The KRS/KTRS Are Still A Train Wreck

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Officials asked residents of a Knott County home to evacuate because of the threat of flooding caused by water leaking from a nearby coal mine. [H-L]

Donald Trump promised during his campaign to bring back mining jobs to struggling workers in coal country. Now the president-elect has tapped for commerce secretary a Manhattan billionaire who owned a West Virginia coal mine where 12 workers died in 2006. [HuffPo]

Greg Fischer said those seeking to address gun violence in Louisville and other cities, such as Gov. Matt Bevin, must consider multiple policy levers in order to halt the rise of shootings and homicides. [C-J/AKN]

President-elect Donald Trump’s transition-team adviser on financial policies and appointments, Paul Atkins, has been depicted as an ideological advocate of small government. But the ways that the Trump administration and Congressional Republicans are likely to approach financial deregulation could serve Atkins’ wallet as well as his political agenda. [ProPublica]

The Louisville attorneys representing three people in a lawsuit stemming from a Donald Trump campaign rally want to depose the president-elect before he’s sworn into office. Dan Canon is one of the lawyers representing the plaintiffs suing Trump and others. He said Trump incited violence at his rally in Louisville back in March. [WLKY]

On Thursday, a federal judge in Oregon ruled that a climate lawsuit brought against the U.S. government by a group of youths can move forward, a win for the strategy of fighting climate change through the judicial branch. [ThinkProgress]

Worried about irreparable damage being done to their retirement benefits, a group of public school teachers on Tuesday asked a judge to order Kentucky’s top political leaders to “perform their constitutional and statutory duties” by adequately funding the pension system. [Richmond Register]

A US serviceman has been killed by an improvised explosive device while fighting against so-called Islamic State (IS) in Syria, officials say. [BBC]

The 5,000 electric customers of Kentucky Utilities in Barren and Hart counties, along with the other 541,000 in more than 70 counties across the commonwealth, could get cost hikes in the coming year, pending Kentucky Public Service Commission approval. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Thirty years ago Friday, a shocking announcement was made in the rotunda of San Francisco’s City Hall by a visibly shaken Dianne Feinstein, who was then president of the city’s Board of Supervisors. [NPR]

The financial woes of Kentucky’s public pension systems continue to worsen, but it’s really one of the six plans which is causing the most concern. [Ronnie Ellis]

Mitch McConnell (R-Granny), whose wife Elaine Chao is Trump’s pick for transportation secretary, was asked if he plans to recuse himself from her Senate confirmation process. McConnell’s answer? In a word: no. [WaPo]

The number of homemade methamphetamine labs found in Kentucky has dropped sharply in the past few years as drug abusers switched to imported meth, reducing the danger and cleanup costs associated with the small labs. [H-L]

A Marine wounded in combat in Fallujah, Iraq, in 2004 has found new purpose as a self-proclaimed peaceful warrior fighting against a 1,172-mile pipeline that protesters fear threatens the water source of Native Americans in North Dakota. [HuffPo]

What The Heck Is Going On In Glasgow?

Paintsville Mayor Robert Porter announced his resignation in the wake of a federal corruption conviction. [H-L]

Two big-money donors who have given or raised tens of thousands of dollars for Donald Trump are livid at the Republican presidential nominee and are asking for their money back, according to a bundler who raised money for Trump. [NBC News]

Under Mayor Greg Fischer’s leadership, Louisville has undertaken several studies aimed at better understanding the city’s environmental challenges. A new national ranking suggests it may be time to move beyond research and into action. [C-J/AKN]

In August, the country’s worst natural disaster since 2012’s Superstorm Sandy hit Louisiana. Flooding killed 13 people and left more than 80,000 homes severely damaged. And once again, the American Red Cross’ response left local officials seething. [ProPublica]

