Woah, There’s A Senate Race In KY?

Thus far, the U.S. Senate race in Kentucky has been more of a leisurely stroll. Less than eight weeks from Election Day, U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, R-Bowling Green, ran his first television ad of the campaign Wednesday in Louisville, a positive spot that focuses on Paul’s career as an eye surgeon. [H-L]

New national polls show the presidential race close, but Clinton remains consistently ahead. [HuffPo]

Members of the county’s teachers union have voted to approve a tentative two-year salary agreement with Jefferson County Public Schools that would give teachers additional raises in addition to their experience-based step raises. [C-J/AKN]

Of course Brown-Forman is fighting the legalization of marijuana – if not with dollars, then with ignorance like this. [The Intercept]

During a Madison County Fiscal Court meeting Tuesday morning, Judge/Executive Reagan Taylor and Deputy Judge/Executive Colleen Chaney announced the state has requested to take back control of the maintenance on certain state roads, previously maintained by the county. [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump intends to rolls back food safety regulations if he wins the White House in November. [The Hill]

Mayor Chuck Charles and former Mayor Steve Gilmore on Tuesday pitched their campaign platforms to local Republicans. [Ashland Independent]

House Speaker Paul Ryan said Thursday he believes Donald Trump should release his tax returns, gently suggesting that the GOP nominee ought to divulge his personal finances as Ryan did when he ran for vice president. [Politico]

Morehead City Council unanimously passed the first reading of an ordinance Monday to allow packaged alcohol sales within city limits on Sundays. [The Morehead News]

A congressional panel will hold a hearing on Sept. 22 to look at the fate of fuel efficiency rules through 2025 amid growing concerns from automakers. [Reuters]

Glasgow City Council delayed a vote Monday on what the 2016 tax rate for real property should be after one councilman proposed amending the ordinance to nullify an agreement the mayor had signed with the Glasgow Electric Plant Board regarding use of the funds it pays the city in lieu of taxes. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Trump recently proposed billions in spending to allow the nation’s poorest students to leave public schools and enroll elsewhere, including by using homeschooling. Except the plan won’t work for the poorest students. [ProPublica]

Montgomery County residents who live near an area of arsenic contamination have retained a Louisville law firm to represent their interests. [H-L]

Hip-hop artist and business mogul Jay Z narrates a new video that traces the history of the war on drugs and highlights the way that it has disproportionately targeted black Americans. [HuffPo]

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Will Andy Beshear Stick It To UK???

The federal government told the Bevin administration Thursday that its Medicaid waiver proposal has “sufficient information to evaluate” and it now wants to hear from Kentuckians what they think about the proposal. [H-L]

Major United States dairy producers will pay $52 million to settle an antitrust class-action lawsuit accusing them of slaughtering more than 500,000 cows to reduce milk supply and inflate prices. [HuffPo]

Thousands of union coal miners, including a large contingent from Kentucky, roamed Capitol Hill Thursday urging a vote on legislation to shore up their depleted health care and pension funds. [C-J/AKN]

House Republican leaders are embracing the Senate’s proposal of a government funding bill that would run through Dec. 9 despite opposition from conservatives who want a longer measure to avoid a lame-duck session of Congress. [The Hill]

Attorney General Andy Beshear wants to intervene in a suit by the University of Kentucky against its campus newspaper, The Kentucky Kernel, in a fight over disputed open records related to sexual harassment charges against a former UK professor. [Ronnie Ellis]

About 10,000 retired coal miners and their families descended on the U.S. Congress on Thursday to pressure lawmakers to pass stalled legislation that would prevent 22,000 of them from losing their pension and health benefits as soon as early 2017. [Reuters]

Keith R. Kappes, publisher of the Morehead News, Grayson Journal-Enquirer and Olive Hill Times, announced his retirement today. [The Morehead News]

For years, Democratic elected officials in Washington have been wary of going after Wall Street excesses too hard, lest the deep-pocketed financial industry throw all its resources to Republicans. [ProPublica]

Boyd County emergency workers have a new device in their ambulances they expect will save lives. [Ashland Independent]

