Matt Bevin Sure Had A Rough Weekend

The Kentucky Supreme Court dealt a decisive blow to Gov. Matt Bevin’s executive power Thursday, finding that he exceeded his statutory authority by cutting state universities’ budgets by 2 percent last spring, after the General Assembly had already appropriated their funding. [H-L]

Donald Trump said Wednesday he finally gave up pushing conspiracy theories about President Barack Obama’s birthplace because it was politically convenient to do so. [HuffPo]

A group will host a series of eight public forums statewide to alert people about possible changes to the state Medicaid program and seek comments, with the first one scheduled Sept. 26 in Morehead. [C-J/AKN]

A new study that examines some major health care proposals from the presidential candidates finds that Donald Trump would cause about 20 million to lose coverage while Hillary Clinton would provide coverage for an additional 9 million people. [AP]

Matt Bevin exceeded his statutory authority when he unilaterally reduced funding to the state’s universities and colleges by 2 percent last spring, according to the Kentucky Supreme Court. [Ronnie Ellis]

As his two-term presidency draws to a close, Barack Obama is looking back—at the legacies of his predecessors, as well as his own—and forward, to the freedom of life after the White House. In a wide-ranging conversation with one of the nation’s foremost presidential historians, he talks about his ambitions, frustrations, and the decisions that still haunt him. [Vanity Fair]

Officials have discovered the presence of hydrilla, an invasive aquatic plant, in several areas of Cave Run Lake near Morehead. State and federal officials are asking boaters and anglers using Cave Run Lake to take precautions to help prevent the spread of this plant. [Ashland Independent]

You can thank people like Scott Jennings for abusing this good will. When Mylan NV recruited food allergy bloggers to learn about its campaign to get allergic shock antidotes into schools, many were eager to join the maker of the EpiPens they carry in purses and stash in book bags to protect their children against potentially lethal attacks. [Reuters]

Of course the Rowan County Fiscal Court gave the mother of Kim Davis an award. Remember Jean Bailey? She’s one of the people who helped her granddaughter cover up the theft of a dog and get away with it. [The Morehead News]

Donald Trump says he has donated millions to charity. Earlier this year, Washington Post reporter David Fahrenthold set out to prove him right. [ProPublica]

PEE ALERT! SMALL TOWN FREAKOUT PEE ALERT! The Glasgow Police Department has received several complaints from residents of Glasgow in reference to someone dressing up as a clown and walking or standing near public areas such as parks and city streets, according to a GPD press release. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Donald Trump’s campaign isn’t alone in patronizing his own businesses: taxpayers are indirectly doing so, too. Federal Election Commission records show that the U.S. Secret Service has paid the Trump campaign about $1.6 million to cover the cost of flying its agents with the candidate on a plane owned and operated by one of his companies. [Politico]

Surprise! Valarie Honeycutt Spears all the sudden cares about a corrupt board of education member. Samantha Rodarte, who is opposing Fayette County school board chairwoman Melissa Bacon in the November general election, is calling for Bacon to resign and withdraw from the race. [H-L]

Hillary Clinton’s campaign is here to show you what a Donald Trump presidency would feel like for young women. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets! [CLICK HERE]

Louisville Has Become Shooting Central

Last month, it appeared that Hillary Clinton’s joint fundraising committee had given nearly $800,000 to cash-poor Kentucky Democrats. Turns out it wasn’t theirs to keep. [H-L]

Donald Trump cannot possibly serve as president if he keeps embracing Russian leader Vladimir Putin, two top former spymasters argued in a scathing editorial. [HuffPo]

FBI agents out of the Louisville Division are going to increase their role in battling gangs and the drug trade here and across Kentucky after a surge of activity. [C-J/AKN]

As Chuck DeBonis was wrapping up his stint as a civilian paramedic at a military base in Kuwait earlier this year, he found a home he wanted to buy in the Virginia town of Bristow for his return. [Reuters]

