Does Anyone Believe Gray Will Win?

Bill Ball has handled multiple whiskey-making tasks in his 47 years at Jim Beam, but on Saturday he took on an unexpected role — joining colleagues on a picket line outside a Beam distillery in Kentucky. [H-L]

Television viewers across the country have been treated to some scary advertisements about the future of Social Security. [HuffPo]

Republican vice presidential candidate Mike Pence began Friday supporting Donald Trump’s statements denying he had sexually assaulted women and promising evidence that would prove Trump’s innocence. [C-J/AKN]

Hillary Clinton’s campaign on Saturday criticized Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump for claiming the election is being rigged. [The Hill]

Parents and guardians gathered around tables in Eastern Kentucky University’s Perkins Building Thursday night as several first responders, and government/health officials instructed them on the many ways drugs can be hiding in “plain sight.” [Richmond Register]

It will be difficult for future U.S. administrations to undo President Barack Obama’s policy of easing trade and travel restrictions with Cuba because of the benefits associated with the measures, a senior U.S. official said on Friday. [Reuters]

Jim Gray spent Saturday criss-crossing a swath of Kentucky between Louisville and Ashland looking for votes in his uphill battle to unseat Republican U.S. Sen. Rand Paul. [Ronnie Ellis]

To understand how Donald Trump’s comments and alleged mistreatment of women are stoking the anxiety of other Republicans, look no further than the private appeal sent Wednesday to a billionaire from a super PAC backing Pennsylvania Sen. Pat Toomey. [ProPublica]

Kentuckians are one step closer to learning what changes will be made to their Medicaid benefits. [WFPL]

A major evangelical college campus organization is allegedly instituting a policy that would result in firing employees who support same-sex marriage. [ThinkProgress]

The Barren County Schools district is finishing up some school improvement projects and getting ready to begin some new ones. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Donald Trump’s efforts to build a small-donor fundraising machine late in the presidential race have come at a steep cost. [WaPo]

The race for Kentucky’s U.S. Senate seat features two self-proclaimed foreign policy realists who have vastly different opinions about how the U.S. should engage in the world. [H-L]

Donald Trump’s troubled campaign has seen an incredible exodus in support over the past week. After footage released last week showed him bragging about groping women, more than a dozen members of Congress withdrew their endorsements. Others, who’d previously stayed neutral in the race, called for the Republican presidential nominee to drop out. [HuffPo]

Of Course Mitch Is Afraid Of The Donald

Mitch McConnell says the country must not turn its back on the nation’s coal miners — but that’s exactly what those miners say the Republican Senate Majority Leader is doing. [H-L]

A former aide on Donald Trump’s presidential campaign now says he regrets working for the Republican nominee and cannot vote for him for president. [HuffPo]

The Kentucky Department of Education is stepping in to review and intervene at two low-performing Jefferson County Public Schools elementaries that would have been named priority schools this year if it were not for the state’s moratorium on that label. [C-J/AKN]

A new Department of Labor report says cuts to state workers’ comp systems have left injured workers with inadequate benefits and raises the specter of federal oversight [ProPublica]

Bounty of the Barrens Farmers Market is making use of a $30,000 grant it was awarded this summer to determine the feasibility and develop a preliminary design of a facility that would allow it to remain in the same location all year. [Glasgow Daily Times]

In 1990, a group of four black teens and one Latino teen were convicted of the brutal assault and rape of a jogger. The April 1989 attack came amid rising crime rates in New York City and a wave of violence in Central Park itself. [ThinkProgress]

Widening of US 25N in Berea to three lanes from Ellipse Street to the Berea Bypass has run into another delay. [Richmond Register]

Drugmaker Mylan N.V. announced Friday that it had reached a $465 million settlement with the U.S. Justice Department and other government agencies to resolve questions over rebates required by the Medicaid program. [NPR]

A new report shows that the number of small businesses in Kentucky that offer employee health insurance dropped sharply from 2012 to 2015. Only 26.6 percent of small businesses in the state offered health insurance last year, down from 36.4 percent in 2012, according to the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky. [Business First]

