Bevin Still Stiffs The Working Poor

The city of Lexington must pay federal environmental regulators $16,800 for failing to keep paperwork of employee training and other safety records at the West Hickman Wastewater Treatment Plant. [H-L]

For all that Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has talked about immigration, the specifics of his deportation policies can be difficult to parse. The biggest question: Trump has said he wants to “round up” and deport all undocumented immigrants, but how, exactly, would he do it, if at all? [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin’s administration unveiled its long-awaited plan to reshape the state’s Medicaid program Wednesday, and while it restores some benefits Bevin proposed be cut two months ago, it retains the most controversial components of the governor’s approach to overhauling the federal-state health plan for low-income and disabled Kentuckians. [C-J/AKN]

Middle- and lower-income children don’t visit eye doctors as often as wealthier kids, and as a result, thousands of them may have undiagnosed sight-threatening conditions, U.S. researchers say. [Reuters]

Several changes could be coming to Grayson’s rules regarding sale of alcoholic beverages. During last Tuesday’s meeting, the City Council heard proposals from ABC Coordinator Willis Johnson on behalf of the alcohol retailers in the city. [Ashland Independent]

Republican racists – which is most of them in Frankfort these days – are freaking out that the Obama Administration is actually trying to help Eastern Kentucky. [White House]

The future of a road leading to one of Rowan County’s most popular recreation hangouts is up in the air. [The Morehead News]

Yet more embarrassing homophobic/transphobic news that’s gone national, courtesy Matt Bevin. Way to go, Republicans, for spreading hate. [NBC News]

What now? That is a question that can apply in several instances in relation to the closing of the Monroe County Jail. [Glasgow Daily Times]

High school graduates from Northeastern states score highest on a key standardized test for college admissions, while students in Southern and Western states struggle most to meet educational benchmarks. [The Hill]

Greg Stumbo had his LRC staffers come up with a column about special education teachers. Maybe he could learn something by digging into the Montgomery County mess we’ve uncovered the past few years. [Floyd County Times]

Donald Trump may be “softening” his incendiary language on immigration, but those versed in the complexities of immigration law say his plan has gone from unrealistic to downright incomprehensible. [Politico]

Federal labor officials have sided with the Bluegrass Area Development District in an ongoing dispute with the state over a multimillion-dollar federal workforce training program that serves 12,000 out-of-work or underemployed people in Central Kentucky. [H-L]

I started working at the county jail in 1995 as a correctional officer ― just your basic entry level position. I became sergeant there, where I supervised staff and an entire shift. And then I took a position called a ‘Correction Specialist One,’ which dealt with mental health issues within the facility. [HuffPo]

Way to go, Montgomery County. Maybe your corrupted sheriff’s department can some day work to help addicts instead of just cleaning up after them when they’re dead. Twelve heroin overdoses were reported Wednesday in Mount Sterling and surrounding Montgomery County, police and the sheriff’s department said. [More H-L]

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University of Louisville Keeps It Real By Constantly Retaliating Against Anyone Pushing For Accountability

Black students in Kentucky were suspended four times more often than white students in 2015, according to a report released Thursday. [H-L]

The Obama administration has joined the fight against the American bail industry, telling a federal appeals court that bail practices that keep poor defendants locked up because they cannot afford to purchase their freedom are unconstitutional. [HuffPo]

This is the University of Louisville way – retaliate against those attempting to hold them accountable. And when that doesn’t work and people fight back? Try to destroy them in the press. [C-J/AKN]

Wild bees that forage from oilseed rape crops treated with insecticides known as neonicotinoids are more likely to undergo long-term population declines than bees that forage from other sources, according to the findings of an 18-year study. [Reuters]

Surprise! The cityfolk are shocked that vote-buying is still going on in rural Eastern Kentucky. [WFPL]

Two K Street firms caught up in the web of Paul Manafort’s influence have hired outside counsel to look into whether a former client he referred to them lied about its source of funding. [The Hill]

A new Morehead State University president should be able to work with lawmakers, get chummy with generous alumni, collaborate with community college officials and communicate well with the university’s students, staff and faculty. [Ashland Independent]

Matt Bevin is a bigot. Matt Bevin’s administration is suing the federal government to block a rule that says medical providers and insurance companies can’t discriminate against transgender patients. [WFPL]

Each school in the Rowan County School District, from preschool through high school, now is offering free breakfast and lunch to every student. [The Morehead News]

