Bevin Still Stiffs The Working Poor

The city of Lexington must pay federal environmental regulators $16,800 for failing to keep paperwork of employee training and other safety records at the West Hickman Wastewater Treatment Plant. [H-L]

For all that Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has talked about immigration, the specifics of his deportation policies can be difficult to parse. The biggest question: Trump has said he wants to “round up” and deport all undocumented immigrants, but how, exactly, would he do it, if at all? [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin’s administration unveiled its long-awaited plan to reshape the state’s Medicaid program Wednesday, and while it restores some benefits Bevin proposed be cut two months ago, it retains the most controversial components of the governor’s approach to overhauling the federal-state health plan for low-income and disabled Kentuckians. [C-J/AKN]

Middle- and lower-income children don’t visit eye doctors as often as wealthier kids, and as a result, thousands of them may have undiagnosed sight-threatening conditions, U.S. researchers say. [Reuters]

Several changes could be coming to Grayson’s rules regarding sale of alcoholic beverages. During last Tuesday’s meeting, the City Council heard proposals from ABC Coordinator Willis Johnson on behalf of the alcohol retailers in the city. [Ashland Independent]

Republican racists – which is most of them in Frankfort these days – are freaking out that the Obama Administration is actually trying to help Eastern Kentucky. [White House]

The future of a road leading to one of Rowan County’s most popular recreation hangouts is up in the air. [The Morehead News]

Yet more embarrassing homophobic/transphobic news that’s gone national, courtesy Matt Bevin. Way to go, Republicans, for spreading hate. [NBC News]

What now? That is a question that can apply in several instances in relation to the closing of the Monroe County Jail. [Glasgow Daily Times]

High school graduates from Northeastern states score highest on a key standardized test for college admissions, while students in Southern and Western states struggle most to meet educational benchmarks. [The Hill]

Greg Stumbo had his LRC staffers come up with a column about special education teachers. Maybe he could learn something by digging into the Montgomery County mess we’ve uncovered the past few years. [Floyd County Times]

Donald Trump may be “softening” his incendiary language on immigration, but those versed in the complexities of immigration law say his plan has gone from unrealistic to downright incomprehensible. [Politico]

Federal labor officials have sided with the Bluegrass Area Development District in an ongoing dispute with the state over a multimillion-dollar federal workforce training program that serves 12,000 out-of-work or underemployed people in Central Kentucky. [H-L]

I started working at the county jail in 1995 as a correctional officer ― just your basic entry level position. I became sergeant there, where I supervised staff and an entire shift. And then I took a position called a ‘Correction Specialist One,’ which dealt with mental health issues within the facility. [HuffPo]

Way to go, Montgomery County. Maybe your corrupted sheriff’s department can some day work to help addicts instead of just cleaning up after them when they’re dead. Twelve heroin overdoses were reported Wednesday in Mount Sterling and surrounding Montgomery County, police and the sheriff’s department said. [More H-L]

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University of Louisville Keeps It Real By Constantly Retaliating Against Anyone Pushing For Accountability

Black students in Kentucky were suspended four times more often than white students in 2015, according to a report released Thursday. [H-L]

The Obama administration has joined the fight against the American bail industry, telling a federal appeals court that bail practices that keep poor defendants locked up because they cannot afford to purchase their freedom are unconstitutional. [HuffPo]

This is the University of Louisville way – retaliate against those attempting to hold them accountable. And when that doesn’t work and people fight back? Try to destroy them in the press. [C-J/AKN]

Wild bees that forage from oilseed rape crops treated with insecticides known as neonicotinoids are more likely to undergo long-term population declines than bees that forage from other sources, according to the findings of an 18-year study. [Reuters]

Surprise! The cityfolk are shocked that vote-buying is still going on in rural Eastern Kentucky. [WFPL]

Two K Street firms caught up in the web of Paul Manafort’s influence have hired outside counsel to look into whether a former client he referred to them lied about its source of funding. [The Hill]

A new Morehead State University president should be able to work with lawmakers, get chummy with generous alumni, collaborate with community college officials and communicate well with the university’s students, staff and faculty. [Ashland Independent]

