Hillary To KDP’s Rescue? Probably Not

Surprise! The Republicans are just as bad as the Democrats. The daughter of Energy and Environment Secretary Charles Snavely landed a $38,000-a-year non-merit job this month in the office of Gov. Matt Bevin. [H-L]

After the chairman of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign resigned on Friday, former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski tried to insist Trump’s bid for the White House was going just fine. Lewandowski, who was fired by Trump in June, drew a puzzling parallel to make his point, arguing that in 2004, John Kerry was also making staff changes as the election approached. [HuffPo]

A Hillary Clinton political committee transferred $793,000 to the Kentucky Democratic Party in July – a huge and apparently sorely needed infusion of cash for Kentucky Democrats, who so far this year have struggled to compete with the Republican Party of Kentucky in the fundraising battle leading up to the November elections. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort was asked to resign, the campaign said Friday. [The Hill]

The Madison County Board of Education took its first step Thursday afternoon in the creation of a new elementary school for students in northern Madison County. [Richmond Register]

More than 30 major technology and communication companies said on Friday they are joining the U.S. government to crack down on “robocalls,” automated, prerecorded phone calls that regulators have labeled a “scourge.” [Reuters]

Rand Paul said it could be “too late” for AK Steel to bring its workforce back in Ashland, despite a tax increase on Chinese steel imports imposed by the United States. [Ashland Independent]

ProPublica’s reporting on the water crisis in the American West has highlighted any number of confounding contradictions worsening the problem: Farmers are encouraged to waste water so as to protect their legal rights to its dwindling supply in the years ahead; Las Vegas sought to impose restrictions on water use while placing no checks on its explosive population growth; the federal government has encouraged farmers to improve efficiency in watering crops, but continues to subsidize the growing of thirsty crops such as cotton in desert states like Arizona. [ProPublica]

A free, wireless Internet network is up and running throughout downtown Morehead. The city, in partnership with Rajant Corporation, installed wireless meshing nodes in March to help provide instant Internet access to anyone within the network’s parameters. [The Morehead News]

As the Republican nominee for the US presidency, Donald Trump received a classified briefing on Wednesday. What does that mean? [BBC]

The vast majority of the crowd of more than 100 people who attended Mayor Dick Doty’s Friday afternoon press conference made it clear they weren’t buying the message he was trying to sell. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Surprise! Fraternity atmosphere can (especially in Frankfart) make state capitols hotbeds of sexual harassment. [USA Today]

The Madison County school district has decided to take a drug company up on its offer of two free doses of Narcan, a life-saving drug in instances of heroin overdose — even though the district hasn’t seen an overdose problem. [H-L]

Oh, look, Valarie Honeycutt Spears noticed that there were more than 200 testing violations in Kentucky schools. She’s failed to investigate anything in Montgomery County. [More H-L]

Religious freedom is a valid defense for a Michigan business owner who fired a trans woman after she asked to dress in accordance with her gender identity, a federal judge ruled Thursday. [HuffPo]

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King Coal Is Still In Severe Denial

You already know Friends of Coal and the Kentucky Coal Association exist only to make a handful of people wealthy. They use far-right Republican extremists as spokespeople (like the Coal Association used RPK’s Tres Watson for years). They decimate Appalachia, take from the poor and ignore Kentucky. It’s all bullshit hype and panicked, worried people fall for it without fail. [H-L]

Donald Trump restructured his campaign leadership Tuesday in a desperate attempt to turn around his flagging presidential bid. [HuffPo]

Of the 87 who died in an accident involving motorcycles, 57 were not wearing a helmet, and neither were any of 19 who died while on an ATV. [Floyd County Times]

Donald Trump’s presidential campaign appears to be soliciting foreign donations despite multiple warnings and a criminal complaint filed with the Department of Justice. [The Hill]

Two of the victims at the heart of a sexual assault and harassment case against an associate professor are angry and say UK is protecting the professor at the expense of his victims, other students and the public. [Kentucky Kernel]

When it comes to the substance of Donald Trump’s speech proposing “extreme vetting” of immigrants to the United States, retired Navy Adm. James Stavridis on Tuesday indicated that the Republican nominee lacked specifics. [Politico]

