Of Course Mitch Is Afraid Of The Donald

Mitch McConnell says the country must not turn its back on the nation’s coal miners — but that’s exactly what those miners say the Republican Senate Majority Leader is doing. [H-L]

A former aide on Donald Trump’s presidential campaign now says he regrets working for the Republican nominee and cannot vote for him for president. [HuffPo]

The Kentucky Department of Education is stepping in to review and intervene at two low-performing Jefferson County Public Schools elementaries that would have been named priority schools this year if it were not for the state’s moratorium on that label. [C-J/AKN]

A new Department of Labor report says cuts to state workers’ comp systems have left injured workers with inadequate benefits and raises the specter of federal oversight [ProPublica]

Bounty of the Barrens Farmers Market is making use of a $30,000 grant it was awarded this summer to determine the feasibility and develop a preliminary design of a facility that would allow it to remain in the same location all year. [Glasgow Daily Times]

In 1990, a group of four black teens and one Latino teen were convicted of the brutal assault and rape of a jogger. The April 1989 attack came amid rising crime rates in New York City and a wave of violence in Central Park itself. [ThinkProgress]

Widening of US 25N in Berea to three lanes from Ellipse Street to the Berea Bypass has run into another delay. [Richmond Register]

Drugmaker Mylan N.V. announced Friday that it had reached a $465 million settlement with the U.S. Justice Department and other government agencies to resolve questions over rebates required by the Medicaid program. [NPR]

A new report shows that the number of small businesses in Kentucky that offer employee health insurance dropped sharply from 2012 to 2015. Only 26.6 percent of small businesses in the state offered health insurance last year, down from 36.4 percent in 2012, according to the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky. [Business First]

One of the most popular items at this year’s Republican National Convention was a navy blue T-shirt that at first glance looked terribly out of place. [Mother Jones]

Paul Ryan immediately came under fire from Donald Trump after declaring he’ll no longer defend or campaign for his party’s bombastic nominee. Mitch McConnell, on the other hand, went mum, privately sharing advice with vulnerable Republican Senate candidates on how to handle Trump’s vulgar sex talk — and publicly telling those interested in his take to take a hike. [Politico]

Some evangelical leaders stood by Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump even after a video was released on Friday containing his lewd remarks about women. [WaPo]

On Friday, the state Supreme Court will hear arguments on whether panhandlers have a legally protected right to ask motorists and pedestrians for money and if Lexington’s city-wide ban violates panhandlers’ First Amendment right to free speech. [H-L]

Donald Trump’s lewd comments about women present him with a tough challenge roughly one month before Election Day, and it’s also landed House Republicans in trouble. [HuffPo]

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Everyone’s Still Gagging Over Trump

Donald J. Trump declared a $916 million loss on his 1995 income tax returns, a tax deduction so substantial it could have allowed him to legally avoid paying any federal income taxes for up to 18 years, records obtained by The New York Times show. [NY Times]

Standard good old boy behavior in Kentucky. Former University of Kentucky board chairman Billy Joe Miles of Owensboro pleaded not guilty Monday to rape, sodomy and bribing a witness at a hearing in which the prosecutor said the alleged victim has received death threats and other harassment since the charges were filed. [H-L]

Donald Trump ramped up his feud with former Miss Universe Alicia Machado on Friday, calling her “disgusting” and accusing her of having a sex tape. [HuffPo]

Kathleen Smith, former University of Louisville President James Ramsey’s chief of staff, is out at the university’s fundraising arm, the U of L Foundation. [C-J/AKN]

We live in an era of increasing automation. But as machines make more decisions for us, it is increasingly important to understand the algorithms that produce their judgments. [ProPublica]

Glasgow Mayor Dick Doty readily accepted responsibility for erroneously signing an agreement with the Tennessee Valley Authority and Glasgow Electric Plant Board. [Glasgow Daily Times]

