Republicans Are In Full Stumbo Panic

A national group of Republican state leaders has paid for a TV ad criticizing Kentucky Democratic House Speaker Greg Stumbo. [H-L]

As he loves to do whenever he talks about himself, Donald Trump on Monday told a Colorado audience that all his business success stemmed from “a small loan” from his father ― a virtual Horatio Alger story. [HuffPo]

Former Kentucky Superintendent of Public Instruction Alice McDonald is asking Franklin Circuit Court to expunge her nearly 20-year-old convictions for theft of government services and tampering with evidence. [C-J/AKN]

International Game Technology has agreed to pay a $500,000 penalty for firing an employee for telling the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission that the casino-gaming company’s financial statements might be distorted. [Reuters]

Matt Bevin’s administration says will be up and running in Kentucky in time for Kynect customers to reapply for their health insurance later this year. [WFPL]

A former Miss Universe is hitting back at Donald Trump, calling his accusation that she once made a sex tape “slander and cheap lies.” [The Hill]

The Glasgow Electric Plant Board chose to move forward Tuesday evening with providing another optional billing structure for residential and small business customers unhappy with the current “Infotricity” option, as GEPB Superintendent Billy Ray calls it. [Glasgow Daily Times]

ProPublica expanded its e-book offerings with the launch of “The Breakdown: How Politics and Government Really Work, and Why They Don’t,” a compilation of long-form stories that deeply examine the American political system. [ProPublica]

Richmond Mayor Jim Barnes was criticized for purchasing furniture for his office early in 2011, soon after he was first sworn in. [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump was slut-shaming before the sun came up on Friday. He fired off a string of tweets smearing former Miss Universe Alicia Machado at 5:30 in the morning, calling her “disgusting” and referencing a “sex tape.” [ThinkProgress]

Boyd County school finances are in good shape compared to the last couple of years thanks in part to the recently enacted 2 percent property tax increase, a school finance official said. [Ashland Independent]

This is getting hilarious. CBS “Late Show” host Stephen Colbert said Donald Trump is a “coward” who won’t appear on his show. [Politico]

Lou Anna Red Corn was sworn in Monday afternoon as the first female Commonwealth’s Attorney for Fayette County in a ceremony that involved her being wrapped in a blanket belonging to her late mother. [H-L]

Afghan forces regained control of most of the northern city of Kunduz on Tuesday amid sporadic fighting, officials said, as questions arose over how Taliban militants once again managed to penetrate the city’s defenses. [HuffPo]

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UK Must Be Envious Of UofL’s Bad Press, Wants More Of The Action

The University of Kentucky’s Senate Council split its votes over approval of a proposed free enterprise center funded by the Charles Koch Foundation and pizza magnate John Schnatter, but the matter will still move to the full university senate. [H-L]

Republicans who wondered whether a teleprompter-less Donald Trump could retain the self-discipline of the previous month without a script to read from got their answer Monday night. [HuffPo]

The wife of former state personnel secretary Tim Longmeyer pleaded for leniency for him in a three-page letter – one in a batch to a federal judge that was made public a day before Longmeyer’s scheduled sentencing for bribery. And so did a bunch of Beshear people. [C-J/AKN]

GOP nominee Donald Trump has said he plans to spend billions of dollars on so-called school choice programs. [ProPublica]

Barren County’s jobless rate dropped from 4.8 percent in July to 4.3 percent in August according to labor force estimates provided by the Kentucky Office of Employment and Training. [Glasgow Daily Times]

It started with a mystifying missed opportunity on race. It ended with a piercing attack on gender. [NY Times]

While Advanced Placement exam scores in Kentucky improved this year, the number of test takers went down. [WLKY]

The greatest mystery heading into the first presidential debate here at Hofstra University was which version of the unpredictable Republican candidate would show up for his first one-on-one face-off with Democratic rival Hillary Clinton. [WaPo]

A month after setting the local property tax rate at the same level as the previous year, the Harlan County Board of Education formally adopted a working budget reflecting those amounts during their September meeting. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

The two US presidential candidates have clashed over jobs, terrorism and race in a bitter television debate. [BBC]

Former residents of Hazard banded together to form a non-profit organization called Appalachian Connection. The mission of the non-profit is to help students in the Appalachian region with the financial burden of higher education. [Hazard Herald]

At the first presidential debate on Monday night, Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton brought up some of the disparaging things Republican rival Donald Trump has said about women over the years, saying, “This is a man who has called women pigs, slobs, and dogs.” [ThinkProgress]

After months of negotiations, the Fayette County Public Schools board voted Monday to buy 39 acres adjacent to Edythe J. Hayes Middle School on Athens-Boonesboro Road for a new elementary school. [H-L]