Hal Rogers joined members of the Chamber of Commerce in touring the Somerset coworking center — billed as being a space for small businesses or those striking out on their own to “connect, create and collaborate.” [Commonwealth Journal]

With hopes of landing the U.S. Senate candidates and high-profile surrogates to represent the presidential candidates, plans are in place for the sixth annual Brushy Fork Forum in Vine Grove. [News-Enterprise]

Facing allegations from former city firefighter Jeffrey Queen that he was subjected to a hostile work environment during his five years in the Bowling Green Fire Department, the city of Bowling Green on Friday acknowledged the existence of a video showing a firefighter burning the Quran, one of many accusations of misconduct in a lawsuit filed by Queen earlier this week. [BGDN]

Over the past decade, the news about Kentucky’s coal industry has been reliably bad. The latest numbers show the state is mining the smallest amount of coal since about 1934, and there are fewer coal miners employed here than anytime in the 20th century. [WFPL]

Those following the Powell Scandal(s) will likely want to keep an eye on this. A school district is hoping voters will help replace what might be the most out-of-shape high and middle schools in Kentucky. [WAVE3]

This is what happens when an illegally-hired former superintendent’s wife heads south. We hear it’s motivating the OAG to seek restitution on behalf of the Montgomery County Board of Education. [Page One]

On Thursday, a Northern Kentucky woman was sentenced to almost 19 years in prison for providing illegal drugs to her daughter in prison; her daughter subsequently died of an overdose. [H-L]

Donald Trump is doing a great job of making the case against his own presidential candidacy, President Barack Obama said at a fundraiser for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton on Monday. [HuffPo]

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Trump Chickens Come Home To Roost

The Lexington Humane Society is inundated with cats every summer, and this August it’s using its “Purrgressive Pricing” program to help them alleviate some of the overcrowding. [H-L]

Aetna Inc, the No. 3 U.S. health insurer, on Monday said that due to persistent financial losses on Obamacare plans, it will sell individual insurance on the government-run online marketplaces in only four states next year, down from the current 15 states. [HuffPo]

GLI is part of what’s wrong with Louisville and it’s beyond time for everyone to recognize it. An organization like that is not necessary in the modern era. Louisville’s first heat-management plan is flawed and should not be used as the basis for any new regulatory programs aimed at reducing temperatures, the city’s chamber of commerce said. [C-J/AKN]

Boeing Co’s KC-46A refueling plane has been approved for production, with work underway for the first two low-rate initial production lots to be awarded in the next 30 days, the U.S. Air Force said on Friday. [Reuters]

On Friday, Gov. Matt Bevin made several appointments to Kentucky’s Universities and College Boards including two to the Eastern Kentucky University Board of Regents. [Richmond Register]

Federal health regulators have announced plans to crack down on nursing home employees who take demeaning photographs and videos of residents and post them on social media. [ProPublica]

Mayor Chuck Charles said the city of Ashland faces a “no-win” situation prior to the Aug. 23, county-wide election on alcohol sales. On Election Day, all registered voters in Boyd County, Ashland and Catlettsburg can vote to turn the county “wet.” The status would expand alcohol sales in convenience stores, gas stations, grocery stores and other businesses. [Ashland Independent]

More than 70 Republicans have signed a letter to the party’s National Committee head urging him to stop helping Donald Trump’s campaign. [BBC]

Watching AT&T buy favors from Rocky Adkins… AT&T Kentucky Tuesday donated $20,000 to the Rowan County Board of Education to be used for college and career readiness programs. [The Morehead News]

Republican strategists say time is running out on Donald Trump. Though there are more than 80 days to go before the election, GOP skeptics believe the party’s nominee has little time left to straighten out his campaign in order to defeat Hillary Clinton for the presidency. [The Hill]

The State Medical Examiner’s Office in Madisonville has determined that the cause of death for a Butler County couple found Tuesday in their home is homicide, according to a Kentucky State Police release. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Peter Greathouse, a Republican from Utah, says he’s not “comfortable” with Donald Trump as his party’s nominee. Jane Lynch, a GOP veteran from Arizona, says she’ll likely cast her personal vote for libertarian Gary Johnson or a write-in candidate. Loren Byers, a Texas Republican, calls Trump “a loose cannon.” [Politico]

