Matt Bevin’s Now Screwing w/The PSC

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Because of course he did. Matt Bevin has ordered a reorganization of the Kentucky Public Service Commission that will shrink the agency responsible for regulating the state’s utilities and protecting their customers. [H-L]

Congress had six months to debate granting President-elect Donald Trump’s FBI new legal powers to hack millions of computers, and Republican leaders objected to doing so on Wednesday. [HuffPo]

Officials in Louisville announced Wednesday the implementation of the Safe Harbor initiative, a policing program designed to encourage the public to report hate crimes and to provide safe spaces for assault and harassment victims. [C-J/AKN]

Here’s your No Shit, Sherlock moment. The flood of “fake news” this election season got support from a sophisticated Russian propaganda campaign that created and spread misleading articles online with the goal of punishing Democrat Hillary Clinton, helping Republican Donald Trump and undermining faith in American democracy, say independent researchers who tracked the operation. [WaPo]

Matt Bevin can now appoint workers’ compensation judges nominated by members of a new commission he appointed, thanks to a judge’s order. [Ronnie Ellis]

During the presidential election, many Americans said that they’d move to Canada if Donald Trump won. But the Internet Archive, the nonprofit organization that backs up virtually the entire public internet, is actually going through with it. [Gizmodo]

Monroe County magistrates approved recommendations for a bid on Wednesday from Marty Milam Construction for the development of a walking trail at Joe Harrison Carter Elementary on Edmonton Road. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Members of the hardline anti-Islam lobby are eagerly anticipating the possibility of the Trump administration designating the Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist organization, which is increasingly likely if conspiracy theorists like Frank Gaffney play a prominent role in Trump’s transition team. Gaffney believes the Muslim Brotherhood has infiltrated the US government at every level and has even questioned whether Barack Obama was “America’s first Muslim president” implementing the Brotherhood’s plans. [BuzzFeed]

PEE ALERT! Congressman Thomas Massie, R-Hypocrite, said he would “seriously consider” a position in President-elect Donald Trump’s administration, but hasn’t been approached by his transition team. [Ashland Independent]

She has also worked on a highly controversial reform package in Kentucky, where the state’s governor wants to require people with incomes below the federal poverty level to pay premiums. The proposal would also require beneficiaries who aren’t primary caregivers to work or get job training. Both the premiums and work requirements have been opposed by the Obama administration. [STAT]

Morehead State University has been forced to temporarily reduce budgetary support of folk art, public radio and traditional music but remains “totally committed to preserving cultural outreach,” two MSU officials Monday told the board of Downtown Morehead, Inc. [The Morehead News]

William Diaz-Castro is about to become one of the “criminal illegal immigrants” whom Donald Trump campaigned against for 17 months—and whom, as president-elect, he now plans to deport immediately. [The Nation]

Oh, look, now Matt Bevin thinks he can help with gun violence. Matt Bevin said Tuesday that escalating gun violence in Louisville and Lexington has his attention. [H-L]

Steve Bannon, chief strategist and senior counselor to President-elect Donald Trump, allegedly told a friend that he didn’t see an issue with fewer black people being able to vote. [HuffPo]

Lexington’s Just Following Frankfort’s Lead

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A three-judge panel of the Kentucky Court of Appeals ruled last week that Lexington may have to pay millions more into its police and fire pension fund. [H-L]

With less than two months before he has to vacate the White House, handing over the keys to a successor who has vowed to open more federal lands and waters to drilling and mining, President Barack Obama is making a last-ditch effort to save swathes of public land. [HuffPo]

During his campaign for governor and since his election, Matt Bevin has said he supports restoring civil rights to nonviolent felons who have completed their sentences. Yet through his first 10 months in office, Bevin has not restored the civil rights, which include the right to vote, to a single person. [C-J/AKN]

Turd Cruz (R-Only Slightly Less Hated Than Trump) said Sunday that “there will be pitchforks and torches in the street” if Republicans don’t deliver on promises made during the campaign. [The Hill]

Kentucky has the 13th highest rate of incarceration in the world, imprisoning people nearly 1.35 times the rate of Turkmenistan — the highest rated country outside of the United States — and the Commonwealth’s rate is above the national average, according to a report released this year by the non-profit group Prison Policy Initiative. [Richmond Register]

Accused white supremacist Dylann Roof is mentally competent to stand trial for the shooting deaths of nine black parishioners at a South Carolina church last year, a federal judge ruled on Friday. [Reuters]

