The KRS/KTRS Are Still A Train Wreck

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Officials asked residents of a Knott County home to evacuate because of the threat of flooding caused by water leaking from a nearby coal mine. [H-L]

Donald Trump promised during his campaign to bring back mining jobs to struggling workers in coal country. Now the president-elect has tapped for commerce secretary a Manhattan billionaire who owned a West Virginia coal mine where 12 workers died in 2006. [HuffPo]

Greg Fischer said those seeking to address gun violence in Louisville and other cities, such as Gov. Matt Bevin, must consider multiple policy levers in order to halt the rise of shootings and homicides. [C-J/AKN]

President-elect Donald Trump’s transition-team adviser on financial policies and appointments, Paul Atkins, has been depicted as an ideological advocate of small government. But the ways that the Trump administration and Congressional Republicans are likely to approach financial deregulation could serve Atkins’ wallet as well as his political agenda. [ProPublica]

The Louisville attorneys representing three people in a lawsuit stemming from a Donald Trump campaign rally want to depose the president-elect before he’s sworn into office. Dan Canon is one of the lawyers representing the plaintiffs suing Trump and others. He said Trump incited violence at his rally in Louisville back in March. [WLKY]

On Thursday, a federal judge in Oregon ruled that a climate lawsuit brought against the U.S. government by a group of youths can move forward, a win for the strategy of fighting climate change through the judicial branch. [ThinkProgress]

Worried about irreparable damage being done to their retirement benefits, a group of public school teachers on Tuesday asked a judge to order Kentucky’s top political leaders to “perform their constitutional and statutory duties” by adequately funding the pension system. [Richmond Register]

A US serviceman has been killed by an improvised explosive device while fighting against so-called Islamic State (IS) in Syria, officials say. [BBC]

The 5,000 electric customers of Kentucky Utilities in Barren and Hart counties, along with the other 541,000 in more than 70 counties across the commonwealth, could get cost hikes in the coming year, pending Kentucky Public Service Commission approval. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Thirty years ago Friday, a shocking announcement was made in the rotunda of San Francisco’s City Hall by a visibly shaken Dianne Feinstein, who was then president of the city’s Board of Supervisors. [NPR]

The financial woes of Kentucky’s public pension systems continue to worsen, but it’s really one of the six plans which is causing the most concern. [Ronnie Ellis]

Mitch McConnell (R-Granny), whose wife Elaine Chao is Trump’s pick for transportation secretary, was asked if he plans to recuse himself from her Senate confirmation process. McConnell’s answer? In a word: no. [WaPo]

The number of homemade methamphetamine labs found in Kentucky has dropped sharply in the past few years as drug abusers switched to imported meth, reducing the danger and cleanup costs associated with the small labs. [H-L]

A Marine wounded in combat in Fallujah, Iraq, in 2004 has found new purpose as a self-proclaimed peaceful warrior fighting against a 1,172-mile pipeline that protesters fear threatens the water source of Native Americans in North Dakota. [HuffPo]

Lexington’s Just Following Frankfort’s Lead

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A three-judge panel of the Kentucky Court of Appeals ruled last week that Lexington may have to pay millions more into its police and fire pension fund. [H-L]

With less than two months before he has to vacate the White House, handing over the keys to a successor who has vowed to open more federal lands and waters to drilling and mining, President Barack Obama is making a last-ditch effort to save swathes of public land. [HuffPo]

During his campaign for governor and since his election, Matt Bevin has said he supports restoring civil rights to nonviolent felons who have completed their sentences. Yet through his first 10 months in office, Bevin has not restored the civil rights, which include the right to vote, to a single person. [C-J/AKN]

Turd Cruz (R-Only Slightly Less Hated Than Trump) said Sunday that “there will be pitchforks and torches in the street” if Republicans don’t deliver on promises made during the campaign. [The Hill]