If you’re the state’s most important newspaper, you could do a better job and have some common sense when covering suicide. At a bare minimum, provide links and numbers for resources. At a bare minimum. [H-L]

When Donald Trump unveiled his council of economic advisors earlier this month, observers were quick to note some of the team’s unorthodox attributes: all of its 13 members are men, six are named Steve and only one has an advanced degree in economics. [HuffPo]

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Bevin, Too, Sells Popular Board Seats

PEE ALERT! Andy Barr says people are poor because they receive assistance. The fact that the Kentucky Democratic Party can’t rustle up someone to beat this halfwit is a searing indictment of the Party’s inability to do anything other than conduct insurance fraud schemes these days. If you think Candy Barr isn’t out of his league and just as terrible as people like Tim Longmeyer, take a look at his anti-poverty proposal. It involves gutting public education and ending the requirement that financial advisers disclose conflicts of interest to their clients. [John Cheves]

Despite the world’s string high-profile terror attacks this year, the economy remains at the top of American voters’ minds, a new HuffPost/YouGov survey finds. A 45 percent plurality name the economy as one of the two issues most important to them, ranking it first on a list of 10 topics. [HuffPo]

Surprise! A Kentucky Newspaper has finally realized heroin has taken over Eastern Kentucky. Growing up in the hardscrabble hills of Appalachia, Bobby Vaughn began popping painkillers at 15-years-old, sneaking them from his injured coal miner dad. That was the start of a three-decade-long addiction to any drug available: OxyContin, cocaine, meth – and beginning a year ago, heroin. [C-J/AKN]

Advisers say Donald Trump has lately been sullen and erratic in private and easily rattled by perceived slights, according to The New York Times. [The Hill]

After nine years of serving as director of the annual Ashland Independent School safety patrol trip, Maj. Mark McDowell is handing the reins over to Lt. Jason Moore. [Ashland Independent]

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration on Thursday denied requests to stop classifying marijuana as a dangerous drug with no medical use, leaving users and businesses in limbo after many states have legalized it for medical or recreational purposes. [Reuters]

Rowan County soon could be host to Eastern Kentucky’s first microbrewery. That’s according to local businessman Steve Williams, who says he plans to have Scoreboard Pub and Microbrewery at 101 West Main Street open by next spring. [The Morehead News]

Courts are scrambling to rule on state election laws in time for the elections being held later this year. [ProPublica]

When Kentuckyana “Tuck” Jones, who seeks out rare treasures, collectibles and antiquities across the country, decided to open a museum featuring artifacts from across the world in a building on Mammoth Cave Road, he had less than $50 to his name. To raise money to fund the opening of the museum, he began trading collectibles. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Republican insiders are more convinced than Democrats that Donald Trump is so far behind Hillary Clinton that he can’t win in November. [Politico]

GE Lighting announced Thursday that it plans to close its Lexington Lamp Plant and Somerset Glass Plant by August 2017. [WKYT]

Donald Trump believes that running for president has been good for his bottom line. He said so under oath during a deposition he gave in a lawsuit stemming from a dispute over his soon-to-open Washington luxury hotel. [WaPo]

Matt Bevin appointed three people Friday to the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees, including one of Kentucky’s top Republican fundraisers. [H-L]

Some Republicans have argued that conservatives skeptical of Donald Trump should vote for him anyway, if only to prevent Hillary Clinton from nominating liberals to the Supreme Court. But the right’s leading legal scholars reject that idea: the risks of a President Trump would outweigh his influence on the high court. [HuffPo]

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Way To Go At The Secrecy, UK! Woo!