At Monday night’s debate, Donald Trump was called out for stiffing the people who work for him. Trump has been accused of failing to pay hundreds of contractors. And so far, he hasn’t seemed very sorry. When asked about failing to pay someone by Hillary Clinton this week, Trump replied, “Maybe he didn’t do a good job and I was unsatisfied with his work.” [WaPo]

James W. Ebert, a lieutenant and assistant night shift commander for the Frankfort Police Department, will be sworn in as Richmond police chief Oct. 17. [Richmond Register]

Donald J. Trump has a cruel streak. He willfully causes pain and distress to others. And he repeats this public behavior so frequently that it’s fair to call it a character trait. Any single example would be off-putting but forgivable. Being shown many examples across many years should make any decent person recoil in disgust. [The Atlantic]

Interim Lewis County Schools Superintendent Donald W. Pace died unexpectedly on Monday. [Ashland Independent]

Suspicion is mounting about Donald Trump’s ties to Russian officials and business interests, as well as possible links between his campaign and the Russian hacking of U.S. political organizations. [TDB]

Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia are among the states challenging the Obama Administration’s Clean Power Plan, or CPP, in oral arguments Tuesday before the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C. [WFPL]

The U.S. Supreme Court opens its new term on Monday in uncharted territory, with an vacancy on the bench on a presidential Election Day now certain for the first time since Abraham Lincoln won re-election in 1864 at the height of the Civil War. [Reuters]

Spoiler alert! Montgomery County Schools are not and never were top ten. But you already knew that. [H-L]

On Wednesday, Congress was so determined to pass a law to sue Saudi Arabia that it overrode President Barack Obama’s veto. But possible backlash against America had top Republican leaders looking for someone else to blame Thursday. [HuffPo]

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Woah, There’s A Senate Race In KY?

Thus far, the U.S. Senate race in Kentucky has been more of a leisurely stroll. Less than eight weeks from Election Day, U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, R-Bowling Green, ran his first television ad of the campaign Wednesday in Louisville, a positive spot that focuses on Paul’s career as an eye surgeon. [H-L]

New national polls show the presidential race close, but Clinton remains consistently ahead. [HuffPo]

Members of the county’s teachers union have voted to approve a tentative two-year salary agreement with Jefferson County Public Schools that would give teachers additional raises in addition to their experience-based step raises. [C-J/AKN]

Of course Brown-Forman is fighting the legalization of marijuana – if not with dollars, then with ignorance like this. [The Intercept]

During a Madison County Fiscal Court meeting Tuesday morning, Judge/Executive Reagan Taylor and Deputy Judge/Executive Colleen Chaney announced the state has requested to take back control of the maintenance on certain state roads, previously maintained by the county. [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump intends to rolls back food safety regulations if he wins the White House in November. [The Hill]

Mayor Chuck Charles and former Mayor Steve Gilmore on Tuesday pitched their campaign platforms to local Republicans. [Ashland Independent]

House Speaker Paul Ryan said Thursday he believes Donald Trump should release his tax returns, gently suggesting that the GOP nominee ought to divulge his personal finances as Ryan did when he ran for vice president. [Politico]

Morehead City Council unanimously passed the first reading of an ordinance Monday to allow packaged alcohol sales within city limits on Sundays. [The Morehead News]

A congressional panel will hold a hearing on Sept. 22 to look at the fate of fuel efficiency rules through 2025 amid growing concerns from automakers. [Reuters]

Glasgow City Council delayed a vote Monday on what the 2016 tax rate for real property should be after one councilman proposed amending the ordinance to nullify an agreement the mayor had signed with the Glasgow Electric Plant Board regarding use of the funds it pays the city in lieu of taxes. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Trump recently proposed billions in spending to allow the nation’s poorest students to leave public schools and enroll elsewhere, including by using homeschooling. Except the plan won’t work for the poorest students. [ProPublica]

Montgomery County residents who live near an area of arsenic contamination have retained a Louisville law firm to represent their interests. [H-L]

Hip-hop artist and business mogul Jay Z narrates a new video that traces the history of the war on drugs and highlights the way that it has disproportionately targeted black Americans. [HuffPo]

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Will Andy Beshear Stick It To UK???

