Everybody Has Donald Trump Regret

Students’ posting of a Black Lives Matter sign in Bryan Station High School fits with the Fayette County Public Schools’ values, officials said on Wednesday. [H-L]

As the saying goes, birds of a feather flock together. So it’s only fitting that within hours of being named Donald Trump’s vice presidential pick, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence (R) pulled one of his running mate’s favorite moves. [HuffPo]

What’s your risk of avoidable hospital death? Thousands of lives could be saved if more hospitals were as safe as those that received an A grade in a recent round of grading by a watchdog group that found no top scorers in Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

Centrist Democrats appear reluctant to join their party’s embrace of a public option for ObamaCare. [The Hill]

Kentucky Power Co. is moving its corporate headquarters back to Ashland after more than a decade in the capital city. [Ashland Independent]

Last week, two lawmakers introduced a bill to put new limits on what debt collectors can take from debtors’ paychecks and bank accounts. It is the first legislation to address the issue in decades and follows a series of ProPublica stories about the widespread practice of garnishment. [ProPublica]

A year later, Smith and his wife Serena, who was also deeply involved in Davis-support rallies, are working the “third shift” at Walmart. Smith said he quit his job last year in order to more fully devote himself to the cause of supporting Davis. [Richmond Register]

Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy (D) and Ohio Congresswoman Marcia Fudge (D) introduced a bill this week that aims to help public schools become more racially diverse by providing grants for school districts to create voluntary school desegregation plans. [ThinkProgress]

A brief hearing in Barren Circuit Court on Tuesday settled a scheduling conflict in the lawsuit Glasgow police Lt. Col. Guy Turcotte has against the city and James Duff, former interim chief. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The last year has shined a harsh light on two distressing realities of American life. Mass shootings are becoming more common. And more Americans are killing themselves. These disturbing trends share something in common, obvious in the first case and less so in the second: guns. [WaPo]

Officials in Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration did not directly answer whether they plan to notify users of a problem-plagued state benefits system that they should reapply for services such as Medicaid and food assistance. [WFPL]

“The Art of the Deal” made America see Trump as a charmer with an unfailing knack for business. Tony Schwartz helped create that myth – and regrets it. [The New Yorker]

Curiosity finally got the best of me. I had to drive up I-75 and see Noah’s Ark. I found the ark to be an impressive piece of woodcraft, which made me feel better about paying $40 to see it. (It cost an additional $10 to park in the 4,000-space parking lot, which was only a fraction full.) [H-L]

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence (R-Gay Panicked), Donald Trump’s vice presidential pick, opposed a successful effort in 2007 to raise the federal minimum wage to $7.25 an hour over two years. [HuffPo]

The Bevin Crew: Worse Than Fletcherites

Just a reminder that it was MATT BEVIN who decided to take no criminal action in the radioactive waste scandal in Estill County. [H-L]

As he heads for the Republican convention in Cleveland next week, Donald Trump’s campaign infrastructure remains severely underdeveloped. In some places it appears to be non-existent. [HuffPo]

At a recent fundraiser for a Republican candidate, Senate Majority Caucus Chairman Dan Seum was speaking and went to turn over the microphone to state Rep. Phil Moffett, of Louisville. In his introductory remarks, Seum called Moffett Kentucky’s “next speaker of the House.” [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump says he could have made a deal to stop the Civil War. This is guy is an Amway salesman in the worst way. [Time]

Matt Bevin on Wednesday vigorously denied allegations by a Democratic lawmaker that Bevin tried to bully him after the lawmaker refused to switch parties at Bevin’s request last December. In fairness, Sinnette IS a hillbilly. That’s not a negative thing and pent up white guys need to own it. But no one believes Bevin. [Ronnie Ellis]

The House Intelligence Committee on Friday released 28 previously classified pages from a 2002 congressional investigation into the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks. [The Hill]

Liberty Counsel is announcing that the federal Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals has granted Clerk Kim Davis’ motion to vacate a federal district court’s injunctions against her and dismiss her pending appeals. [The Morehead News]

President Barack Obama on Wednesday said more must be done to build trust that police violence against blacks and Hispanics will be properly investigated. [Reuters]