Matt Bevin is a bigot. Matt Bevin’s administration is suing the federal government to block a rule that says medical providers and insurance companies can’t discriminate against transgender patients. [WFPL]

Each school in the Rowan County School District, from preschool through high school, now is offering free breakfast and lunch to every student. [The Morehead News]

Donald Trump used his campaign funds to buy thousands of copies of his own book at retail cost, simultaneously diverting donor money back into his pockets while artificially boosting his sales figures. It’s a tactic that may be illegal, campaign finance experts say. [TDB]

Cave City Council members voted earlier in the week to enter into an inter-local agreement with the Barren River Drug Task Force. City officials cited a desire to help combat the ever growing drug problem as a reason for rejoining the drug task force. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The nation’s first “soda tax” on sugar-sweetened beverages, which went into effect in Berkeley, Calif., last year, appears to be working. According to a new study, consumption of sugary drinks — at least in some neighborhoods — is down by a whopping 20 percent. [NPR]

An attorney for Steven Edwards, who was fired this month as commissioner of the Kentucky Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control just five months after Gov. Matt Bevin appointed him, said Edwards has not been given any reason for his dismissal. [John Cheves]

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton leads Republican rival Donald Trump by 12 percentage points among likely voters, her strongest showing this month, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll released on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

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Hillary To KDP’s Rescue? Probably Not

Surprise! The Republicans are just as bad as the Democrats. The daughter of Energy and Environment Secretary Charles Snavely landed a $38,000-a-year non-merit job this month in the office of Gov. Matt Bevin. [H-L]

After the chairman of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign resigned on Friday, former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski tried to insist Trump’s bid for the White House was going just fine. Lewandowski, who was fired by Trump in June, drew a puzzling parallel to make his point, arguing that in 2004, John Kerry was also making staff changes as the election approached. [HuffPo]

A Hillary Clinton political committee transferred $793,000 to the Kentucky Democratic Party in July – a huge and apparently sorely needed infusion of cash for Kentucky Democrats, who so far this year have struggled to compete with the Republican Party of Kentucky in the fundraising battle leading up to the November elections. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort was asked to resign, the campaign said Friday. [The Hill]

The Madison County Board of Education took its first step Thursday afternoon in the creation of a new elementary school for students in northern Madison County. [Richmond Register]

More than 30 major technology and communication companies said on Friday they are joining the U.S. government to crack down on “robocalls,” automated, prerecorded phone calls that regulators have labeled a “scourge.” [Reuters]

Rand Paul said it could be “too late” for AK Steel to bring its workforce back in Ashland, despite a tax increase on Chinese steel imports imposed by the United States. [Ashland Independent]

ProPublica’s reporting on the water crisis in the American West has highlighted any number of confounding contradictions worsening the problem: Farmers are encouraged to waste water so as to protect their legal rights to its dwindling supply in the years ahead; Las Vegas sought to impose restrictions on water use while placing no checks on its explosive population growth; the federal government has encouraged farmers to improve efficiency in watering crops, but continues to subsidize the growing of thirsty crops such as cotton in desert states like Arizona. [ProPublica]

A free, wireless Internet network is up and running throughout downtown Morehead. The city, in partnership with Rajant Corporation, installed wireless meshing nodes in March to help provide instant Internet access to anyone within the network’s parameters. [The Morehead News]

As the Republican nominee for the US presidency, Donald Trump received a classified briefing on Wednesday. What does that mean? [BBC]

The vast majority of the crowd of more than 100 people who attended Mayor Dick Doty’s Friday afternoon press conference made it clear they weren’t buying the message he was trying to sell. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Surprise! Fraternity atmosphere can (especially in Frankfart) make state capitols hotbeds of sexual harassment. [USA Today]

The Madison County school district has decided to take a drug company up on its offer of two free doses of Narcan, a life-saving drug in instances of heroin overdose — even though the district hasn’t seen an overdose problem. [H-L]

