Want Kentucky To Survive? Vote Against Republicans No Matter What. There’s No Other Option In 2018.

Preservationists are alarmed that the owner of one of Bourbon County’s oldest houses — built by a Revolutionary War officer in the late 1700s — has said he will demolish it soon if he cannot find a buyer. [Tom Eblen]

Why the American Dream no longer includes home ownership. Before Karyn Chylewski and her husband got married, they spent several adventurous years together traveling and sharing new experiences. Once the Gen-Xers tied the knot, buying a house seemed like the obvious next step. [HuffPo]

In the early 2000s, Iroquois Middle School had a reputation for being tough. The conditions also led to high rates of teacher turnover, and the instability caused by staff churn ultimately harmed students, Vowels said. [C-J/AKN]

The secrets are hidden behind fortified walls in cities across the United States, inside towering, windowless skyscrapers and fortress-like concrete structures that were built to withstand earthquakes and even nuclear attack. [The Intercept]

Whether the Supreme Court affirms a lower court ruling that a pension reform bill violates the state constitution or not, one key lawmaker says the court’s ruling won’t alter the financial stress of the state’s public pension problems or the need to do something about it. [Ronnie Ellis]

U.S. District Judge T.S. Ellis denied on Tuesday former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort’s request to dismiss the case the special counsel Robert Mueller brought against him in Virginia. [TPM]

Welp, this is probably going to end badly for journalism in Kentucky. CNHI, LLC, one of the country’s leading providers of local news and owner of The Daily Independent, said Monday it is exploring the sale of its newspaper properties in 22 states. [Ashland Independent]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday imposed limits on the ability of police to obtain cellphone data pinpointing the past location of criminal suspects in a major victory for digital privacy advocates and a setback for law enforcement authorities. [Reuters]

The Horse Cave City Council approved on second reading an ordinance on June 11 adopting the city’s budget for the 2018-19 fiscal year. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The chaotic process of reuniting thousands of migrant children and parents separated by the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy poses great psychological risks, both short- and long-term, mental health experts said on Friday. So does holding those families indefinitely while they await legal proceedings, which could happen under the president’s new executive order. [NY Times]

The Bevin Administration knew this was occurring long before the bribery trial but chose to do nothing. The Bevin folks won’t do anything positive for Kentucky unless they’re forced to by the feds. [WFPL]

Donald Trump is so stupid he doesn’t realize that tariffs are taxes. And Harley should sue his orange ass. [WaPo]

Friday’s partial collapse of a Bardstown rickhouse containing 20,000 barrels of Barton 1792 bourbon will lead to a fine to the distillery’s owner, a state official said Monday. [H-L]

When the news broke last week that migrant children from Central America are being housed in an old Walmart in Brownsville, Texas, it was just the latest indication that the U.S. is fast turning into some kind of dystopian hellscape. [HuffPo]

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Surprise! Mitch McConnell Wants To Kill The Mueller Investigation

Franklin Circuit Judge Phillip Shepherd struck down Kentucky’s controversial new public pension law Wednesday. [H-L]

Julian Carroll is a confirmed monster and the fact that neither the Kentucky Democratic Party nor the Republican Party of Kentucky care to oust him is damning. [More H-L]

Conservative groups that promote themselves as “pro-life” and “pro-family” are quietly supporting the Trump administration policy of separating immigrant children from their parents at the border, or refusing to weigh in at all. [HuffPo]

Opposition to Donald Trump’s controversial policy of separating migrant children from their parents at the border crossed partisan lines Tuesday as Sen. Mitch McConnell and U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth said they would support plans to fix the problem. [C-J/AKN]

The Trump administration has likely lost track of nearly 6,000 unaccompanied migrant children, thousands more than lawmakers were alerted to last month, according to a McClatchy review of federal data. [McClatchy]

As Paul Trickel approached the front entrance of the Kentucky state Capitol Monday, he observed three people enter without incident. [Ronnie Ellis]

Just a reminder that Mitch McConnell is trying to kill the Mueller investigation. [The Hill]

Ashland City Commisioner Matt Perkins believes thousands of dollars the city pays annually to elected leaders for vehicle allowances should be re-allocated to help fund the cost of Boyd County’s new animal shelter. [Ashland Independent]

