Way To Go At The Secrecy, UK! Woo!

Here comes UK wasting even more money. University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto announced Monday that UK will appeal two recent opinions by the Kentucky Attorney General’s Office that found UK violated the state’s Open Records Act and the Open Meetings Act. [H-L]

Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) just joined a small but growing list of Republican members of Congress who won’t vote for GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump come November because of his temperament and rhetoric. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro Police shot and killed a man armed with a knife early Monday morning while responding to a domestic violence call at an apartment complex near Shively. [C-J/AKN]

Emergency managers in Louisiana turned to the Red Cross when record floods swept the state in March, but many say they received little help. [ProPublica]

How dare anyone want safe drinking water or the preservation of lands. That makes native Appalachians environmental extremists, according to Rand Paul. He goes from literally telling black people they shouldn’t be allowed to sit at the lunch counter to making shit up about coal. [The Gleaner]

Former Pennsylvania Governor Ed Rendell, who presided over the state’s fracking boom of the mid-2000s, admitted the state’s fracking regulations favored economics over environmental safety during much of his tenure. [ThinkProgress]

The Morehead Utility Plant Board has unanimously agreed to apply for Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) funding to help repair the water tank at the John Will Stacy MMRC Regional Business Park on KY 801. [The Morehead News]

US presidential candidate Donald Trump has publicly backed House Speaker Paul Ryan days after snubbing him in a spat at the top of the Republican Party. [BBC]

More than four years after a conversation between then-Mayor Rhonda Riherd Trautman and Bill Prather, president and CEO of Farmers Rural Electric Cooperative Corp., that got a project rolling, they and dozens of others gathered to celebrate its completion. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Nearly half of registered U.S. voters think American infrastructure has deteriorated in the last five years, a national poll released on Tuesday found, with Republicans taking the dimmer view. [Reuters]

Dear Louisville media newbies: Fancy Farm isn’t a political picnic, it’s a church picnic. It’d also serve you well to do things like report on Scott Jennings’ racist/anti-LatinX “joke” when attempting to whitewash what really went down. [WHAS11]

Less than 100 days before the general election, Donald Trump has still not spent a dime on television advertising, even as Hillary Clinton floods the airwaves with tens of millions of dollars in ad spending. [The Hill]

Kentucky Utilities customers will pay extra each month to cover environmental upgrades at the company’s power plants under a settlement approved Monday. [H-L]

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump brushed off an open letter signed by dozens of the GOP’s most experienced national security officials, in which they say he “would be the most reckless President in American history.” [HuffPo]

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Fancy Fart Farm 2016 Will Be Unbearable

The University of Kentucky is starting a new program to help Appalachian students prepare for careers fighting cancer, a disease that disproportionately affects their home region. [H-L]

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump will not be releasing his tax returns, his top aide said Wednesday on “CBS This Morning.” [HuffPo]

Seems like only yesterday when Jones and his crew were trying to stifle our coverage of the pension mess when everyone else was ignoring it. [C-J/AKN]

Under the Freedom of Information Act, ProPublica requested letters closing HIPAA complaint investigations. Here’s what we’ve received so far. [ProPublica]

Cave City’s police chief and the mayor said this week they came to an understanding regarding the police chief’s retirement. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Nearly 50 years ago Richard Nixon launched his successful election under the banner of restoring “law and order” to a nation wrecked by violent protests and social upheaval. Now, another Republican nominee, Donald Trump, is going to run under that same banner. [BBC]

Glued to your television, mesmerized by the drama of the two political parties’ national conventions? Well, if you’ve never attended the annual Fancy Farm Picnic and its raucous political speaking event, you ain’t seen nothin’ yet. And with this year’s emcee, you’ll get to hear what someone who excuses racism, bigotry and homophobia thinks is cool. [Ronnie Ellis]

Big City is watching you. It will do it with camera-equipped drones that inspect municipal power lines and robotic cars that know where people go. Sensor-laden streetlights will change brightness based on danger levels. Technologists and urban planners are working on a major transformation of urban landscapes over the next few decades. [NY Times]