A Raceland city councilman was arrested early Thanksgiving morning on multiple drug charges, according to the Boyd County Sheriff’s Office. That’s right, kids, Kentucky is still arresting people for marijuana. [Ashland Independent]

President-elect Donald Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan agree that repealing the Affordable Care Act and replacing it with some other health insurance system is a top priority. [NPR]

Rowan County Senior High School faculty and school board members celebrated the school’s completed renovation with a ceremonial ribbon cutting Monday. [The Morehead News]

Views about race mattered more in electing Trump than in electing Obama. Support for Trump was more tightly linked to racial resentment than support for John McCain and Mitt Romney in 2008 and 2012, respectively — even after controlling for party and ideology. Sorry, Adam Edelen, your bullshit talking point about economics is dead in the water. [WaPo]

Work to develop a strategic plan that will show how best to connect Barren, Edmonson, Hart and Warren counties, as well as Barren River Lake State Resort Park, Nolin Lake State Park and Mammoth Cave National Park via trails continues by the Cave Country Trails Inc. [Glasgow Daily Times]

I would like to express my gratitude to Jared Kushner for reviving interest in my 2006 book, “The Price of Admission.” I have never met or spoken with him, and it’s rare in this life to find such a selfless benefactor. Of course, I doubt he became Donald Trump’s son-in-law and consigliere merely to boost my lagging sales, but still, I’m thankful. [ProPublica]

For the past few months, Kentucky’s university presidents and policy makers have tried to create a way to tie some of their state funding to outcomes like higher graduation rates and more degrees in science and technology. [H-L]

President-elect Donald Trump’s chief of staff, Reince Priebus, said that Trump will reverse President Barack Obama’s executive orders restoring diplomatic ties with Cuba unless the Cuban government agrees to additional reforms. [HuffPo]

RPK: Still A Bunch Of Homophobic Bigots

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Hopefully they’re not just learning the whitewashed version of Thanksgiving history. [H-L]

Activists protesting plans to run an oil pipeline beneath a lake near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota said on Saturday they have no intention of leaving a protest camp after U.S. authorities warned it must be vacated by Dec. 5. [HuffPo]

The last remaining dry precinct located within the Watterson Expressway could switch sides next month following a wet-dry vote. [C-J/AKN]

A member of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) is sounding the alarm over the new changes floated by Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), warning that the minority leader’s proposals could erode the power of African-American lawmakers even as they attempt to spread influence to younger members. [The Hill]

A state senator is planning to once again propose a bill during the upcoming legislative session that he says will protect religious freedoms. The bill would nullify local “fairness” ordinances across the state that protect Kentuckians from discrimination based on sexual orientation. Imagine how different things could be if Chris Hartman were permitted by the Fairness board over the past seven or eight years, as I have pushed, to spend time with these extremists trying to educate them. Kentucky would be in a much better spot than it is today. [WFPL]

Sales and traffic at U.S. brick-and-mortar stores on Thanksgiving Day and Black Friday declined from last year, as stores offered discounts well beyond the weekend and more customers shopped online. [Reuters]

Unhappy with Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear’s refusal to file criminal charges against those responsible for illegally dumping 1,200 tons of low-level radioactive fracking waste at a landfill near Irvine, an Estill County citizens group is suing to obtain the investigative records of Beshear and two state regulatory cabinets. [Richmond Register]

Falwell says he couldn’t afford to work at a Cabinet-level job for longer than that. That’s $205,000 per year, FYI. He couldn’t afford to live on $205K per year. That’s the New Fascist Party for you. [Politico]

They’re official: the state Board of Elections certified the results of the Nov. 8 election in Kentucky Tuesday. [Ronnie Ellis]

On Tuesday, the director of the National Security Agency, Admiral Michael Rogers, was asked about the WikiLeaks release of hacked information during the campaign, and he said, “This was a conscious effort by a nation-state to attempt to achieve a specific effect.” [Mother Jones]

The civil lawsuit filed by a former police chief against the City of Glasgow and the subsequent interim chief has been set for trial in March. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The education gap among whites this year wasn’t about education. It was about race. There are, of course, several plausible reasons for this growing education gap. No one factor explains everything. That said, a major factor was racial attitudes. Sorry, Adam Edelen, your bullshit talking point about economics is dead in the water. [WaPo]

Like many students, Tyler Allen spent his college days enthusiastically experimenting with alcohol. Only for Allen, it turned into a habit that was more than recreational. [H-L]

