Bevin Still Stiffs The Working Poor

The city of Lexington must pay federal environmental regulators $16,800 for failing to keep paperwork of employee training and other safety records at the West Hickman Wastewater Treatment Plant. [H-L]

For all that Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has talked about immigration, the specifics of his deportation policies can be difficult to parse. The biggest question: Trump has said he wants to “round up” and deport all undocumented immigrants, but how, exactly, would he do it, if at all? [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin’s administration unveiled its long-awaited plan to reshape the state’s Medicaid program Wednesday, and while it restores some benefits Bevin proposed be cut two months ago, it retains the most controversial components of the governor’s approach to overhauling the federal-state health plan for low-income and disabled Kentuckians. [C-J/AKN]

Middle- and lower-income children don’t visit eye doctors as often as wealthier kids, and as a result, thousands of them may have undiagnosed sight-threatening conditions, U.S. researchers say. [Reuters]

Several changes could be coming to Grayson’s rules regarding sale of alcoholic beverages. During last Tuesday’s meeting, the City Council heard proposals from ABC Coordinator Willis Johnson on behalf of the alcohol retailers in the city. [Ashland Independent]

Republican racists – which is most of them in Frankfort these days – are freaking out that the Obama Administration is actually trying to help Eastern Kentucky. [White House]

The future of a road leading to one of Rowan County’s most popular recreation hangouts is up in the air. [The Morehead News]

Yet more embarrassing homophobic/transphobic news that’s gone national, courtesy Matt Bevin. Way to go, Republicans, for spreading hate. [NBC News]

What now? That is a question that can apply in several instances in relation to the closing of the Monroe County Jail. [Glasgow Daily Times]

High school graduates from Northeastern states score highest on a key standardized test for college admissions, while students in Southern and Western states struggle most to meet educational benchmarks. [The Hill]

Greg Stumbo had his LRC staffers come up with a column about special education teachers. Maybe he could learn something by digging into the Montgomery County mess we’ve uncovered the past few years. [Floyd County Times]

Donald Trump may be “softening” his incendiary language on immigration, but those versed in the complexities of immigration law say his plan has gone from unrealistic to downright incomprehensible. [Politico]

Federal labor officials have sided with the Bluegrass Area Development District in an ongoing dispute with the state over a multimillion-dollar federal workforce training program that serves 12,000 out-of-work or underemployed people in Central Kentucky. [H-L]

I started working at the county jail in 1995 as a correctional officer ― just your basic entry level position. I became sergeant there, where I supervised staff and an entire shift. And then I took a position called a ‘Correction Specialist One,’ which dealt with mental health issues within the facility. [HuffPo]

Way to go, Montgomery County. Maybe your corrupted sheriff’s department can some day work to help addicts instead of just cleaning up after them when they’re dead. Twelve heroin overdoses were reported Wednesday in Mount Sterling and surrounding Montgomery County, police and the sheriff’s department said. [More H-L]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets! [CLICK HERE]

University of Louisville Keeps It Real By Constantly Retaliating Against Anyone Pushing For Accountability

Black students in Kentucky were suspended four times more often than white students in 2015, according to a report released Thursday. [H-L]

The Obama administration has joined the fight against the American bail industry, telling a federal appeals court that bail practices that keep poor defendants locked up because they cannot afford to purchase their freedom are unconstitutional. [HuffPo]

This is the University of Louisville way – retaliate against those attempting to hold them accountable. And when that doesn’t work and people fight back? Try to destroy them in the press. [C-J/AKN]

Wild bees that forage from oilseed rape crops treated with insecticides known as neonicotinoids are more likely to undergo long-term population declines than bees that forage from other sources, according to the findings of an 18-year study. [Reuters]

Surprise! The cityfolk are shocked that vote-buying is still going on in rural Eastern Kentucky. [WFPL]

Two K Street firms caught up in the web of Paul Manafort’s influence have hired outside counsel to look into whether a former client he referred to them lied about its source of funding. [The Hill]