After an election was held Tuesday evening in the Glasgow High School library, Glasgow Independent Schools will add Justin Kirkpatrick to the superintendent screening committee as a minority parent representative. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The Cleveland jails are being emptied and its courts are staying open until 1 a.m. in case of mass arrests. Riot gear, handcuffs, body cameras — police equipment that cost tens of millions of dollars — are ready, and more than 70 law enforcement and government agencies are on alert. [WaPo]

Breathitt County is going wet. Voters Tuesday chose to allow alcohol sales in the county, 58 percent to 42 percent. [WYMT]

During a CNN town hall last night, a student named Zachary Marcone asked House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) how he can morally justify his support for presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump. [ThinkProgress]

How to know the RNC is a train wreck and desperate for speakers… Ralph Alvarado got a primetime spot for Wednesday. He’ll sound a little slick to outsiders but once they poke around his voting history, his hemp fun and general backwardness, he’ll end up being yet another person of color the Republican Party is so fond of objectifying and he’ll be too thick to realize it. [H-L]

In a rare instance of bipartisanship and compromise in Congress, the Senate on Wednesday passed legislation by a 92-2 vote that addresses the opioid epidemic. [HuffPo]

ICYMI: Comer Is Under Investigation

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is wrestling with an unenviable, arguably impossible task this election year: protecting Senate Republicans from the political upheaval caused by Donald Trump’s presidential candidacy. [H-L]

A graphic video shows a Baton Rouge police officer shooting and killing Alton Sterling, a 37-year-old black man who was selling CDs in front of a convenience store early Tuesday morning. [HuffPo]

SURPRISE! Bevin’s proposal to reshape the state’s Medicaid program ran into a buzzsaw of criticism at its first public hearing since the governor announced it last Wednesday. [C-J/AKN]

A regulatory effort by the Obama administration to crack down on tax deals is facing backlash from business groups and lawmakers on both sides of the aisle. [The Hill]

Charles Gabbard, who is accused of stealing donations from volunteers meant for Kentucky River Regional Animal Shelter (KRRAS) and a volunteer’s cellphone was indicted this month on charges relating to the incident. [Hazard Herald]

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch said on Tuesday fighting economic espionage was a priority for the Department of Justice. [Reuters]

Access Fund, the national advocacy organization that protects America’s climbing, is excited to announce that Breaks Interstate Park, which sits across the southwest Virginia/southeast Kentucky line, is now officially open to rock climbing. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

At a time when Democrats and Republicans in Congress can’t agree on just about anything, there is one issue that unites them: the urgent need for criminal justice reform. [ProPublica]

Bobby Paisley’s health insurance covers his vision and dental care. He knows, because he and his wife pay for it. “I don’t have to do community service, I don’t have to earn points and I don’t have to wait,” he said. But that’s exactly what some 400,000 Kentuckians would have to do if they need an eye exam or a tooth pulled under Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposal to overhaul the state’s Medicaid program. [Richmond Register]

In his final State of the Union address in January, President Obama made an ambitious pledge to overhaul the management of fossil fuels on America’s public lands in his final year, focusing, in particular, on the antiquated and little-known federal coal program. [ThinkProgress]

Beginning this fall, the Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS) will offer a free dual credit class to Kentucky public high school juniors, allowing them to earn high school and college credit at the same time. [Ashland Independent]

If you missed it, Jamie Comer and his crew are under investigation by the Office of the Attorney General. [Page One]

Giant coal producer Murray Energy has issued notices that it could lay off up to 4,400 coal mine workers in six states come September. A news release from the St. Clairsville, Ohio, company says it issued the notices for its operations in Ohio, West Virginia, Illinois, Kentucky, Utah and Pennsylvania. [H-L]

A Texas man who sued the federal government because it wouldn’t approve his application to manufacture a machine gun doesn’t have a constitutional right to possess the automatic weapon, an appeals court ruled. [HuffPo]

Reminder: Matt Bevin Has No Concept Of Ethics… Or Anything, Really

Just when you thought Matt Bevin and his people couldn’t get more ignorant? Matt Bevin has signed an executive order that effectively gives him control over all appointments to the Executive Branch Ethics Commission without any input from the state attorney general and state auditor. Almost as funny as the Personnel Secretary begging folks to help them dig through Beshear data to uncover corruption because they don’t know anything about Kentucky. HAHAHA. You can’t fix the kind of stupid these people possess. [H-L]

