The KRS/KTRS Are Still A Train Wreck

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Officials asked residents of a Knott County home to evacuate because of the threat of flooding caused by water leaking from a nearby coal mine. [H-L]

Donald Trump promised during his campaign to bring back mining jobs to struggling workers in coal country. Now the president-elect has tapped for commerce secretary a Manhattan billionaire who owned a West Virginia coal mine where 12 workers died in 2006. [HuffPo]

Greg Fischer said those seeking to address gun violence in Louisville and other cities, such as Gov. Matt Bevin, must consider multiple policy levers in order to halt the rise of shootings and homicides. [C-J/AKN]

President-elect Donald Trump’s transition-team adviser on financial policies and appointments, Paul Atkins, has been depicted as an ideological advocate of small government. But the ways that the Trump administration and Congressional Republicans are likely to approach financial deregulation could serve Atkins’ wallet as well as his political agenda. [ProPublica]

The Louisville attorneys representing three people in a lawsuit stemming from a Donald Trump campaign rally want to depose the president-elect before he’s sworn into office. Dan Canon is one of the lawyers representing the plaintiffs suing Trump and others. He said Trump incited violence at his rally in Louisville back in March. [WLKY]

On Thursday, a federal judge in Oregon ruled that a climate lawsuit brought against the U.S. government by a group of youths can move forward, a win for the strategy of fighting climate change through the judicial branch. [ThinkProgress]

Worried about irreparable damage being done to their retirement benefits, a group of public school teachers on Tuesday asked a judge to order Kentucky’s top political leaders to “perform their constitutional and statutory duties” by adequately funding the pension system. [Richmond Register]

A US serviceman has been killed by an improvised explosive device while fighting against so-called Islamic State (IS) in Syria, officials say. [BBC]

The 5,000 electric customers of Kentucky Utilities in Barren and Hart counties, along with the other 541,000 in more than 70 counties across the commonwealth, could get cost hikes in the coming year, pending Kentucky Public Service Commission approval. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Thirty years ago Friday, a shocking announcement was made in the rotunda of San Francisco’s City Hall by a visibly shaken Dianne Feinstein, who was then president of the city’s Board of Supervisors. [NPR]

The financial woes of Kentucky’s public pension systems continue to worsen, but it’s really one of the six plans which is causing the most concern. [Ronnie Ellis]

Mitch McConnell (R-Granny), whose wife Elaine Chao is Trump’s pick for transportation secretary, was asked if he plans to recuse himself from her Senate confirmation process. McConnell’s answer? In a word: no. [WaPo]

The number of homemade methamphetamine labs found in Kentucky has dropped sharply in the past few years as drug abusers switched to imported meth, reducing the danger and cleanup costs associated with the small labs. [H-L]

A Marine wounded in combat in Fallujah, Iraq, in 2004 has found new purpose as a self-proclaimed peaceful warrior fighting against a 1,172-mile pipeline that protesters fear threatens the water source of Native Americans in North Dakota. [HuffPo]

Bevin Isn’t The Pension Savior After All

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Kentucky’s unfunded public pension liability has grown from $30.5 billion to $32.6 billion, a debt that threatens to undermine every other service the state provides, an oversight panel was told Monday. [John Cheves]

Democrats on the House Oversight Committee on Monday asked the committee’s chairman, Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah), to look into President-elect Donald Trump’s financial entanglements and make sure he’s not breaking the law. [HuffPo]

Gunmen exchanged about 20 shots at an annual Thanksgiving Day football event, thrusting Louisville past its homicide record and into the national spotlight. [C-J/AKN]

The Republican Party long insisted that the troubles of the inner city were cultural—but rather than apply the same logic to struggling blue-collar communities, Trump blamed their problems on external forces. [The Atlantic]

The Berea Tourism Commission approved a work addendum in order to pay Jones Signs, a company that recently installed way-finding signage around the city, an additional $68,402.10. [Richmond Register]

Senate Republicans are wary of making a historic move to nix the filibuster despite growing pressure from conservatives. [The Hill]

The generosity of northeast Kentuckians is proven every Christmas season through donations to the Needy Families Fund, a holiday tradition for more than a quarter of a century. [Ashland Independent]

Democrat Hillary Clinton’s campaign will take part in a recount of Wisconsin votes in the U.S. presidential race, an effort Republican winner Donald Trump called “ridiculous” on Saturday. [Reuters]

The Rowan County Fiscal Court voted to move forward with the harm reduction program within the community last week, however the vote wasn’t unanimous. [The Morehead News]