A new Morehead State University president should be able to work with lawmakers, get chummy with generous alumni, collaborate with community college officials and communicate well with the university’s students, staff and faculty. [Ashland Independent]

Matt Bevin is a bigot. Matt Bevin’s administration is suing the federal government to block a rule that says medical providers and insurance companies can’t discriminate against transgender patients. [WFPL]

Each school in the Rowan County School District, from preschool through high school, now is offering free breakfast and lunch to every student. [The Morehead News]

Donald Trump used his campaign funds to buy thousands of copies of his own book at retail cost, simultaneously diverting donor money back into his pockets while artificially boosting his sales figures. It’s a tactic that may be illegal, campaign finance experts say. [TDB]

Cave City Council members voted earlier in the week to enter into an inter-local agreement with the Barren River Drug Task Force. City officials cited a desire to help combat the ever growing drug problem as a reason for rejoining the drug task force. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The nation’s first “soda tax” on sugar-sweetened beverages, which went into effect in Berkeley, Calif., last year, appears to be working. According to a new study, consumption of sugary drinks — at least in some neighborhoods — is down by a whopping 20 percent. [NPR]

An attorney for Steven Edwards, who was fired this month as commissioner of the Kentucky Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control just five months after Gov. Matt Bevin appointed him, said Edwards has not been given any reason for his dismissal. [John Cheves]

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton leads Republican rival Donald Trump by 12 percentage points among likely voters, her strongest showing this month, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll released on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets! [CLICK HERE]

Hillary To KDP’s Rescue? Probably Not

Surprise! The Republicans are just as bad as the Democrats. The daughter of Energy and Environment Secretary Charles Snavely landed a $38,000-a-year non-merit job this month in the office of Gov. Matt Bevin. [H-L]

After the chairman of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign resigned on Friday, former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski tried to insist Trump’s bid for the White House was going just fine. Lewandowski, who was fired by Trump in June, drew a puzzling parallel to make his point, arguing that in 2004, John Kerry was also making staff changes as the election approached. [HuffPo]

A Hillary Clinton political committee transferred $793,000 to the Kentucky Democratic Party in July – a huge and apparently sorely needed infusion of cash for Kentucky Democrats, who so far this year have struggled to compete with the Republican Party of Kentucky in the fundraising battle leading up to the November elections. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort was asked to resign, the campaign said Friday. [The Hill]

The Madison County Board of Education took its first step Thursday afternoon in the creation of a new elementary school for students in northern Madison County. [Richmond Register]

More than 30 major technology and communication companies said on Friday they are joining the U.S. government to crack down on “robocalls,” automated, prerecorded phone calls that regulators have labeled a “scourge.” [Reuters]

Rand Paul said it could be “too late” for AK Steel to bring its workforce back in Ashland, despite a tax increase on Chinese steel imports imposed by the United States. [Ashland Independent]

ProPublica’s reporting on the water crisis in the American West has highlighted any number of confounding contradictions worsening the problem: Farmers are encouraged to waste water so as to protect their legal rights to its dwindling supply in the years ahead; Las Vegas sought to impose restrictions on water use while placing no checks on its explosive population growth; the federal government has encouraged farmers to improve efficiency in watering crops, but continues to subsidize the growing of thirsty crops such as cotton in desert states like Arizona. [ProPublica]

A free, wireless Internet network is up and running throughout downtown Morehead. The city, in partnership with Rajant Corporation, installed wireless meshing nodes in March to help provide instant Internet access to anyone within the network’s parameters. [The Morehead News]

As the Republican nominee for the US presidency, Donald Trump received a classified briefing on Wednesday. What does that mean? [BBC]

The vast majority of the crowd of more than 100 people who attended Mayor Dick Doty’s Friday afternoon press conference made it clear they weren’t buying the message he was trying to sell. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Surprise! Fraternity atmosphere can (especially in Frankfart) make state capitols hotbeds of sexual harassment. [USA Today]

The Madison County school district has decided to take a drug company up on its offer of two free doses of Narcan, a life-saving drug in instances of heroin overdose — even though the district hasn’t seen an overdose problem. [H-L]