The Coal Fields Regional Industrial Park is sprawled across 400 acres of land in Perry County and has more than 200,000 square feet of warehousing space. But 20 years after its construction, just three companies call it home. [Richmond Register]

A tenth of the planet’s wilderness was eradicated in the last two decades and conservation efforts are failing to keep pace with the rate of wilderness loss, according to a new study. [ThinkProgress]

The murder tally in Louisville is spiking this year. As of Wednesday, Louisville Metro Police report 81 homicides since the beginning of the year. That’s the highest year-to-date total since at least 2006, police records show. [WPFL]

President Barack Obama has nominated the first Muslim-American to serve as a federal judge, saying the D.C. based-lawyer would serve “with integrity and a steadfast commitment to justice” if confirmed. [Politico]

A great football player, for sure. But the late Howard Murphy was every bit a great person, too. [Ashland Independent]

Two Americans have been arrested and charged for allegedly helping to hack high-ranking US government officials. [BBC]

Whose money is it? That’s one question Park City commissioners tried to answer Tuesday when talking about the more than $4,000 in a bank account that is earmarked for the upkeep of the veterans memorial. [Glasgow Daily Times]

At last, Bill Clinton could not help himself. He paced the stage during a speech on Tuesday in North Carolina, holding his microphone close. He raised his left index finger. And at once, the meandering address turned sharply, and without prompting, to his charitable foundation, a magnet for criticism in recent weeks. [NY Times]

This is just gross. Hunt Brothers Pizza will be the official pizza of Rupp Arena and its concession stands beginning this fall, Lexington Center announced Wednesday. [H-L]

It’s no secret that Donald Trump hasn’t exactly been a choirboy during his presidential campaign. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets! [CLICK HERE]

And Miles To Go Before We Sleep…

This… wow. All the makings of a scandal. Billy Joe Miles, a prominent farm businessman in Owensboro and a former chairman of the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees, was charged Tuesday with rape, sodomy and bribing a witness. He is 76. He has four children. Daughter Suzanne Miles is a Republican state representative for the 7th House District, which includes Daviess, Henderson and Union counties. [H-L]

Donald Trump is living large on his donors’ dime. His campaign is spending lavishly on Trump businesses instead of cheaper alternatives. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin, who came into office last year saying that he didn’t owe anyone anything because he largely paid for his own election, is still raising money for his old campaign, which at last count owed him more than $4 million. [More C-J/AKN]

Physicians whose state boards have sanctioned them for harming patients, unnecessarily prescribing addictive drugs, bilking federal insurance programs and even sexual misconduct nonetheless continue to receive payments for consulting, giving talks about products, and more. [ProPublica]

Congressman Thomas Massie, R-Ky., seeks an end to the lame-duck session, but predicted Congress will likely pass a continuing resolution when it returns to Washington that could lead to another omnibus spending bill in December. [Ashland Independent]

Americans of a certain age who follow politics and policy closely still have vivid memories of the 2000 election — bad memories, and not just because the man who lost the popular vote somehow ended up in office. For the campaign leading up to that end game was nightmarish too. [NY Times]

Metcalfe County magistrates approved on second reading Tuesday during a special-called meeting the county’s alcohol ordinance. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Refugees can be an economic boost, not burden, to the communities that host them, a new study by the United Nations concludes. [Click the Clicky]

On International Overdose Awareness Day, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced $53 million in funding to 44 states, four tribes and Washington, D.C., to improve access to treatment for opioid use disorders, reduce opioid related deaths and strengthen drug misuse prevention efforts. [Richmond Register]

What does it mean to be a Republican? For generations, the answer had been clear: A belief in individual liberty. Free markets. Strong national defense. But what does it mean to be a Republican today? With Donald Trump as the party’s new standard-bearer, it’s impossible to say. [Dallas Morning News]

Morehead State University officially welcomed four new Board of Regents members – Adam Abbott of Buckhorn, Craig Preece of Lovely, Patrick Price of Flemingsburg and Terri S. Walters of Pikeville – Friday, Aug. 26, at its special meeting. [The Morehead News]