You don’t get a pat on the back for ratcheting down from rabid after exploiting that very radicalism to your advantage. Unrepentant opportunism belies a staggering lack of character and caring that can’t simply be vanquished from memory. [NY Times]

The Barren-Metcalfe County Emergency Communications Center’s governing board received “a standard clean, unqualified” opinion on an audit of its financial statement for the 2016 fiscal year. [Glasgow Daily Times]

How racially resentful working-class whites fled the Democratic Party – before Donald Trump. During the Obama presidency, racial attitudes became more strongly connected to whether whites identified as Democratic or Republican. But those stronger connections were most visible among whites with less formal education. Sorry, Adam Edelen, your bullshit talking point about economics is dead in the water. [WaPo]

Louisville’s streets were quiet on Thanksgiving Day 150 years ago. Few people were out, in part because the mud on Nov. 29, 1866, was so deep, and the city’s street crossings already were “the worst in the country,” wrote the Daily Courier. [H-L]

President-elect Donald Trump falsely claimed on Sunday that “millions of people” voted illegally in the 2016 presidential election. In a conference call with reporters on Monday, Trump’s campaign team did not produce any evidence to support that allegation. But the strangest thing about the president-elect’s claim isn’t that there is zero evidence to support it — it’s that Trump, who has turned away daily intelligence briefings since winning the election, took time out of his day to repeat a rumor that initially spread because of one guy on Twitter. [HuffPo]

Fayette Co Coroner Needs Your Help

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Reminder – Attorney General Andy Beshear wants the Kentucky Supreme Court to settle whether Gov. Matt Bevin had the authority to overhaul the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees, once and for all. [H-L]

Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein’s call to raise funds to support vote recounts in three key states was met with ease late Wednesday, with the fundraiser reaching its $2 million goal in less than one day. [HuffPo]

Maybe, instead of arresting people seeking drugs, we could focus on getting them help? [C-J/AKN]

Hundreds of protesters rallied in Washington, D.C., on Saturday to express outrage at a gathering of white nationalists celebrating U.S. President-elect Donald Trump’s victory, according to media reports. [Reuters]

An Estill County citizens group is taking legal action against three state entities. The organization wants more information on the state’s response to the illegal dumping of low-level radioactive waste in the county landfill. [WEKU]

On Thursday, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) finalized a measure that aims to modernize solar and wind energy development on public lands. [ThinkProgress]

Ashland police needed parts, so the Boyd County Fiscal Court gave them an entire truck. [Ashland Independent]

Republican Sen. John McCain issued a fiery warning to President-elect Donald Trump on the subject of torture Saturday. [Politico]

A Morehead resident is concerned over the air quality in her neighborhood due to a large pile of dirt sitting nearby. [The Morehead News]

Even a well known story depends on where you begin to tell it. In the summer of 1955, Emmett Till, a 14-year-old African-American boy visiting Mississippi, was lynched by white men who said he’d flirted with a white woman. Till’s body was returned home to Chicago where his mother insisted on an open casket. Photos were wired around the globe and the world saw his mutilated body. His murderers would be free within a month. [NPR]

After more than five months of trying to find a place to temporarily house stray dogs, Metcalfe County magistrates have approved a three-year agreement with the Edmonton Veterinary Clinic. [Glasgow Daily Times]

When President-elect Donald J. Trump met with the British politician Nigel Farage in recent days, he encouraged Mr. Farage and his entourage to oppose the kind of offshore wind farms that Mr. Trump believes will mar the pristine view from one of his two Scottish golf courses, according to one person present. [NY Times]

The Fayette County Coroner’s Office is asking for the public’s help as they search for the relatives of a woman who died Sunday. [H-L]

Trump’s roster of key White House advisers and Cabinet officials could, in the end, rank among the least experienced in recent presidential history. [HuffPo]

Go Read Tom Eblen’s Latest Column

Dearly beloved, we are gathered here today to mark the passing of Kynect.ky.gov, Kentucky’s health insurance exchange. WATB Matt Bevin killed it, not because it wasn’t working, but because it was working too well. [H-L]

City officials in Orlando, Florida, on Monday released recordings of mass shooter Omar Mateen’s conversations with police during his standoff at a gay nightclub in June. [HuffPo]

Democratic nominee Jim Gray kept the pressure on U.S. Sen. Rand Paul during the first and only debate in this year’s U.S. Senate race Monday, at one point accusing him of having “wild-ass philosophies.” [C-J/AKN]