One of the most popular items at this year’s Republican National Convention was a navy blue T-shirt that at first glance looked terribly out of place. [Mother Jones]

Paul Ryan immediately came under fire from Donald Trump after declaring he’ll no longer defend or campaign for his party’s bombastic nominee. Mitch McConnell, on the other hand, went mum, privately sharing advice with vulnerable Republican Senate candidates on how to handle Trump’s vulgar sex talk — and publicly telling those interested in his take to take a hike. [Politico]

Some evangelical leaders stood by Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump even after a video was released on Friday containing his lewd remarks about women. [WaPo]

On Friday, the state Supreme Court will hear arguments on whether panhandlers have a legally protected right to ask motorists and pedestrians for money and if Lexington’s city-wide ban violates panhandlers’ First Amendment right to free speech. [H-L]

Donald Trump’s lewd comments about women present him with a tough challenge roughly one month before Election Day, and it’s also landed House Republicans in trouble. [HuffPo]

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What A Week In Our Lovely, Backward, Corrupt Commonwealth

Let’s all just laugh about this one last time. House Speaker Greg Stumbo announced Wednesday he is appointing a committee to investigate what he says have been threats by Gov. Matt Bevin against state lawmakers. [C-J/AKN]

The United States broke off talks with Russia on Monday on implementing a ceasefire agreement on Syria and accused Moscow of not living up to its commitments under the Sept. 9 deal to [HuffPo]

Saying small cash bonds pose an unfair burden on the poor, a Jefferson County public defender Monday asked a circuit judge to release three defendants from jail on the grounds that district judges had violated their rights by failing to inquire about their financial ability to post bond. [C-J/AKN]

A video of a US student in “blackface” apparently mocking the Black Lives Matter campaign has sparked outrage. [BBC]

Real estate property owners in Glasgow will have the same tax rate as last year. [Glasgow Daily Times]

What does it mean to declare that #blacklivesmatter in education? Last month the Movement for Black Lives, representing elements of the Black Lives Matter movement and related groups, issued a detailed policy platform denouncing what it called “corporate-backed,” “market driven” “privatization” in school reform, and helped set off a furor over this question. [NPR]

“Backing the Lines,” an event showing support for first responders, was held on Friday evening at the Carl Perkins Center. [The Morehead News]

President Barack Obama made his case for a deliberate, measured path toward economic progress in an op-ed published Thursday in The Economist that reads like a plea to disenchanted voters tempted by the economic populism of Republican nominee Donald Trump. [Politico]

On Nov. 8, Kentuckians will decide who represents the Commonwealth as United States Senator. One of Kentucky’s two senate seats is occupied by Mitch McConnell. The other seat belongs to Rand Paul. However, Rand Paul, a republican, has a democratic challenger in the November election, and that challenger is Lexington Mayor Jim Gray. [Hazard Herald]

Voters in four states appear likely to approve ballot measures that would legalize marijuana for recreational purposes, according to recent surveys, while voters are split on the question in a fifth state. [The Hill]

The Republican Party of Kentucky has tons of other racists in their midst. Tons of them appointed by Matt Bevin to various and sundry positions. You’ve read all about them on Page One. This is their attempt to appear non-racist by throwing some nobody with no shot of winning to the wolves as a sacrifice. [WDRB]

Forty-four Afghan troops visiting the United States for military training have gone missing in less than two years, presumably in an effort to live and work illegally in America, Pentagon officials said. [Reuters]

Horse Country hopes to boost Thoroughbred racing, Central Kentucky tourism by offering behind-the-scenes tours of farms, equine clinics and feed mills. The goal is to do for horse breeding what the Kentucky Bourbon Trail is doing for whiskey-making. [H-L]

Civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) on Monday implored young leaders invited to the White House to continue his generation’s legacy of civil rights activism by reminding them of sacrifices that won the right to vote. [HuffPo]

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Who Could Longmeyer Have Worked With? Could It Be Another Prominent Political Family? Cough, Cough

