Let’s Relive Bevin’s High Court Loss

A Fayette district judge’s ruling on a 2016 amendment to the drunken-driving law has prosecutors and defense attorneys battling in court. [H-L]

Shutting down for-profit detention facilities would hurt Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s ability to do its job, agency director Sarah Saldaña said Thursday amid a review over whether the government should do just that. [HuffPo]

In a ruling that has as much impact on state politics as the state purse, the Kentucky Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Gov. Matt Bevin violated his power last spring in unilaterally ordering funding cuts to state universities. [C-J/AKN]

Warplanes launched some of the heaviest air strikes yet on rebel-held areas of Aleppo on Friday after the Russian-backed Syrian army declared an offensive to fully capture Syria’s biggest city, killing off any hope of reviving a ceasefire. [Reuters]

The four-year graduation rate at Eastern Kentucky University has nearly doubled in the past seven years. [Richmond Register]

If you notice the news and/or aren’t that guy in Plato’s favorite cave, you’ve probably already suffered rage-induced anaphylaxis while reading about the cool 600 percent price increase for EpiPens in recent years. [ProPublica]

Thursday’s Kentucky Supreme Court ruling that Gov. Matt Bevin can’t reduce university funding on his own didn’t surprise many who listened to oral arguments before the court last month. [Ronnie Ellis]

On Wednesday, Donald Trump Jr. told Pittsburgh Tribune-Review he doesn’t think the Trump Organization’s international operations would be problematic if his dad were elected president. [ThinkProgress]

Barren Circuit Judge John T. Alexander has upheld the city’s January decision to fire Michael Burton, who was a Glasgow Police Department sergeant at the time. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Our team that’s been travelling across the northern US hearing from voters is now at the halfway stage – crossing the states of North Dakota and Montana. There, our North America correspondent, Aleem Maqbool has been looking at the thorny issues surrounding the oil industry and climate change, in a place that’s directly affected by both. [BBC]

On Wednesday, Kentucky legislators listened to a presentation about the benefits of medical cannabis from Don Stacy, a cancer doctor and medical liaison for pro-legalization group Alliance for Innovative Medicine. [WFPL]

Ruling on a lawsuit filed by a state’s Democratic attorney general against its Republican governor, the Kentucky Supreme Court says Gov. Matt Bevin doesn’t have the authority to unilaterally slice money out of a state university’s budget. [NPR]

In the summer of 1969, a man picking flowers along the secluded Little Shepherd Trail in Harlan County saw a body on the side of a hill, so decomposed it was hard to tell if it was a man or woman. [H-L]

Republican vice presidential candidate Mike Pence on Thursday said Americans should refrain from speaking about racial bias within law enforcement immediately after police shootings to help bring unity to communities like Charlotte, North Carolina, where violent protests raged this week over the police shooting of a black man. [HuffPo]

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Louisville Has Become Shooting Central

Last month, it appeared that Hillary Clinton’s joint fundraising committee had given nearly $800,000 to cash-poor Kentucky Democrats. Turns out it wasn’t theirs to keep. [H-L]

Donald Trump cannot possibly serve as president if he keeps embracing Russian leader Vladimir Putin, two top former spymasters argued in a scathing editorial. [HuffPo]

FBI agents out of the Louisville Division are going to increase their role in battling gangs and the drug trade here and across Kentucky after a surge of activity. [C-J/AKN]

As Chuck DeBonis was wrapping up his stint as a civilian paramedic at a military base in Kuwait earlier this year, he found a home he wanted to buy in the Virginia town of Bristow for his return. [Reuters]

The Coal Fields Regional Industrial Park is sprawled across 400 acres of land in Perry County and has more than 200,000 square feet of warehousing space. But 20 years after its construction, just three companies call it home. [Richmond Register]

A tenth of the planet’s wilderness was eradicated in the last two decades and conservation efforts are failing to keep pace with the rate of wilderness loss, according to a new study. [ThinkProgress]

The murder tally in Louisville is spiking this year. As of Wednesday, Louisville Metro Police report 81 homicides since the beginning of the year. That’s the highest year-to-date total since at least 2006, police records show. [WPFL]

President Barack Obama has nominated the first Muslim-American to serve as a federal judge, saying the D.C. based-lawyer would serve “with integrity and a steadfast commitment to justice” if confirmed. [Politico]

