Will Andy Beshear Stick It To UK???

The federal government told the Bevin administration Thursday that its Medicaid waiver proposal has “sufficient information to evaluate” and it now wants to hear from Kentuckians what they think about the proposal. [H-L]

Major United States dairy producers will pay $52 million to settle an antitrust class-action lawsuit accusing them of slaughtering more than 500,000 cows to reduce milk supply and inflate prices. [HuffPo]

Thousands of union coal miners, including a large contingent from Kentucky, roamed Capitol Hill Thursday urging a vote on legislation to shore up their depleted health care and pension funds. [C-J/AKN]

House Republican leaders are embracing the Senate’s proposal of a government funding bill that would run through Dec. 9 despite opposition from conservatives who want a longer measure to avoid a lame-duck session of Congress. [The Hill]

Attorney General Andy Beshear wants to intervene in a suit by the University of Kentucky against its campus newspaper, The Kentucky Kernel, in a fight over disputed open records related to sexual harassment charges against a former UK professor. [Ronnie Ellis]

About 10,000 retired coal miners and their families descended on the U.S. Congress on Thursday to pressure lawmakers to pass stalled legislation that would prevent 22,000 of them from losing their pension and health benefits as soon as early 2017. [Reuters]

Keith R. Kappes, publisher of the Morehead News, Grayson Journal-Enquirer and Olive Hill Times, announced his retirement today. [The Morehead News]

For years, Democratic elected officials in Washington have been wary of going after Wall Street excesses too hard, lest the deep-pocketed financial industry throw all its resources to Republicans. [ProPublica]

Boyd County emergency workers have a new device in their ambulances they expect will save lives. [Ashland Independent]

On Thursday, California Governor Jerry Brown signed the state’s sweeping climate legislation — passed by the state legislature at the end of August — into law. [ThinkProgress]

Habitat for Humanity of Madison and Clark Counties is picking up the pieces after approximately $3,000 worth of equipment was stolen from them in early August. [Richmond Register]

President Barack Obama took a swipe at Donald Trump Thursday, saying the GOP presidential nominee has contradictory and “outright wacky ideas.” [Politico]

A state judge ruled Thursday that Thomas Elliott can stay on the governing board of the Kentucky Retirement Systems but won’t be allowed to vote. [H-L]

Poles apart. Night and day. Those are the easiest ways to sum up where Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump stand on environmental issues. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets! [CLICK HERE]

Surprise! The Beshears Hate Transparency & Accountability In Kentucky

A longtime champion of Kentucky’s government transparency laws retired Wednesday from Attorney General Andy Beshear’s office after she was reprimanded for speaking with a journalist. [John Cheves]

The 10,000th Syrian refugee to resettle in the U.S. this fiscal year arrived on Monday, the White House announced, following through on an ambitious plan by President Barack Obama to welcome more people from the country. [HuffPo]

U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth and Lexington Mayor Jim Gray, the Democratic nominee for U.S. Senate, are calling for the federal government to help deal with the burgeoning heroin epidemic. And they’re blaming U.S. Sen. Rand Paul for supporting a drug treatment bill that included no money to pay for it. [C-J/AKN]

The State Department said Monday it is concerned about Iran state media reports that the country has deployed an advanced missile defense system around its Fordow underground uranium facility. [The Hill]

This has got to be one of the dumbest moves yet from someone with the surname Beshear! Assistant Attorney General Amye Bensenhaver has retired “under considerable duress” after being reprimanded for speaking to a journalist without permission, creating yet another public relations issue for a government agency that has had more than its share in recent months. [Roger Alford]

Last year 35,092 people died in traffic crashes in the United States, a 7.2 percent year-on-year increase that runs counter to a five-decade trend of declining fatalities, the U.S. Transportation Department said. [Reuters]

Coal-producing states are preparing for arguments next month in the federal appeals court case known as West Virginia v. EPA, challenging the Obama Administration’s Clean Power Plan to limit greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. [WFPL]

