Which News Dumps Will Hit Today?

This is what you call good old boy butthurt. Officials with the Bluegrass Area Development District said Tuesday they will continue to pay staff through July as they fight the state’s attempt to take away millions of dollars in federal and state funding for aging and workforce programs by Friday. [H-L]

Robert Murray, owner of the country’s largest private coal company, wasted no time pointing the finger when he announced plans earlier this week to lay off as many as 4,400 workers, or 80 percent of his workforce. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin’s halfwit staffers spent years attacking Steve Beshear for not appointing enough minorities for the University of Louisville’s board. So what do they do? They don’t find any minority appointees. Fascinating how these people operate. Dumber than you could have ever imaged. Not corrupt – dumb. Deeply, deeply dumb. [C-J/AKN]

A review of campaign finance records by The Hill shows that the practice of skirting or openly flouting the contractor ban has become widespread in both congressional and presidential politics. [The Hill]

Any hopes for a better reception for Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed changes to expanded Medicaid in Kentucky vanished pretty quickly at a second public hearing here Wednesday. [Ronnie Ellis]

South Carolina fire officials decided to make sprinklers mandatory in new homes. Homebuilders overturned the rule with help behind the scenes from Gov. Nikki Haley. It was one more win for an industry that has spent millions of dollars in state capitals to block a life-saving upgrade included in the nation’s model building code. [ProPublica]

Liberal state lawmakers have for 16 years pushed for a bill that would amend Kentucky’s civil rights code to protect people from discrimination in the workplace, housing and other areas based on their sexual orientation. [WFPL]

According to experts, white supremacy has experienced a renaissance in the last two years, reaching levels of popularity and influence not seen since the late-1960s. [ThinkProgress]

The Eastern Kentucky Veterans Center in Hazard was presented with a $2,500 check from the County Clerk’s Association on Monday to help the center fund an Independence Day celebration for citizens who truly represent our nation’s liberty and patriotic pride; our veterans. [Hazard Herald]

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump on Wednesday rejected criticism of his campaign tactics, in a wide-ranging speech defending his team’s use of a Jewish star and his own praise of the late Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein. [Reuters]

The Bank of Harlan has been acquired by Monticello Bankshares Inc. in a deal that will see the merger of the two financial institutions. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Donald Trump has to be one of the dumbest people in history. [Politico]

State alcohol regulators prepared a new map a couple of months ago showing Kentucky’s jumble of legally dry, wet and partially wet cities and counties, but it’s already out of date. [H-L]

The Iraqi man who was filmed attacking Saddam Hussein’s statue with a sledgehammer when U.S. troops stormed into Baghdad in 2003 said Iraq was in a better shape under his rule and George W. Bush and Tony Blair should be put on trial “for ruining” it. [HuffPo]

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Maybe Mitch Isn’t In Love With Trump?

The Republican leader in the Senate says most candidates for president have released their tax documents as presumptive GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump insists he’ll wait until after an IRS audit. [H-L]

Two Boston brothers accused of urinating on and beating a homeless Mexican man and telling police “Donald Trump was right: All these illegals need to be deported,” were sentenced to prison on Monday, prosecutors said. [HuffPo]

An atheist group has been stymied in its planned billboard campaign in Kentucky to protest the controversial $92 million Noah’s Ark replica theme park, set to open in July. [C-J/AKN]

From the time we began reporting on the archive provided to us in Hong Kong by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, we sought to fulfill his two principal requests for how the materials should be handled: that they be released in conjunction with careful reporting that puts the documents in context and makes them digestible to the public, and that the welfare and reputations of innocent people be safeguarded. As time has gone on, The Intercept has sought out new ways to get documents from the archive into the hands of the public, consistent with the public interest as originally conceived. [The Intercept]

A 48-year-old Ashland man was indicted on a bigamy charge after he refused to divorce his first wife and married a second. [Ashland Independent]

President Obama inherited two wars from his predecessor, George W. Bush, and has struggled to wind them down. American troops are still in both Iraq and Afghanistan, but their missions have changed and there are far fewer troops in combat than at the heights of those wars a decade ago. [NY Times]