Donald Trump, within striking distance of the presidency, stepped on stage here Monday and did what Hillary Clinton hoped he would. [HuffPo]

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Not A Great School-Related Statistic…

Longtime Democratic activist and political consultant Larry O’Bryan, of Louisville, was charged Wednesday with federal crimes alleging that he played a role in the political bribery and kickback scheme arranged by Tim Longmeyer while Longmeyer was secretary of the Kentucky Personnel Cabinet. [C-J/AKN]

About 6 p.m. Tuesday, Attorney General Andy Beshear received what he called an unsolicited text message from Gov. Matt Bevin. It said: “I would strongly suggest that you get your house in order. Your office is becoming an increasing embarrassment to the Commonwealth.” [H-L]

The number of students charged with assaults in the third degree at Kentucky schools rose significantly in one year by 51.3 percent, according to an annual school safety report released Thursday. [More H-L]

I’ve been traveling to presidential debates since 1988, and the one I just saw here at Hofstra University was historic. Republican nominee Donald Trump turned in the worst ― and I mean worst ― debate performance in modern times. It was so bad that in a normal year, it would disqualify him from getting anywhere near the White House. [HuffPo]

They piled into the minivan, all seven of them, and drove slowly on a darkened Louisville interstate toward the exit marked for the airport. Hustling up escalators with five boys in the half-empty, late-night terminal, Ahmad Al Tybawi and his wife, Ahlam Al Swedan, found themselves back where they had arrived almost a year before — when they were gaunt and exhausted from fleeing Syria’s bloody civil war. [C-J/AKN]

According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, 37 states now offer voters some way to cast ballots early and avoid lining up at the polls on Election Day. [ProPublica]

Louisville has been chosen for a federal pilot program aimed at attacking the city’s heroin and prescription opioid problem. [WFPL]

Turns out that when it comes to fighting climate change, most Americans are willing to pay a little more to get the job done. [ThinkProgress]

Kentucky’s seasonally adjusted preliminary unemployment rate for August fell to 4.9 percent, down from a revised 5 percent in July, the state Office of Employment and Training announced Monday. [Richmond Register]

Kentucky sure is good at proving stereotypes correct. This clown panic is just the latest incident. [BBC]

The Kentucky Supreme Court ruling against Gov. Matt Bevin’s higher education funding reductions was welcome news at Ashland Community and Technical College. [Ashland Independent]

Mrs. Clinton seems to have bested Mr. Trump in the debate largely thanks to her mastery of three subjects that have defined her general election campaign: race, gender and national security. [NY Times]

The Rowan County Board of Education has approved a partnership with Morehead State for the use of some of the district’s kitchen facilities. [The Morehead News]

Donald Trump on Tuesday insisted that Hillary Clinton did not get under his skin during their first debate and suggested he may “hit her harder” in their next encounter by raising the subject of former President Bill Clinton’s infidelities. [WaPo]

A judge has upheld a state ethics code violation against a woman linked with former state Agriculture Commissioner Richie Farmer. [H-L]

Donald Trump accused NBC News’ Lester Holt of favoring Hillary Clinton in Monday night’s presidential debate. [HuffPo]

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Let’s Relive Bevin’s High Court Loss

A Fayette district judge’s ruling on a 2016 amendment to the drunken-driving law has prosecutors and defense attorneys battling in court. [H-L]

Shutting down for-profit detention facilities would hurt Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s ability to do its job, agency director Sarah Saldaña said Thursday amid a review over whether the government should do just that. [HuffPo]

In a ruling that has as much impact on state politics as the state purse, the Kentucky Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Gov. Matt Bevin violated his power last spring in unilaterally ordering funding cuts to state universities. [C-J/AKN]

Warplanes launched some of the heaviest air strikes yet on rebel-held areas of Aleppo on Friday after the Russian-backed Syrian army declared an offensive to fully capture Syria’s biggest city, killing off any hope of reviving a ceasefire. [Reuters]

The four-year graduation rate at Eastern Kentucky University has nearly doubled in the past seven years. [Richmond Register]

If you notice the news and/or aren’t that guy in Plato’s favorite cave, you’ve probably already suffered rage-induced anaphylaxis while reading about the cool 600 percent price increase for EpiPens in recent years. [ProPublica]

Thursday’s Kentucky Supreme Court ruling that Gov. Matt Bevin can’t reduce university funding on his own didn’t surprise many who listened to oral arguments before the court last month. [Ronnie Ellis]

On Wednesday, Donald Trump Jr. told Pittsburgh Tribune-Review he doesn’t think the Trump Organization’s international operations would be problematic if his dad were elected president. [ThinkProgress]

