Homophobia Harms Kentucky’s Economy

Could adding small units on lots with houses solve Lexington’s infill woes? Hell yes. Absolutely. Make tiny houses a thing! Even if they’re just accessory dwelling units. Get with the times, Kentucky. [H-L]

When the 10 members of Donald Trump’s Presidential Advisory Commission On Election Integrity met each other for the first time during a June 28 conference call, Mike Pence and Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach (R), the panel’s leaders, made it clear they wanted the committee’s work to be unbiased. [HuffPo]

Bigots like Matt Bevin and Jeff Hoover need to get it through their gay-panicked heads that economic disasters like this will continue to occur as long as they push homophobia as their official platform. The Omni Louisville Hotel would have hosted the two conventions that reportedly pulled out of negotiations as a result of California’s state-funded travel ban, the company’s general manager said Saturday. [C-J/AKN]

The number of opioid prescriptions written in the United States has declined in recent years, according to newly released federal data, but the number of people who have fallen victim to fatal overdoses from prescription painkillers or heroin continues to rise. [The Hill]

Facebook users searching for the City of Ashland’s page won’t be able to find it, and the account will likely remain dormant until after a public information officer is hired. [Ashland Independent]

The U.S. Department of Energy said on Friday it is helping U.S. firms defend against a hacking campaign that targeted power companies including at least one nuclear plant, saying the attacks have not impacted electricity generation or the grid. [Reuters]

As a young boy, Alan Barnett’s parents gave him a metal detector. A toy, really. It beeped on anything from gum wrappers to pennies. One day as he was walking past a baseball field near his home, he saw a man with a metal detector, digging in the ground. [Richmond Register]

As Republicans in Congress work to roll back the Affordable Care Act, they and some states are proposing major changes to the Medicaid program. Researchers say these changes would cost millions their health coverage. [ProPublica]

Kelly McKinney, 29, of Glasgow, held a megaphone on the public sidewalk in front of the Barren River Plaza shopping center midday on Thursday and chanted along with a group of area residents. [Glasgow Daily Times]

After a prolonged recovery that culminated in two years of record sales, the American auto industry is slowing down, with fewer buyers in dealer showrooms and fewer workers on the factory floor. [NY Times]

Warren County has been selected to receive $46,857 in federal funds through the Department of Homeland Security/Federal Emergency Management Agency under the Emergency Food and Shelter National Board Program to supplement emergency food and shelter programs in the county. [BGDN]

Iraq’s prime minister showed up Sunday in the city of Mosul to declare victory in the nine-month battle for control of the Islamic State’s former capital in Iraq, signaling the near-end of the most grueling campaign against the extremist group to date and dealing a near-fatal blow to the survival of its self-declared caliphate. [WaPo]

The head of Duke University’s physician practice plan will take over the University of Kentucky’s sprawling billion-dollar health enterprise, officials announced Friday morning. [H-L]

The final statement from Group of 20 leaders on Saturday exposed a divide between the United States and other G20 members on the Paris accord aimed at combating climate change. [HuffPo]

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Republican Whitney Westerfield On Castration & Being A Wuss

Why is Whitney Westerfield, a Republican state senator who wishes he were attorney general, so fixated on manhood, manliness and being able to perform as a man?

What deep, personal issue is driving him to constantly obsess over his manhood and that of other men?

And why is he allowing his deep-seated personal issues and insecurities to directly impact or harm others with whom he disagrees?

Because he’s the typical “conservative” focused solely on overcompensating for what he feels he’s lacking, I’m guessing. You’ll have to be your own judge instead of allowing someone else to form your opinions for you. (You already know the answer, though, so let’s get real.)

During an IJC Judiciary discussion with turncoat John Tilley (Really an R-Friends with all kinds of scandalous campaign felons like Jeff Smith) about drug policy and DNA collection, Westerfield had a bit of a slip/meltdown.

Check it out:



That’s right. Whitney Westerfield says men refusing to be placed on a registry of folks who believe they may be fathers should be castrated. Trying to preach responsibility in his best Scott-Jennings-Thinks-He’s-A-Creepy-Baptist-Minister voice.

Party of individual freedom? Not so much.