On Thursday, California Governor Jerry Brown signed the state’s sweeping climate legislation — passed by the state legislature at the end of August — into law. [ThinkProgress]

Habitat for Humanity of Madison and Clark Counties is picking up the pieces after approximately $3,000 worth of equipment was stolen from them in early August. [Richmond Register]

President Barack Obama took a swipe at Donald Trump Thursday, saying the GOP presidential nominee has contradictory and “outright wacky ideas.” [Politico]

A state judge ruled Thursday that Thomas Elliott can stay on the governing board of the Kentucky Retirement Systems but won’t be allowed to vote. [H-L]

Poles apart. Night and day. Those are the easiest ways to sum up where Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump stand on environmental issues. [HuffPo]

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Bevin Didn’t Learn From His Cockfighting Rally Incident, Once Again Caught By The Balls By Democrats

The timing of a family court judge’s announcement of his resignation — and the subsequent filing by his wife to succeed him — has raised questions in Clark and Madison counties about whether the retirement was orchestrated to prevent competition from other potential candidates. [H-L]

House Science Committee Chair Lamar Smith (R-Toots) wants to exert congressional authority over state attorneys general who are trying to investigate ExxonMobil’s climate record. [HuffPo]

The University of Louisville violated the state’s open records law when it didn’t hand over documents related to its decision to impose a postseason ban on the men’s basketball team, Attorney General Andy Beshear has decided. [C-J/AKN]

President Obama says he plans to keep pushing for action on climate change after his presidency ends in January. [The Hill]

Congressman John Yarmuth is accusing Gov. Matt Bevin of plotting to end Medicaid expansion in Kentucky. [WDRB]

S&P Global Ratings warned on Thursday that the Chicago public school system’s B-plus credit rating could fall deeper into the junk level due to its “extremely weak” cash position. [Reuters]

When Florida State athletes arrived on campus in 1998, they received $144,750 in free Nike footwear and apparel. This year, a vault of $2.8 million in Nike gear awaited players arriving in Tallahassee. That’s in addition to the $1.4 million in cash Nike will pay this year for the right to outfit the university’s athletes. [Business First]

Insys, which has come under fire before for using doctors with troubled histories to promote or consult on its products, faces new claims from Illinois’ attorney general. [ProPublica]

In a very brief special called meeting of the Berea Board of Education in late August, board members voted to keep the school tax rates the same for the 2016-2017 fiscal year. [Richmond Register]

A powerful drug that’s normally used to tranquilize elephants is being blamed for a record spike in drug overdoses in the Midwest. Officials in Ohio have declared a public health emergency and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration says communities everywhere should be on alert for carfentanil. [NPR]

The Ashland Rotary Club received a glimpse of what the Kyova Interstate Planning Commission does at Monday’s meeting. The commission, located in Huntington, is an association of the Tri-State region that operates as a forum for evaluating and taking on transportation issues. Counties include Boyd and Greenup in Kentucky, Lawrence County in Ohio and Cabell, Wayne and a portion of Putnam in West Virginia. [Ashland Independent]

When Congress gets back from recess, one of the first items on Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton’s (D-DC) agenda will be salary histories. [ThinkProgress]

UK is the worst these days. After weeks of national publicity, the University of Kentucky proceeded this week with a lawsuit against its independent student newspaper, the Kentucky Kernel. [H-L]

Saying he’s “tired of all the lies,” Rep. Fitz Steele, D-Hazard, said he was present at a meeting Gov. Matt Bevin denies ever took place, a meeting where Democrat Rep. Kevin Sinnette of Ashland says the governor tried to pressure him into switching parties. [Ronnie Ellis]

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Heroin Hell Has Hit The Commonwealth

House Speaker Greg Stumbo raised the possibility of impeaching Gov. Matt Bevin Saturday after CNHI News Service reported that a Democratic state lawmaker said he was threatened by Bevin’s chief of staff for refusing to switch political parties. If true, the governor’s actions “are criminal in nature and in my judgment rise to the level of an impeachable offense.” [H-L]