Glasgow Independent Schools Board of Education presented its evaluation of Superintendent Sean Howard for the 2015-16 school year Monday night in its regular meeting at Glasgow High School. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The rich world has got used to health and longevity getting better, and death rates falling for everyone. But over the past few years, data has been accumulating which suggests that this trend has stopped for poorly-educated, white Americans. [BBC]

Disappointed. Sad. Hurt. Shocked. Lorrina Mabry White says she’s experienced all of these emotions and many others since losing her job last month at Maysville Community and Technical College. [The Morehead News]

Donald Trump spent his first two weeks as the presumptive Republican presidential nominee changing his stances on a number of policy issues, sometimes multiple times. That got an interesting defense from one of his senior advisers on Friday. [ThinkProgress]

Only 9.1 percent of Americans lacked health insurance last year, the lowest uninsured rate on record. [Business First]

Millions of Americans live with the possibility that, at any moment, their wages or the cash in their bank accounts could be seized over an old debt. It’s an easily ignored part of America’s financial system, in part due to a common attitude that people who don’t pay their debts deserve what’s coming to them. [ProPublica]

Kentucky transportation officials have started an online service for people to renew their license plates. [H-L]

More than 7 million previously uninsured Americans gained health coverage in 2015, the second full year of the Obamacare coverage expansion, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [HuffPo]

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Andy Beshear’s Big Conflict Remains Hot

The University of Kentucky will lose $12.6 million next year thanks to a 4.5 percent cut in state funding. At the same time, student financial aid and scholarships will increase by more than $20 million, and fixed costs for things such as utilities and employee health insurance are on the rise. [H-L]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) has not been shy about his disdain for the mainstream media. But the Democratic presidential hopeful has rarely, if ever, articulated it as bluntly as he did in an interview that aired on MSNBC’s “The Rachel Maddow Show” on Friday night. Sanders called out the network for its corporate character in a novel exchange with host Rachel Maddow. [HuffPo]

It symbolizes how cavalier we were in 20th century America – a hole dug next to a drinking water source where businesses sent hazardous waste to be buried out of sight and out of mind. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump says he thinks he can win the general election, even if the Republican Party does not unify to support his candidacy. [ABC News]

Andy Beshear says he has no reason to recuse himself from the Longmeyer case so let us break it down for him. Here are the conflicts: LONGMEYER WAS HIS DEPUTY! He’s a longtime friend of Longmeyer’s. Longmeyer worked directly for his daddy. Longmeyer raised/laundered cash for him. Longmeyer is going to prison. Jesus H at the stupid. Someone file a bar complaint against the man posthaste! [Ronnie Ellis]

On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, the presidency of George W. Bush changed instantly. In a new collection of never-before-seen photographs from that day, the president can be seen responding to the worst terrorist attack in United States history — an event that would redefine his time in office and propel the nation into two wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. [PBS]

When it came down to it, John Bland was unhappy and growing desperate. He was 65 years old, had led a life of watching in awe as his grandmother and aunt tried on dresses, mourned the realization that he would never bear a child and spent each day hating the body he had been given. [The News-Enterprise]

President Obama can’t wait to take on Donald Trump. Obama has been largely sidelined in the presidential contest, a last-year officeholder with high approval ratings who has repeatedly shown he likes to spar with political foes. [The Hill]

We think what Greg Stumbo really means is he wants a forensic accounting because an audit is way too random and easy to manipulate. Kentucky House Speaker Greg Stumbo is asking Auditor Mike Harmon if the General Assembly can authorize an audit of another branch of government. [WKMS]

FBI requests for customer records under a secretive surveillance order increased by nearly 50 percent in 2015, according to a U.S. government transparency report published this week. [Reuters]

Supt. Marvin Moore said the relocation of the Rowan County Board of Education’s central office from East Second Street to the old middle school on West Sun Street went better than anticipated. [The Morehead News]

Including a Kentuckian from Henderson. President Barack Obama commuted the sentences of 58 more federal prisoners Thursday, seeking to add momentum to his drive to allow earlier releases of men and women serving lengthy terms for drug offenses. [Politico & Press Release]