Despite yet more evidence of trouble with the Red Cross’ disaster response — this time to floods in Louisiana — Apple, Amazon, T-Mobile, and many others have made the venerable charity the exclusive conduit for helping victims. [ProPublica]

Democratic House Speaker Greg Stumbo said if Republican Gov. Matt Bevin threatened a Democratic lawmaker for refusing to switch parties he could be guilty of criminal behavior or an impeachable offense. [Ronnie Ellis]

Way to go, Appalachia. New analysis from the Clean Air Task Force shows that by 2025 America’s children will experience 750,000 asthma attacks each summer that will be directly attributable to the oil and gas industry. [ThinkProgress]

The battle for the last legislative chamber in the South still controlled by Democrats escalated over the weekend as Republicans announced they would boycott a special meeting this week, while the House Speaker publicly threatened to impeach the state’s Republican governor. [Richmond Register]

In 1988, a small-time drug dealer became the first man charged under a new, harsh drug law signed by then-President Ronald Reagan. Almost 30 years later, President Barack Obama granted a sentence commutation to Richard Van Winrow, a literal posterboy for the history of America’s drug war. [BBC]

A state environmental response team began taking more extensive soil samples Tuesday to test for higher-than-normal arsenic levels along a rural Montgomery County road. [H-L]

Taco trucks on every corner!? SIGN US UP! [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets! [CLICK HERE]

Trump Chickens Come Home To Roost

The Lexington Humane Society is inundated with cats every summer, and this August it’s using its “Purrgressive Pricing” program to help them alleviate some of the overcrowding. [H-L]

Aetna Inc, the No. 3 U.S. health insurer, on Monday said that due to persistent financial losses on Obamacare plans, it will sell individual insurance on the government-run online marketplaces in only four states next year, down from the current 15 states. [HuffPo]

GLI is part of what’s wrong with Louisville and it’s beyond time for everyone to recognize it. An organization like that is not necessary in the modern era. Louisville’s first heat-management plan is flawed and should not be used as the basis for any new regulatory programs aimed at reducing temperatures, the city’s chamber of commerce said. [C-J/AKN]

Boeing Co’s KC-46A refueling plane has been approved for production, with work underway for the first two low-rate initial production lots to be awarded in the next 30 days, the U.S. Air Force said on Friday. [Reuters]

On Friday, Gov. Matt Bevin made several appointments to Kentucky’s Universities and College Boards including two to the Eastern Kentucky University Board of Regents. [Richmond Register]

Federal health regulators have announced plans to crack down on nursing home employees who take demeaning photographs and videos of residents and post them on social media. [ProPublica]

Mayor Chuck Charles said the city of Ashland faces a “no-win” situation prior to the Aug. 23, county-wide election on alcohol sales. On Election Day, all registered voters in Boyd County, Ashland and Catlettsburg can vote to turn the county “wet.” The status would expand alcohol sales in convenience stores, gas stations, grocery stores and other businesses. [Ashland Independent]

More than 70 Republicans have signed a letter to the party’s National Committee head urging him to stop helping Donald Trump’s campaign. [BBC]

Watching AT&T buy favors from Rocky Adkins… AT&T Kentucky Tuesday donated $20,000 to the Rowan County Board of Education to be used for college and career readiness programs. [The Morehead News]

Republican strategists say time is running out on Donald Trump. Though there are more than 80 days to go before the election, GOP skeptics believe the party’s nominee has little time left to straighten out his campaign in order to defeat Hillary Clinton for the presidency. [The Hill]

The State Medical Examiner’s Office in Madisonville has determined that the cause of death for a Butler County couple found Tuesday in their home is homicide, according to a Kentucky State Police release. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Peter Greathouse, a Republican from Utah, says he’s not “comfortable” with Donald Trump as his party’s nominee. Jane Lynch, a GOP veteran from Arizona, says she’ll likely cast her personal vote for libertarian Gary Johnson or a write-in candidate. Loren Byers, a Texas Republican, calls Trump “a loose cannon.” [Politico]

If you’re the state’s most important newspaper, you could do a better job and have some common sense when covering suicide. At a bare minimum, provide links and numbers for resources. At a bare minimum. [H-L]

When Donald Trump unveiled his council of economic advisors earlier this month, observers were quick to note some of the team’s unorthodox attributes: all of its 13 members are men, six are named Steve and only one has an advanced degree in economics. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. [CLICK HERE]

Do You Have A Fun DNC Hangover?