Donald Trump used his campaign funds to buy thousands of copies of his own book at retail cost, simultaneously diverting donor money back into his pockets while artificially boosting his sales figures. It’s a tactic that may be illegal, campaign finance experts say. [TDB]

Cave City Council members voted earlier in the week to enter into an inter-local agreement with the Barren River Drug Task Force. City officials cited a desire to help combat the ever growing drug problem as a reason for rejoining the drug task force. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The nation’s first “soda tax” on sugar-sweetened beverages, which went into effect in Berkeley, Calif., last year, appears to be working. According to a new study, consumption of sugary drinks — at least in some neighborhoods — is down by a whopping 20 percent. [NPR]

An attorney for Steven Edwards, who was fired this month as commissioner of the Kentucky Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control just five months after Gov. Matt Bevin appointed him, said Edwards has not been given any reason for his dismissal. [John Cheves]

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton leads Republican rival Donald Trump by 12 percentage points among likely voters, her strongest showing this month, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll released on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

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Allegations Of Testing Fraud Still Plague Montgomery County Schools’ Previous Administration

Montgomery County Schools. Three words that make longtime readers of Page One cringe.

So get ready to cringe a bit because it’s time to yank another thread.

Sources within Montgomery County Schools and the Kentucky Department of Education allege that the district, while under Joshua Powell’s leadership, bused students to the Clay Community Center during regular instruction time in order to prepare for the ACT. In case you’re wondering, that’s in contradiction to Kentucky Department of Education guidelines.

Check out this note that was captured, along with a schedule for the test prep:


CLICK TO ENLARGE

KDE doesn’t permit ACT prep to take place outside of the classroom. Districts can’t just take kids out of the classroom solely to prepare for the ACT.

Check out this Powerpoint presentation from the KDE site:



Isn’t that fascinating?

Terry Holliday, while still Commissioner of Education, allegedly turned a blind eye.

The above is just a taste of what’s to come.

If anyone in Montgomery County has additional information, get in touch with me. You don’t have to use that form to send your message – but you’ll find the email address there.

Hillary To KDP’s Rescue? Probably Not

Surprise! The Republicans are just as bad as the Democrats. The daughter of Energy and Environment Secretary Charles Snavely landed a $38,000-a-year non-merit job this month in the office of Gov. Matt Bevin. [H-L]

After the chairman of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign resigned on Friday, former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski tried to insist Trump’s bid for the White House was going just fine. Lewandowski, who was fired by Trump in June, drew a puzzling parallel to make his point, arguing that in 2004, John Kerry was also making staff changes as the election approached. [HuffPo]

A Hillary Clinton political committee transferred $793,000 to the Kentucky Democratic Party in July – a huge and apparently sorely needed infusion of cash for Kentucky Democrats, who so far this year have struggled to compete with the Republican Party of Kentucky in the fundraising battle leading up to the November elections. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman Paul Manafort was asked to resign, the campaign said Friday. [The Hill]

The Madison County Board of Education took its first step Thursday afternoon in the creation of a new elementary school for students in northern Madison County. [Richmond Register]

More than 30 major technology and communication companies said on Friday they are joining the U.S. government to crack down on “robocalls,” automated, prerecorded phone calls that regulators have labeled a “scourge.” [Reuters]

Rand Paul said it could be “too late” for AK Steel to bring its workforce back in Ashland, despite a tax increase on Chinese steel imports imposed by the United States. [Ashland Independent]

ProPublica’s reporting on the water crisis in the American West has highlighted any number of confounding contradictions worsening the problem: Farmers are encouraged to waste water so as to protect their legal rights to its dwindling supply in the years ahead; Las Vegas sought to impose restrictions on water use while placing no checks on its explosive population growth; the federal government has encouraged farmers to improve efficiency in watering crops, but continues to subsidize the growing of thirsty crops such as cotton in desert states like Arizona. [ProPublica]

A free, wireless Internet network is up and running throughout downtown Morehead. The city, in partnership with Rajant Corporation, installed wireless meshing nodes in March to help provide instant Internet access to anyone within the network’s parameters. [The Morehead News]

As the Republican nominee for the US presidency, Donald Trump received a classified briefing on Wednesday. What does that mean? [BBC]

The vast majority of the crowd of more than 100 people who attended Mayor Dick Doty’s Friday afternoon press conference made it clear they weren’t buying the message he was trying to sell. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Surprise! Fraternity atmosphere can (especially in Frankfart) make state capitols hotbeds of sexual harassment. [USA Today]

The Madison County school district has decided to take a drug company up on its offer of two free doses of Narcan, a life-saving drug in instances of heroin overdose — even though the district hasn’t seen an overdose problem. [H-L]