Afghanistan is failing. Fifteen years after the United States first scattered the Taliban with high-altitude bombing, the battlefield gains achieved by tens of thousands of U.S. troops are in jeopardy from a resurgent Taliban. [HuffPo]

Gobble Gobble, Bevin’s Still Delusional

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Kentucky’s dentists and optometrists asked Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration not to remove dental and vision coverage from basic Medicaid benefits. Visits to the dentist and eye doctor are often the first step in identifying more serious health conditions, including diabetes, they say. [H-L]

Exactly a week after winning the presidential election, Donald Trump took time out to meet with Indian business partners and his three eldest children at Trump Tower in Manhattan. [HuffPo]

All hat, no cattle. Community members pressed Kentucky Education Commissioner Stephen Pruitt for clear answers Monday about how the state and Jefferson County Public Schools plan to ensure equity is at the forefront of education reform efforts in the age of the new Every Student Succeeds Act. [C-J/AKN]

This won’t be news to you if you haven’t been living under a rock. Sucks for the Whiny Ass Titty Baby-Elect. An actor from the Broadway hit “Hamilton” is responding to President-elect Donald Trump’s claim that the show’s cast “harassed” Vice President-elect Mike Pence. [The Hill]

Preparation for Thanksgiving family dinners can be a daunting task. But what if your “family” numbers 1,600? [Ashland Independent]

Donald Trump agreed on Friday to pay $25 million to settle fraud lawsuits over his Trump University real estate seminars, in what New York’s attorney general called a “stunning reversal” for the U.S. president-elect. [Reuters]

The Thanksgiving holiday week is a busy time for members of the Rosedale Baptist Church. [Richmond Register]

The attacks may have seemed like just a fleeting, perverse twist on RINO (“Republican in name only”), but in fact they were something far more ominous—the stirrings of a loosely knit extremist movement soon more widely known as the “alt-right.” [Mother Jones]

Rowan County Fiscal Court passed a resolution last Tuesday asking the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to order a full Environmental Impact Study for the repurposing of the Tennessee Gas Pipeline. [The Morehead News]

By the time Richard B. Spencer, the leading ideologue of the alt-right movement and the final speaker of the night, rose to address a gathering of his followers on Saturday, the crowd was restless. [NY Times]

Three findings were listed by the state auditor after reviewing Metcalfe County Sheriff Rondal Shirley’s 2015 financial statement. [Glasgow Daily Times]

President-elect Donald Trump’s charitable foundation has admitted to the IRS that it violated a legal prohibition against “self-dealing,” which bars nonprofit leaders from using their charity’s money to help themselves, their businesses or their families. That admission was contained in the Donald J. Trump Foundation’s IRS tax filings for 2015. [WaPo]

Matt Bevin says he spoke by phone with Donald Trump and came away even more convinced that Kentucky has an ally in the president-elect. [H-L]

If you want to know why the unabashedly racist and Nazi-sympathizing “alt-right” movement is making a mark on the Trump administration and beyond, look no further than Tila Tequila and her white nationalist friend, Richard Spencer. [HuffPo]

RPK: Finally More Racist Than The KDP

Fun fact: The Republican Party of Kentucky doesn’t actually care about racism, homophobia or anything like that. Look at who runs the Party and speaks on its behalf and you’ll have all you need to know. Republican Dan Johnson posted messages on Facebook that displayed prejudice toward black people, Muslims and others during his campaign for a seat in the Kentucky House of Representatives. [John Cheves]

Americans are overwhelmingly surprised by Donald Trump’s victory, a new HuffPost/YouGov survey finds, with a narrow majority saying they’re unhappy with the results of the election. [HuffPo]

As a busy working mother with four children — three with autism — Jennifer Adams-Tucker said it’s hard enough managing school schedules, after-school activities, doctor’s appointments, therapy sessions and other events. [C-J/AKN]

A battle is brewing between the GOP foreign policy establishment and outsiders over who will sit on President-elect Donald Trump’s national security team. [The Hill]

Morehead State University can be a force to improve life in northeast Kentucky by working through its regional campus here to enhance education, economic development and public health, said respondents at a forum Tuesday. [Ashland Independent]

For several years, transgender U.S. Army Captain Julia Harrison shunned military social events, anxious at the thought of having to wear the pants and coat of male service members despite identifying as a woman. [Reuters]