Donald J. Trump is causing some high anxiety inside the military. He has suggested carpet-bombing Syrian cities, assassinating the families of Islamic State fighters and torturing detainees, all illegal under international or U.S. law. He has proposed withdrawing troops from South Korea (a similar troop withdrawal helped ignite the 1950 Korean War), advocated disengaging from NATO, and declared that Japan would be “better off” with its own nuclear weapons. And he has famously bragged, “I know more about ISIS than the generals!” [HuffPo]

Authorities have reported more than 200 overdoses in the region over the past two weeks. [C-J/AKN]

Three Congressional leaders on Monday asked top federal environmental and safety officials to extend by 60 days the public comment period on new vehicle emissions and fuel economy standards. [Reuters]

Two of the wilder caves at Carter Caves State Resort Park have been reopened to limited public use, a park official said. [Ashland Independent]

States that voted against President Obama twice are more dependent on the federal government, according to an analysis of new data released by the Pew Charitable Trusts on Monday. [The Hill]

The Rowan County Board of Education voted unanimously Aug. 24 to set the tax rates for real and personal property. [The Morehead News]

The National Labor Relations Board decided in two separate cases last week that — as far as federal labor law is concerned — charter schools are not public schools but private corporations. [WaPo]

Kentucky public high school graduates held steady in meeting the state’s college-readiness benchmarks on the ACT college-entrance exam in reading and English, but lost ground in meeting the state mathematics benchmark. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The planet is warming at a pace not experienced within the past 1,000 years, at least, making it “very unlikely” that the world will stay within a crucial temperature limit agreed by nations just last year, according to Nasa’s top climate scientist. [The Guardian]

Even with the assistance of detoxification and rehabilitation programs, 80 percent of people attempting recovery from opioid addiction will relapse. [Richmond Register]

The United States admitted its 10,000th Syrian refugee this week in a resettlement program announced by President Obama last fall, according to The White House. [NY Times]

After giving a speech critical of the Obama Administration and Democrats in Congress, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said politics in Washington aren’t as polarizing as they seem. [H-L]

The producers of EpiPen will offer a generic version of the emergency allergy treatment following outrage last week over price increases, the company announced Monday. [HuffPo]

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Edelen & Trump Are On The Same Page

Matt Bevin doesn’t know how to stop running face-first into scandals. And they’re not even the good kind of scandals that involve corruption – they’re just embarrassing and dumb. Matt Bevin’s administration on Friday named a retired Texas official who oversaw a controversial 2008 raid on a polygamist sect, seizing more than 400 children without a court order, to run Kentucky’s troubled Department of Juvenile Justice. [John Cheves]

Emily Graeber sat on a plane, her long hair falling over her face, and pressed her nose against the window. Then she leaned back in her seat, trying not to cry. [HuffPo]

Jim Ramsey and his crew have been pulling these corrupt open records stunts for a decade. Want to find out former University of Louisville President James Ramsey’s new phone number and email address at the university’s foundation? Hope you have better luck than we did. [C-J/AKN]

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton is marking the 53rd anniversary of the March on Washington with a call to action, saying too many Americans still face systemic racism and “constant assaults on their franchise.” [The Hill]

U.S. Senate candidate Jim Gray told a flock of rural Democrats on Saturday he’d deploy a four-point plan that would help rejuvenate a diminishing eastern Kentucky economy if elected. [Ashland Independent]

The turbulent months after the 9/11 attacks were notable for something that did not happen. Even though al-Qaeda had killed thousands of people and scored a direct hit on the Pentagon, hardly anyone in either political party blamed the Bush Administration for failing to defend the homeland. [ProPublica]

In another display of the changing political tides in Kentucky, only Republican office-holders spoke from the stage Thursday morning at the Kentucky Farm Bureau Country Ham Breakfast, while Democrats found themselves on the outside, both figuratively and literally. [Ronnie Ellis]

President Barack Obama’s former campaign manager on Sunday called Donald Trump “a psychopath.” [Politico]

Late Friday afternoon, Glasgow Electric Plant Board Superintendent Billy Ray said that after an all-afternoon meeting with TVA, there was little new to report in the wake of receipt of two documents Thursday from the Kentucky Office of the Attorney General. [Glasgow Daily Times]

