Chavies is facing multiple theft charges after Hazard Police say he stole a police cruiser. [Hazard Herald]

Hillary Clinton leaned as far as she ever has into making gun control a central focus of her presidential campaign on Tuesday, releasing a somber new 30-second television advertisement calling for more stringent gun policies. [Politico]

Ryan Quarles, a Republican state representative from Georgetown, will be the new commissioner of agriculture. [H-L]

Though 8,000 Detroit residents were foreclosed on this year, they’re finding inventive ways to deal with an ongoing crisis. Tynetta Sneed, 32, had been settled for years in a modest white bungalow, down the street from her mom and brother, when she got a notice saying that her house was going into foreclosure. [HuffPo]

Nobody’s Satisfied With 2015 Candidates

Ultimately, less than half of Kentucky’s voters are satisfied with their choices for governor this year, but that number is slightly worse for Bevin than it is for Conway. [H-L]

Both the Democratic and Republican National Committees have agreed to give their blessing to a presidential town hall set up by activists in the Black Lives Matter movement. But organizers within the network have said that gesture isn’t enough. They want the parties to devote one of their official — and more high-profile — debates to racial justice issues. [HuffPo]

Two Republican lawmakers announced bills Wednesday that would increase legislative oversight of the state pension systems for public employees and teachers. [C-J/AKN]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Granny) is now viewed negatively by a majority of Republicans, a new poll says. [The Hill]

Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin stopped briefly in Ashland to talk to voters during a zip around the state in a final push before next week’s election. [Ashland Independent]

Their lips are moving. They’re lying: Ben Carson, Rand Paul and the right-wing’s truthiness problem. When Rand Paul, Ben Carson and Ted Cruz start citing history and “facts,” best double-check them right away. [Salon]

A divided Kentucky Supreme Court has upheld the validity of a fee assessed by Campbell County to pay for 911 services. [WHAS11]

A manhunt for a fugitive accused of opening fire at police officers three times in two different states continued for a sixth day Thursday, continuing a search that has closed schools and stretched across a wide swath of this region. [WaPo]

Kentucky’s Supreme Court has ruled that state mine-safety laws and regulations did not apply to a subcontract worker who died while installing a massive garage door on a mine-site building in Muhlenberg County. [WKYT]

Let’s take a look at this again. Peabody Energy, the nation’s largest coal company, is seeking release from a pledge to pay into a health insurance fund. [ProPublica]

Candidates for Kentucky’s offices of governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general and agriculture commissioner were recently asked to respond to written questions from the Daily News. [BGDN]

The US Navy scrambled four F/A-18 jets to intercept Russian warplanes which flew near a US aircraft carrier off the Korean peninsula, officials say. [BBC]

Democrat Jack Conway raised more than $900,000 in the first two weeks of October to increase his fundraising lead over Republican Matt Bevin by $5 million. [H-L]

Lots of people seem to think the dominant storylines about Wednesday night’s Republican primary debate are Marco Rubio’s smooth delivery, Jeb Bush’s weak attempt to knock Rubio off his game, and the supposed incompetence of the CNBC moderators. [HuffPo]