Retired coal miners and their congressional allies are shifting into overdrive in their push for Congress to pass legislation shoring up their retirement benefits. [The Hill]

Eric C. Conn’s attorney has filed a notice of compliance last week with court orders imposed Aug. 19 asking that the court be updated on the status of Conn’s malpractice insurance. However, court documents show that a judge’s order allowing Conn’s assets to be unfrozen was based on the incorrect information that Conn did have valid malpractice insurance. [Floyd Chronicle]

Years after the issue was debunked, Donald Trump still refuses to back away from the birther conspiracy he helped fuel. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets! [CLICK HERE]

Do You Smell The Republican Scandals?

University of Kentucky officials will eventually unveil a controversial mural in Memorial Hall that was shrouded last year and will surround it with other works of art and more context, President Eli Capilouto announced Thursday. [H-L]

Are House Republicans trying to have it both ways on Hillary Clinton? [HuffPo]

The James Graham Brown Foundation, which has provided more than $72 million in grants to the University of Louisville and related entities over the past 55 years, has threatened to cut off funding unless the U of L Foundation hires a nationally recognized forensic accounting firm to review its finances. [C-J/AKN]

Secretary of Health and Human Services Sylvia Burwell said Thursday that the ObamaCare marketplaces, which have been troubled by exiting insurers, can be made sustainable even if Congress does not act to make fixes to the healthcare law. [The Hill]

There’s a set of concrete steps leading down the hill to Smoky Bridge, the natural span near Smoky Valley Lake, and Paul Tierney walks down them the same way he would the stairs to his rec room. [Ashland Independent]

Median income is down but public college tuition is way up. Public colleges play a special role in making higher education affordable, but in recent years, soaring tuition is pushing that dream out of reach. [ProPublica]

The Glasgow Electric Plant Board voted during a special-called meeting Wednesday to send a letter to the Kentucky Attorney General, explaining the GEPB could not revert back to the rates it charged in 2015 and that it will be designing a rate structure that will involve customers paying the “real cost of their energy usage.” [Glasgow Daily Times]

The U.S. has set a new record for how much gasoline the country consumes in a month. Drivers burned more than 405 million gallons of gas a day in June, the latest month counted. The Energy Information Administration says that’s the highest amount ever, on records dating back to 1946. [NPR]

An individual and two of his companies will remain defendants in a civil action filed by the Estill Fiscal Court involving the dumping of low-level radioactive wastes at a landfill near Irvine. [Richmond Register]

Three federal prisons in California and others nationwide appear to be falling short in preparing inmates for safe release into society, investigators are warning. [McClatchy]

Republican Gov. Matt Bevin left a message on a Democratic lawmaker’s cellphone voicemail on Dec. 17, 2015 that seems to imply he planned to punish the lawmaker for refusing to switch parties. [The Morehead News]

Donald Trump paid the IRS a $2,500 penalty this year, an official at Trump’s company said, after it was revealed that Trump’s charitable foundation had violated tax laws by giving a political contribution to a campaign group connected to Florida’s attorney general. [WaPo]

The University of Kentucky violated the state’s Open Records Act by refusing to disclose documents the Herald-Leader requested concerning a Hazard cardiology practice that UK once owned, the attorney general’s office has ruled. [John Cheves]

President Barack Obama made history on Tuesday by nominating the first Muslim person to the federal judiciary, Abid Qureshi. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets! [CLICK HERE]

University of Louisville Keeps It Real By Constantly Retaliating Against Anyone Pushing For Accountability

Black students in Kentucky were suspended four times more often than white students in 2015, according to a report released Thursday. [H-L]

The Obama administration has joined the fight against the American bail industry, telling a federal appeals court that bail practices that keep poor defendants locked up because they cannot afford to purchase their freedom are unconstitutional. [HuffPo]