Oh, look, Valarie Honeycutt Spears noticed that there were more than 200 testing violations in Kentucky schools. She’s failed to investigate anything in Montgomery County. [More H-L]

Religious freedom is a valid defense for a Michigan business owner who fired a trans woman after she asked to dress in accordance with her gender identity, a federal judge ruled Thursday. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets! [CLICK HERE]

The Kernel’s Lesson Was A Good One

A federal judge on Thursday dismissed three lawsuits pending against Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis over her refusal to issue marriage licenses in 2015, following the legalization of same-sex marriage by the U.S. Supreme Court. [John Cheves]

If July felt horrendously hot, that’s because it was. NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ― two leading global authorities on climate ― both say July 2016 was not only the hottest July on record, but the most sizzling month in the history of record-keeping. [HuffPo]

Student-run newspapers can be great experiences, giving students a taste of what they’ll face if they continue with a journalism career. They learn to chase important stories and dig for the facts. They learn to take on powerful institutions and hold officials accountable. [C-J/AKN]

The Department of Justice and the FBI are looking at Paul Manafort as part of a broad investigation into alleged corruption in Ukraine. [The Hill]

Eastern Kentucky University has 161 academic programs, but 47 of them have graduated an average of fewer than 10 in the past three years. [Richmond Register]

The FBI and U.S. Justice Department are investigating possible U.S. ties to alleged corruption involving the former president of Ukraine, including the work of firms headed by political operatives Paul Manafort and Tony Podesta, CNN reported on Friday, citing multiple U.S. law enforcement officials. [Reuters]

Greenup County school officials are looking at new security camera systems for the district, and may choose the one they want next month. [Ashland Independent]

Earlier this month, Paul Manafort met with Donald Trump and suggested that they put in place a succession plan for the upper ranks of the Republican nominee’s flailing presidential campaign, according to three campaign sources with direct knowledge of the events that led to Manafort’s resignation on Friday morning as campaign chairman. [Politico]

When Corey Brewer passed a drug test required for his new job at Walmart in Richmond, his mother, Julie Robinson, felt relieved. [Ronnie Ellis]

Days of heavy rain have caused historic flooding in the US state of Louisiana, bringing as much as 31in (79cm) across a third of the state. [BCC]

The three finalists for the Glasgow Independent Schools’ superintendent position each spent a day this week getting familiar with the school district. [Glasgow Daily Times]

An article in The Atlantic on post-9/11 America makes a powerful case that the “never again” approach to homeland security is good politics but lousy policy. The turbulent months after the 9/11 attacks were notable for something that did not happen. [ProPublica]

Kentucky Supreme Court justices had plenty of questions for attorneys during oral arguments Thursday over the legality of midyear budget cuts that Gov. Matt Bevin made to universities last spring. [H-L]

While the coal lobby is often blamed for a lot of Washington’s foot-dragging on addressing climate change, two major coal industry groups may be losing some of their clout. A new report from the environmental group Climate Investigations Center looks at recent losses in the membership of two major coal lobbies: the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity (ACCCE) and the National Mining Association. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets! [CLICK HERE]

King Coal Is Still In Severe Denial

You already know Friends of Coal and the Kentucky Coal Association exist only to make a handful of people wealthy. They use far-right Republican extremists as spokespeople (like the Coal Association used RPK’s Tres Watson for years). They decimate Appalachia, take from the poor and ignore Kentucky. It’s all bullshit hype and panicked, worried people fall for it without fail. [H-L]

Donald Trump restructured his campaign leadership Tuesday in a desperate attempt to turn around his flagging presidential bid. [HuffPo]

Of the 87 who died in an accident involving motorcycles, 57 were not wearing a helmet, and neither were any of 19 who died while on an ATV. [Floyd County Times]

Donald Trump’s presidential campaign appears to be soliciting foreign donations despite multiple warnings and a criminal complaint filed with the Department of Justice. [The Hill]