That’s gonna make for good campaign ads.

But so is this:



Yaaaasssss.

Note: Original available from KET here – July 7, 2017.

Bigots In Frankfort Are Harming Kentucky’s Economy But Wealthy Liberals Aren’t Much Better

***Care about the future of Kentucky? Help us cover FOIA and open records request fees relating to Matt Bevin and Jamie Comer.*** [CLICK HERE]

A bit player in the bribery scandal involving former Kentucky Personnnel Cabinet Secretary Tim Longmeyer was sentenced Friday to two years in prison. Myron Harrod must report to prison by 2 p.m. Sept. 13 under the order from U.S. District Judge Karen K. Caldwell. [H-L]

Vladimir Putin said on Saturday he thought his U.S. counterpart Donald Trump had been satisfied with his assertions that Russia had not meddled in the U.S. presidential election. Speaking at the end of a G20 summit in Germany where the two leaders met face-to-face for the first time, Putin said he believed he had been able to establish a personal relationship with Trump, and that the initial groundwork had been laid for an improvement in U.S.-Russian ties. [HuffPo]

In a move the state says would save money but cut another 9,000 people from Medicaid, Gov. Matt Snowflake Bevin’s administration is seeking permission from the federal government for more changes to the state-federal health plan that serves 1.4 million Kentuckians. [C-J/AKN]

Weeks after the Food and Drug Administration said opioid painkiller Opana ER should be removed from the market amid concerns about the potential for abuse, Endo Pharmaceuticals has agreed to pull the drug, which has been linked to serious outbreaks of HIV and hepatitis C. [Consumerist]

A catchy new brand and logo for Kentucky’s Adult Education Department represents more than a cosmetic name change, according to state officials and local educators. [Ashland Independent]

A senior Senate Republican on Sunday said President Trump’s plan to work with Russia on cybersecurity is “pretty close” to the “dumbest idea I’ve ever heard.” [The Hill]

The Madison County Detention Center housed its highest number of inmates ever Monday. The 184-bed facility held 409 inmates, according to Jailer Doug Thomas. That number did not include about 20 other inmates being housed in a separate county, Thomas said. [Richmond Register]

A U.S. appeals court on Friday rejected Hawaii’s request to issue an emergency order blocking parts of Donald Trump’s temporary travel ban while the state sought clarification over what groups of people would be barred from travel. [Reuters]

Protesters stood at one entrance of Barren River Plaza shopping center off L. Rogers Wells Boulevard on Thursday, holding signs and shouting “health care not wealth care” as they waited for U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Garbage, to arrive. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Two weeks after Donald J. Trump clinched the Republican presidential nomination last year, his eldest son arranged a meeting at Trump Tower in Manhattan with a Russian lawyer who has connections to the Kremlin, according to confidential government records described to The New York Times. [NY Times]

Louisville IS Kentucky and suggesting otherwise shows extreme ignorance on the part of Brandon Coan. Ditching that superiority complex that wealthy liberals like Coan in Louisville love to exude will be necessary if they ever want to stop being hated by the rest of the Commonwealth. And until they stop hanging around exclusively with other wealthy progressives? Nothing will change. Ever. They’ll never be able to beat people like idiot Matt Bevin or butthurt Jeff Hoover. Note: Coan, you may recall, is the guy from Greg Fischer’s 2010 race who spent every waking moment attacking anyone and everyone questioning Fischer. He’s now on the Louisville Metro Council thanks to sizable family fortune. Yes, money won that race. [WFPL]

Trump vowed Sunday to “move forward in working constructively with Russia,” including forming a “cyber security unit” between the two countries, after Russian President Vladimir Putin denied any involvement in Russia’s interference in the 2016 U.S. election. [WaPo]

A new state law aimed at limiting medical practice lawsuits in Kentucky is unconstitutional, a Kentucky woman claims in a lawsuit filed last week. [H-L]

Hackers have been targeting companies that operate nuclear power stations around America, prompting the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI to issue an urgent warning about the severity of the threat. [HuffPo]

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Will Ramsey Ever Be Held Accountable?