This is the University of Louisville way – retaliate against those attempting to hold them accountable. And when that doesn’t work and people fight back? Try to destroy them in the press. [C-J/AKN]

Wild bees that forage from oilseed rape crops treated with insecticides known as neonicotinoids are more likely to undergo long-term population declines than bees that forage from other sources, according to the findings of an 18-year study. [Reuters]

Surprise! The cityfolk are shocked that vote-buying is still going on in rural Eastern Kentucky. [WFPL]

Two K Street firms caught up in the web of Paul Manafort’s influence have hired outside counsel to look into whether a former client he referred to them lied about its source of funding. [The Hill]

A new Morehead State University president should be able to work with lawmakers, get chummy with generous alumni, collaborate with community college officials and communicate well with the university’s students, staff and faculty. [Ashland Independent]

Matt Bevin is a bigot. Matt Bevin’s administration is suing the federal government to block a rule that says medical providers and insurance companies can’t discriminate against transgender patients. [WFPL]

Each school in the Rowan County School District, from preschool through high school, now is offering free breakfast and lunch to every student. [The Morehead News]

Donald Trump used his campaign funds to buy thousands of copies of his own book at retail cost, simultaneously diverting donor money back into his pockets while artificially boosting his sales figures. It’s a tactic that may be illegal, campaign finance experts say. [TDB]

Cave City Council members voted earlier in the week to enter into an inter-local agreement with the Barren River Drug Task Force. City officials cited a desire to help combat the ever growing drug problem as a reason for rejoining the drug task force. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The nation’s first “soda tax” on sugar-sweetened beverages, which went into effect in Berkeley, Calif., last year, appears to be working. According to a new study, consumption of sugary drinks — at least in some neighborhoods — is down by a whopping 20 percent. [NPR]

An attorney for Steven Edwards, who was fired this month as commissioner of the Kentucky Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control just five months after Gov. Matt Bevin appointed him, said Edwards has not been given any reason for his dismissal. [John Cheves]

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton leads Republican rival Donald Trump by 12 percentage points among likely voters, her strongest showing this month, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll released on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets! [CLICK HERE]

Hillary To KDP’s Rescue? Probably Not

Surprise! The Republicans are just as bad as the Democrats. The daughter of Energy and Environment Secretary Charles Snavely landed a $38,000-a-year non-merit job this month in the office of Gov. Matt Bevin. [H-L]

After the chairman of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign resigned on Friday, former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski tried to insist Trump’s bid for the White House was going just fine. Lewandowski, who was fired by Trump in June, drew a puzzling parallel to make his point, arguing that in 2004, John Kerry was also making staff changes as the election approached. [HuffPo]

A Hillary Clinton political committee transferred $793,000 to the Kentucky Democratic Party in July – a huge and apparently sorely needed infusion of cash for Kentucky Democrats, who so far this year have struggled to compete with the Republican Party of Kentucky in the fundraising battle leading up to the November elections. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort was asked to resign, the campaign said Friday. [The Hill]

The Madison County Board of Education took its first step Thursday afternoon in the creation of a new elementary school for students in northern Madison County. [Richmond Register]

More than 30 major technology and communication companies said on Friday they are joining the U.S. government to crack down on “robocalls,” automated, prerecorded phone calls that regulators have labeled a “scourge.” [Reuters]

Rand Paul said it could be “too late” for AK Steel to bring its workforce back in Ashland, despite a tax increase on Chinese steel imports imposed by the United States. [Ashland Independent]

ProPublica’s reporting on the water crisis in the American West has highlighted any number of confounding contradictions worsening the problem: Farmers are encouraged to waste water so as to protect their legal rights to its dwindling supply in the years ahead; Las Vegas sought to impose restrictions on water use while placing no checks on its explosive population growth; the federal government has encouraged farmers to improve efficiency in watering crops, but continues to subsidize the growing of thirsty crops such as cotton in desert states like Arizona. [ProPublica]