Oh, look, Valarie Honeycutt Spears noticed that there were more than 200 testing violations in Kentucky schools. She’s failed to investigate anything in Montgomery County. [More H-L]

Religious freedom is a valid defense for a Michigan business owner who fired a trans woman after she asked to dress in accordance with her gender identity, a federal judge ruled Thursday. [HuffPo]

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The Kernel’s Lesson Was A Good One

A federal judge on Thursday dismissed three lawsuits pending against Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis over her refusal to issue marriage licenses in 2015, following the legalization of same-sex marriage by the U.S. Supreme Court. [John Cheves]

If July felt horrendously hot, that’s because it was. NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ― two leading global authorities on climate ― both say July 2016 was not only the hottest July on record, but the most sizzling month in the history of record-keeping. [HuffPo]

Student-run newspapers can be great experiences, giving students a taste of what they’ll face if they continue with a journalism career. They learn to chase important stories and dig for the facts. They learn to take on powerful institutions and hold officials accountable. [C-J/AKN]

The Department of Justice and the FBI are looking at Paul Manafort as part of a broad investigation into alleged corruption in Ukraine. [The Hill]

Eastern Kentucky University has 161 academic programs, but 47 of them have graduated an average of fewer than 10 in the past three years. [Richmond Register]

The FBI and U.S. Justice Department are investigating possible U.S. ties to alleged corruption involving the former president of Ukraine, including the work of firms headed by political operatives Paul Manafort and Tony Podesta, CNN reported on Friday, citing multiple U.S. law enforcement officials. [Reuters]

Greenup County school officials are looking at new security camera systems for the district, and may choose the one they want next month. [Ashland Independent]

Earlier this month, Paul Manafort met with Donald Trump and suggested that they put in place a succession plan for the upper ranks of the Republican nominee’s flailing presidential campaign, according to three campaign sources with direct knowledge of the events that led to Manafort’s resignation on Friday morning as campaign chairman. [Politico]

When Corey Brewer passed a drug test required for his new job at Walmart in Richmond, his mother, Julie Robinson, felt relieved. [Ronnie Ellis]

Days of heavy rain have caused historic flooding in the US state of Louisiana, bringing as much as 31in (79cm) across a third of the state. [BCC]

The three finalists for the Glasgow Independent Schools’ superintendent position each spent a day this week getting familiar with the school district. [Glasgow Daily Times]

An article in The Atlantic on post-9/11 America makes a powerful case that the “never again” approach to homeland security is good politics but lousy policy. The turbulent months after the 9/11 attacks were notable for something that did not happen. [ProPublica]

Kentucky Supreme Court justices had plenty of questions for attorneys during oral arguments Thursday over the legality of midyear budget cuts that Gov. Matt Bevin made to universities last spring. [H-L]

While the coal lobby is often blamed for a lot of Washington’s foot-dragging on addressing climate change, two major coal industry groups may be losing some of their clout. A new report from the environmental group Climate Investigations Center looks at recent losses in the membership of two major coal lobbies: the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity (ACCCE) and the National Mining Association. [HuffPo]

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2 Kentucky Teachers Win Mega Award

Earlier this morning the White House announced more than 200 outstanding math and science teachers. Among them were two teachers from Kentucky:

  • Vivian Bowles, Kit Carson Elementary School, Science
  • Gina Kimery, Farmer Elementary School, Mathematics

Bowles and Kimery will travel to Washington, D.C. for an awards ceremony on September 8. Note: Kit Carson is in Richmond and Farmer is in Louisville.

From a White House release:

The Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching is awarded to outstanding K-12 science and mathematics teachers from across the country. The winners are selected by a panel of distinguished scientists, mathematicians, and educators following an initial selection process at the state level. Each nomination year of the award alternates between teachers in the kindergarten through 6th grade level, and those teaching 7th through 12th grades. The cohort of awardees named today represent two nomination years, one of teachers in kindergarten through 6th grade classrooms and the other in 7th through 12th grade classrooms.

-SNIP-

“The recipients of this award are integral to ensuring our students are equipped with critical thinking and problem-solving skills that are vital to our Nation’s success,” President Obama said. “As the United States continues to lead the way in the innovation that is shaping our future, these excellent teachers are preparing students from all corners of the country with the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics skills that help keep us on the cutting-edge.”

As part of the award, each will receive $10,000 from the National Science Foundation to be spent at their discretion.

They’re why Kentucky CAN have nice things.