RPK: Still A Bunch Of Homophobic Bigots

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Hopefully they’re not just learning the whitewashed version of Thanksgiving history. [H-L]

Activists protesting plans to run an oil pipeline beneath a lake near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota said on Saturday they have no intention of leaving a protest camp after U.S. authorities warned it must be vacated by Dec. 5. [HuffPo]

The last remaining dry precinct located within the Watterson Expressway could switch sides next month following a wet-dry vote. [C-J/AKN]

A member of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) is sounding the alarm over the new changes floated by Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), warning that the minority leader’s proposals could erode the power of African-American lawmakers even as they attempt to spread influence to younger members. [The Hill]

A state senator is planning to once again propose a bill during the upcoming legislative session that he says will protect religious freedoms. The bill would nullify local “fairness” ordinances across the state that protect Kentuckians from discrimination based on sexual orientation. Imagine how different things could be if Chris Hartman were permitted by the Fairness board over the past seven or eight years, as I have pushed, to spend time with these extremists trying to educate them. Kentucky would be in a much better spot than it is today. [WFPL]

Sales and traffic at U.S. brick-and-mortar stores on Thanksgiving Day and Black Friday declined from last year, as stores offered discounts well beyond the weekend and more customers shopped online. [Reuters]

Unhappy with Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear’s refusal to file criminal charges against those responsible for illegally dumping 1,200 tons of low-level radioactive fracking waste at a landfill near Irvine, an Estill County citizens group is suing to obtain the investigative records of Beshear and two state regulatory cabinets. [Richmond Register]

Falwell says he couldn’t afford to work at a Cabinet-level job for longer than that. That’s $205,000 per year, FYI. He couldn’t afford to live on $205K per year. That’s the New Fascist Party for you. [Politico]

They’re official: the state Board of Elections certified the results of the Nov. 8 election in Kentucky Tuesday. [Ronnie Ellis]

On Tuesday, the director of the National Security Agency, Admiral Michael Rogers, was asked about the WikiLeaks release of hacked information during the campaign, and he said, “This was a conscious effort by a nation-state to attempt to achieve a specific effect.” [Mother Jones]

The civil lawsuit filed by a former police chief against the City of Glasgow and the subsequent interim chief has been set for trial in March. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The education gap among whites this year wasn’t about education. It was about race. There are, of course, several plausible reasons for this growing education gap. No one factor explains everything. That said, a major factor was racial attitudes. Sorry, Adam Edelen, your bullshit talking point about economics is dead in the water. [WaPo]

Like many students, Tyler Allen spent his college days enthusiastically experimenting with alcohol. Only for Allen, it turned into a habit that was more than recreational. [H-L]

Afghanistan is failing. Fifteen years after the United States first scattered the Taliban with high-altitude bombing, the battlefield gains achieved by tens of thousands of U.S. troops are in jeopardy from a resurgent Taliban. [HuffPo]

The EBEC Still Has Absolutely No Teeth

The Executive Branch Ethics Commission says that it and unnamed law enforcement agencies are investigating people who may have helped former Kentucky Personnel Secretary Tim Longmeyer to illegally solicit campaign donations from state employees under his supervision from 2011 to 2015. [H-L]

In a testament to humanity’s willingness to take on the most futile tasks imaginable without regard to sanity, it was announced Tuesday that outgoing Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) has put forward legislation that would scrap the Electoral College in favor of electing the president of the United States by popular vote. [HuffPo]

Often, when conducting a routine eye exam, Louisville optometrist Dr. Aaron McNulty discovers that a patient has diabetes but doesn’t know it. [C-J/AKN]

Questions are swirling about whether President-elect Donald Trump will follow through on suggestions during the campaign that he might allow other countries to develop nuclear weapons. [The Hill]

Surprise! The WFPL folks have noticed Eastern Kentucky again. At least that Brendan jackass isn’t trying to tag poor people like cattle this time. (How is he still employed there after the mass exodus of employees?) For Freida Lockaby, an unemployed 56-year-old woman who lives with her dog in an aging mobile home in Manchester, Ky., one of America’s poorest places, the Affordable Care Act was life altering. [WFPL]