Kentucky has the 13th highest rate of incarceration in the world, imprisoning people nearly 1.35 times the rate of Turkmenistan — the highest rated country outside of the United States — and the Commonwealth’s rate is above the national average, according to a report released this year by the non-profit group Prison Policy Initiative. [Richmond Register]

Accused white supremacist Dylann Roof is mentally competent to stand trial for the shooting deaths of nine black parishioners at a South Carolina church last year, a federal judge ruled on Friday. [Reuters]

A Raceland city councilman was arrested early Thanksgiving morning on multiple drug charges, according to the Boyd County Sheriff’s Office. That’s right, kids, Kentucky is still arresting people for marijuana. [Ashland Independent]

President-elect Donald Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan agree that repealing the Affordable Care Act and replacing it with some other health insurance system is a top priority. [NPR]

Rowan County Senior High School faculty and school board members celebrated the school’s completed renovation with a ceremonial ribbon cutting Monday. [The Morehead News]

Views about race mattered more in electing Trump than in electing Obama. Support for Trump was more tightly linked to racial resentment than support for John McCain and Mitt Romney in 2008 and 2012, respectively — even after controlling for party and ideology. Sorry, Adam Edelen, your bullshit talking point about economics is dead in the water. [WaPo]

Work to develop a strategic plan that will show how best to connect Barren, Edmonson, Hart and Warren counties, as well as Barren River Lake State Resort Park, Nolin Lake State Park and Mammoth Cave National Park via trails continues by the Cave Country Trails Inc. [Glasgow Daily Times]

I would like to express my gratitude to Jared Kushner for reviving interest in my 2006 book, “The Price of Admission.” I have never met or spoken with him, and it’s rare in this life to find such a selfless benefactor. Of course, I doubt he became Donald Trump’s son-in-law and consigliere merely to boost my lagging sales, but still, I’m thankful. [ProPublica]

For the past few months, Kentucky’s university presidents and policy makers have tried to create a way to tie some of their state funding to outcomes like higher graduation rates and more degrees in science and technology. [H-L]

President-elect Donald Trump’s chief of staff, Reince Priebus, said that Trump will reverse President Barack Obama’s executive orders restoring diplomatic ties with Cuba unless the Cuban government agrees to additional reforms. [HuffPo]

Bevin Isn’t The Pension Savior After All

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Kentucky’s unfunded public pension liability has grown from $30.5 billion to $32.6 billion, a debt that threatens to undermine every other service the state provides, an oversight panel was told Monday. [John Cheves]

Democrats on the House Oversight Committee on Monday asked the committee’s chairman, Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah), to look into President-elect Donald Trump’s financial entanglements and make sure he’s not breaking the law. [HuffPo]

Gunmen exchanged about 20 shots at an annual Thanksgiving Day football event, thrusting Louisville past its homicide record and into the national spotlight. [C-J/AKN]

The Republican Party long insisted that the troubles of the inner city were cultural—but rather than apply the same logic to struggling blue-collar communities, Trump blamed their problems on external forces. [The Atlantic]

The Berea Tourism Commission approved a work addendum in order to pay Jones Signs, a company that recently installed way-finding signage around the city, an additional $68,402.10. [Richmond Register]

Senate Republicans are wary of making a historic move to nix the filibuster despite growing pressure from conservatives. [The Hill]

The generosity of northeast Kentuckians is proven every Christmas season through donations to the Needy Families Fund, a holiday tradition for more than a quarter of a century. [Ashland Independent]

Democrat Hillary Clinton’s campaign will take part in a recount of Wisconsin votes in the U.S. presidential race, an effort Republican winner Donald Trump called “ridiculous” on Saturday. [Reuters]

The Rowan County Fiscal Court voted to move forward with the harm reduction program within the community last week, however the vote wasn’t unanimous. [The Morehead News]

You don’t get a pat on the back for ratcheting down from rabid after exploiting that very radicalism to your advantage. Unrepentant opportunism belies a staggering lack of character and caring that can’t simply be vanquished from memory. [NY Times]