The federal government told the Bevin administration Thursday that its Medicaid waiver proposal has “sufficient information to evaluate” and it now wants to hear from Kentuckians what they think about the proposal. [H-L]

Major United States dairy producers will pay $52 million to settle an antitrust class-action lawsuit accusing them of slaughtering more than 500,000 cows to reduce milk supply and inflate prices. [HuffPo]

Thousands of union coal miners, including a large contingent from Kentucky, roamed Capitol Hill Thursday urging a vote on legislation to shore up their depleted health care and pension funds. [C-J/AKN]

House Republican leaders are embracing the Senate’s proposal of a government funding bill that would run through Dec. 9 despite opposition from conservatives who want a longer measure to avoid a lame-duck session of Congress. [The Hill]

Attorney General Andy Beshear wants to intervene in a suit by the University of Kentucky against its campus newspaper, The Kentucky Kernel, in a fight over disputed open records related to sexual harassment charges against a former UK professor. [Ronnie Ellis]

About 10,000 retired coal miners and their families descended on the U.S. Congress on Thursday to pressure lawmakers to pass stalled legislation that would prevent 22,000 of them from losing their pension and health benefits as soon as early 2017. [Reuters]

Keith R. Kappes, publisher of the Morehead News, Grayson Journal-Enquirer and Olive Hill Times, announced his retirement today. [The Morehead News]

For years, Democratic elected officials in Washington have been wary of going after Wall Street excesses too hard, lest the deep-pocketed financial industry throw all its resources to Republicans. [ProPublica]

Boyd County emergency workers have a new device in their ambulances they expect will save lives. [Ashland Independent]

On Thursday, California Governor Jerry Brown signed the state’s sweeping climate legislation — passed by the state legislature at the end of August — into law. [ThinkProgress]

Habitat for Humanity of Madison and Clark Counties is picking up the pieces after approximately $3,000 worth of equipment was stolen from them in early August. [Richmond Register]

President Barack Obama took a swipe at Donald Trump Thursday, saying the GOP presidential nominee has contradictory and “outright wacky ideas.” [Politico]

A state judge ruled Thursday that Thomas Elliott can stay on the governing board of the Kentucky Retirement Systems but won’t be allowed to vote. [H-L]

Poles apart. Night and day. Those are the easiest ways to sum up where Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump stand on environmental issues. [HuffPo]

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Bevin Didn’t Learn From His Cockfighting Rally Incident, Once Again Caught By The Balls By Democrats

The timing of a family court judge’s announcement of his resignation — and the subsequent filing by his wife to succeed him — has raised questions in Clark and Madison counties about whether the retirement was orchestrated to prevent competition from other potential candidates. [H-L]

House Science Committee Chair Lamar Smith (R-Toots) wants to exert congressional authority over state attorneys general who are trying to investigate ExxonMobil’s climate record. [HuffPo]

The University of Louisville violated the state’s open records law when it didn’t hand over documents related to its decision to impose a postseason ban on the men’s basketball team, Attorney General Andy Beshear has decided. [C-J/AKN]

President Obama says he plans to keep pushing for action on climate change after his presidency ends in January. [The Hill]

Congressman John Yarmuth is accusing Gov. Matt Bevin of plotting to end Medicaid expansion in Kentucky. [WDRB]

S&P Global Ratings warned on Thursday that the Chicago public school system’s B-plus credit rating could fall deeper into the junk level due to its “extremely weak” cash position. [Reuters]

When Florida State athletes arrived on campus in 1998, they received $144,750 in free Nike footwear and apparel. This year, a vault of $2.8 million in Nike gear awaited players arriving in Tallahassee. That’s in addition to the $1.4 million in cash Nike will pay this year for the right to outfit the university’s athletes. [Business First]

Insys, which has come under fire before for using doctors with troubled histories to promote or consult on its products, faces new claims from Illinois’ attorney general. [ProPublica]