Incumbent Republican Sen. Rand Paul is targeted by two separate attack ads released Tuesday, one from the campaign of Paul’s Democratic challenger Lexington Mayor Jim Gray and the other from a PAC supporting Gray. [Ronnie Ellis]

Lawmakers in a state that abolished the death penalty in 2009 want to resurrect it for political gain, according to Democratic lawmakers in New Mexico. [ThinkProgress]

Five of the seven candidates running for commissioner of Ashland answered questions about missing tires, city water and job growth on Monday in a forum hosted by the Human Rights Commission. [Ashland Independent]

Republican candidate Donald Trump has denied the allegation that he violated the US trade embargo with Cuba. [BBC]

Morehead City Council passed an ordinance on Monday evening to allow the sale of packaged alcohol sales on Sunday. [The Morehead News]

The U.S. has lifted sanctions against Myanmar that have been in place for nearly two decades. [NPR]

Everything about this smells scandalous. Glasgow Councilman Gary Oliver, when asked directly by fellow council member Karalee Oldenkamp, still would not reveal his motivation behind asking the city’s legislative body to consider reducing its size, starting with the 2018 election. [Glasgow Daily Times]

When you are threatening to investigate and then jail your political opponent in a presidential debate you have crossed an exceptionally dangerous line. [Boston Globe]

The federal government has denied Kentucky’s request for a one-year extension to comply with regulations known as Real ID, requiring tougher standards for driver’s licenses and identification cards. [H-L]

Donald Trump may be losing ground in Utah, according to a new poll that was conducted after the release of the tape in which the Republican presidential nominee boasts about sexually assaulting women. [HuffPo]

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The First Dem Domino Has Fallen

Tim Longmeyer is just the first shoe to drop in this corrupt Democratic Party roundup by the FBI. The former secretary of the state Personnel Cabinet allegedly took more than $200,000 in kickbacks to steer business to a consulting company and make illegal contributions to political candidates. [H-L]

Tens of thousands of people have signed a petition calling for Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland to allow guns at the Republican National Convention — all in the name of safety. [HuffPo]

At the second local gathering of religious leaders in the wake of the Belgium terror attacks, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer on Wednesday called the responses by some Republican political candidates “naive and unrealistic.” [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump’s heretical positions on foreign policy are multiplying. [The Hill]

Richmond’s industrial park along Duncannon Lane now has a new feature to help attract business, the fastest-available broadband Internet service. [Richmond Register]

Kentucky’s House of Representatives on Friday approved a bill to create a single marriage license form for opposite-sex and same-sex couples that would allow applicants to identify as “bride,” “groom” or “spouse.” [Reuters]

Coal’s days are numbered as the dominant energy source and utility companies had better be ready to deploy other sources, a top electric company official said Monday. “Coal will not return to where it was,” said Kentucky Power President Greg Pauley, citing federal regulations and competition from natural gas and alternative energy sources. [Ashland Independent]

James Hansen and 18 leading climate experts have published a peer-reviewed version of their 2015 discussion paper on the dangers posed by unrestricted carbon pollution. The study adds to the growing body of evidence that the current global target or defense line embraced by the world — 2°C (3.6°F) total global warming — “could be dangerous” to humanity. [ThinkProgress]

The former personnel secretary for then Gov. Steve Beshear and until this week a deputy attorney general for Andy Beshear has been charged by federal officials with setting up a kickback scheme that netted him more than $200,000 during his time in the elder Beshear’s administration. [Ronnie Ellis]

This is not a joke. Senator Al Franken should be the Democratic Party’s choice for vice president. [Politico]

State regulators have told an Eastern Kentucky coal mine to immediately cease operations after a pond overflow released iron-laced water into a stream last week and killed hundreds of fish. [WFPL]

Bernie Sanders has swept to victory over Hillary Clinton in all three states that voted for the Democratic presidential nominee on Saturday. [BBC]