Republican Sen. Rand Paul made a campaign stop in Harlan on Tuesday, speaking to a large crowd of supporters at the Harlan Center. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Work that involves complex thinking and interaction with other people seems to help protect against the onset of Alzheimer’s Disease, according to research presented Sunday at the Alzheimer’s Association’s International Conference in Toronto. [WaPo]

Morehead State University’s Presidential Search and Screening Advisory Committee will host seven public meetings to obtain input from members of the MSU community and the general public on the presidential search. [Ashland Independent]

Cities and states have limited resources. When they’re faced with a growing homeless problem, those resources can either go toward finding housing for the homeless or to policing and criminalizing the daily habits of the homeless. [ThinkProgress]

Laurel County is back to being the armpit of the Commonwealth. A body was found Tuesday morning in a pond in Laurel County, the sheriff’s office said. [H-L]

At the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, in an interview with me on SiriusXM Progress, gay former congressman Barney Frank lashed at out Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and his repeated claims that he is a better candidate for queer people than Hillary Clinton. [HuffPo]

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A Scandal Begins To Unfold In Rowan

The Executive Branch Ethics Commission has fined a one-time state mine inspector $4,000 for accepting bribes from a former lawmaker. [H-L]

There’s a reason Donald Trump’s be-very-afraid acceptance speech resonated with his supporters. [HuffPo]

Wanna see Scott Jennings fall into an unbearable tirade about “liberal thought police”? It’s your lucky day. Jennings went on for paragraph after paragraph blaming liberals for daring hold Doug Cobb accountable for the heinous, disgusting, homophobic things the man has said. And, of course, Jennings even whitewashed that by ignoring the impact on the LGBT community entirely. If you whitewash and excuse homophobia, you’re a homophobe. Liberal thought police? More like Whiny Ass Titty Baby Republican. [C-J/AKN]

What kind of first gentleman would Bill Clinton be? That’s the question on the minds of many as Hillary Clinton seeks to become the first woman to ever hold the Oval Office. [The Hill]

East Kentucky Power Cooperative has filed an application with the Kentucky Public Service Commission to build a 60-acre solar energy facility in Clark County. [Winchester Sun]

David Duke, a former leader of the white supremacist Ku Klux Klan, launched his candidacy on Friday for the U.S. Senate from Louisiana, saying white people are threatened in America and that he hears echoes of his views in Donald Trump’s rhetoric. [Reuters]

On Monday, a court will hear arguments over the legality of some electronic betting machines that base outcomes on horse races that have already taken place. [WFPL]

The leadership of the religious right once looked like a promising stronghold for the Never Trump movement, a bastion of the GOP deeply at odds with a man who is heretical on many of the political and personal values the country’s most prominent Christian leaders hold dear. [Politico]

A dismembered body was found in a container floating in the Green River in Hart County on Saturday, according to a press release from the Kentucky State Police Post 3 in Bowling Green. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Ranchers near the Mexican border see smugglers and sometimes find bodies, but they favor a different approach to illegal immigration from Donald J. Trump’s wall. [NY Times]

An Office of Education Accountability investigation has found Rowan County Schools Supt. Marvin Moore and Rowan County Senior High School Principal Ray Ginter “violated law and policy” by not investigating complaints of hazing and bullying in the Vikings football program, according to its report July 8. [The Morehead News]

DONALD J. TRUMP, until now a Republican problem, this week became a challenge the nation must confront and overcome. Mr. Trump has nothing positive to offer, only scapegoats and dark conspiracy theories. [WaPo]

Estill County Judge-Executive Wallace Taylor was critical Tuesday of the state’s conduct in regard to the illegal dumping of out-of-state radioactive waste at an Estill landfill. [H-L]

Hillary Clinton made her first appearance with vice presidential pick, Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.), hailing him for being extremely qualified for the job and offering a stark contrast to Donald Trump and his VP choice. [HuffPo]

Everybody Has Donald Trump Regret

Students’ posting of a Black Lives Matter sign in Bryan Station High School fits with the Fayette County Public Schools’ values, officials said on Wednesday. [H-L]

As the saying goes, birds of a feather flock together. So it’s only fitting that within hours of being named Donald Trump’s vice presidential pick, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence (R) pulled one of his running mate’s favorite moves. [HuffPo]