Madison County is a regional “economic engine,” and a 21st century airport is a key to maximizing the county’s potential, Charles “Chuck” Conley of the Central Kentucky Regional Airport Board said Monday after a presentation to leaders of the county’s three local governments. [Richmond Register]

Just down the street from the Trump Hotel and six blocks from President-elect Donald Trump’s soon-to-be White House, the alt-right movement gathered on Pennsylvania Avenue and declared victory Saturday. [Politico]

The Morehead Utility Plant Board says its water is safe to drink and utilize for other needs after a few residents have complained that their water tasted bad. [The Morehead News]

Donald J. Trump met in the last week in his office at Trump Tower with three Indian business partners who are building a Trump-branded luxury apartment complex south of Mumbai, raising new questions about how he will separate his business dealings from the work of the government once he is in the White House. [NY Times]

Discussion about the federal indictment of a Cave City businessman who requested grant funds from the Cave City Tourist and Convention Commission in August led to talk earlier this week of possible changes to the commission’s grant request application. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Mitch McConnell, like Matt Bevin, is really into backing racists. A person close to Sessions said that Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Enables Bigots), the majority leader, spoke directly to his colleague and said he would give his strong and full support for his confirmation as attorney general. [WaPo]

Lexington Realtors announced Friday a $16,500 program that will help pay deposits and the first month’s rent for people struggling with homelessness. [H-L]

Donald Trump and Republican leaders in Congress have made clear they are serious about repealing Obamacare, and doing so quickly. But don’t assume their dismantling of government health insurance programs will stop there. [HuffPo]

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The EBEC Still Has Absolutely No Teeth

The Executive Branch Ethics Commission says that it and unnamed law enforcement agencies are investigating people who may have helped former Kentucky Personnel Secretary Tim Longmeyer to illegally solicit campaign donations from state employees under his supervision from 2011 to 2015. [H-L]

In a testament to humanity’s willingness to take on the most futile tasks imaginable without regard to sanity, it was announced Tuesday that outgoing Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) has put forward legislation that would scrap the Electoral College in favor of electing the president of the United States by popular vote. [HuffPo]

Often, when conducting a routine eye exam, Louisville optometrist Dr. Aaron McNulty discovers that a patient has diabetes but doesn’t know it. [C-J/AKN]

Questions are swirling about whether President-elect Donald Trump will follow through on suggestions during the campaign that he might allow other countries to develop nuclear weapons. [The Hill]

Surprise! The WFPL folks have noticed Eastern Kentucky again. At least that Brendan jackass isn’t trying to tag poor people like cattle this time. (How is he still employed there after the mass exodus of employees?) For Freida Lockaby, an unemployed 56-year-old woman who lives with her dog in an aging mobile home in Manchester, Ky., one of America’s poorest places, the Affordable Care Act was life altering. [WFPL]

A work crew began to dismantle a Confederate monument in Louisville, Kentucky on Saturday, the mayor said, in the latest move to take down or relocate symbols of the slaveholding Southern Confederacy from the American Civil War. [Reuters]

Bill Langley, senior pastor of an Elizabethtown church with a strong reputation for supporting missions, has been elected president of the 750,000-member Kentucky Baptist Convention. [Ashland Independent]

It was supposed to be a big, beautiful infrastructure bill. But President-elect Donald Trump’s pitch for a $1 trillion upgrade of the nation’s roads, bridges, tunnels and airports is already running into potholes as it meets reality in Washington. [Politico]

Richmond police officers may drive their city vehicles home after work only if they live within Madison County. [Richmond Register]

Making sense of this presidential election requires figuring out what happened in rural places across the country. This is especially true in the upper Midwest, where there were sharp swings toward Donald Trump that helped produce surprising victories in states such as my home state of Wisconsin. [WaPo]

City council members agreed Monday night to amend the city’s alcohol ordinance, making several changes. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Safety pins have again become a symbol of solidarity with victims of racist, religious or homophobic abuse, following alleged attacks in the US in the wake of Donald Trump’s election win. [BBC]

Matt Bevin couldn’t find a Kentucky vendor? This should end really well and will likely cost way more than suggested. $583,000 seems unbelievably low. Big Brother may be watching the next time you visit Kentucky’s Capitol. [H-L]

Europe needs to think about developing its own nuclear deterrent strategy given concerns that U.S. President-elect Donald Trump could scale back U.S. military commitments in Europe, a senior member of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s conservatives said. [HuffPo]