Lexmark, one of the city’s biggest employers, plans to lay off 143 workers in Lexington, beginning May 25, according to a notice filed with the city. The layoffs will be permanent, the notice said. Those cuts came on top of 500 job cuts announced last July. [H-L]

These anti-woman efforts aren’t just taking place in Floriduh, they’re also taking places in Kentucky. And Democrats are cheering the restrictionsi along every step of the way. [HuffPo]

Refugee Freakout Continues For Racists

Gov. Steve Beshear launched a program Monday to help Kentuckians move from a life of drug abuse and addiction to one of sobriety and productivity. [H-L]

Attorney General Loretta Lynch said Tuesday there was “no data” to support the notion that the national debate over the use of force by police has made the country less safe, an idea that has sometimes been referred to as the “Ferguson effect.” [HuffPo]

Just what Kentucky’s working poor need! Once they lose access to health care, they can pay more taxes for the crap that Greg Fischer and his rich daddy want to build and/or destroy. [C-J/AKN]

Five ways conservative media are exploiting the terrorist attacks in Paris to hype misinformation. [MMFA]

Here’s the latest column Greg Stumbo’s LRC staffers have written for him. In the late 1990s, Gov. Paul Patton rolled out a simple but effective campaign summarized by two words: “Education pays.” [Floyd County Times]

Refugees aren’t just slipping into the US. Screening takes two years, and it’s nearly impossible for people to pass. [Vox]

The situation is under investigation by the state department of corrections but the jailer says what happened is just another sign of how bad the drug situation is. [WKYT]

Confusing refugees with terrorists is morally unacceptable and, as a matter of strategy, misguided. [NY Times]

Copper thieves are responsible for a power outage that affected nearly 1,500 Kentucky Power customers in Pikeville Monday night, including the local hospital. [Hazard Herald]

Australia’s Carmichael coal mine project has been under major scrutiny by large conservation groups and prominent Australians for months. Now, progressive think tank the Australia Institute has found just how damaging the emissions from burning coal at the mine could really be. [ThinkProgress]

The Kentucky Auditor of Public Accounts Adam Edelen released the 2014 audit of the former Harlan County Sheriff Marvin Lipfird’s office on Friday. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Fields along the Mississippi River Delta once gleamed white in the autumn with acre upon acre of cotton ready to be picked. But to see the decline of a cash crop once nicknamed “King Cotton” one need look no further than the 300 acres (121 hectares) that Michael Shelton farms in Clarksdale, Mississippi, about 75 miles (120 km) down river from Memphis. [Reuters]

A new mobile activity center that will educate students about agriculture will be on the road to eastern Kentucky after the first of the year. [H-L]

Astronomers have spotted what they believe is the most distant object in the solar system — a dwarf planet floating some 9.5 billion miles from the sun. [HuffPo]

UK Wastes Your Tax Dollars Yet Again

Laughable that the University of Kentucky, with your taxpayer dollars, would attempt to threaten a business for using the word “Kentucky”. [H-L]

President Barack Obama tackled the opioid epidemic on Wednesday by telling health care providers across the country that access to medication-assisted treatment must be expanded. [HuffPo]

Louisville fines don’t stop chronic polluters. A continued manufacturing base and coal-fired electricity helped Jefferson County rank fourth in the nation for industrial toxic air pollution in 2014, up one ranking from the year before, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. [C-J/AKN]

Ben Carson has knocked Donald Trump off of the top spot in Iowa for the first time since July, according to a new poll. [The Hill]

State auditors found no issues with the 2014 financial statement of Metcalfe County Clerk Carol England Chaney. [Glasgow Daily Times]

U.S. Marine General Joseph Dunford, who took over this month as America’s top military officer, pledged on Tuesday to seek new ways to build momentum in Iraq’s battle against Islamic State and bucked descriptions of the conflict as a “stalemate.” [Reuters]

Jared Arnett, executive director of Shaping Our Appalachian Region, talked to the Ashland Rotary Club about progress the group is making to enrich the economy in eastern Kentucky. [Ashland Independent]