For years, police and prosecutors have used special presentations to sell judges on the ​​​​​reliability of drug tests that help convict thousands. [ProPublica]

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray accused U.S. Sen. Rand Paul of having “wild-ass philosophies and theories” in their first and only face-to-face debate of the election year. The at times freewheeling event underscored the candidates’ differences on foreign policy and economic values. [WFPL]

Opening arguments in the trial of a former University of Cincinnati police officer charged with murdering a black Ohio man during a traffic stop focused Tuesday on whether the victim tried to flee from police, putting the officer’s life in danger. [Reuters]

Candidates for the U.S. Senate squared off Monday night on Kentucky Education Television but mostly stuck to the same talking points of their campaigns. [Ronnie Ellis]

Marijuana legalization could spread to five new states next Tuesday. Another four are weighing access to medical marijuana. [ThinkProgress]

The needle exchange program at The Neighborhood will have a change in hours of operation in November. [Ashland Independent]

Two decades ago, Muslim refugees fleeing Bosnia arrived in St Louis and became a crucial part of the city. Now anti-immigrant fervour might lead the Bosnians of St Louis to become more politically active. [BBC]

An outside Republican group, the Republican State Leadership Committee, has poured more money into broadcast ads targeting Democratic state House Speaker Greg Stumbo of Prestonsburg. [Ronnie Ellis]

Mobilizing the voters who are with you is far more important than persuading new ones to support you at this point. [WaPo]

The Clay County judge executive has resigned following charges related to public corruption. [H-L]

Shortly before the 1990 election, at least 150,000 postcards were sent to North Carolina voters in predominantly black precincts. [HuffPo]

A Reminder That Bevin Keeps Losing

Democrats could lose control of their only legislative chamber in the South because of a blustery hero for folks in coal country — Donald Trump. [H-L]

“Go back to Univision.” That’s how Donald Trump answered award-winning journalist Jorge Ramos’ question on the specifics of how the GOP presidential hopeful planned to deport all 11 million undocumented immigrants from the U.S. [HuffPo]

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray’s Senate campaign raised more money than Sen. Rand Paul this summer, but Paul enters the final sprint to Election Day with a cash advantage, campaign finance reports show. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump has repeatedly called this year’s presidential election rigged and has coyly said “I will keep you in suspense” on whether he would accept a Hillary Clinton victory, but many Republicans are less circumspect, according to a new poll. [Reuters]

Matt Bevin lost another round in court Friday when a Franklin Circuit Judge declined to vacate or amend his earlier ruling that Bevin could not abolish the University of Louisville Board of Trustees. [Ronnie Ellis]

President Obama promised to fight corporate concentration. Eight years later, the airline industry is dominated by just four companies. And you’re paying for it. [ProPublica]

Former Kentucky Gov. Paul Patton developed a soft spot for Ashland during his days of growing up in Lawrence County. [Ashland Independent]

The sharp decline in Arctic sea ice area in recent decades has been matched by a harder-to-see, but equally sharp, drop in sea ice thickness. The combined result has been a warming-driven collapse in total sea ice volume — to about one quarter of its 1980 level. [ThinkProgress]

Voters will decide early next year whether to allow the sale of packaged alcoholic beverages in Monroe County. [Glasgow Daily Times]

“Do you speak English?” When Hua-Yu Sebastian Cherng walked into his summer school classroom for the first time as a brand-new teacher, a student greeted him with this question. Nothing in his training had prepared him to address race and identity. But he was game, answering the student lightly, “Yes, I do, but this is a math class, so you don’t have to worry about it.” [NPR]

Morehead area citizens made their concerns known last week over the alleged lack of zoning enforcement within city limits. [The Morehead News]

As the worst of a nationwide opioid epidemic raged in Appalachia, DEA investigators went after companies distributing millions of highly addictive pills. Then, their cases ground to a halt. [WaPo]

Fayette Circuit Court Judge Pamela Goodwine erred when she excluded the death penalty as a potential sentencing option in a murder and robbery case, the Kentucky Supreme Court unanimouly(sic) ruled Thursday. [H-L]

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump will “100 percent” accept the results of the U.S. election if it is fair, his son Eric Trump said on Sunday. [HuffPo]

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Bevin: Northerner WATB Still Being WATB

Lexington’s minimum wage will roll back to $7.25 an hour after the state Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Kentucky cities do not have the authority to raise the minimum wage. [H-L]