A free, wireless Internet network is up and running throughout downtown Morehead. The city, in partnership with Rajant Corporation, installed wireless meshing nodes in March to help provide instant Internet access to anyone within the network’s parameters. [The Morehead News]

As the Republican nominee for the US presidency, Donald Trump received a classified briefing on Wednesday. What does that mean? [BBC]

The vast majority of the crowd of more than 100 people who attended Mayor Dick Doty’s Friday afternoon press conference made it clear they weren’t buying the message he was trying to sell. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Surprise! Fraternity atmosphere can (especially in Frankfart) make state capitols hotbeds of sexual harassment. [USA Today]

The Madison County school district has decided to take a drug company up on its offer of two free doses of Narcan, a life-saving drug in instances of heroin overdose — even though the district hasn’t seen an overdose problem. [H-L]

Oh, look, Valarie Honeycutt Spears noticed that there were more than 200 testing violations in Kentucky schools. She’s failed to investigate anything in Montgomery County. [More H-L]

Religious freedom is a valid defense for a Michigan business owner who fired a trans woman after she asked to dress in accordance with her gender identity, a federal judge ruled Thursday. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets! [CLICK HERE]

King Coal Is Still In Severe Denial

You already know Friends of Coal and the Kentucky Coal Association exist only to make a handful of people wealthy. They use far-right Republican extremists as spokespeople (like the Coal Association used RPK’s Tres Watson for years). They decimate Appalachia, take from the poor and ignore Kentucky. It’s all bullshit hype and panicked, worried people fall for it without fail. [H-L]

Donald Trump restructured his campaign leadership Tuesday in a desperate attempt to turn around his flagging presidential bid. [HuffPo]

Of the 87 who died in an accident involving motorcycles, 57 were not wearing a helmet, and neither were any of 19 who died while on an ATV. [Floyd County Times]

Donald Trump’s presidential campaign appears to be soliciting foreign donations despite multiple warnings and a criminal complaint filed with the Department of Justice. [The Hill]

Two of the victims at the heart of a sexual assault and harassment case against an associate professor are angry and say UK is protecting the professor at the expense of his victims, other students and the public. [Kentucky Kernel]

When it comes to the substance of Donald Trump’s speech proposing “extreme vetting” of immigrants to the United States, retired Navy Adm. James Stavridis on Tuesday indicated that the Republican nominee lacked specifics. [Politico]

Hal Rogers joined members of the Chamber of Commerce in touring the Somerset coworking center — billed as being a space for small businesses or those striking out on their own to “connect, create and collaborate.” [Commonwealth Journal]

With hopes of landing the U.S. Senate candidates and high-profile surrogates to represent the presidential candidates, plans are in place for the sixth annual Brushy Fork Forum in Vine Grove. [News-Enterprise]

Facing allegations from former city firefighter Jeffrey Queen that he was subjected to a hostile work environment during his five years in the Bowling Green Fire Department, the city of Bowling Green on Friday acknowledged the existence of a video showing a firefighter burning the Quran, one of many accusations of misconduct in a lawsuit filed by Queen earlier this week. [BGDN]

Over the past decade, the news about Kentucky’s coal industry has been reliably bad. The latest numbers show the state is mining the smallest amount of coal since about 1934, and there are fewer coal miners employed here than anytime in the 20th century. [WFPL]

Those following the Powell Scandal(s) will likely want to keep an eye on this. A school district is hoping voters will help replace what might be the most out-of-shape high and middle schools in Kentucky. [WAVE3]

This is what happens when an illegally-hired former superintendent’s wife heads south. We hear it’s motivating the OAG to seek restitution on behalf of the Montgomery County Board of Education. [Page One]

On Thursday, a Northern Kentucky woman was sentenced to almost 19 years in prison for providing illegal drugs to her daughter in prison; her daughter subsequently died of an overdose. [H-L]

Donald Trump is doing a great job of making the case against his own presidential candidacy, President Barack Obama said at a fundraiser for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton on Monday. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for Ting or Cricket and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. [CLICK HERE]