Barren Circuit Judge John T. Alexander has upheld the city’s January decision to fire Michael Burton, who was a Glasgow Police Department sergeant at the time. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Our team that’s been travelling across the northern US hearing from voters is now at the halfway stage – crossing the states of North Dakota and Montana. There, our North America correspondent, Aleem Maqbool has been looking at the thorny issues surrounding the oil industry and climate change, in a place that’s directly affected by both. [BBC]

On Wednesday, Kentucky legislators listened to a presentation about the benefits of medical cannabis from Don Stacy, a cancer doctor and medical liaison for pro-legalization group Alliance for Innovative Medicine. [WFPL]

Ruling on a lawsuit filed by a state’s Democratic attorney general against its Republican governor, the Kentucky Supreme Court says Gov. Matt Bevin doesn’t have the authority to unilaterally slice money out of a state university’s budget. [NPR]

In the summer of 1969, a man picking flowers along the secluded Little Shepherd Trail in Harlan County saw a body on the side of a hill, so decomposed it was hard to tell if it was a man or woman. [H-L]

Republican vice presidential candidate Mike Pence on Thursday said Americans should refrain from speaking about racial bias within law enforcement immediately after police shootings to help bring unity to communities like Charlotte, North Carolina, where violent protests raged this week over the police shooting of a black man. [HuffPo]

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Matt Bevin Sure Had A Rough Weekend

The Kentucky Supreme Court dealt a decisive blow to Gov. Matt Bevin’s executive power Thursday, finding that he exceeded his statutory authority by cutting state universities’ budgets by 2 percent last spring, after the General Assembly had already appropriated their funding. [H-L]

Donald Trump said Wednesday he finally gave up pushing conspiracy theories about President Barack Obama’s birthplace because it was politically convenient to do so. [HuffPo]

A group will host a series of eight public forums statewide to alert people about possible changes to the state Medicaid program and seek comments, with the first one scheduled Sept. 26 in Morehead. [C-J/AKN]

A new study that examines some major health care proposals from the presidential candidates finds that Donald Trump would cause about 20 million to lose coverage while Hillary Clinton would provide coverage for an additional 9 million people. [AP]

Matt Bevin exceeded his statutory authority when he unilaterally reduced funding to the state’s universities and colleges by 2 percent last spring, according to the Kentucky Supreme Court. [Ronnie Ellis]

As his two-term presidency draws to a close, Barack Obama is looking back—at the legacies of his predecessors, as well as his own—and forward, to the freedom of life after the White House. In a wide-ranging conversation with one of the nation’s foremost presidential historians, he talks about his ambitions, frustrations, and the decisions that still haunt him. [Vanity Fair]

Officials have discovered the presence of hydrilla, an invasive aquatic plant, in several areas of Cave Run Lake near Morehead. State and federal officials are asking boaters and anglers using Cave Run Lake to take precautions to help prevent the spread of this plant. [Ashland Independent]

You can thank people like Scott Jennings for abusing this good will. When Mylan NV recruited food allergy bloggers to learn about its campaign to get allergic shock antidotes into schools, many were eager to join the maker of the EpiPens they carry in purses and stash in book bags to protect their children against potentially lethal attacks. [Reuters]

Of course the Rowan County Fiscal Court gave the mother of Kim Davis an award. Remember Jean Bailey? She’s one of the people who helped her granddaughter cover up the theft of a dog and get away with it. [The Morehead News]

Donald Trump says he has donated millions to charity. Earlier this year, Washington Post reporter David Fahrenthold set out to prove him right. [ProPublica]

PEE ALERT! SMALL TOWN FREAKOUT PEE ALERT! The Glasgow Police Department has received several complaints from residents of Glasgow in reference to someone dressing up as a clown and walking or standing near public areas such as parks and city streets, according to a GPD press release. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Donald Trump’s campaign isn’t alone in patronizing his own businesses: taxpayers are indirectly doing so, too. Federal Election Commission records show that the U.S. Secret Service has paid the Trump campaign about $1.6 million to cover the cost of flying its agents with the candidate on a plane owned and operated by one of his companies. [Politico]

Surprise! Valarie Honeycutt Spears all the sudden cares about a corrupt board of education member. Samantha Rodarte, who is opposing Fayette County school board chairwoman Melissa Bacon in the November general election, is calling for Bacon to resign and withdraw from the race. [H-L]

Hillary Clinton’s campaign is here to show you what a Donald Trump presidency would feel like for young women. [HuffPo]

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The Kernel’s Lesson Was A Good One

A federal judge on Thursday dismissed three lawsuits pending against Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis over her refusal to issue marriage licenses in 2015, following the legalization of same-sex marriage by the U.S. Supreme Court. [John Cheves]

If July felt horrendously hot, that’s because it was. NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ― two leading global authorities on climate ― both say July 2016 was not only the hottest July on record, but the most sizzling month in the history of record-keeping. [HuffPo]