Oh, look, Valarie Honeycutt Spears noticed that there were more than 200 testing violations in Kentucky schools. She’s failed to investigate anything in Montgomery County. [More H-L]

Religious freedom is a valid defense for a Michigan business owner who fired a trans woman after she asked to dress in accordance with her gender identity, a federal judge ruled Thursday. [HuffPo]

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Eastern Kentucky Just Cannot Win

Is anyone holding their breath on this one? Should we? Two prominent Kentucky Democrats on Tuesday launched a nonprofit organization, the New Kentucky Project, to cultivate the next generation of political leaders. [H-L]

Emergency medical services scrambled in a West Virginia city after 26 people overdosed on heroin in a span of just four hours. Thanks to a fast response time and an overdose reversal drug, everyone survived. [HuffPo]

James Ramsey, who was forced to resign last month as president of the University of Louisville, apparently plans to stay awhile at its foundation, where he is still president. The foundation is constructing new offices at its building at 215 Central Ave., for Ramsey and Kathleen Smith, his chief of staff, according to a university official and several tradesmen who were busy working Friday on the space. [C-J/AKN]

The Pentagon warned the Syrian government Friday not to strike U.S. and coalition personnel in Syria, a day after the regime carried out airstrikes in an area near American special operations forces, prompting the U.S. to scramble jets to protect them. [WSJ]

More than a year after introducing a multimillion-dollar body camera system, the Louisville Metro Police Department isn’t keeping track of how the cameras are being used. [WFPL]

Donald Trump on Friday predicted he would get 95 percent of the black vote after four years as president. [The Hill]

Richmond police officers, along with all city employees, received a 4-percent cost-of-living raise for the 2016-17 fiscal year. However, a proposal to create a 10-step pay scale that would provide most officers with a raise every two years for 20 years remains before the city commission. [Richmond Register]

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton leads Republican rival Donald Trump by 8 percentage points among likely voters, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll released on Friday. [Reuters]

OF COURSE some wingnut pastor is trying to stop alcohol sales. Circuit Judge David Hagerman will hear the case of the City of Ashland and a local pastor against the Boyd County Clerk and Board of Elections on Monday, a day before the scheduled “wet” election. [Ashland Independent]

You’d think Donald Trump would love the Olympics: The flag-waving pageantry, the pure, unbridled patriotism—and, my god, the winning. So much winning you almost get tired of the winning. [Politico]

The Rowan County Board of Education will hold a public hearing in the board’s meeting room in the old Rowan County Middle School on Wednesday, Aug. 24, at 6 p.m. [The Morehead News]

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has made a direct appeal to African-American voters, saying “What do you have to lose?” [BBC]

We’ve been yelling about it for years and here you go. Many people in Lexington who see doctors at University of Kentucky HealthCare write checks to the Kentucky Medical Services Foundation. [H-L]

The Justice Department plans to stop using privately run prisons that typically house undocumented federal inmates following a report finding they are less safe than those that are federally run, Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates said Thursday. [HuffPo]

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Trump Chickens Come Home To Roost

The Lexington Humane Society is inundated with cats every summer, and this August it’s using its “Purrgressive Pricing” program to help them alleviate some of the overcrowding. [H-L]

Aetna Inc, the No. 3 U.S. health insurer, on Monday said that due to persistent financial losses on Obamacare plans, it will sell individual insurance on the government-run online marketplaces in only four states next year, down from the current 15 states. [HuffPo]

GLI is part of what’s wrong with Louisville and it’s beyond time for everyone to recognize it. An organization like that is not necessary in the modern era. Louisville’s first heat-management plan is flawed and should not be used as the basis for any new regulatory programs aimed at reducing temperatures, the city’s chamber of commerce said. [C-J/AKN]

Boeing Co’s KC-46A refueling plane has been approved for production, with work underway for the first two low-rate initial production lots to be awarded in the next 30 days, the U.S. Air Force said on Friday. [Reuters]

On Friday, Gov. Matt Bevin made several appointments to Kentucky’s Universities and College Boards including two to the Eastern Kentucky University Board of Regents. [Richmond Register]