It’s a common sight at public events – a long line for the the ladies’ loos and a short one for the men’s. [BBC]

As the district’s only Leader in Me school, Glenn Marshall Elementary School’s first school assembly focused on, naturally, leadership. The assembly explored how students in all grades can find the leaders in themselves this school year. [Richmond Register]

Emboldened by Donald J. Trump’s struggles in the presidential race, Democrats in Congress are laying the groundwork to expand the list of House Republicans they will target for defeat as part of an effort to slash the Republicans’ 30-seat majority and even reclaim control if Mr. Trump falls further. [NY Times]

One of the biggest investments held by the $14.9 billion Kentucky Retirement Systems is a hedge fund that’s also one of its worst performers — and yet the financially troubled agency is doubling down. [John Cheves]

Adam Edelen and Donald Trump are apparently birds of a feather. Surprise! [HuffPo]

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UK Is Run By A Bunch Of Assholes

Eastern Kentucky needs your love. She died alone in the middle of the night, and her body was swiftly autopsied, embalmed and carted 135 miles to a remote Kentucky county where she had been raised. [H-L]

The Department of Justice made a landmark decision last week when it announced it would direct the Bureau of Prisons to let its contracts with private prison companies lapse. But last week’s change in policy left the U.S. Marshals Service untouched, even though that agency is also under DOJ control and keeps nearly as many people locked in privatized jails as the Bureau of Prisons. [HuffPo]

You know, like Jim Ramsey took the high road when attacking ON TELEVISION anyone questioning Robert Flener, who went to prison. “Chairman Benz needs to keep his comments on the high road and work with all of the UL staff, its affiliated boards and their leadership, and the media to promote harmony,” said Hughes, who also serves on the Board of Trustees. [C-J/AKN]

A bipartisan quartet of lawmakers is circulating a letter that seeks to delay a pending arms sale to Saudi Arabia. [The Hill]

With just less than six weeks before a countywide election to determine whether legal alcohol sales will be allowed in Barren County, election officers are seeking some temporary polling places. [Glasgow Daily Times]

North Carolina’s university system must allow two transgender students and a transgender employee to use bathrooms matching their gender identity, a U.S. judge ruled on Friday, in a partial victory for those fighting the state’s restrictive restroom law. [Reuters]

The first guy was believable but Russ Meyer doesn’t carry the same credibility. That’s problematic, sure. His ties to Adam Edelen and the the Cormans also do not help him. But that doesn’t mean what he’s saying is in any way untrue. Thankfully for him, Sinnette’s story went public first, establishing a pattern. It’s clear that the Bevin team is attempting to retaliate against ANYONE holding them accountable. A second Democratic state lawmaker now claims Republican Gov. Matt Bevin tried to persuade him to switch parties and that the governor’s chief of staff threatened to punish him politically when he refused. [Ronnie Ellis]

Physicians whose state boards have sanctioned them for harming patients, unnecessarily prescribing addictive drugs, bilking federal insurance programs and even sexual misconduct nonetheless continue to receive payments for consulting, giving talks about products, and more. [ProPublica]

Louisville can’t stop killing everybody. Two vigils were held for three different victims of homicides near Shelby Park this week. [WDRB]

Hillary Clinton and Paul Ryan don’t agree on much — but both are lending their support to an anti-poverty proposal that cuts across racial and party lines. [Politico]

The University of Kentucky could soon be taking legal action against its own school newspaper. [WHAS11]

Hillary Clinton has launched a full broadside against Donald Trump, accusing her Republican opponent of issuing a “steady stream of bigotry” and espousing policies that would “put prejudice into practice”. [BBC]

State Rep. John Short, whose name surfaced this year in a federal vote-buying investigation in Magoffin County that led to several convictions, said Tuesday that he doesn’t want to discuss the case. [John Cheves]

A massive crack in one of Antarctica’s largest ice shelves has grown exponentially in recent months, and scientists worry a break-off could destabilize the entire structure. [HuffPo]