Two of the victims at the heart of a sexual assault and harassment case against an associate professor are angry and say UK is protecting the professor at the expense of his victims, other students and the public. [Kentucky Kernel]

When it comes to the substance of Donald Trump’s speech proposing “extreme vetting” of immigrants to the United States, retired Navy Adm. James Stavridis on Tuesday indicated that the Republican nominee lacked specifics. [Politico]

Hal Rogers joined members of the Chamber of Commerce in touring the Somerset coworking center — billed as being a space for small businesses or those striking out on their own to “connect, create and collaborate.” [Commonwealth Journal]

With hopes of landing the U.S. Senate candidates and high-profile surrogates to represent the presidential candidates, plans are in place for the sixth annual Brushy Fork Forum in Vine Grove. [News-Enterprise]

Facing allegations from former city firefighter Jeffrey Queen that he was subjected to a hostile work environment during his five years in the Bowling Green Fire Department, the city of Bowling Green on Friday acknowledged the existence of a video showing a firefighter burning the Quran, one of many accusations of misconduct in a lawsuit filed by Queen earlier this week. [BGDN]

Over the past decade, the news about Kentucky’s coal industry has been reliably bad. The latest numbers show the state is mining the smallest amount of coal since about 1934, and there are fewer coal miners employed here than anytime in the 20th century. [WFPL]

Those following the Powell Scandal(s) will likely want to keep an eye on this. A school district is hoping voters will help replace what might be the most out-of-shape high and middle schools in Kentucky. [WAVE3]

This is what happens when an illegally-hired former superintendent’s wife heads south. We hear it’s motivating the OAG to seek restitution on behalf of the Montgomery County Board of Education. [Page One]

On Thursday, a Northern Kentucky woman was sentenced to almost 19 years in prison for providing illegal drugs to her daughter in prison; her daughter subsequently died of an overdose. [H-L]

Donald Trump is doing a great job of making the case against his own presidential candidacy, President Barack Obama said at a fundraiser for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton on Monday. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. [CLICK HERE]

Trump Chickens Come Home To Roost

The Lexington Humane Society is inundated with cats every summer, and this August it’s using its “Purrgressive Pricing” program to help them alleviate some of the overcrowding. [H-L]

Aetna Inc, the No. 3 U.S. health insurer, on Monday said that due to persistent financial losses on Obamacare plans, it will sell individual insurance on the government-run online marketplaces in only four states next year, down from the current 15 states. [HuffPo]

GLI is part of what’s wrong with Louisville and it’s beyond time for everyone to recognize it. An organization like that is not necessary in the modern era. Louisville’s first heat-management plan is flawed and should not be used as the basis for any new regulatory programs aimed at reducing temperatures, the city’s chamber of commerce said. [C-J/AKN]

Boeing Co’s KC-46A refueling plane has been approved for production, with work underway for the first two low-rate initial production lots to be awarded in the next 30 days, the U.S. Air Force said on Friday. [Reuters]

On Friday, Gov. Matt Bevin made several appointments to Kentucky’s Universities and College Boards including two to the Eastern Kentucky University Board of Regents. [Richmond Register]

Federal health regulators have announced plans to crack down on nursing home employees who take demeaning photographs and videos of residents and post them on social media. [ProPublica]

Mayor Chuck Charles said the city of Ashland faces a “no-win” situation prior to the Aug. 23, county-wide election on alcohol sales. On Election Day, all registered voters in Boyd County, Ashland and Catlettsburg can vote to turn the county “wet.” The status would expand alcohol sales in convenience stores, gas stations, grocery stores and other businesses. [Ashland Independent]

More than 70 Republicans have signed a letter to the party’s National Committee head urging him to stop helping Donald Trump’s campaign. [BBC]

Watching AT&T buy favors from Rocky Adkins… AT&T Kentucky Tuesday donated $20,000 to the Rowan County Board of Education to be used for college and career readiness programs. [The Morehead News]