Federal health regulators have announced plans to crack down on nursing home employees who take demeaning photographs and videos of residents and post them on social media. [ProPublica]

Mayor Chuck Charles said the city of Ashland faces a “no-win” situation prior to the Aug. 23, county-wide election on alcohol sales. On Election Day, all registered voters in Boyd County, Ashland and Catlettsburg can vote to turn the county “wet.” The status would expand alcohol sales in convenience stores, gas stations, grocery stores and other businesses. [Ashland Independent]

More than 70 Republicans have signed a letter to the party’s National Committee head urging him to stop helping Donald Trump’s campaign. [BBC]

Watching AT&T buy favors from Rocky Adkins… AT&T Kentucky Tuesday donated $20,000 to the Rowan County Board of Education to be used for college and career readiness programs. [The Morehead News]

Republican strategists say time is running out on Donald Trump. Though there are more than 80 days to go before the election, GOP skeptics believe the party’s nominee has little time left to straighten out his campaign in order to defeat Hillary Clinton for the presidency. [The Hill]

The State Medical Examiner’s Office in Madisonville has determined that the cause of death for a Butler County couple found Tuesday in their home is homicide, according to a Kentucky State Police release. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Peter Greathouse, a Republican from Utah, says he’s not “comfortable” with Donald Trump as his party’s nominee. Jane Lynch, a GOP veteran from Arizona, says she’ll likely cast her personal vote for libertarian Gary Johnson or a write-in candidate. Loren Byers, a Texas Republican, calls Trump “a loose cannon.” [Politico]

If you’re the state’s most important newspaper, you could do a better job and have some common sense when covering suicide. At a bare minimum, provide links and numbers for resources. At a bare minimum. [H-L]

When Donald Trump unveiled his council of economic advisors earlier this month, observers were quick to note some of the team’s unorthodox attributes: all of its 13 members are men, six are named Steve and only one has an advanced degree in economics. [HuffPo]

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Magoffin County Can’t Catch A Break

Federal jurors have convicted two Magoffin County officials in a vote-fraud scheme in which the judge-executive also was implicated. [H-L]

Donald Trump has been making waves this week ― great waves, terrific waves ― after accusing President Barack Obama of creating ISIS. But earlier this year, he was saying something different: that the U.S. invasion of Iraq created the terrorist group. [HuffPo]

In the latest blow for Catholic Health Initiatives in Kentucky, a jury has returned a $21.2 million verdict against the company and its St. Joseph Hospital London for conspiring with cardiologists to perform unnecessary heart procedures. [C-J/AKN]

The “lock her up” chants started early and came often at Donald Trump’s campaign event near Fort Lauderdale, Florida on Wednesday evening. [BBC]

Eddie Sexton has always held a passion to become a school principal, and now, after 16 years as an educator, he gets to fulfill that goal as the new principal of Daniel Boone Elementary. [Richmond Register]

In 2011, Gene Sperling had a problem. He was working as President Obama’s chief economic advisor but his government salary did not cover his expenses. He and his wife lived in a Georgetown townhouse valued today at around $2 million, but did not have enough equity to qualify for a second mortgage or credit line. He didn’t want to sell the house and he wanted to keep working at a prestigious but relatively low-paid public service job. [ProPublica]

Former Elliott County Clerk Shelia Blevins and her sister, former Elliott County Deputy Clerk Jeannie Moore, were formally sentenced Friday in Franklin Circuit Court to complicity to commit abuse of public trust under $10,000. [Ashland Independent]

The Obama administration on Friday declared a public health emergency in the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico, saying the rapid and widespread transmission of the Zika virus threatens the health of infected pregnant women and their babies. [Reuters]

From what was described as a “strong pool of candidates from across the country,” the Board of Directors of the Morehead-Rowan County Economic Development Council, Inc., (EDC) has narrowed its search for a new executive director to three or four candidates. [The Morehead News]

Coal mining. Bad management. Runoff from cities and farms. These are all things that are creating major problems for America’s rivers, according to a new report. [ThinkProgress & American Rivers]