What’s your risk of avoidable hospital death? Thousands of lives could be saved if more hospitals were as safe as those that received an A grade in a recent round of grading by a watchdog group that found no top scorers in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

Centrist Democrats appear reluctant to join their party’s embrace of a public option for ObamaCare. [The Hill]

Kentucky Power Co. is moving its corporate headquarters back to Ashland after more than a decade in the capital city. [Ashland Independent]

Last week, two lawmakers introduced a bill to put new limits on what debt collectors can take from debtors’ paychecks and bank accounts. It is the first legislation to address the issue in decades and follows a series of ProPublica stories about the widespread practice of garnishment. [ProPublica]

A year later, Smith and his wife Serena, who was also deeply involved in Davis-support rallies, are working the “third shift” at Walmart. Smith said he quit his job last year in order to more fully devote himself to the cause of supporting Davis. [Richmond Register]

Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy (D) and Ohio Congresswoman Marcia Fudge (D) introduced a bill this week that aims to help public schools become more racially diverse by providing grants for school districts to create voluntary school desegregation plans. [ThinkProgress]

A brief hearing in Barren Circuit Court on Tuesday settled a scheduling conflict in the lawsuit Glasgow police Lt. Col. Guy Turcotte has against the city and James Duff, former interim chief. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The last year has shined a harsh light on two distressing realities of American life. Mass shootings are becoming more common. And more Americans are killing themselves. These disturbing trends share something in common, obvious in the first case and less so in the second: guns. [WaPo]

Officials in Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration did not directly answer whether they plan to notify users of a problem-plagued state benefits system that they should reapply for services such as Medicaid and food assistance. [WFPL]

“The Art of the Deal” made America see Trump as a charmer with an unfailing knack for business. Tony Schwartz helped create that myth – and regrets it. [The New Yorker]

Curiosity finally got the best of me. I had to drive up I-75 and see Noah’s Ark. I found the ark to be an impressive piece of woodcraft, which made me feel better about paying $40 to see it. (It cost an additional $10 to park in the 4,000-space parking lot, which was only a fraction full.) [H-L]

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence (R-Gay Panicked), Donald Trump’s vice presidential pick, opposed a successful effort in 2007 to raise the federal minimum wage to $7.25 an hour over two years. [HuffPo]

Which News Dumps Will Hit Today?

This is what you call good old boy butthurt. Officials with the Bluegrass Area Development District said Tuesday they will continue to pay staff through July as they fight the state’s attempt to take away millions of dollars in federal and state funding for aging and workforce programs by Friday. [H-L]

Robert Murray, owner of the country’s largest private coal company, wasted no time pointing the finger when he announced plans earlier this week to lay off as many as 4,400 workers, or 80 percent of his workforce. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin’s halfwit staffers spent years attacking Steve Beshear for not appointing enough minorities for the University of Louisville’s board. So what do they do? They don’t find any minority appointees. Fascinating how these people operate. Dumber than you could have ever imaged. Not corrupt – dumb. Deeply, deeply dumb. [C-J/AKN]

A review of campaign finance records by The Hill shows that the practice of skirting or openly flouting the contractor ban has become widespread in both congressional and presidential politics. [The Hill]

Any hopes for a better reception for Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed changes to expanded Medicaid in Kentucky vanished pretty quickly at a second public hearing here Wednesday. [Ronnie Ellis]

South Carolina fire officials decided to make sprinklers mandatory in new homes. Homebuilders overturned the rule with help behind the scenes from Gov. Nikki Haley. It was one more win for an industry that has spent millions of dollars in state capitals to block a life-saving upgrade included in the nation’s model building code. [ProPublica]

Liberal state lawmakers have for 16 years pushed for a bill that would amend Kentucky’s civil rights code to protect people from discrimination in the workplace, housing and other areas based on their sexual orientation. [WFPL]

According to experts, white supremacy has experienced a renaissance in the last two years, reaching levels of popularity and influence not seen since the late-1960s. [ThinkProgress]

The Eastern Kentucky Veterans Center in Hazard was presented with a $2,500 check from the County Clerk’s Association on Monday to help the center fund an Independence Day celebration for citizens who truly represent our nation’s liberty and patriotic pride; our veterans. [Hazard Herald]