The best part of this – or maybe the most terrifying – is that Republicans in Frankfort have worked hard to fight needle exchanges that prevent this sort of thing. Kentucky saw a dramatic increase in the rate of hepatitis C infections among women ages 15-44 in recent years, according to a new federal report that offers further evidence of growing problems in the state from intravenous drug use. [H-L]

Bernie Sanders again urged his supporters to rally behind presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, telling them it’s much easier to jeer and boo than it is to deal with the reality of Donald Trump as president. [HuffPo]

Eight years ago, Olivia Ann Morris Fuchs stood on the turf at what was then known as Invesco Field at Mile High and watched as other Hillary Clinton delegates gripped the backs of the chairs in front of them – some of them in tears – waiting for Barack Obama to accept the Democratic nomination for president. [C-J/AKN]

President Obama said in an interview broadcast Sunday that Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s comments about NATO show he is unprepared to address issues of foreign policy. [The Hill]

While questions loom about the University of Louisville’s future, its new Board of Trustees met Thursday and took no significant action. And then they called of a special meeting on Tuesday. [WFPL]

An Alaska law requiring doctors to notify the parents of girls under the age of 18 seeking an abortion violates the state’s constitution and cannot be enforced, the state’s top court ruled on Friday. [Reuters]

A local Richmond man wants to say “thank you” to a Madison County Sheriff’s deputy who showed him an act of kindness. [Richmond Register]

A federal agency sends thousands of letters a year to health providers closing out complaints about HIPAA violations. Though the government could make those letters public, it doesn’t. ProPublica has started to do so. [ProPublica]

Boyd County Coroner’s Office issued a warning about a deadly batch of heroin circulating in the area on its Facebook page Friday night. The office reported eight overdoses and one death in the last 12 hours. [Ashland Independent]

Kevin Green’s lawyers were pleading with the governor for mercy. It was spring 2008, and Mr. Green, a 31-year-old who had shot and killed a grocery owner, was on Virginia’s death row. His woes, his lawyers said, dated to childhood; he was born with his umbilical cord wrapped around his neck, repeated three years of elementary school and never learned to tie his shoes. [NY Times]

Only linking to this because the headline mentions “hot mess” – a huge win on any account. [Glasgow Daily Times]

After a lengthy debate and a deal between supporters of Hillary Clinton and Sen. Bernie Sanders, the Democratic Party’s rules committee voted to created a “unity commission” that would dramatically limit the role of convention “superdelegates,” binding roughly two-thirds of them to the results of state primaries and caucuses. [WaPo]

Developer Dudley Webb has released the final renderings for the downtown CentrePointe project. [H-L]

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) labeled Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump a fraudulent plutocrat dividing the country by race, religion and gender to empower the oligarchy, in her speech Monday at the Democratic National Convention. [HuffPo]

Funtimes At The New Ark Park?

If you worry the Creation Museum and its new Noah’s Ark theme park will cause outsiders to think Kentuckians are a bunch of anti-science rubes, at least take comfort in this: Lexington was home to perhaps America’s greatest evolutionary biologist. [H-L]

Two separate attempts to recognize lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals in the Republican Party platform ― a statement of its core ideas and principles ― were voted down by GOP delegates on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

Just wait til the gays wake up to the reality that Bevin has turned UofL into Six Flags Over Jesus University. The University of Louisville Faculty Senate approved a statement Wednesday saying that Gov. Matt Bevin’s recent orders abolishing the Board of Trustees and appointing his own in its place “compromise” the board’s independence and “may affect the institutional ideal of democratically-shared governance at the university.” [C-J/AKN]