In a very brief special called meeting of the Berea Board of Education in late August, board members voted to keep the school tax rates the same for the 2016-2017 fiscal year. [Richmond Register]

A powerful drug that’s normally used to tranquilize elephants is being blamed for a record spike in drug overdoses in the Midwest. Officials in Ohio have declared a public health emergency and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration says communities everywhere should be on alert for carfentanil. [NPR]

The Ashland Rotary Club received a glimpse of what the Kyova Interstate Planning Commission does at Monday’s meeting. The commission, located in Huntington, is an association of the Tri-State region that operates as a forum for evaluating and taking on transportation issues. Counties include Boyd and Greenup in Kentucky, Lawrence County in Ohio and Cabell, Wayne and a portion of Putnam in West Virginia. [Ashland Independent]

When Congress gets back from recess, one of the first items on Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton’s (D-DC) agenda will be salary histories. [ThinkProgress]

UK is the worst these days. After weeks of national publicity, the University of Kentucky proceeded this week with a lawsuit against its independent student newspaper, the Kentucky Kernel. [H-L]

Saying he’s “tired of all the lies,” Rep. Fitz Steele, D-Hazard, said he was present at a meeting Gov. Matt Bevin denies ever took place, a meeting where Democrat Rep. Kevin Sinnette of Ashland says the governor tried to pressure him into switching parties. [Ronnie Ellis]

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Heroin Hell Has Hit The Commonwealth

House Speaker Greg Stumbo raised the possibility of impeaching Gov. Matt Bevin Saturday after CNHI News Service reported that a Democratic state lawmaker said he was threatened by Bevin’s chief of staff for refusing to switch political parties. If true, the governor’s actions “are criminal in nature and in my judgment rise to the level of an impeachable offense.” [H-L]

Donald J. Trump is causing some high anxiety inside the military. He has suggested carpet-bombing Syrian cities, assassinating the families of Islamic State fighters and torturing detainees, all illegal under international or U.S. law. He has proposed withdrawing troops from South Korea (a similar troop withdrawal helped ignite the 1950 Korean War), advocated disengaging from NATO, and declared that Japan would be “better off” with its own nuclear weapons. And he has famously bragged, “I know more about ISIS than the generals!” [HuffPo]

Authorities have reported more than 200 overdoses in the region over the past two weeks. [C-J/AKN]

Three Congressional leaders on Monday asked top federal environmental and safety officials to extend by 60 days the public comment period on new vehicle emissions and fuel economy standards. [Reuters]

Two of the wilder caves at Carter Caves State Resort Park have been reopened to limited public use, a park official said. [Ashland Independent]

States that voted against President Obama twice are more dependent on the federal government, according to an analysis of new data released by the Pew Charitable Trusts on Monday. [The Hill]

The Rowan County Board of Education voted unanimously Aug. 24 to set the tax rates for real and personal property. [The Morehead News]

The National Labor Relations Board decided in two separate cases last week that — as far as federal labor law is concerned — charter schools are not public schools but private corporations. [WaPo]

Kentucky public high school graduates held steady in meeting the state’s college-readiness benchmarks on the ACT college-entrance exam in reading and English, but lost ground in meeting the state mathematics benchmark. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The planet is warming at a pace not experienced within the past 1,000 years, at least, making it “very unlikely” that the world will stay within a crucial temperature limit agreed by nations just last year, according to Nasa’s top climate scientist. [The Guardian]

Even with the assistance of detoxification and rehabilitation programs, 80 percent of people attempting recovery from opioid addiction will relapse. [Richmond Register]

The United States admitted its 10,000th Syrian refugee this week in a resettlement program announced by President Obama last fall, according to The White House. [NY Times]

After giving a speech critical of the Obama Administration and Democrats in Congress, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said politics in Washington aren’t as polarizing as they seem. [H-L]

The producers of EpiPen will offer a generic version of the emergency allergy treatment following outrage last week over price increases, the company announced Monday. [HuffPo]

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