The Barren-Metcalfe County Emergency Communications Center’s governing board received “a standard clean, unqualified” opinion on an audit of its financial statement for the 2016 fiscal year. [Glasgow Daily Times]

How racially resentful working-class whites fled the Democratic Party – before Donald Trump. During the Obama presidency, racial attitudes became more strongly connected to whether whites identified as Democratic or Republican. But those stronger connections were most visible among whites with less formal education. Sorry, Adam Edelen, your bullshit talking point about economics is dead in the water. [WaPo]

Louisville’s streets were quiet on Thanksgiving Day 150 years ago. Few people were out, in part because the mud on Nov. 29, 1866, was so deep, and the city’s street crossings already were “the worst in the country,” wrote the Daily Courier. [H-L]

President-elect Donald Trump falsely claimed on Sunday that “millions of people” voted illegally in the 2016 presidential election. In a conference call with reporters on Monday, Trump’s campaign team did not produce any evidence to support that allegation. But the strangest thing about the president-elect’s claim isn’t that there is zero evidence to support it — it’s that Trump, who has turned away daily intelligence briefings since winning the election, took time out of his day to repeat a rumor that initially spread because of one guy on Twitter. [HuffPo]

You Should Probably Read That H-L Editorial

Pee alert! Jeff Hoover has named Julian Carroll to his fake transition team. Meet thew new good old boy, same as the old good old boy. [Hoover Nonsense]

Anyone thinking of illegally using Kentucky to dump radioactive fracking waste from other states will no doubt reconsider in light of fines announced this week by the Bevin administration. [H-L]

More than a dozen women have accused President-elect Donald Trump of sexual misconduct, ranging from forcible kissing to assault. Many Americans who did not support Trump’s candidacy have grappled with shock since his election. But for these women, his win is also deeply personal. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin gleefully said “good riddance” to House Speaker Greg Stumbo last week, and Stumbo made clear on Wednesday that the not-so-warm feelings are mutual. [C-J/AKN]

The protests in major U.S. cities against Republican Donald Trump’s surprise presidential election victory have been impromptu affairs, quickly organized by young Americans with a diverse array of backgrounds and agendas. [Reuters]

City of Ashland workers will pump 24 million gallons of water back into a drained reservoir later this week. [Ashland Independent]

If President-elect Trump follows through on his campaign promises, millions of individuals — immigrants, religious minorities, people of color — face a very grim four years. One of the worst hit groups will be Americans with significant health costs. The Trump transition team published a brief summary of the incoming president’s health plan on its website, and the news is not good for the elderly, the poor, and millions of Americans with preexisting conditions. [ThinkProgress]

A 19-year-old Berea man, who was charged with arson Tuesday morning, told investigators he set the blaze because people “needed to die.” [Richmond Register]

Children and teenagers of Mexican descent make up one of the fastest-growing populations in the nation’s public schools. [NPR]

Three Morehead Fire Department firefighters did not report any injuries after multiple oxygen cylinders exploded inside a residence in which they were preparing to suppress a fire. [The Morehead News]

One of the most important phases of the transition to power for President-elect Donald Trump includes briefings on U.S. intelligence capabilities and secret operations as well as separate descriptions of the extraordinary powers he will have over the military, especially contingency plans to use nuclear weapons, according to officials. [WaPo]

Area tourism officials came together Tuesday morning, along with representatives of local, state and federal governments, for the Caveland Marketing Association’s legislative luncheon. [Glasgow Daily Times]

No, Bernie Sanders could not have won. So calm the eff down, Bernie Bros. Donald Trump won whether we like it or not. [BBC]

Dozens of students marched through the University of Kentucky’s campus Friday to protest rape culture and how the university handles sexual assault cases. [H-L]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) voiced concerns Tuesday that President-elect Donald Trump is breaking a core campaign promise of keeping special interests out of Washington ― “draining the swamp.” [HuffPo]

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West Liberty Waste Dumpers: PAY UP!