Senate Republicans have never made it easy for President Barack Obama to put judges on federal courts. But now, with just months left in his term, they’re not even pretending to try to let judicial nominees through. [HuffPo]

Isn’t it fun watching Kentucky’s half-literate governator claim “God” has sanctioned his extreme Medicaid cuts? That’s what Jesus would do – choke even more out of the working poor, deny access to dental and vision, claim it’s helping them. [C-J/AKN]

The coal industry is slated to lose clout in the next Congress, with term limits set to force out a chairman who has frequently battled with the Obama administration on behalf of mining companies. Rep. Hal Rogers (R-Keeping Eastern Kentucky Impoverished) will relinquish the gavel of the House Appropriations Committee in January, after having led the powerful panel for six years, which is the maximum allowed under GOP rules. [The Hill]

A deadly shooting took place in the South Fork community of Breathitt County on Saturday. One person was pronounced deceased at the scene and two others seriously injured. [Hazard Herald]

Reverberations from the U.S. Supreme Court’s major ruling backing abortion rights were felt on Tuesday as the justices rejected bids by Mississippi and Wisconsin to revive restrictions on abortion doctors matching those struck down in Texas on Monday. [Reuters]

The Harlan Fiscal Court discussed a situation concerning the safety of a much-used bridge on U.S. 119 in Cumberland during a special-called meeting on Monday. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

The children of Vietnam vets describe how they believe their fathers’ exposure to Agent Orange during the war has impacted their families and their health. [ProPublica]

All members of the Madison Fiscal Court took turns June 14 criticizing the Madison County and Berea school boards for paying the sheriff a 1.5 percent fee for collecting its property taxes instead of the 4.25 percent paid by all other local taxing entities except the ambulance board. [Richmond Register]

Local communities are increasingly passing laws to control crime and nuisances on rental properties. They do so mostly by limiting the number of times police can be called to a residence. But it turns out that crime victims — especially victims of domestic abuse — are often the ones who end up being penalized. [NPR]

Republican Gov. Matt Bevin proclaims the days of “pay to play” ended with his arrival in Frankfort. But some House Democrats say if you’re not willing to play, Bevin isn’t reluctant to make you pay. [Ronnie Ellis]

On Tuesday night, 128 members of Congress weighed in to urge a federal appeals court to protect against sexual orientation-based discrimination under existing civil rights laws. [BuzzFeed]

Massie’s ideas about “sovereignty” are an extreme example of the naïve thinking that fueled the Brexit vote, has propelled Trump’s candidacy and energizes Tea Party activists. It is our inner 4-year-old screaming, “You can’t tell me what to do!” [H-L]

The draft of the 2016 Democratic Party platform endorses abolishing the death penalty, a break with the views of its presumptive presidential nominee. [HuffPo]

Is Yarmuth The Only KY Democrat?

One year ago, Michael Todd was getting ready for a doctor’s appointment when his phone was flooded with messages from relatives. [H-L]

Iraqi forces recaptured the last district held by Islamic State militants in the city of Falluja on Sunday and the general commanding the operation declared the battle complete after nearly five weeks of fighting. [HuffPo]

The Kentucky Democrat who helped orchestrate this week’s historic shutdown of the U.S. House to demand action on gun violence said his involvement began with a voice mail. [C-J/AKN]

Former Democratic presidential candidate Martin O’Malley on Sunday called Donald Trump a racist bigot who appeals to the worst instincts in people. [The Hill]

Toward the end of the inaugural Metcalfe County Proud Festival, several members of the Hornets’ Nest Pickers gathered on Saturday afternoon behind the stage that was built on the Metcalfe County Courthouse lawn. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Hawaii’s governor signed a bill making it the first state to place its residents who own firearms in a federal criminal record database and monitor them for possible wrongdoing anywhere in the country, his office said. [Reuters]