A great football player, for sure. But the late Howard Murphy was every bit a great person, too. [Ashland Independent]

Two Americans have been arrested and charged for allegedly helping to hack high-ranking US government officials. [BBC]

Whose money is it? That’s one question Park City commissioners tried to answer Tuesday when talking about the more than $4,000 in a bank account that is earmarked for the upkeep of the veterans memorial. [Glasgow Daily Times]

At last, Bill Clinton could not help himself. He paced the stage during a speech on Tuesday in North Carolina, holding his microphone close. He raised his left index finger. And at once, the meandering address turned sharply, and without prompting, to his charitable foundation, a magnet for criticism in recent weeks. [NY Times]

This is just gross. Hunt Brothers Pizza will be the official pizza of Rupp Arena and its concession stands beginning this fall, Lexington Center announced Wednesday. [H-L]

It’s no secret that Donald Trump hasn’t exactly been a choirboy during his presidential campaign. [HuffPo]

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Rand Paul Is Still Just A Tiny Texan Troll

Rand Paul is the reason so many miners are suffering, their pensions are disappearing and they have no hope. Twats like the Miniature Texan and his drunken, DUI-prone spokesperson are why Kentucky can’t have nice things. Because you can’t fix that kind of stupid. [H-L]

UK has been pooping its pants for years. Not nearly as badly as UofL but pretty damn close. The University of Kentucky’s ongoing lawsuit against its student newspaper prompted a dramatic split among the 21-member UK Board of Trustees Friday, with one trustee saying he was told President Eli Capilouto would resign if he brought the issue to a vote. [More H-L]

Thick, massive cakes of smelly green toxic algae bubbled up along beaches and rivers in South Florida’s coastal communities this summer. It was so serious, authorities declared a state of emergency. [HuffPo]

The University of Kentucky’s lawsuit against its student newspaper, the Kentucky Kernel, over an open records dispute is on the UK Board of Trustees’ radar as the group continues to meet in Bowling Green on Friday. [C-J/AKN]

Under the leadership of University of Louisville Foundation President James Ramsey, the value of the university’s foundation – adjusted for inflation – dropped 19 percent, or $131 million, from 2006 through April this year. [More C-J/AKN]

Republican incumbents are leading their Democratic Senate challengers in four crucial swing states, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Friday. [The Hill]

You should check out the crazy lady Matt Bevin campaigned for in Morehead. Matt Bevin came to Morehead Thursday to campaign for Wendy Fletcher, Republican candidate for state representative in the 99th District. [The Morehead News]

The notes are handwritten on a legal pad and provide a verbatim account of the shock, pain and grim determination aboard Air Force One on Sept. 11, 2001. [Reuters]

You can bet both parties are doing a lot of polling in the contest for control of the state House of Representatives. [Ronnie Ellis]

As soon as Stewart Anderson stepped foot inside the Lorton Reformatory, a Virginia prison, he knew he’d have to work for negligible pay in order to endure his 20-year sentence. [ThinkProgress]

Things are looking up for some Kentucky workers. That’s according to a new report from the left-leaning Kentucky Center for Economic Policy. [WFPL]

Donald Trump’s broadside against the top military brass is drawing warnings of a crisis in civilian-military relations should he become commander in chief and begin bypassing generals and admirals now serving under President Barack Obama. [Politico]

The Madison County Cooperative Extension Board has the lowest property tax rate of any local entity, but it will go up slightly for 2016. [Richmond Register]

Once upon a time, in New York City in the 1950s, a little boy didn’t like his second-grade music teacher, Charles Walker. So, the boy later boasted, he slugged Mr. Walker, giving him a black eye. [NY Times]

University of Louisville trustees are threatening to sue the school’s foundation for what they see as a lack of accountability in the university’s fundraising arm. [H-L]

A major ruling expected Friday from a federal judge could derail construction of a controversial oil pipeline in North Dakota. [HuffPo]

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And Miles To Go Before We Sleep…

This… wow. All the makings of a scandal. Billy Joe Miles, a prominent farm businessman in Owensboro and a former chairman of the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees, was charged Tuesday with rape, sodomy and bribing a witness. He is 76. He has four children. Daughter Suzanne Miles is a Republican state representative for the 7th House District, which includes Daviess, Henderson and Union counties. [H-L]