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump opened a rally on Thursday by mocking widespread concerns that he may not accept the results of November’s presidential election. [HuffPo]

The University of Louisville’s real-estate foundation voted Friday to approve a paper transaction that will restore $29 million to the books of the university’s endowment. [C-J/AKN]

The drug industry’s answer to opioid addiction: more pills. [WaPo]

Homeownership is a dream not only of U.S. born citizens but of many who arrive here from other countries. In Kentucky, more than 26,000 immigrants own their homes. [WFPL]

President Barack Obama may be plotting a return to his community organizing roots. When he leaves the White House, Obama wants to create a “platform” to train the next generation of leaders and activists, he said during a town-hall event broadcast on ESPN Tuesday evening. [Politico]

While access to oral health care for children in Kentucky has increased since 2001, more still face urgent dental needs, according to a new study. [Richmond Register]

As Election Day approaches and the polls continue to look dire for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, he is pinning the blame on everything except himself. [ThinkProgress]

Matt Bevin’s attorneys were back in Franklin Circuit Court on Wednesday asking Judge Phillip Shepherd to reconsider his ruling that the governor cannot abolish and re-create the University of Louisville Board of Trustees. [Ronnie Ellis]

Global health officials are racing to better understand the Zika virus behind a major outbreak that began in Brazil last year and has spread to almost 60 countries. [Reuters]

Voters will decide early next year whether to allow the sale of packaged alcoholic beverages in Monroe County. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Ohio Gov. John Kasich has a grave warning for the GOP. “If the Republican Party does not evolve, the Republican Party is going to die,” Kasich said in an interview with Business Insider published Saturday. [The Hill]

The wife of the alleged ringleader in the theft of more than $100,000 worth of bourbon from Central Kentucky distilleries has accepted a plea deal on a couple of drug-related charges. [H-L]

It was a tacky, hostile and personal insult, but for Trump, it was actually a euphemism of sorts. Women around the world instantly knew what he was really saying. [HuffPo]

Anyone Remember The Iraq Quagmire?

A federal grand jury has indicted two men who are accused of distributing elephant tranquilizer that resulted a string of overdoses in Rowan County. [H-L]

When Sarbast Salih and his men enter a house formerly held by ISIS, they don’t go through the front door. Instead, they shimmy in through a window. [HuffPo]

When Pierce Mumaw’s students ask who he’ll vote for in the upcoming presidential election, he’s unapologetically honest about his conservatism. [C-J/AKN]

Haha, they think he’s from Ohio. Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Ohio) on Saturday dismissed Donald Trump’s repeated claims that the November election will be rigged. [The Hill]

If you think this isn’t a Larry Clark-Damon Thayer good old boy political situation, you’re part of the problem. What this story doesn’t mention is that Thayer is advised by RPK’s spokesperson, who advocates for the repeal of label taxes and all that. Fun how that’s all overlooked. Thayer wanted it in the bill. [WFPL]

The U.S. economy is on track to grow at a 1.9 percent annualized pace in the third quarter following the September data on domestic retail data, the Atlanta Federal Reserve’s GDP Now forecast model showed on Friday. [Reuters]

The removal of sludge from the city of Ashland’s water reservoir, a process that hasn’t taken place in eight years, is set to begin. [Ashland Independent]

It took Nick Alati half a day to cast a ballot in Arizona’s August primary — and his vote didn’t even count. [ProPublica]

Local historical figures will come to life Nov. 4-5 in South Central Kentucky Cultural Center’s Harvest of History, a living history event that doubles as a fundraiser for the cultural center. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Donald Trump appeared to question the legitimacy of Barack Obama’s presidency on Saturday, referring to him at a rally as the “quote ‘president.’’’ [Politico]

Sharon Sandifer-Bethea of Morehead is happy but anxious about the latest step in efforts to have her criminal record expunged. [The Morehead News]

Their public conference had been interrupted by a demonstration march and a bomb threat, so the white nationalists decided to meet secretly instead. They slipped past police officers and protesters into a hotel in downtown Memphis. The country had elected its first black president just a few days earlier, and now in November 2008, dozens of the world’s most prominent racists wanted to strategize for the years ahead. [WaPo]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is in a pickle. The senior Kentucky Republican began the year with a tough Senate electoral map. A wildly unpredictable Republican presidential nominee, Donald Trump, has possibly made that map even harder. [H-L]

Following the news of yet another “warmest month ever,” NASA has basically called it: This year will be the hottest since record-keeping began in 1880. [HuffPo]