Student-run newspapers can be great experiences, giving students a taste of what they’ll face if they continue with a journalism career. They learn to chase important stories and dig for the facts. They learn to take on powerful institutions and hold officials accountable. [C-J/AKN]

The Department of Justice and the FBI are looking at Paul Manafort as part of a broad investigation into alleged corruption in Ukraine. [The Hill]

Eastern Kentucky University has 161 academic programs, but 47 of them have graduated an average of fewer than 10 in the past three years. [Richmond Register]

The FBI and U.S. Justice Department are investigating possible U.S. ties to alleged corruption involving the former president of Ukraine, including the work of firms headed by political operatives Paul Manafort and Tony Podesta, CNN reported on Friday, citing multiple U.S. law enforcement officials. [Reuters]

Greenup County school officials are looking at new security camera systems for the district, and may choose the one they want next month. [Ashland Independent]

Earlier this month, Paul Manafort met with Donald Trump and suggested that they put in place a succession plan for the upper ranks of the Republican nominee’s flailing presidential campaign, according to three campaign sources with direct knowledge of the events that led to Manafort’s resignation on Friday morning as campaign chairman. [Politico]

When Corey Brewer passed a drug test required for his new job at Walmart in Richmond, his mother, Julie Robinson, felt relieved. [Ronnie Ellis]

Days of heavy rain have caused historic flooding in the US state of Louisiana, bringing as much as 31in (79cm) across a third of the state. [BCC]

The three finalists for the Glasgow Independent Schools’ superintendent position each spent a day this week getting familiar with the school district. [Glasgow Daily Times]

An article in The Atlantic on post-9/11 America makes a powerful case that the “never again” approach to homeland security is good politics but lousy policy. The turbulent months after the 9/11 attacks were notable for something that did not happen. [ProPublica]

Kentucky Supreme Court justices had plenty of questions for attorneys during oral arguments Thursday over the legality of midyear budget cuts that Gov. Matt Bevin made to universities last spring. [H-L]

While the coal lobby is often blamed for a lot of Washington’s foot-dragging on addressing climate change, two major coal industry groups may be losing some of their clout. A new report from the environmental group Climate Investigations Center looks at recent losses in the membership of two major coal lobbies: the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity (ACCCE) and the National Mining Association. [HuffPo]

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Mitch McConnell Is Trump’s Chump

TVA is closing and capping 10 coal ash ponds at power plants in Tennessee and Alabama, against the urging of environmentalists who want the ash dug up and removed. [H-L]

In what has become a familiar pattern, GOP leaders on Sunday denounced Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s latest round of offensive remarks. But they continue to support his campaign. [HuffPo]

On the third floor of the Copper & Kings brandy distillery near the edge of Butchertown, a spacious tasting room that’s accented by a view of the Louisville skyline is expected to soon be renovated into the neighborhood’s latest cocktail spot. [C-J/AKN]

Hillary Clinton’s campaign had its computer network hacked as part of the cyberattack on Democratic organizations, Reuters reported Friday. [The Hill]

The Morehead Utility Plant Board voted unanimously Tuesday to amend its 2016-17 budget to include two capital projects. [The Morehead News]

A U.S. appeals court on Friday struck down a North Carolina law that required voters to show photo identification when casting ballots, ruling that it intentionally discriminated against African-American residents. [Reuters]

It became apparent to Marvin Claywell about a year ago that there is very little documentation about those from the Barrens area who fought during World War I, so he decided to see what information he could find that would enable him to put together at least one, if not more, exhibits at the South Central Kentucky Cultural Center featuring information about the soldiers, as well as life on the home front during the World War I era. [Glasgow Daily Times]

On the 50th anniversary of the Freedom of Information Act, here are ProPublica reporters’ most frustrating public record failures. [ProPublica]

Kentucky Power recognized the Ashland Alliance by presenting an $84,000 check to help spur economic development in the aerospace industry. [Ashland Independent]

One of the ringleaders of the militia takeover of an Oregon nature preserve last winter is now hoping to avoid prison by convincing the courts that the United States is actually being run by a shadow government that enslaves children at birth. [ThinkProgress]

The Richmond Planning and Zoning Commission will conduct a town hall type discussion of its comprehensive plan revision on Tuesday evening, Aug. 19. [Richmond Register]

He walked onto the convention stage Thursday night with his wife beside him, the Constitution to guide him and the pride of a father who knows he has a story to tell. [Politico]

An administrator in Crittenden County has been jailed on charges of trafficking drugs to inmates. [H-L]

Both Donald Trump and his campaign chairman said Sunday they had nothing to do with altering the Republican Party’s position on Ukraine ― which must have been news to GOP leaders who confirmed last week that Trump’s campaign insisted on exactly that change. [HuffPo]

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