Here comes UK wasting even more money. University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto announced Monday that UK will appeal two recent opinions by the Kentucky Attorney General’s Office that found UK violated the state’s Open Records Act and the Open Meetings Act. [H-L]

Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) just joined a small but growing list of Republican members of Congress who won’t vote for GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump come November because of his temperament and rhetoric. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro Police shot and killed a man armed with a knife early Monday morning while responding to a domestic violence call at an apartment complex near Shively. [C-J/AKN]

Emergency managers in Louisiana turned to the Red Cross when record floods swept the state in March, but many say they received little help. [ProPublica]

How dare anyone want safe drinking water or the preservation of lands. That makes native Appalachians environmental extremists, according to Rand Paul. He goes from literally telling black people they shouldn’t be allowed to sit at the lunch counter to making shit up about coal. [The Gleaner]

Former Pennsylvania Governor Ed Rendell, who presided over the state’s fracking boom of the mid-2000s, admitted the state’s fracking regulations favored economics over environmental safety during much of his tenure. [ThinkProgress]

The Morehead Utility Plant Board has unanimously agreed to apply for Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) funding to help repair the water tank at the John Will Stacy MMRC Regional Business Park on KY 801. [The Morehead News]

US presidential candidate Donald Trump has publicly backed House Speaker Paul Ryan days after snubbing him in a spat at the top of the Republican Party. [BBC]

More than four years after a conversation between then-Mayor Rhonda Riherd Trautman and Bill Prather, president and CEO of Farmers Rural Electric Cooperative Corp., that got a project rolling, they and dozens of others gathered to celebrate its completion. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Nearly half of registered U.S. voters think American infrastructure has deteriorated in the last five years, a national poll released on Tuesday found, with Republicans taking the dimmer view. [Reuters]

Dear Louisville media newbies: Fancy Farm isn’t a political picnic, it’s a church picnic. It’d also serve you well to do things like report on Scott Jennings’ racist/anti-LatinX “joke” when attempting to whitewash what really went down. [WHAS11]

Less than 100 days before the general election, Donald Trump has still not spent a dime on television advertising, even as Hillary Clinton floods the airwaves with tens of millions of dollars in ad spending. [The Hill]

Kentucky Utilities customers will pay extra each month to cover environmental upgrades at the company’s power plants under a settlement approved Monday. [H-L]

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump brushed off an open letter signed by dozens of the GOP’s most experienced national security officials, in which they say he “would be the most reckless President in American history.” [HuffPo]

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Fancy Fart Farm 2016 Will Be Unbearable

The University of Kentucky is starting a new program to help Appalachian students prepare for careers fighting cancer, a disease that disproportionately affects their home region. [H-L]

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump will not be releasing his tax returns, his top aide said Wednesday on “CBS This Morning.” [HuffPo]

Seems like only yesterday when Jones and his crew were trying to stifle our coverage of the pension mess when everyone else was ignoring it. [C-J/AKN]

Under the Freedom of Information Act, ProPublica requested letters closing HIPAA complaint investigations. Here’s what we’ve received so far. [ProPublica]

Cave City’s police chief and the mayor said this week they came to an understanding regarding the police chief’s retirement. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Nearly 50 years ago Richard Nixon launched his successful election under the banner of restoring “law and order” to a nation wrecked by violent protests and social upheaval. Now, another Republican nominee, Donald Trump, is going to run under that same banner. [BBC]

Glued to your television, mesmerized by the drama of the two political parties’ national conventions? Well, if you’ve never attended the annual Fancy Farm Picnic and its raucous political speaking event, you ain’t seen nothin’ yet. And with this year’s emcee, you’ll get to hear what someone who excuses racism, bigotry and homophobia thinks is cool. [Ronnie Ellis]

Big City is watching you. It will do it with camera-equipped drones that inspect municipal power lines and robotic cars that know where people go. Sensor-laden streetlights will change brightness based on danger levels. Technologists and urban planners are working on a major transformation of urban landscapes over the next few decades. [NY Times]

Republican Sen. Rand Paul made a campaign stop in Harlan on Tuesday, speaking to a large crowd of supporters at the Harlan Center. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Work that involves complex thinking and interaction with other people seems to help protect against the onset of Alzheimer’s Disease, according to research presented Sunday at the Alzheimer’s Association’s International Conference in Toronto. [WaPo]