Education will never, ever matter in Kentucky and corrupt fools like this will always remain in control. Unless you stop voting for the lowest common denominator. Vic Adams, president of Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College, recently hired Texas community college dean Joel Michaelis as chief academic officer for its five campuses. [H-L]

On a solemn afternoon in December 2012, President Barack Obama broke down in tears in the Oval Office. It was the first time many of his aides had seen him cry. That morning, 20 students had been killed in a mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, and like the rest of the nation, the president was shaken by the news. [HuffPo]

Karma’s a real bitch, Jim Ramsey. I was right about your crew in 2008 when I broke the Felner mess wide open. When you and your Democratic Party pals thought it’d be a good idea to retaliate, I knew I was right. And whattya know? Everything’s coming to light now. You’ll never be held accountable because you’re wealthy but at least you’ll die (not now, obviously – I mean when you kick the bucket years from now from natural causes) tainted and your family will forever be tarnished with your blood money. Same goes for your circle of supporters. Glad to see you assholes getting a healthy dose of Karma. [C-J/AKN]

Experts say the plan is certain to produce thousands of false positives that could distort the understanding of the potential for fraud, especially given the limited data states have agreed to turn over. [ProPublica]

Of course Matt Bevin’s band of merry idiots, Derrick Ramsey included, think they know what’s best in education again. [Ronnie Ellis]

Canada will issue an apology and compensation to former Guantanamo Bay detainee Omar Khadr for abuses he suffered while in prison, reports say. Canadian-born Khadr, 30, was convicted in 2010 by a US military commission of killing a US soldier in Afghanistan. [BBC]

The last meeting of the Glasgow Electric Plant Board’s board of directors occurred simultaneously with the final of three meetings of a community advisory council that was developing recommendations the utility should use for future electric-rate designs and educating the public about them. [Glasgow Daily Times]

A few Sundays ago, federal immigration agents walked through the doors of handsome houses here in the Detroit suburbs, brushing past tearful children, stunned wives and statuettes of the Virgin Mary in search of men whose time was up. If the Trump administration prevails, more than 100 of these men may soon be deported, like the tens of thousands of other people rounded up this year as part of a national clampdown on illegal immigration. [NY Times]

The Ashland Board of City Commissioners on Wednesday agreed to direct up to $4.5 million to business developers who plan to turn the Ashland Plaza Hotel into a Marriott-brand hotel. [Ashland Independent]

U.S. private employers hired fewer workers than expected in June and applications for unemployment benefits last week increased for a third straight week, pointing to some loss of momentum in job growth as the labor market nears full employment. [Reuters]

During an hour-long WFPL News special on Wednesday, city officials discussed public safety and surging violence in Louisville. [WFPL]

Nineteen Democratic state attorneys general are suing Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos over rescinded student loan regulations. [The Hill]

Developers signed a lease Wednesday that will allow work to start on the parking lot and boat ramp for the first new commercial marina on Lake Cumberland in decades, according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. [H-L]

Even as controversy continues over President Dumpster Fire’s tweet of a video showing him beating up a personified version of CNN, a poll released Tuesday shows the cable news outlet edging him in trust among most Americans. [HuffPo]

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Governor Snowflake Did Another Thing

Governor Snowflake pardoned 10 Kentuckians Monday, including a Lexington mother who was accused of reckless homicide in the 2011 death of her 5-year-old son after he consumed a large amount of vinegar. [H-L]

Nearly 40 states are refusing to hand over personal voter information to a new White House commission on election fraud, which was formed last month in the wake of President Donald Trump’s unsubstantiated claims that millions voted illegally in last year’s presidential election. [HuffPo]

Western Kentucky University has a new president running the show. Dr. Timothy Caboni, who was selected to take over by WKU’s Board of Regents in January, served his first day on the job on Monday. He is the university’s 10th president and took over for Gary A. Ransdell, who served as WKU’s president for 20 years. [C-J/AKN]

The Trump administration will soon begin a review that will question the veracity of the climate change science used by President Barack Obama’s administration as the basis for environmental regulations. [Reuters]

A sad fate awaits three former railroad bridges just south of Grayson. CR-1111A is the official designation for the county-owned right of way that once hosted the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway through central Carter County. [Ashland Independent]