A coal company owned by West Virginia billionaire Jim Justice has agreed to pay a $900,000 fine for environmental violations and improve pollution controls at mines in Kentucky and three other states at an estimated cost of $5 million. [H-L]

Vice President Joe Biden has a message for Donald Trump: you are not qualified to be the commander-in-chief of America’s armed forces. [HuffPo]

Tim Longmeyer used much more than just a few thousand dollars he got in an illegal kickback scheme to make straw contributions to the Democratic campaigns he supported in recent years, according to a federal prosecutor. [C-J/AKN]

In 1733, New York printer John Peter Zenger began publishing the eighth newspaper in the American colonies, and the first willing to venture criticism of the government. [ProPublica]

Metcalfe County is still in the early stages of legalizing the sale of packaged alcoholic beverages. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The Boston-based Conservation Law Foundation filed a lawsuit against ExxonMobil on Thursday, arguing that the company is violating several key water regulations at one of their Boston storage and transfer locations. [ThinkProgress]

Meeting Friday at Eastern Kentucky University, the state Council on Post-secondary Education endorsed new goals and strategies for colleges to achieve ethnic/cultural diversity, including graduating students who are “culturally competent.” [Richmond Register]

Former Miss Universe Alicia Machado hit back at Donald Trump’s vicious Twitter tirade from the early morning hours of Friday, calling his attacks “slander and lies.” [Politico]

The Harlan Independent School Board heard a presentation during a recent meeting concerning a program designed to help pre-school age children get ready for life in the classroom. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Donald Trump has attacked a former beauty pageant winner who criticised him for alleged sexist and misogynistic remarks as “disgusting”. [BBC]

An influx of cash has eased the pressure to meet payroll in Ashland schools so the district won’t need the line of credit it had considered taking earlier this month. [Ashland Independent]

Men who may have been exposed to the Zika virus should wait at least six months before trying to conceive a child with a partner, regardless of whether they ever had any symptoms, federal health officials are recommending. [NPR]

Kentucky’s fourth-largest health insurer says it will stop selling individual plans in the state next year, prompting another round of finger-pointing between a pair of feuding governors over the merits of President Obama’s federal health care law. [H-L]

The first aerial survey of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch shows that the amount of debris swirling in the North Pacific has been “heavily underestimated,” the expedition group said. [HuffPo]

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Karpf Finally Gets Pushed Out While There’s Next To No Media Focus On Him

One of the most scandalous people to ever work at UK is finally biting the dust. Michael Karpf, who led UK HealthCare as it mushroomed in size over the past 13 years, has announced he will retire next year. [H-L]

Republican vice presidential nominee Mike Pence said Sunday he wants to be like Dick Cheney. [HuffPo]

The University of Louisville Foundation has officially accepted the resignation of President James Ramsey. Foundation chairman Bob Hughes said Ramsey offered his resignation from the foundation on his own and will not receive additional compensation. Hughes also resigned as chairman of the board on Friday. [C-J/AKN]

President Obama highlighted the world’s oceans Thursday as both a unique victim of climate change and a key resource in the fight against it. [The Hill]

When looking at her son Grant McMaine as a child, longtime Richmond resident Martina Hackworth never could have thought he would become an addict. The bright, intelligent boy was always kind to others, was close to his mother and sister, and was somewhat of a dreamer. [Richmond Register]

Ford Motor Co’s 2017 financial performance will decline from this year as it increases spending on “emerging opportunities” like self-driving cars and other costs rise, the No. 2 U.S.-based automaker said on Wednesday. [Reuters]

Despite area job losses in recent months, Brad Hall, manager external affairs at AEP, delivered good news to those attending Monday’s Rotary Club meeting. [Ashland Independent]

In all but four states, private citizens can challenge someone’s right to cast a ballot on or before Election Day. In most places, the burden of proof then falls on the voter. [ProPublica]

City council members approved on first reading an ordinance Monday night to take the compensating tax rates for real and personal property for 2016. The new tax rate for both real and personal property is .086 cents per $100 of assessed value, making the tax on a $100,000 home $86, said Dawn Devore, deputy city clerk. [Glasgow Daily Times]