A work crew began to dismantle a Confederate monument in Louisville, Kentucky on Saturday, the mayor said, in the latest move to take down or relocate symbols of the slaveholding Southern Confederacy from the American Civil War. [Reuters]

Bill Langley, senior pastor of an Elizabethtown church with a strong reputation for supporting missions, has been elected president of the 750,000-member Kentucky Baptist Convention. [Ashland Independent]

It was supposed to be a big, beautiful infrastructure bill. But President-elect Donald Trump’s pitch for a $1 trillion upgrade of the nation’s roads, bridges, tunnels and airports is already running into potholes as it meets reality in Washington. [Politico]

Richmond police officers may drive their city vehicles home after work only if they live within Madison County. [Richmond Register]

Making sense of this presidential election requires figuring out what happened in rural places across the country. This is especially true in the upper Midwest, where there were sharp swings toward Donald Trump that helped produce surprising victories in states such as my home state of Wisconsin. [WaPo]

City council members agreed Monday night to amend the city’s alcohol ordinance, making several changes. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Safety pins have again become a symbol of solidarity with victims of racist, religious or homophobic abuse, following alleged attacks in the US in the wake of Donald Trump’s election win. [BBC]

Matt Bevin couldn’t find a Kentucky vendor? This should end really well and will likely cost way more than suggested. $583,000 seems unbelievably low. Big Brother may be watching the next time you visit Kentucky’s Capitol. [H-L]

Europe needs to think about developing its own nuclear deterrent strategy given concerns that U.S. President-elect Donald Trump could scale back U.S. military commitments in Europe, a senior member of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s conservatives said. [HuffPo]

Eastern Kentucky Ignored Again In 3, 2…

Of all the lies politicians have told struggling Eastern Kentuckians over the years, few are more cruel than the “war on coal” myth. [Tom Eblen]

Donald Trump’s transition team is nearing a state of stasis, causing concern among both Democrats and Republicans in Washington that his White House will be woefully ill-prepared once he is inaugurated. [HuffPo]

In more than three decades of practicing medicine, Dr. Barbara Casper said she has never witnessed a better time than the present for the patients she treats at the University of Louisville medical school clinic. [C-J/AKN]

President-elect Donald Trump won over millions of Americans with promises of change and even some controversial proposals. Now, Trump will be under pressure over the next four years to follow through on many of the promises he’s made since his June 2015 entry into the race — especially in the first 100 days of his administration. [The Hill]

Barely five months since its inception, the Kentucky Dual Credit Scholarship Program is already yielding dramatic results across the Commonwealth. [Ashland Independent]

Back in April, there were already early signs in this quiet Michigan town of the rural American discontent that helped propel Donald Trump to election victory, even if it was underestimated by the Washington establishment, pollsters and Hillary Clinton’s campaign. [Reuters]

The Berea City Council voted four to three to table the land management development ordinance until the next meeting, after the suggestion was made by Councilman Steve Caudill to do so. [Richmond Register]

Supporters of President Barack Obama’s energy agenda are scrambling to adjust to the looming Donald Trump era — with climate activists girding for battle while some green industry groups hope to appeal to the president-elect’s love of commerce. [Politico]

Morehead State University’s Kentucky Folk Art Center will host its annual Appalachian Holiday Arts and Crafts Fair at the Laughlin Health Building on Saturday, Dec. 3, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. [The Morehead News]

As he sat next to an Army veteran in an open-air jeep during the Veterans Day parade in a northern California town, U.S. Rep. Jared Huffman had his attention caught by a sight. [WaPo]

Barren County Fiscal Court backtracked on a previous position and decided to change the county’s regulatory fee on gross alcohol sales to 5 percent. That choice was unanimous among the six members present out of the eight total members. [Glasgow Daily Times]