The phone would ring almost every week with fundraising appeals from a super PAC called Voters for Hillary. Margo Marquess and her husband, Amitava Gupta, backed the presidential campaign of the former Secretary of State, so they were happy to write checks. In all, they gave $6,000. [ProPublica]

Metcalfe County magistrates opened bids for three bridge projects on Monday, and awarded contracts two companies. Judge-Executive Greg Wilson explained that the county had two bridges, one on Pine Hill Road and another on Jack Shaw Road, that were washed out in 2015 during heavy rainfalls. [Glasgow Daily Times]

It sure is easy for uptight white guys to minimize the African American experience because it makes them uncomfortable. [The Hill]

Doug Cobb, the Louisville businessman who drew recent attention for sharing political opinions on Twitter that are far outside the mainstream, has declined an appointment to the University of Louisville Board of Trustees, according to Gov. Matt Bevin’s office. By “outside the mainstream”? They mean jacked up, homophobic and backwater. [WFPL]

At the theme park Ark Encounter, which opened last week in Williamstown, Kentucky, thousands of visitors can step inside a recreation of Noah’s Ark—built to spec as detailed in the Bible. Inside, exhibits attempt to explain how two of each animal might have fit on the boat, while visitors can pick up souvenirs at the gift shop or eat at a 700-person restaurant on the ship. [FastCo]

Addia Wuchner loves to preach the bullshit of compassionate conservatism but she wouldn’t know what was right for Kentucky’s Medicaid program if it hit her square in her xenophobic face. She’s part of the reason so many Kentuckians remain impoverished, under educated and afraid. [HEAD-DESK]

How American politics went insane. It happened gradually – and until the U.S. figures out how to treat the problem, it will only get worse. [The Atlantic]

I participated in this program something like 20 years ago and think everyone in Eastern Kentucky should get involved. Each September, hundreds of Appalachian citizen leaders travel to Berea College to participate in the Brushy Fork Annual Institute. Widely recognized as one of the premier leadership and networking conferences in Appalachia, the Institute helps residents explore regional issues and develop skills to strengthen their organizations and communities. [Hazard Herald]

The violence in Dallas last week is intensifying worries in Cleveland about visitors and protesters taking firearms downtown during the Republican National Convention, where thousands of people plan to demonstrate. [NY Times]

Central Kentucky religious leaders and Democrats spoke against presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump at Blue Grass Airport Monday afternoon, just hours before he landed in Lexington for a private fundraiser. [H-L]

A black doctor who treated shooting victims of a Dallas attack that left five police officers dead spoke out Monday on the fraught relationship between people of color and law enforcement. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. [CLICK HERE]

SOARing Up, Up & Away To Nowhere

Such a shame no one in Frankfort takes any of this seriously or will ever provide more than lip service. Innovative projects aimed at improving the economy and quality of life of Eastern Kentucky were the theme of a conference in Pikeville Monday, and there were examples in fields from telemedicine and education to agriculture. [H-L]

Donald Verrilli, the administration lawyer whom President Barack Obama picked five years ago to serve as the nation’s top advocate before the Supreme Court, is stepping down at the end of June, the White House announced Thursday. [HuffPo]

When young Cassius Clay returned to his hometown in 1960 after winning an Olympic gold medal as a light heavyweight, he was greeted by hundreds of fans at the airport, and a 30-car motorcade followed him to Central High School, his alma mater. [C-J/AKN]

Arising from the shadows of the American repressed, Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump have been sending chills through the corridors of establishment power. Who would have thunk it? [Bill Moyers]

Ryan Luther makes an annual trek to Rowan County to keep his father’s death in the minds of the community. [The Morehead News]

Republicans face an uphill road to keeping their Senate majority in the November election. Just not in Kentucky. [The Hill]

Still can’t fix hate-filled stupid. Attorneys for Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis and the four area couples who sued her in 2015 will make their cases in federal appeals court July 28, court records show. [Ashland Independent]