Lexington’s push to increase internet speeds will be delayed a few months as the city studies the cost of providing ultra high-speed internet access to Fayette County’s rural areas. [H-L]

Bernie Sanders has said that Hillary Clinton is not a “true progressive” and many of his supporters seem to agree. It’s one reason that Sanders keeps performing well in primaries and caucuses, prolonging the campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination. [HuffPo]

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Surprise! Adam Edelen Suddenly Cares

NOW Adam Edelen cares about the direction of the Commonwealth? Kentucky is headed the wrong way, down a dangerous road. [H-L]

President Barack Obama on Tuesday vowed to pick an indisputably qualified nominee for the Supreme Court and chided Republicans who control the U.S. Senate for threatening to block him from filling the pivotal vacancy. [HuffPo]

A top Bevin administration regulator over banking, insurance, horse racing and other business resigned Wednesday as a director of Kentucky’s major Republican super PAC after The Courier-Journal inquired about potential conflicts of holding both roles. K. Gail Russell, who was appointed Dec. 30 as deputy secretary of the Public Protection Cabinet, resigned Wednesday morning as a director of the super PAC Kentuckians for Strong Leadership, according to both the Governor’s Office and the super PAC. [C-J/AKN]

Polylactic acid (PLA) plastic is an increasingly common, environmentally friendly, alternative to conventional petrochemical-based mass plastics. But it’s a costly process. [Reuters]

House Republican Floor Leader Jeff Hoover, R-Jamestown, went out of his way to praise a Democratic colleague with whom he frequently disagrees — and in doing so subtly suggested most Democrats are afraid to take tough votes or stand up for their convictions. [Ronnie Ellis]

Wealth, jobs and pay inequality are big political issues this presidential primary season, and they’re bound to become bigger once the parties pick their nominees. In the plethora of plans candidates tout for tackling these problems, one favored tool stands out: the federal tax code. [ProPublica]

In the wake of the firing of a Glasgow Police Department sergeant and public information officer, questions have remained about whether any other members of the department were investigated or disciplined. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Former President George W Bush has hit the campaign trail to boost younger brother Jeb’s faltering presidential nomination bid. [BBC]

Employees of Morehead State University were directed last Friday to take immediate steps to reduce expenditures to “an absolute minimum” for the balance of the current fiscal year. [The Morehead News]

Dr. Seth Ammerman listens intently to his new, 21-year-old patient. Ernesto, who does not want his last name disclosed, is homeless. He is earning a high school degree and working part time, but at night, he and his brother share a tent that they set up on the streets of San Jose, Calif. The daily stress of being homeless is wearing Ernesto out, and making him light up too many cigarettes. [NPR]

Providers of community mental health have no choice but to sit and wait in fear of how state budget cuts will affect them, said Pathways Inc. CEO Kimberly McClanahan. [Ashland Independent]

America is getting angrier, according to one watchdog. For the first time in five years, the number of hate groups in the United States rose in 2015, according to a new report from the Southern Poverty Law Center, a legal and advocacy organization known among other things for monitoring extremist activity. [WaPo]

The state’s Kynect health insurance exchange is a financially unsustainable boondoggle that has cost $330 million, Gov. Matt Bevin’s top health officials told lawmakers at the Capitol Tuesday. An hour earlier, at a news conference down the hall, several Kentucky farmers described Kynect as a lifeline that provided their families with affordable health insurance. [John Cheves]

Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump on Tuesday praised two audience members who tackled a protester at his rally in South Carolina. [HuffPo]

Mary Lou Marzian Is Still Fighting Mad

What’s good for the goose is good for the gander. Angered by several anti-abortion bills this winter with language restricting a woman’s relationship with her doctor, Democratic state Rep. Mary Lou Marzian fired back Thursday with a bill to limit men’s access to Viagra and other erectile-dysfunction drugs. [H-L]

The Affordable Care Act is nearly six years old, and over that time it’s made real headway accomplishing some of its key goals. [HuffPo]

We watched in awe on Thursday as former Gov. Steve Beshear went to Louisville and Lexington to announce that he was heading up an organization that would push for Gov. Matt Bevin to change his stance on expanded Medicaid and the kynect health care exchange that has brought Kentucky kudos from around the nation. [C-J/AKN]