While Wells Fargo was creating millions of fraudulent bank accounts to collect falsified fees and boost its sales, another financial firm was creating a checking account with zero mandatory fees (including ATM fees) and a rarely seen 1.00% interest rate. [ThinkProgress]

What was startling about a visit to Bradley Picklesimer’s house outside of Paintsville was the contrast of driving down a fairly remote country road on a sunny fall morning, pulling up in the driveway and, suddenly, having Picklesimer come out to greet you in glamorous drag befitting a big city night club. [H-L]

An architect of anti-immigration efforts who says he is advising President-elect Donald Trump said the new administration could push ahead rapidly on construction of a U.S.-Mexico border wall without seeking immediate congressional approval. [HuffPo]

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West Liberty Waste Dumpers: PAY UP!

PEE ALERT! Former Kentucky Personnel Secretary Tim Longmeyer must pay a $5,000 civil fine after settling 45 counts of ethics violations with the Executive Branch Ethics Commission, officials said Monday. [John Cheves]

Planned Parenthood is reporting a spike in donations and demand for long-acting contraceptives since Donald Trump’s election as U.S. president while abortion foes hope to gain momentum in their quest to cut public funding to the women’s health organization. [HuffPo]

Kentucky’s Department for Public Health is seeking millions of dollars of penalties from companies blamed for bringing radioactive drilling waste into Kentucky last year. [C-J/AKN]

Transportation advocates are excited by the prospect of an infrastructure package passing under President-elect Donald Trump next year, but there are a number of other transportation issues that could see action during the lame duck session of Congress. [The Hill]

A century of weather records show there’s no escape in Louisville from the fingerprints of climate change, as local temperatures climb and seasons are altered, research at the University of Louisville has found. [WHAS11]

Hillary Clinton blamed FBI director James Comey for her stunning defeat in Tuesday’s presidential election in a conference call with her top campaign funders on Saturday, according to two participants who were on the call. [Reuters]

The first significant change proposed to Grayson’s alcohol laws met with initial resistance from Mayor George Steele, although he ultimately agreed to the proposal early this week. [Ashland Independent]

Hillary Clinton and the Democrats were playing with fire when they effectively wrote off white workers in the small towns and cities of the Rust Belt. [ProPublica]

Officials of Morehead State University along with members of its Board of Regents, local and state legislators held a dedication ceremony Friday, Nov. 11, for Padula Hall at the Derrickson Agricultural Complex. [The Morehead News]

The new president may merit a brief honeymoon in governing while he figures out what his policies will be and how he will implement them. But we should not wait one nanosecond to lay out the unprecedented set of conflicts of interests he and his family bring to the presidency, to compare his campaign rhetoric with his post-election decisions, and to chronicle post-election moves made by state and local governments where authorities may feel emboldened to push the boundaries of their power and our laws. [CJR]

A recanvass of the 43rd district judicial race in Barren and Metcalfe counties changed nothing about the unofficial election tally, leaving Gabe Pendleton as the winner by 36 votes. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The potential conflicts of interest facing Donald Trump are so unprecedented that U.S. ethics laws weren’t even written to account for them. [Politico]

The 26 soldiers of the Kentucky National Guard’s 149th Military Engagement Team said goodbye to their families Saturday for a nearly yearlong mission overseas. [John Cheves]

President-elect Donald Trump, who took to Twitter Thursday to blast demonstrations against his victory as “very unfair,” had a different view of post-election distress four years earlier, when he called for a march on Washington “to stop this great and disgusting injustice.” [HuffPo]

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October Surprise: Receipts Sucked Again

Saved this one for a few days so it wouldn’t get lost in the midst of election panic.

General Fund and Road Fund receipts for the month of October weren’t great in Matt Bevin’s economy. You know, the one he claims is magical as it falls out from under him.

General Fund receipts increased a meager 6% to $849.4 million while the Road Fund sank another 7.4% to $120.3 million.