Morehead State University’s Presidential Search and Screening Advisory Committee will host seven public meetings to obtain input from members of the MSU community and the general public on the presidential search. [Ashland Independent]

Cities and states have limited resources. When they’re faced with a growing homeless problem, those resources can either go toward finding housing for the homeless or to policing and criminalizing the daily habits of the homeless. [ThinkProgress]

Laurel County is back to being the armpit of the Commonwealth. A body was found Tuesday morning in a pond in Laurel County, the sheriff’s office said. [H-L]

At the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, in an interview with me on SiriusXM Progress, gay former congressman Barney Frank lashed at out Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and his repeated claims that he is a better candidate for queer people than Hillary Clinton. [HuffPo]

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Funtimes At The New Ark Park?

If you worry the Creation Museum and its new Noah’s Ark theme park will cause outsiders to think Kentuckians are a bunch of anti-science rubes, at least take comfort in this: Lexington was home to perhaps America’s greatest evolutionary biologist. [H-L]

Two separate attempts to recognize lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals in the Republican Party platform ― a statement of its core ideas and principles ― were voted down by GOP delegates on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

Just wait til the gays wake up to the reality that Bevin has turned UofL into Six Flags Over Jesus University. The University of Louisville Faculty Senate approved a statement Wednesday saying that Gov. Matt Bevin’s recent orders abolishing the Board of Trustees and appointing his own in its place “compromise” the board’s independence and “may affect the institutional ideal of democratically-shared governance at the university.” [C-J/AKN]

The phone would ring almost every week with fundraising appeals from a super PAC called Voters for Hillary. Margo Marquess and her husband, Amitava Gupta, backed the presidential campaign of the former Secretary of State, so they were happy to write checks. In all, they gave $6,000. [ProPublica]

Metcalfe County magistrates opened bids for three bridge projects on Monday, and awarded contracts two companies. Judge-Executive Greg Wilson explained that the county had two bridges, one on Pine Hill Road and another on Jack Shaw Road, that were washed out in 2015 during heavy rainfalls. [Glasgow Daily Times]

It sure is easy for uptight white guys to minimize the African American experience because it makes them uncomfortable. [The Hill]

Doug Cobb, the Louisville businessman who drew recent attention for sharing political opinions on Twitter that are far outside the mainstream, has declined an appointment to the University of Louisville Board of Trustees, according to Gov. Matt Bevin’s office. By “outside the mainstream”? They mean jacked up, homophobic and backwater. [WFPL]

At the theme park Ark Encounter, which opened last week in Williamstown, Kentucky, thousands of visitors can step inside a recreation of Noah’s Ark—built to spec as detailed in the Bible. Inside, exhibits attempt to explain how two of each animal might have fit on the boat, while visitors can pick up souvenirs at the gift shop or eat at a 700-person restaurant on the ship. [FastCo]

Addia Wuchner loves to preach the bullshit of compassionate conservatism but she wouldn’t know what was right for Kentucky’s Medicaid program if it hit her square in her xenophobic face. She’s part of the reason so many Kentuckians remain impoverished, under educated and afraid. [HEAD-DESK]

How American politics went insane. It happened gradually – and until the U.S. figures out how to treat the problem, it will only get worse. [The Atlantic]

I participated in this program something like 20 years ago and think everyone in Eastern Kentucky should get involved. Each September, hundreds of Appalachian citizen leaders travel to Berea College to participate in the Brushy Fork Annual Institute. Widely recognized as one of the premier leadership and networking conferences in Appalachia, the Institute helps residents explore regional issues and develop skills to strengthen their organizations and communities. [Hazard Herald]

The violence in Dallas last week is intensifying worries in Cleveland about visitors and protesters taking firearms downtown during the Republican National Convention, where thousands of people plan to demonstrate. [NY Times]

Central Kentucky religious leaders and Democrats spoke against presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump at Blue Grass Airport Monday afternoon, just hours before he landed in Lexington for a private fundraiser. [H-L]

A black doctor who treated shooting victims of a Dallas attack that left five police officers dead spoke out Monday on the fraught relationship between people of color and law enforcement. [HuffPo]

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