The 2016 campaign has bewildered and captivated George W. Bush. At home in Dallas, the 43rd president rises before dawn and reads political news online. He fires off emails to his old advisers to check on the latest campaign-trail gossip. He tunes into the debates, even though they stretch past his bedtime. [WaPo]

Landowners who had opposed efforts to put a natural gas pipeline across 13 counties have been victorious in the Kentucky Supreme Court. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders focused on helping minority communities during a series of campaign events in St. Paul, Minn., on Friday. [The Hill]

Father James Sichko of Richmond’s Saint Mark Catholic Church was in Rome this week where Pope Francis commissioned him and other selected priests as Missionaries of Mercy on Ash Wednesday. [Richmond Register]

What could go wrong??? A Republican-controlled U.S. House of Representatives panel approved legislation to privatize the U.S. air traffic control system on Thursday as part of a six-year bill to authorize funding for the Federal Aviation Administration. [Reuters]

A new transformer is more than meets the eye at the Big Sandy Power Plant. [Ashland Independent]

Most students in the U.S. are learning about climate change in schools, according to a new survey. But the quality of that climate science education is, for many students, questionable. [ThinkProgress]

Hart County magistrates awarded several bids during their regular monthly meeting Thursday morning. Among the bids they awarded was for the sale of various pieces of road equipment. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Minnesota, long accustomed to being a presidential primary season also-ran, is suddenly emerging as one of the most contentious and competitive fronts on Super Tuesday. [Politico]

After years of being knee-deep in the Horse Park shenanigans, Damon Thayer now wants an audit? Fascinating how that works. When the consulting money dried up, he started getting butthurt. [H-L]

For decades, politicians have been celebrated — sometimes even rewarded — for spouting “tough on crime” rhetoric and supporting laws that have inflated the nation’s inmate population and made the U.S. the world’s leading jailer. But voters from both parties have grown weary of such policies and overwhelmingly support broad reforms aimed at reducing the prison population, according to a public opinion poll released [last] week. [HuffPo]

Let The Budget Freakout Fun Begin!

Matt Bevin spoke at a Republican presidential forum in New Hampshire Saturday afternoon, less than 24 hours after declaring a state of emergency and activating the Kentucky National Guard to help residents stranded by a massive snowstorm. [H-L]

The people of Michigan hired themselves a GOP businessman to be governor in 2011. And what they got was children poisoned by public water in Flint. That is, what they got was a government run based on GOP business values. [HuffPo]

The man recently appointed as director of resorts for the Kentucky Department of Parks despite a past violation of the state government ethics code has resigned. [C-J/AKN]

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is considering a third-party bid for president, telling allies he could spend at least $1 billion to mount the uphill climb. [The Hill]

Kentucky’s new education commissioner announced plans Thursday to broaden math and English standards and acknowledged that the system of assessing student achievement remains “a work in progress.” [Richmond Register]

Is it true that rare Italian goats were airlifted to Afghanistan? Did Defense Department employees go to carpet tradeshows in Europe? How about on jewelry-related trips to India? [ProPublica]

A local folk artist’s work is featured in the book “Mommy Goose: Rhymes from the Mountains,” published by the University Press of Kentucky and set to be released Feb. 5. Minnie Adkins of Isonville carved more than 100 pieces for the book by Kentucky native Mike Norris. [Ashland Independent]

On September 9, 2002, as the George W. Bush administration was launching its campaign to invade Iraq, a classified report landed on the desk of the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. It came from Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, and it carried an ominous note. [Politico]

Barren County Detention Center inmates Damien Hurt, left, and Scott Szabo move a desk into an office at the new location of the Barren County county attorney’s office at 220 W. Main St. on Thursday. The county just recently completed the purchase of the building, which had been the home of Bailey and Grissom, a real estate company, for the offices. The former county attorney building approximately two blocks away had issues with bats, bat droppings and other concerns. [Glasgow Daily Times]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… Archaeologists say they have unearthed the earliest evidence of warfare between hunter-gatherers, at a site in northern Kenya. The 10,000-year-old remains of 27 people found at a remote site west of Lake Turkana show that they met violent deaths. [BBC]