Dmitri “David” Zaikin made Russian energy deals with powerful officials, advised Eastern European parties drifting toward Russia, brokered condos at Toronto’s Trump Tower, and teamed up with the guy who hired Michael Flynn. [ProPublica]

When Maj. Gen. William “Bull” Nelson took command of Union troops at Richmond in 1862, he had a commission signed by President Abraham Lincoln. That document was recently acquired by the Battle of Richmond Association, which has it on permanent display at the county’s Battle of Richmond Visitors Center. [Richmond Register]

Officials at Auschwitz have criticised a US congressman for making and voicing a video inside a gas chamber at the former Nazi death camp. The memorial and museum tweeted that the gas chamber was “not a stage” but was a place for mournful silence. [BBC]

After three inches of rain fell in less than three hours on Friday, June 23, the Rowan County Road Department found themselves in a tough situation. Road foreman Paul Brown said nearly 30 roads in the county have been impacted by the heavy rain. That’s about 10 percent of the county’s nearly 320 roadways that cover about 750 miles. [The Morehead News]

In normal times, the Fourth of July parade is a fat pitch down the middle for the grinning politician. For instance, here was Senator Joe Manchin III, a Democrat facing re-election next year in a state that President Trump won by 42 points, waving unheckled among the firefighters, beauty queens and county commissioners who streamed up Maple Avenue. [NY Times]

Glasgow’s city clerk retired in mid-December, and Mayor Dick Doty said he’s still trying to find the right match for the new twist he’s seeking for the position. State law requires a city clerk, but it sets no time limit for hiring one or a maximum time the position can be vacant. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Experts assumed Kim Jong Un had the capability to launch nuclear weapons even before last weekend’s test flight of a new missile that, on a normal, flatter trajectory, would have been capable of reaching Guam. But they don’t think he wants to fire them randomly. [WaPo]

The man who called himself “Charles Grass” and was dubbed the “Godfather of Grass” is no angel. John Robert “Johnny” Boone guarded his fields with rottweilers whose vocal chords had been surgically removed, so they could attack silently. To fend off “rippers” who might try to steal his crop, his crew set booby traps, including fishhooks hung at eye level, trip wires tied to dynamite, and live rattlesnakes tied to poles. [H-L]

President Dumpster Fire slammed North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un on Twitter on Monday after the country’s latest missile test. [HuffPo]

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Hold On To Health Care While You’ve Got It & Let Mitch McConnell Have An Earful

Attorney General Andy Beshear announced Wednesday that his office plans to file two to 10 lawsuits against drug manufacturers, distributors and retailers that allegedly contributed to the state’s drug overdose crisis by illegally marketing and selling opioids. [H-L]

As President Dumpster Fire prepares for this week’s G-20 summit, his European partners aren’t hiding their disillusionment with how his “America First” approach to foreign policy has damaged the liberal world order. [HuffPo]

We’re wiling to give anyone a chance but the last four or five were beyond disastrous. How long are we gonna hold our breath? In his first official media briefing as acting superintendent, Marty Pollio on Monday morning reiterated his push to improve the climate in Jefferson County Public Schools. [C-J/AKN]

More than 30 “disappointed and alarmed” senators penned a letter chastising civil rights enforcement at the Department of Education. [ProPublica]

Charitable organizations feeding the hungry could see an increase in the number of people they serve if a cut in food stamps is approved by Congress. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Can you imagine if anyone in Kentucky put pressure on Mitch McConnell to stand up for his constituents? [The Hill]

A new housing development in southwest Morehead is expected to bring 48 living units to the area by the end of 2018. [The Morehead News]

A 19-year-old American soldier has died in Afghanistan’s Helmand Province from wounds received in an attack, the Pentagon said on Wednesday. [Reuters]

In the wake of mounting overdoses and deaths from the opioid-addiction crisis sweeping across the U.S., drugmakers are racing to come up with safer painkillers. Companies are highly motivated to create alternatives to the $4 billion opioid market. The federal government is cracking down on lax prescriptions that contribute to many thousands of deaths a year and has started to block the sale of medications it considers unsafe. [Richmond Register]