Donald Trump is living large on his donors’ dime. His campaign is spending lavishly on Trump businesses instead of cheaper alternatives. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin, who came into office last year saying that he didn’t owe anyone anything because he largely paid for his own election, is still raising money for his old campaign, which at last count owed him more than $4 million. [More C-J/AKN]

Physicians whose state boards have sanctioned them for harming patients, unnecessarily prescribing addictive drugs, bilking federal insurance programs and even sexual misconduct nonetheless continue to receive payments for consulting, giving talks about products, and more. [ProPublica]

Congressman Thomas Massie, R-Ky., seeks an end to the lame-duck session, but predicted Congress will likely pass a continuing resolution when it returns to Washington that could lead to another omnibus spending bill in December. [Ashland Independent]

Americans of a certain age who follow politics and policy closely still have vivid memories of the 2000 election — bad memories, and not just because the man who lost the popular vote somehow ended up in office. For the campaign leading up to that end game was nightmarish too. [NY Times]

Metcalfe County magistrates approved on second reading Tuesday during a special-called meeting the county’s alcohol ordinance. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Refugees can be an economic boost, not burden, to the communities that host them, a new study by the United Nations concludes. [Click the Clicky]

On International Overdose Awareness Day, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced $53 million in funding to 44 states, four tribes and Washington, D.C., to improve access to treatment for opioid use disorders, reduce opioid related deaths and strengthen drug misuse prevention efforts. [Richmond Register]

What does it mean to be a Republican? For generations, the answer had been clear: A belief in individual liberty. Free markets. Strong national defense. But what does it mean to be a Republican today? With Donald Trump as the party’s new standard-bearer, it’s impossible to say. [Dallas Morning News]

Morehead State University officially welcomed four new Board of Regents members – Adam Abbott of Buckhorn, Craig Preece of Lovely, Patrick Price of Flemingsburg and Terri S. Walters of Pikeville – Friday, Aug. 26, at its special meeting. [The Morehead News]

Retired coal miners and their congressional allies are shifting into overdrive in their push for Congress to pass legislation shoring up their retirement benefits. [The Hill]

Eric C. Conn’s attorney has filed a notice of compliance last week with court orders imposed Aug. 19 asking that the court be updated on the status of Conn’s malpractice insurance. However, court documents show that a judge’s order allowing Conn’s assets to be unfrozen was based on the incorrect information that Conn did have valid malpractice insurance. [Floyd Chronicle]

Years after the issue was debunked, Donald Trump still refuses to back away from the birther conspiracy he helped fuel. [HuffPo]

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When Will The Bevin-Beshear Fight End?

The president of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools has expressed concern about “the potential for undue political influence” in Gov. Matt Bevin’s overhaul of the University of Louisville’s governing board. SACS President Belle S. Wheelan said in an Aug. 18 letter to acting University of Louisville President Neville G. Pinto that “there is evidence of significant accreditation-related issues” involving Bevin’s changes at U of L that are being challenged in court by state Attorney General Andy Beshear. [H-L]

Donald Trump’s new campaign manager, Kellyanne Conway, found herself in the unenviable position Sunday morning of having to defend one of the candidate’s most despicable tweets ever. [HuffPo]

Judicial candidates in Kentucky can make misleading statements but they can’t tell outright lies. [C-J/AKN]

The prescriptions you have in your medicine cabinet might not be as private as you believe they are. Thirty-one states grant law enforcement warrantless access to databases containing drug histories, and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration is pushing hard to search records even in states that have privacy safeguards. [WCPO]

I suspect most people are paying only passing attention to the multiple court battles between Republican Gov. Matt Bevin and Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear. But the stakes are high and, depending upon how the courts rule in the various suits and Bevin’s potential reactions, these cases are likely to make history and set precedents that will affect Kentucky state government for years. [Ronnie Ellis]

Now for some startling opinions about race relations and the current leader of the Republican Party, Donald Trump. [The Hill]

Louisville-based GE Appliances, part of the Haier Group, plans to close a water heater manufacturing line that it launched in 2012 at Appliance Park. [Business First]