PEE ALERT! Former Kentucky Personnel Secretary Tim Longmeyer must pay a $5,000 civil fine after settling 45 counts of ethics violations with the Executive Branch Ethics Commission, officials said Monday. [John Cheves]

Planned Parenthood is reporting a spike in donations and demand for long-acting contraceptives since Donald Trump’s election as U.S. president while abortion foes hope to gain momentum in their quest to cut public funding to the women’s health organization. [HuffPo]

Kentucky’s Department for Public Health is seeking millions of dollars of penalties from companies blamed for bringing radioactive drilling waste into Kentucky last year. [C-J/AKN]

Transportation advocates are excited by the prospect of an infrastructure package passing under President-elect Donald Trump next year, but there are a number of other transportation issues that could see action during the lame duck session of Congress. [The Hill]

A century of weather records show there’s no escape in Louisville from the fingerprints of climate change, as local temperatures climb and seasons are altered, research at the University of Louisville has found. [WHAS11]

Hillary Clinton blamed FBI director James Comey for her stunning defeat in Tuesday’s presidential election in a conference call with her top campaign funders on Saturday, according to two participants who were on the call. [Reuters]

The first significant change proposed to Grayson’s alcohol laws met with initial resistance from Mayor George Steele, although he ultimately agreed to the proposal early this week. [Ashland Independent]

Hillary Clinton and the Democrats were playing with fire when they effectively wrote off white workers in the small towns and cities of the Rust Belt. [ProPublica]

Officials of Morehead State University along with members of its Board of Regents, local and state legislators held a dedication ceremony Friday, Nov. 11, for Padula Hall at the Derrickson Agricultural Complex. [The Morehead News]

The new president may merit a brief honeymoon in governing while he figures out what his policies will be and how he will implement them. But we should not wait one nanosecond to lay out the unprecedented set of conflicts of interests he and his family bring to the presidency, to compare his campaign rhetoric with his post-election decisions, and to chronicle post-election moves made by state and local governments where authorities may feel emboldened to push the boundaries of their power and our laws. [CJR]

A recanvass of the 43rd district judicial race in Barren and Metcalfe counties changed nothing about the unofficial election tally, leaving Gabe Pendleton as the winner by 36 votes. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The potential conflicts of interest facing Donald Trump are so unprecedented that U.S. ethics laws weren’t even written to account for them. [Politico]

The 26 soldiers of the Kentucky National Guard’s 149th Military Engagement Team said goodbye to their families Saturday for a nearly yearlong mission overseas. [John Cheves]

President-elect Donald Trump, who took to Twitter Thursday to blast demonstrations against his victory as “very unfair,” had a different view of post-election distress four years earlier, when he called for a march on Washington “to stop this great and disgusting injustice.” [HuffPo]

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Matt Bevin’s You-Know-What! RUH RO!

Safe to say Matt Bevin’s pussy is on fire, kids. We fucking said it. Matt Bevin does not mince words in his utter disdain for state Democratic Rep. Russ Meyer of Nicholasville. [H-L]

FBI Director James Comey privately argued against having his bureau sign onto a statement saying the Russian government was meddling in the U.S. election, CNBC first reported on Monday, citing “a former FBI official.” [HuffPo]

The Estill County dump that accepted radioactive waste will install monitors, fund school radon testing and develop a corrective action plan, under a draft agreement the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet. [C-J/AKN]

The greatest miracle of the internet is that it exists—the second greatest is that it persists. Every so often we’re reminded that bad actors wield great skill and have little conscience about the harm they inflict on the world’s digital nervous system. [Slate]

Lurking beneath the headlines of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton’s bids for president, there’s a battle waging for Kentucky’s state House of Representatives. [WFPL]

Although the sale of marijuana is a federal crime, the number of U.S. banks working with pot businesses, now sanctioned in many states, is growing, up 45 percent in the last year alone. [Reuters]