The death of boxing great Muhammad Ali cost American Muslims perhaps their greatest hero, a goodwill ambassador for Islam in a country where their minority faith is widely misunderstand and mistrusted. [Reuters]

At 85 pounds, Carmine is one of the smallest visitors to the University of Kentucky Gill Heart Institute’s inpatient unit. But his heart is mighty, and he shares that strength with everyone on the floor. [Richmond Register]

On a spring afternoon in 2014, Brisha Borden was running late to pick up her god-sister from school when she spotted an unlocked kid’s blue Huffy bicycle and a silver Razor scooter. Borden and a friend grabbed the bike and scooter and tried to ride them down the street in the Fort Lauderdale suburb of Coral Springs. [ProPublica]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. [CLICK HERE]

Donald Trump has, purportedly, captured the Republican nomination on the strength of his “straight talk” and his willingness to “give voice to people’s frustrations.” [ThinkProgress]

“All rise!” the bailiff commands as Circuit Judge Tim Philpot takes his seat behind the bench for “motions hour” in Fayette County Family Court. [H-L]

Throughout U.S. history, white Americans have toned down the life stories of radical people of color so that they can celebrate them as they want them to be, not as they were. [HuffPo]

ICYMI: The Dem Scandal Got Entertaining

Attorney General Andy Beshear has hired another veteran of his father’s administration to replace Tim Longmeyer, the former deputy attorney general who resigned and is now facing federal bribery charges. [Press Release & H-L]

Young women of color face particularly tough barriers to success in school, work and life. Now one foundation is working with them to break them down. [HuffPo]

If you’ve been rubbing your eyes and sneezing up a storm, you might be right to blame it on the ‘Ville. [C-J/AKN]

President Obama late Monday scolded members of the media for their coverage of the 2016 presidential race, calling on them to not “dumb down the news” in a campaign with headlines dominated by businessman Donald Trump. [The Hill]

Turns out, one of the people at the center of the latest political scandal in Kentucky is knee-deep in something really exciting. Spoiler alert: it’s probably not entirely safe for work. [Page One]

Three years into a grain market slump, U.S. farmers are set to plant more corn, taking a calculated gamble that higher sales will help them make up for falling prices without triggering even more declines. [Reuters]

AK Steel Corp. CEO Roger Newport has said what Washington legislators are doing to help the steel industry “may be not enough” to help the domestic market make a complete recovery, U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., reported Monday. [Ashland Independent]

This is why people affiliated with the RPK will never call out the disgusting racism, homophobia and bigotry flowing freely in the Republican Party right now. They just tip-toe around it and dismiss it as no big deal. Grossroads GPS money, plain and simple. [Politico]

The attorney representing a Horse Cave police officer intends to accept an offer made by the city of Horse Cave involving one of the city’s police officers. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Rosemarie Allen, lecturer of Early Childhood Education at the Metropolitan State University of Denver, knows a thing or two about school suspensions. [ThinkProgress]

The concept of farm-to-table is in vogue. Restaurants proudly proclaim the individual farms where their ingredients originate, and on-farm dinners trumpet menus entirely sourced from the land on which a diner sits. [Richmond Register]

On November 19, 2014, the door clanged shut behind David Sesson and Bernard Simmons. Sesson put his hands through the food slot to have his handcuffs removed. Both men were in “disciplinary segregation,” a bureaucratic term for solitary confinement, at Menard Correctional Center in southern Illinois. But unlike many in solitary, Sesson and Simmons wouldn’t have a moment alone. [The Marshall Project]

A former state employee said Monday he was fired soon after telling superiors that he feared possible violent reaction over problems with a new public benefits system. [H-L]

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services released a proposed rule on Tuesday to double the number of patients a doctor can treat with an opioid addiction medication that public health officials consider essential. The change could help alleviate the long waiting lists in places hard hit by the opioid epidemic and tilt the U.S. drug treatment system toward a more evidence-based approach. [HuffPo]