Nearly a third of U.S. counties will likely be served by only one insurer that participates in an Affordable Care Act (ACA) marketplace in 2017, according to an analysis published Sunday by the Kaiser Family Foundation. [Reuters]

Brenda Stamm will face a familiar challenger this fall as she seeks another term on the Rowan County Board of Education. [The Morehead News]

The U.S. Department of Justice announced that it would phase out its use of private prisons. While significant, the move will not put an end to the booming immigrant detention industry. Private prison companies will continue to receive millions in government contracts to detain unauthorized immigrants. [ProPublica]

Officials in several states are scrambling to deal with a series of heroin overdose outbreaks affecting dozens of people and involving at least six deaths. [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump made a direct pitch to Iowa’s farmers in a speech here Saturday — and then pivoted back to his appeal for support from African-Americans, even though there were virtually none in the audience. [Politico]

How do you document Kentucky history that has been mostly hidden and, until 1992, was technically illegal? [Tom Eblen]

Someone using an email address connected to Harold Bornstein, Donald Trump’s doctor, apparently doesn’t want to miss out on the opportunity to cash in on the GOP presidential nominee’s campaign. [HuffPo]

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UK Is Run By A Bunch Of Assholes

Eastern Kentucky needs your love. She died alone in the middle of the night, and her body was swiftly autopsied, embalmed and carted 135 miles to a remote Kentucky county where she had been raised. [H-L]

The Department of Justice made a landmark decision last week when it announced it would direct the Bureau of Prisons to let its contracts with private prison companies lapse. But last week’s change in policy left the U.S. Marshals Service untouched, even though that agency is also under DOJ control and keeps nearly as many people locked in privatized jails as the Bureau of Prisons. [HuffPo]

You know, like Jim Ramsey took the high road when attacking ON TELEVISION anyone questioning Robert Flener, who went to prison. “Chairman Benz needs to keep his comments on the high road and work with all of the UL staff, its affiliated boards and their leadership, and the media to promote harmony,” said Hughes, who also serves on the Board of Trustees. [C-J/AKN]

A bipartisan quartet of lawmakers is circulating a letter that seeks to delay a pending arms sale to Saudi Arabia. [The Hill]

With just less than six weeks before a countywide election to determine whether legal alcohol sales will be allowed in Barren County, election officers are seeking some temporary polling places. [Glasgow Daily Times]

North Carolina’s university system must allow two transgender students and a transgender employee to use bathrooms matching their gender identity, a U.S. judge ruled on Friday, in a partial victory for those fighting the state’s restrictive restroom law. [Reuters]

The first guy was believable but Russ Meyer doesn’t carry the same credibility. That’s problematic, sure. His ties to Adam Edelen and the the Cormans also do not help him. But that doesn’t mean what he’s saying is in any way untrue. Thankfully for him, Sinnette’s story went public first, establishing a pattern. It’s clear that the Bevin team is attempting to retaliate against ANYONE holding them accountable. A second Democratic state lawmaker now claims Republican Gov. Matt Bevin tried to persuade him to switch parties and that the governor’s chief of staff threatened to punish him politically when he refused. [Ronnie Ellis]

Physicians whose state boards have sanctioned them for harming patients, unnecessarily prescribing addictive drugs, bilking federal insurance programs and even sexual misconduct nonetheless continue to receive payments for consulting, giving talks about products, and more. [ProPublica]

Louisville can’t stop killing everybody. Two vigils were held for three different victims of homicides near Shelby Park this week. [WDRB]

Hillary Clinton and Paul Ryan don’t agree on much — but both are lending their support to an anti-poverty proposal that cuts across racial and party lines. [Politico]

The University of Kentucky could soon be taking legal action against its own school newspaper. [WHAS11]

Hillary Clinton has launched a full broadside against Donald Trump, accusing her Republican opponent of issuing a “steady stream of bigotry” and espousing policies that would “put prejudice into practice”. [BBC]

State Rep. John Short, whose name surfaced this year in a federal vote-buying investigation in Magoffin County that led to several convictions, said Tuesday that he doesn’t want to discuss the case. [John Cheves]

A massive crack in one of Antarctica’s largest ice shelves has grown exponentially in recent months, and scientists worry a break-off could destabilize the entire structure. [HuffPo]