Guess some folks in Morehead finally realized Walter Junior’s just been coasting and out of it. A few Rowan County officials told Judge-Executive Walter Blevins that it’s time for him to assume control of his office during Tuesday’s Fiscal Court meeting. [The Morehead News]

At first blush, the FBI’s national crime numbers for the first half of 2015 seem like bad news: Violent crime is up 1.7 percent over the same period last year. [NPR]

The head of the state Education and Workforce Development Cabinet wants a group of elected officials to rebid an up to $11.4 million workforce training grant awarded to the Bluegrass Area Development District in early January. [H-L]

Flint was a failure of government — but it didn’t have to be so. And government wasn’t the root of the problem. It was about the people, and ideas they advocate, who have taken control of governments across the country. [HuffPo]

Bevin Is Your New Dumb Overlord

Fayette Circuit Judge Kimberly Bunnell has ruled in favor of Lexington 1st District Councilman James Brown in a lawsuit that challenged his candidacy. [H-L]

The fossil fuel industry is at a crossroads. Oil and gas giants such as Royal Dutch Shell, ExxonMobil and BP continue to reap stupendous profits from selling products that contribute to the high levels of carbon emissions causing climate change. Like the tobacco industry before it, these companies have poured money into lobbying and misinformation campaigns to escape restrictive regulations. [HuffPo]

Wondering how to further kill Kentucky’s environment? Matt Bevin announced Monday that he will appoint former coal executive Charles Snavely as secretary of his Energy and Environment Cabinet. [C-J/AKN]

Liberty University president Jerry Falwell Jr. urged more students to carry guns on Friday, arguing that if the victims of Wednesday’s attack in San Bernardino, California were armed, they would have been able to protect themselves from the attackers. “I’ve always thought that if more good people had concealed-carry permits, then we could end those Muslims before they walked in and killed them,” he said during the school’s convocation, before teasing the students about his own gun. [ThinkProgress]

Morehead’s First Street could be receiving some much needed construction of walkways and lighting to make the road more pedestrian friendly in the upcoming months. [The Morehead News]

Donald J. Trump called on Monday for the United States to bar all Muslims from entering the country. A prohibition of Muslims – an unprecedented proposal by a leading American presidential candidate, and an idea more typically associated with hate groups – reflects a progression of mistrust that is rooted in ideology as much as politics. [NY Times]

“I don’t care.” That was Mr. Trump’s response to the outcry from the mainstream news media, Democrats and Republican presidential candidates over his call to halt the influx of Muslims into the United States. [NY Times]

Kentucky has been awarded a nearly $4.4 million five-year federal grant to train and employ people with disabilities in the Eastern Kentucky and Louisville metropolitan areas in information technology, manufacturing and healthcare fields. Kentucky is one of four states to receive the grant. [Press Release]

In his statement calling for a complete ban on Muslim immigration to the United States, GOP presidential frontrunner Donald Trump cites as a key part of his argument a discredited opt-in online survey by a far-right anti-Muslim conspiracy theorist. [The Intercept]

The Harlan County Tourism Commission got down to business during the panel’s first meeting, taking action on transient tax collection. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Donald Trump’s anti-Muslim rhetoric undermines US national security by boosting the Islamic State (IS) group, the Pentagon has warned. [BBC]

After a lengthy discussion and a few frustrated participants, the Flatwoods City Council approved the purchase of eight new police vehicles. [Ashland Independent]

NPR’s Audie Cornish talks to Rick Wilson, a former aide to Vice President Dick Cheney, and Matt Moore, a chairman of the South Carolina Republican Party, about Donald Trump’s controversial proposal. [NPR]

Pregnancy can be one of the most exciting and important times in a woman’s life, filled with anticipation of the arrival of the newest part of the family. [H-L]

Former President George W. Bush was a lot of things, but one thing he wasn’t was soft. He responded to the attack on 9/11 by invading not one but two countries, authorized the use of torture and indefinite detention and launched a mass surveillance program. When the occupation of Iraq turned against the U.S., he surged more troops at it. [HuffPo]

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