Republican strategists say time is running out on Donald Trump. Though there are more than 80 days to go before the election, GOP skeptics believe the party’s nominee has little time left to straighten out his campaign in order to defeat Hillary Clinton for the presidency. [The Hill]

The State Medical Examiner’s Office in Madisonville has determined that the cause of death for a Butler County couple found Tuesday in their home is homicide, according to a Kentucky State Police release. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Peter Greathouse, a Republican from Utah, says he’s not “comfortable” with Donald Trump as his party’s nominee. Jane Lynch, a GOP veteran from Arizona, says she’ll likely cast her personal vote for libertarian Gary Johnson or a write-in candidate. Loren Byers, a Texas Republican, calls Trump “a loose cannon.” [Politico]

If you’re the state’s most important newspaper, you could do a better job and have some common sense when covering suicide. At a bare minimum, provide links and numbers for resources. At a bare minimum. [H-L]

When Donald Trump unveiled his council of economic advisors earlier this month, observers were quick to note some of the team’s unorthodox attributes: all of its 13 members are men, six are named Steve and only one has an advanced degree in economics. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. [CLICK HERE]

Magoffin County Can’t Catch A Break

Federal jurors have convicted two Magoffin County officials in a vote-fraud scheme in which the judge-executive also was implicated. [H-L]

Donald Trump has been making waves this week ― great waves, terrific waves ― after accusing President Barack Obama of creating ISIS. But earlier this year, he was saying something different: that the U.S. invasion of Iraq created the terrorist group. [HuffPo]

In the latest blow for Catholic Health Initiatives in Kentucky, a jury has returned a $21.2 million verdict against the company and its St. Joseph Hospital London for conspiring with cardiologists to perform unnecessary heart procedures. [C-J/AKN]

The “lock her up” chants started early and came often at Donald Trump’s campaign event near Fort Lauderdale, Florida on Wednesday evening. [BBC]

Eddie Sexton has always held a passion to become a school principal, and now, after 16 years as an educator, he gets to fulfill that goal as the new principal of Daniel Boone Elementary. [Richmond Register]

In 2011, Gene Sperling had a problem. He was working as President Obama’s chief economic advisor but his government salary did not cover his expenses. He and his wife lived in a Georgetown townhouse valued today at around $2 million, but did not have enough equity to qualify for a second mortgage or credit line. He didn’t want to sell the house and he wanted to keep working at a prestigious but relatively low-paid public service job. [ProPublica]

Former Elliott County Clerk Shelia Blevins and her sister, former Elliott County Deputy Clerk Jeannie Moore, were formally sentenced Friday in Franklin Circuit Court to complicity to commit abuse of public trust under $10,000. [Ashland Independent]

The Obama administration on Friday declared a public health emergency in the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico, saying the rapid and widespread transmission of the Zika virus threatens the health of infected pregnant women and their babies. [Reuters]

From what was described as a “strong pool of candidates from across the country,” the Board of Directors of the Morehead-Rowan County Economic Development Council, Inc., (EDC) has narrowed its search for a new executive director to three or four candidates. [The Morehead News]

Coal mining. Bad management. Runoff from cities and farms. These are all things that are creating major problems for America’s rivers, according to a new report. [ThinkProgress & American Rivers]

In an effort to better serve patients from the Cave City, Park City and Horse Cave areas, T.J. Regional Health has opened the T.J. Health Cave City Clinic. The new clinic at 440 Happy Valley St. provides walk-in medical and injury care. It is staffed with physicians, nurse practitioners, registered nurses and technicians, and is one of several clinics owned by T.J. Regional Health. [Glasgow Daily Times]

BHP Billiton, the world’s largest mining firm by market value, reported a record $6.4 billion annual loss on Tuesday, hammered by a bad bet on shale, a dam disaster in Brazil and a commodities slump. [CNBC]

Kentucky’s Prichard Committee Student Voice Team has received national attention for its advocacy on issues such as increasing school funding in Kentucky. [H-L]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Grandmother) is not optimistic that he will be in charge of the Senate come November ― and Donald Trump, he implied, is not helping matters. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. [CLICK HERE]