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump on Wednesday rejected criticism of his campaign tactics, in a wide-ranging speech defending his team’s use of a Jewish star and his own praise of the late Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein. [Reuters]

The Bank of Harlan has been acquired by Monticello Bankshares Inc. in a deal that will see the merger of the two financial institutions. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Donald Trump has to be one of the dumbest people in history. [Politico]

State alcohol regulators prepared a new map a couple of months ago showing Kentucky’s jumble of legally dry, wet and partially wet cities and counties, but it’s already out of date. [H-L]

The Iraqi man who was filmed attacking Saddam Hussein’s statue with a sledgehammer when U.S. troops stormed into Baghdad in 2003 said Iraq was in a better shape under his rule and George W. Bush and Tony Blair should be put on trial “for ruining” it. [HuffPo]

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Reminder: Matt Bevin Has No Concept Of Ethics… Or Anything, Really

Just when you thought Matt Bevin and his people couldn’t get more ignorant? Matt Bevin has signed an executive order that effectively gives him control over all appointments to the Executive Branch Ethics Commission without any input from the state attorney general and state auditor. Almost as funny as the Personnel Secretary begging folks to help them dig through Beshear data to uncover corruption because they don’t know anything about Kentucky. HAHAHA. You can’t fix the kind of stupid these people possess. [H-L]

Senate Republicans have never made it easy for President Barack Obama to put judges on federal courts. But now, with just months left in his term, they’re not even pretending to try to let judicial nominees through. [HuffPo]

Isn’t it fun watching Kentucky’s half-literate governator claim “God” has sanctioned his extreme Medicaid cuts? That’s what Jesus would do – choke even more out of the working poor, deny access to dental and vision, claim it’s helping them. [C-J/AKN]

The coal industry is slated to lose clout in the next Congress, with term limits set to force out a chairman who has frequently battled with the Obama administration on behalf of mining companies. Rep. Hal Rogers (R-Keeping Eastern Kentucky Impoverished) will relinquish the gavel of the House Appropriations Committee in January, after having led the powerful panel for six years, which is the maximum allowed under GOP rules. [The Hill]

A deadly shooting took place in the South Fork community of Breathitt County on Saturday. One person was pronounced deceased at the scene and two others seriously injured. [Hazard Herald]

Reverberations from the U.S. Supreme Court’s major ruling backing abortion rights were felt on Tuesday as the justices rejected bids by Mississippi and Wisconsin to revive restrictions on abortion doctors matching those struck down in Texas on Monday. [Reuters]

The Harlan Fiscal Court discussed a situation concerning the safety of a much-used bridge on U.S. 119 in Cumberland during a special-called meeting on Monday. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

The children of Vietnam vets describe how they believe their fathers’ exposure to Agent Orange during the war has impacted their families and their health. [ProPublica]

All members of the Madison Fiscal Court took turns June 14 criticizing the Madison County and Berea school boards for paying the sheriff a 1.5 percent fee for collecting its property taxes instead of the 4.25 percent paid by all other local taxing entities except the ambulance board. [Richmond Register]

Local communities are increasingly passing laws to control crime and nuisances on rental properties. They do so mostly by limiting the number of times police can be called to a residence. But it turns out that crime victims — especially victims of domestic abuse — are often the ones who end up being penalized. [NPR]

Republican Gov. Matt Bevin proclaims the days of “pay to play” ended with his arrival in Frankfort. But some House Democrats say if you’re not willing to play, Bevin isn’t reluctant to make you pay. [Ronnie Ellis]

On Tuesday night, 128 members of Congress weighed in to urge a federal appeals court to protect against sexual orientation-based discrimination under existing civil rights laws. [BuzzFeed]

Massie’s ideas about “sovereignty” are an extreme example of the naïve thinking that fueled the Brexit vote, has propelled Trump’s candidacy and energizes Tea Party activists. It is our inner 4-year-old screaming, “You can’t tell me what to do!” [H-L]

The draft of the 2016 Democratic Party platform endorses abolishing the death penalty, a break with the views of its presumptive presidential nominee. [HuffPo]