In an effort to better serve patients from the Cave City, Park City and Horse Cave areas, T.J. Regional Health has opened the T.J. Health Cave City Clinic. The new clinic at 440 Happy Valley St. provides walk-in medical and injury care. It is staffed with physicians, nurse practitioners, registered nurses and technicians, and is one of several clinics owned by T.J. Regional Health. [Glasgow Daily Times]

BHP Billiton, the world’s largest mining firm by market value, reported a record $6.4 billion annual loss on Tuesday, hammered by a bad bet on shale, a dam disaster in Brazil and a commodities slump. [CNBC]

Kentucky’s Prichard Committee Student Voice Team has received national attention for its advocacy on issues such as increasing school funding in Kentucky. [H-L]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Grandmother) is not optimistic that he will be in charge of the Senate come November ― and Donald Trump, he implied, is not helping matters. [HuffPo]

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Bevin, Too, Sells Popular Board Seats

PEE ALERT! Andy Barr says people are poor because they receive assistance. The fact that the Kentucky Democratic Party can’t rustle up someone to beat this halfwit is a searing indictment of the Party’s inability to do anything other than conduct insurance fraud schemes these days. If you think Candy Barr isn’t out of his league and just as terrible as people like Tim Longmeyer, take a look at his anti-poverty proposal. It involves gutting public education and ending the requirement that financial advisers disclose conflicts of interest to their clients. [John Cheves]

Despite the world’s string high-profile terror attacks this year, the economy remains at the top of American voters’ minds, a new HuffPost/YouGov survey finds. A 45 percent plurality name the economy as one of the two issues most important to them, ranking it first on a list of 10 topics. [HuffPo]

Surprise! A Kentucky Newspaper has finally realized heroin has taken over Eastern Kentucky. Growing up in the hardscrabble hills of Appalachia, Bobby Vaughn began popping painkillers at 15-years-old, sneaking them from his injured coal miner dad. That was the start of a three-decade-long addiction to any drug available: OxyContin, cocaine, meth – and beginning a year ago, heroin. [C-J/AKN]

Advisers say Donald Trump has lately been sullen and erratic in private and easily rattled by perceived slights, according to The New York Times. [The Hill]

After nine years of serving as director of the annual Ashland Independent School safety patrol trip, Maj. Mark McDowell is handing the reins over to Lt. Jason Moore. [Ashland Independent]

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration on Thursday denied requests to stop classifying marijuana as a dangerous drug with no medical use, leaving users and businesses in limbo after many states have legalized it for medical or recreational purposes. [Reuters]

Rowan County soon could be host to Eastern Kentucky’s first microbrewery. That’s according to local businessman Steve Williams, who says he plans to have Scoreboard Pub and Microbrewery at 101 West Main Street open by next spring. [The Morehead News]

Courts are scrambling to rule on state election laws in time for the elections being held later this year. [ProPublica]

When Kentuckyana “Tuck” Jones, who seeks out rare treasures, collectibles and antiquities across the country, decided to open a museum featuring artifacts from across the world in a building on Mammoth Cave Road, he had less than $50 to his name. To raise money to fund the opening of the museum, he began trading collectibles. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Republican insiders are more convinced than Democrats that Donald Trump is so far behind Hillary Clinton that he can’t win in November. [Politico]

GE Lighting announced Thursday that it plans to close its Lexington Lamp Plant and Somerset Glass Plant by August 2017. [WKYT]

Donald Trump believes that running for president has been good for his bottom line. He said so under oath during a deposition he gave in a lawsuit stemming from a dispute over his soon-to-open Washington luxury hotel. [WaPo]

Matt Bevin appointed three people Friday to the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees, including one of Kentucky’s top Republican fundraisers. [H-L]

Some Republicans have argued that conservatives skeptical of Donald Trump should vote for him anyway, if only to prevent Hillary Clinton from nominating liberals to the Supreme Court. But the right’s leading legal scholars reject that idea: the risks of a President Trump would outweigh his influence on the high court. [HuffPo]

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