One of the toughest ways to make a living is undoubtedly being a standup comedian. The comedian goes onstage with nothing but a microphone to face a crowd of people smugly sitting back with the attitude, “Make us laugh, if you can.” [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump claimed he was a “much better friend to the gays” than Hillary Clinton after the mass shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando earlier this month. On Sunday, it was Clinton who showed up to show she was the better friend of the LGBT community. [Politico]

After 70 weeks on the picket line near the entrance of the old fire brick plant in Grahn, United Steelworkers Local 857 President Donald Frazier sums up negotiations in a few simple words. [Ashland Independent]

Ralph Stanley, the singer, banjo player and guardian of unvarnished mountain music who was also a pivotal figure in the recent revival of interest in bluegrass, died on Thursday. He was 89. [NY Times]

Supt. Marvin Moore received an “exemplary” evaluation Tuesday from the Rowan County Board of Education. [The Morehead News]

With Dwight D. Eisenhower’s signature, the government fired thousands of federal employees for being gay or lesbian, and Francis wants the department to release the internal memos, documents and communications surrounding it. [Roll Call]

You already knew this guy was a pandering lunatic. Rep. Thomas Massie thinks it’s time for “amexit.” [H-L]

Longtime conservative columnist George Will is wiping his hands clean of the Republican Party. [HuffPo]

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“Stop Being So Poor, You Poors!” -Bevin

The Medicaid revamp proposed by Gov. Matt Bevin last week is built on a belief that providing health care to low-income people somehow robs them of their dignity. Also, that 20 percent of Kentuckians lacked health insurance only a few years ago, not because they couldn’t afford it, but because they were disengaged or didn’t understand deductibles. On that dubious base, Bevin wants to replace a fairly straightforward system with a red-tape tangle of penalties, incentives, premiums and cutbacks in coverage, including some proposals that the federal government already has rejected in other states. [H-L]

Mitch McConnell (R-Cowardly Grandmother) is supporting Republican presumptive nominee Donald Trump for president — but he isn’t saying, at least for now, whether he thinks the business mogul is actually up to the job. [HuffPo]

It sure is fun watching the newspaper folks ignore the reality that Nancy Rodriguez misreported and/or ignored shenanigans in the Felner Scandal until she had egg all over her face. [C-J/AKN]

West Virginia’s three most devastated counties and possibly others will receive federal assistance after the state’s worst flooding in more than a century killed at least 24 people, officials said on Saturday. [Reuters]

Mayor Bill May and City of Frankfort Commissioners say they fully support actions taken by Police Maj. Rob Richardson in regard to recent allegations that appeared in the discovery file for the case against Tom Banta. [State Journal]

President Barack Obama on Thursday demanded that lawmakers put politics aside and move forward on the longstanding impasse over gun legislation in the wake of the latest tragedy. [Politico]

A house built with illicit drug money soon will shelter addicts while they work to get clean and sober. [Ashland Independent]

Republicans STILL DON’T have an actual health care alternative and they never will. The House GOP’s health-care proposal would expand savings accounts, provide tax credits for buying insurance, and allow people to purchase coverage across state lines. Just don’t ask how much it costs. [The Atlantic]

Country and bluegrass music will ring from the hills of eastern Rowan County with a concert for the late Keith Whitley on Friday, July 1, at Poppy Mountain. [The Morehead News]

Lives are on the line: the smearing of LGBT individuals by right-wing extremists is more than disturbing – it’s dangerous. [Salon]

Alyne Barrick left her home in the Laurel Ridge community of Edmonson County on the afternoon of April 12, 1996, to walk her dog. [Glasgow Daily Times]

A tax break that benefits only about 2,000 people adds up to billions in savings for them — and billions lost for the US economy. Leo Hindery Jr. remembers the call he got the night before he was to testify before Congress, in September of 2007, to close a tax loophole enjoyed by private-equity investors. It was from Stephen Schwarzman, co-founder of the Blackstone Group, the largest private-equity management firm in the US. [Bill Moyers]

Meanwhile, the people who do all the actual work at UK are paid dirt in comparison. University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto received a 48 percent increase in his base pay and a three-year contract extension Friday. [H-L]

The U.S. Supreme Court is due on Monday to issue its first major abortion ruling since 2007 against a backdrop of unremitting divisions among Americans on the issue and a decades-long decline in the rate at which women terminate pregnancies. [HuffPo]