Kentucky police officers are some of the best-trained in the country, and much of that training takes place right here in Madison County. [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump’s hiring of pollster Tony Fabrizio in May was viewed as a sign that the real estate mogul was finally bringing seasoned operatives into his insurgent operation. [WaPo]

Helena Harbour, a case coordinator for Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) of Northeast Kentucky, spoke to the Ashland Rotary Monday about cases the non-profit has handled and background on what the non-profit organization does. [Ashland Independent]

Natalie Solomon was always an early riser. Back in her days at a Ford-owned auto electronics plant, managing production schedules and bringing in $60,000 a year with overtime, she would be behind the wheel of her Ford Explorer by 4 a.m. — in time to grab coffee at Wawa, swing by her locker, grab her smock and get on the factory floor before 5. [NY Times]

Glasgow City Council’s nonpartisan race ended up with 15 candidates after three who initially filed later withdrew for various reasons and another person filed to run as a write-in candidate. [Glasgow Daily Times]

White House press secretary Josh Earnest said repeatedly on Monday that he would “neither defend nor criticize” FBI Director James Comey’s disclosures of the new Hillary Clinton email developments. [Politico]

Coal jobs and production continued to decline in Eastern Kentucky in the three-month period from July through September, but the losses were not as large as in some recent periods, according to a report released Monday. [H-L]

Hillary Clinton’s campaign knew in advance that Clinton might get a question from a Flint, Michigan, resident at a presidential primary debate in March, but she still couldn’t come up with a good answer ― at least according to the Flint resident. [HuffPo]

Anyone Remember The Iraq Quagmire?

A federal grand jury has indicted two men who are accused of distributing elephant tranquilizer that resulted a string of overdoses in Rowan County. [H-L]

When Sarbast Salih and his men enter a house formerly held by ISIS, they don’t go through the front door. Instead, they shimmy in through a window. [HuffPo]

When Pierce Mumaw’s students ask who he’ll vote for in the upcoming presidential election, he’s unapologetically honest about his conservatism. [C-J/AKN]

Haha, they think he’s from Ohio. Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Ohio) on Saturday dismissed Donald Trump’s repeated claims that the November election will be rigged. [The Hill]

If you think this isn’t a Larry Clark-Damon Thayer good old boy political situation, you’re part of the problem. What this story doesn’t mention is that Thayer is advised by RPK’s spokesperson, who advocates for the repeal of label taxes and all that. Fun how that’s all overlooked. Thayer wanted it in the bill. [WFPL]

The U.S. economy is on track to grow at a 1.9 percent annualized pace in the third quarter following the September data on domestic retail data, the Atlanta Federal Reserve’s GDP Now forecast model showed on Friday. [Reuters]

The removal of sludge from the city of Ashland’s water reservoir, a process that hasn’t taken place in eight years, is set to begin. [Ashland Independent]

It took Nick Alati half a day to cast a ballot in Arizona’s August primary — and his vote didn’t even count. [ProPublica]

Local historical figures will come to life Nov. 4-5 in South Central Kentucky Cultural Center’s Harvest of History, a living history event that doubles as a fundraiser for the cultural center. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Donald Trump appeared to question the legitimacy of Barack Obama’s presidency on Saturday, referring to him at a rally as the “quote ‘president.’’’ [Politico]

Sharon Sandifer-Bethea of Morehead is happy but anxious about the latest step in efforts to have her criminal record expunged. [The Morehead News]

Their public conference had been interrupted by a demonstration march and a bomb threat, so the white nationalists decided to meet secretly instead. They slipped past police officers and protesters into a hotel in downtown Memphis. The country had elected its first black president just a few days earlier, and now in November 2008, dozens of the world’s most prominent racists wanted to strategize for the years ahead. [WaPo]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is in a pickle. The senior Kentucky Republican began the year with a tough Senate electoral map. A wildly unpredictable Republican presidential nominee, Donald Trump, has possibly made that map even harder. [H-L]

Following the news of yet another “warmest month ever,” NASA has basically called it: This year will be the hottest since record-keeping began in 1880. [HuffPo]