Highlights:

  • Corporate taxes were up $43.1 million but only due to a multi-year payment collection
  • Individual taxes increased a slight 8.5%, up 5.7% for the fiscal year
  • Sales and use taxes dropped 3.6%, up just 2.2% for the year
  • Property taxes rose 13.4%, up 12.5% for the calendar year. These increases are normal during this time of year and are not a result of Bevin’s fictional economy.
  • Cancer stick taxes dropped another 7.9%, down 3.2% for the fiscal year
  • Coal severance taxes sank a whopping 25.8% – which Bevin’s crew tried to play off as the highest collection in ten months (ha!), down a disastrous 34% for the calendar year
  • Lottery revenue increased 1.1%, up 6.7% for the year
  • Motor fuels taxes increased 2.5%, up 1.4% for the year
  • Vehicle use taxes dropped 14.8%, up 1.2% for the year
  • License and privilege revenue sank 22.7%, down 2.1% for the year
  • Nontax receipts increased 3.1%, down 6.3% for the year

About that magical economy where everything is improving and thinking people aren’t fleeing… it’s non-existent.

Click here (Warning: PDF Link) if you’d like to take a look at the full release from the state budget director.

The Bevin Fun Train Won’t Slow Down

Matt Bevin has raised more than $325,000 for his 2015 election since he was elected a year ago, according to finance reports he filed Monday. Although the ballots were counted Nov. 3, 2015, Bevin did not follow the customary practice of closing his campaign accounts and turning full-time to the business of governing. Instead, he attended a series of fund-raising events for his 2015 campaign that were held throughout 2016. [John Cheves]

Former Attorney General Eric Holder called for an end to the electoral college voting system on Friday. [HuffPo]

Granny Mitch is finally admitting that all the coal hype is just that. Mitch McConnell hedged on Friday about when and if Republicans would be able to bring coal mining jobs to Kentucky, saying that is a “private sector activity.” [C-J/AKN]

This is the white supremacist Donald Trump named his Chief Strategist. This is the guy people like Scott Jennings and Julie Raque Adams are supporting and allowing to lead their political party. [Media Matters]

“Tourism provides a significant amount of economic impact for Madison County,” said Kerri Hensley, Berea Tourism director, during a Wednesday night Berea Tourism Commission meeting. [Richmond Register]

Chanting “Not my president” and “love trumps hate,” thousands of demonstrators took the streets in cities across the United States at the weekend to protest against President-elect Donald Trump, who they say threatens their civil and human rights. [Reuters]

Commercial prices will rise at Big Run Landfill, but odor reports have plummeted since the last “trash train” rolled into Coalton. [Ashland Independent]

The bitter infighting that plagued Donald Trump’s campaign during the Republican presidential primary is starting to spill over into his team’s efforts to establish an administration and political operation, according to more than half a dozen sources familiar with the planning efforts. [Politico]

The Office of the State Climatologist and the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet, in coordination with the Kentucky Drought Mitigation Team, are issuing a Level I drought declaration for 117 counties in Kentucky, including Rowan. [The Morehead News]

So what do we do now? By “we” I mean all those left, center and even right who saw Donald Trump as the worst man ever to run for president and assumed that a strong majority of our fellow citizens would agree. [NY Times]

It didn’t take long for the new Republican state House majority to choose their Speaker, turning to the man who led them in the political wilderness for 16 years — Jeff Hoover of Jamestown. [Ronnie Ellis]

Behind the barber’s chair where Claude Rasnake diagnoses many of the world’s problems, he charted the to-do list of the Trump administration. [WaPo]

Boone County’s prosecutor wants a thumb drive back. And it’s not just any thumb drive. What’s on the digital storage device could free a convicted murderer in a high-profile Northern Kentucky case, one featured on the national TV show “Dateline.” [H-L]

I’m not going to sugarcoat this at all. We are in for a full-blown assault on LGBTQ rights the likes of which many, particularly younger LGBTQ people, have not seen. Progress will most certainly be halted completely, likely rolled back. And it’s already underway. [HuffPo]

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