The US has confirmed that North Korea tested a long-range missile which some experts believe could reach Alaska. [BBC]

With three weeks of work down, Appalachia Service Project volunteers continue to lend a helping hand with local home repairs. [Ashland Independent]

For the 15th year, Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) spent July 4 marching through this town of 1,331, a short boat ride away from Canada. She walked and waved, next to marching bands and Shriner-driven lobster boats. Her constituents cheered — and then asked whether she would vote against repealing the Affordable Care Act. [WaPo]

You don’t say. Teaching assistant Kelvin Holt watched as a preschool student fell to the back of a cafeteria line during breakfast in Killeen, Texas, as if trying to hide. [H-L]

A journalist who revealed the racist, anti-Semitic internet troll behind the CNN beat-down video that President Dumpster Fire shared says he’s facing a barrage of death threats. And he warns that the president is fueling a violent, anti-media conversation online. [HuffPo]

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You Can Thank McConnell For Killing Poor Kentuckians In Droves. No, That’s Not An Exaggeration. That’s Health Care Reality.

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Dewey Gorman, a 59-year-old banker who has struggled with opioid addiction, had just gotten out of the hospital in this tiny central Appalachian city when he heard the word from Washington: His fellow Kentuckian, Sen. Mitch McConnell, had delayed a vote to repeal the Affordable Care Act. He felt torn about that. [H-L]

Following Orange Excrement Donald Trump’s latest inflammatory tweet that essentially promoted violence against journalists, top GOP lawmakers so far have responded with silence, perpetuating their pattern of doing little as the nation’s chief executive breaks more barriers in his war with the media. [HuffPo]

Can’t wait for the next terrible superintendent to take over Jefferson County Public Schools. On her last day as head of Jefferson County Public Schools, outgoing superintendent Donna Hargens wished the school system team “all the best.” [C-J/AKN]

Moscow believes its leader, ex-spy master Vladimir Putin, can extract major concessions from President Donald Trump when the two men meet for the first time next week. [TDB]

Kathy Bartlett watched helplessly this spring as Kentucky lawmakers cut back on mine safety inspections and replaced them with coaching sessions on miners’ safety habits. She knows more than most what’s at stake. [Richmond Register]

Before the 2016 presidential election, a longtime Republican opposition researcher mounted an independent campaign to obtain emails he believed were stolen from Hillary Clinton’s private server, likely by Russian hackers. In conversations with members of his circle and with others he tried to recruit to help him, the GOP operative, Peter W. Smith, implied he was working with retired Lt. Gen. Mike Flynn, at the time a senior adviser to then-candidate Donald Trump. [WSJ]

Boyd County property owners will be expected this fall to pay an extra fee of $48 per parcel to fund the county’s financially-strapped 911 center, if a new ordinance gains final approval. [Ashland Independent]

A trove of internal documents sheds light on the algorithms that Facebook’s censors use to differentiate between hate speech and legitimate political expression. [ProPublica]

A voting precinct change in western Rowan County has resulted in an official complaint filed against the Rowan County Board of Elections. [The Morehead News]

Michael R. Bloomberg will throw his financial might into helping beleaguered American mayors, creating a $200 million philanthropic program aimed at backing inventive policies at the city level and giving mayors a stronger hand in national politics. [NY Times]

He won’t win because he’s not white and you know that’s the sad reality. Even though he’s probably one of the best people to ever run in that district. Promising to run a “campaign by the people and for the people,” state Sen. Reggie Thomas, a Lexington attorney, Saturday became the first Democrat to officially announce a challenge to Sixth District Republican U.S. Congressman Andy Barr of Lexington. [Ronnie Ellis]

The stupid is getting worse. Donald Trump stepped up his feud with the media on Sunday by tweeting a mock video of himself tackling and repeatedly striking a man with a CNN logo super-imposed in place of his head, followed by a logo saying “Fraud News Network.” [Reuters]

This will likely end up being one of the dumbest Republican moves yet. Party of personal responsibility? Not on your life. [H-L]

A top Justice Department corporate crime expert has quit, saying it’s impossible to hold suspected lawbreakers to standards that Elderly Shart Donald Trump is not meeting himself. [HuffPo]

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