Iceland is hunting for Rand Paul! [BBC]

During a special-called meeting on Monday, Harlan County Industrial Development Chairman Harry Gibson updated the board members on the findings regarding a $460,000 debt the Harlan County Fiscal Court said they owed. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Yanira, a 41-year-old Guatemalan national, left her home country with her three children because their lives were in danger from gang violence. She and her family arrived in Texas in February — but they were soon put in an immigration detention center for two months. Yanira now lives in San Antonio, Texas as she awaits her court date for her asylum case. But she said that her experience in a family detention center left her scarred. [ThinkProgress]

State-level data shows that fewer school children who do not qualify for free or reduced-price school lunches are paying full price for meals, Katherine Ralston and Constance Newman report for Amber Waves, part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. [Hazard Herald]

Civil rights lawyers are using a new strategy to change a common court practice that they have long argued unfairly targets the poor. At issue is the way courts across the country sometimes issue arrest warrants for indigent people when they fall behind on paying court fees and fines owed for minor offenses like traffic tickets. [NPR]

Democrats appear to be winning the TV ad war in Kentucky with less than two weeks left until voters pick a new governor and choose a slate of statewide constitutional officers. [H-L]

After a recent federal report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration called for an end to conversion therapy for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth, survivors of the practice joined HuffPost Live last week to discuss their traumatic experiences. [HuffPo]

Community Wifi Should Be A Bigger Deal

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It’s back to the drawing board for the state Transportation Cabinet on its proposed regulations to allow more digital LED billboards throughout the state and let billboard owners cut trees on public rights of way that block their outdoor advertisements. [H-L]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A huge array of ice age fossils, including the bones of mammoths, turtles and horses, were uncovered at a Southern California construction site this summer. [HuffPo]

More communities should be following Greg Fischer’s lead on this wifi matter. [C-J/AKN]

President Obama was in Alaska last week witnessing and warning of a warming world. After a powerful speech at an international Arctic conference hosted by Secretary of State John Kerry for foreign ministers, native leaders, and other dignitaries from 20 countries, President Obama toured the state to see staggering climate changes up close. [ThinkProgress]

Kim Davis is apparently taking time to enjoy being reunited with her family after a federal judge released her from jail Tuesday. [Ronnie Ellis]

The oil-rich West African nation of Angola has a dubious distinction. Its child morality rate is the world’s worst: 157 kids out of every 1,000 die before their 5th birthday. By comparison the child mortality rate in the U.S. is 7 deaths per 1,000. In Europe it’s between 3 and 4. [NPR]

A new event called Third Thursday Shindig has proven to be profitable for downtown businesses. Ann Stewart, marketing director of the Glasgow-Barren County Tourist and Convention Commission, gave a report Tuesday during the commission meeting. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Former National Security Agency chief Keith Alexander said Wednesday that the ex parte, non-adversarial nature of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act court made for a “great debate” and that he was in favor of allowing third-party, friend-of-the-court observations on proceedings — amicus curiae — though he “forgot what you call it.” [The Intercept]

Marriage licenses are still being issued. Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis is out of jail but not back to her office. [The Morehead News]

Dawn Johnson and her domestic partner, Mohamed Diallo, used to live in a shabby Bronx apartment, supported by his job as a mechanic. The building owner allowed the apartment to go weeks without running water and more than a year without heat. [NY Times]

A monkey escaped in Bath County and everybody lost their minds. [WKYT]

As Congress gets back to work this week, it’s facing a nearly unprecedented number of deadlines and political dramas. [WaPo]

More than seven years after public outcry over the demolition of a block of downtown buildings and discussions began on design standards for downtown Lexington, the city is no closer to passing those standards. [H-L]

More children than ever before are living to celebrate their 5th birthdays. But health advocates are disappointed that figures have fallen short of the U.N.’s child mortality goals. [HuffPo]