For months, the official talking point of the Trump campaign has been that Donald Trump would be happy to release his tax returns but cannot because they are under audit. [ThinkProgress]

The entire full-time University of Kentucky journalism faculty is calling for UK President Eli Capilouto to drop his suit against the school’s student newspaper and apologize for criticism leveled at the paper and its editor at a Board of Trustees meeting last Friday. [Ronnie Ellis]

Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities have long lobbied for Hollywood to not only include, but portray, characters that identify as LGBT+ in a realistic way. [BBC]

Only 6 percent of Kentuckians lacked health insurance in 2015, a drop of 8.3 percentage points since 2013, according to fresh data from the U.S. Census Bureau. [H-L]

A powerful web video released by Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign on Friday ― National Prisoners of War Remembrance Day ― features an emotional World War II veteran urging Americans to reject real estate mogul Donald Trump. [HuffPo]

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Woah, There’s A Senate Race In KY?

Thus far, the U.S. Senate race in Kentucky has been more of a leisurely stroll. Less than eight weeks from Election Day, U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, R-Bowling Green, ran his first television ad of the campaign Wednesday in Louisville, a positive spot that focuses on Paul’s career as an eye surgeon. [H-L]

New national polls show the presidential race close, but Clinton remains consistently ahead. [HuffPo]

Members of the county’s teachers union have voted to approve a tentative two-year salary agreement with Jefferson County Public Schools that would give teachers additional raises in addition to their experience-based step raises. [C-J/AKN]

Of course Brown-Forman is fighting the legalization of marijuana – if not with dollars, then with ignorance like this. [The Intercept]

During a Madison County Fiscal Court meeting Tuesday morning, Judge/Executive Reagan Taylor and Deputy Judge/Executive Colleen Chaney announced the state has requested to take back control of the maintenance on certain state roads, previously maintained by the county. [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump intends to rolls back food safety regulations if he wins the White House in November. [The Hill]

Mayor Chuck Charles and former Mayor Steve Gilmore on Tuesday pitched their campaign platforms to local Republicans. [Ashland Independent]

House Speaker Paul Ryan said Thursday he believes Donald Trump should release his tax returns, gently suggesting that the GOP nominee ought to divulge his personal finances as Ryan did when he ran for vice president. [Politico]

Morehead City Council unanimously passed the first reading of an ordinance Monday to allow packaged alcohol sales within city limits on Sundays. [The Morehead News]

A congressional panel will hold a hearing on Sept. 22 to look at the fate of fuel efficiency rules through 2025 amid growing concerns from automakers. [Reuters]

Glasgow City Council delayed a vote Monday on what the 2016 tax rate for real property should be after one councilman proposed amending the ordinance to nullify an agreement the mayor had signed with the Glasgow Electric Plant Board regarding use of the funds it pays the city in lieu of taxes. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Trump recently proposed billions in spending to allow the nation’s poorest students to leave public schools and enroll elsewhere, including by using homeschooling. Except the plan won’t work for the poorest students. [ProPublica]

Montgomery County residents who live near an area of arsenic contamination have retained a Louisville law firm to represent their interests. [H-L]

Hip-hop artist and business mogul Jay Z narrates a new video that traces the history of the war on drugs and highlights the way that it has disproportionately targeted black Americans. [HuffPo]

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Bevin Appoints Another Tea Extremist

Who is Kathy Gornik, a woman Matt Bevin just appointed to the Work Ready Skills Initiative & Work Ready Skills Advisory Committee?


Right up Matt Bevin’s alley to appoint a borderline racist tea lady, steeped in pseudoscience and Ayn Rand bullshit, who complains about “race baiting” and denies climate change.

She’s a real piece of work. And she’s in charge of, according to Bevin’s office: developing “a highly trained, modernized workforce in the Commonwealth to meet the needs of employers and promote sustainable incomes for Kentuckians” and establishing an “application process for partnerships seeking state support for partnership programs, establish an application review process and review, consider and approve applications for funding.”