It’s a fundamental part of representative government: Politicians are elected to advocate for their constituents, and not their own interests. But in many states, laws and ethics rules allow representatives to advance bills that would benefit their own financial interests, as well. [ProPublica]

For decades, Kentucky’s own coal stoked the fires that generated most of its electricity. And while some of those power plants have shut down or switched to natural gas, their legacy remains today in the leftover coal ash that’s stored all over the commonwealth. [WFPL]

Donald Trump on Saturday repeated his false assertion that Democrats were responsible for his administration’s policy of separating migrant families apprehended at the border, sticking to a weekslong refusal to publicly accept responsibility for a widely condemned practice that has become a symbol of his crackdown on illegal immigration. [NY Times]

Barren County Fiscal Court approved the second reading of its budget ordinance Tuesday with only two sources of discussion – a summary by the judge-executive of some of the notable changes and expenses and one commentary during the public hearing portion of the court’s regular meeting. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The economy is not robust or wonderful. The average hourly wage paid to a key group of American workers has fallen from last year when accounting for inflation, as an economy that appears strong by several measures continues to fail to create bigger paychecks, the federal government said Tuesday. [WaPo]

A Pike County man who previously pleaded guilty to shooting his brother last June is back in police custody after, Kentucky State Police say, he shot his brother again Thursday. [H-L]

New Republicanism is a disease. U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley will announce on Tuesday that the United States is withdrawing from the United Nations Human Rights Council, a Trump administration source told Reuters. [HuffPo]

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More Messy Turnover From Matt Bevin

Two-year-old Charlee Campbell’s sudden and mysterious reappearance after 32 hours missing raised more questions among law enforcement, according to media reports. [H-L]

Kentucky’s top official overseeing child protection in Kentucky plans to leave her job as commissioner of the Department for Community Based Services, an agency spokesman said Monday. [C-J/AKN]

“To be a first responder, your DNA is built differently,” said Omar Delgado, a former Florida police officer who responded to Orlando’s Pulse nightclub shooting, in which 49 people were killed and at least 53 others wounded. “Everyone’s going to be running out of danger; you’re going to be running in.” [ProPublica]

Summer brings fun and lazy days to kids across the county, but for the many families relying on school meals to feed their children, summer break can prove stressful as they try to fill the nutritional gap. [Richmond Register]

The deaths of the designer Kate Spade and the chef Anthony Bourdain, both of whom committed suicide this week, were not simply pop culture tragedies. They were the latest markers of an intractable public health crisis that has been unfolding in slow motion for a generation. [NY Times]

The city of Ashland has fine-tuned its plans for a new park area at 16th Street and Winchester Avenue adjacent to the Community Trust Bank building. [Ashland Independent]

In “I Sing the Body Electric,” poet Walt Whitman waxed lyrically about the “action and power” of “beautiful, curious, breathing, laughing flesh.” More than 150 years later, MIT materials scientist and engineer Canan Dagdeviren and colleagues are giving new meaning to Whitman’s poem with a device that can generate electricity from the way it distorts in response to the beating of the heart. [WaPo]

An ordinance adopting Cave City’s budget for the 2018-19 fiscal year on second reading was approved Monday night by the Cave City Council. [Glasgow Daily Times]

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Monday overturned a key immigration case that had granted asylum to a Salvadoran woman who had been raped and beaten by her former husband. [Reuters]

Students stream through the orange-lockered hallways of Fern Creek High School and eventually make their way outside of the school. It’s the end of the day on a Thursday afternoon, but the day isn’t over yet for a group of students gathering for a Black Student Union meeting. [WFPL]

UK Prime Minister Theresa May has paid tribute to Canadian PM Justin Trudeau’s leadership after a G7 summit which she described as “difficult”. “I want to pay a particular tribute to Prime Minister Trudeau for his leadership and skilful chairing, which enabled us after two days of negotiation between leaders to agree actions and a shared approach on some of the most pressing challenges facing the international community and our citizens,” she told parliament. [BBC]

In 2012, Lexington, which uses a joint city-county government system, had a $296 million unfunded liability to its police and firefighter pension plan. [H-L]

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Pre-Existing Condition? You’re Screwed

Rick Sanders apparently thinks leaving sidewalk chalk messages in Frankfort is reason to block people from the Capitol. Matt Bevin has been pressuring KSP to retaliate against protestors because he can’t handle criticism. [H-L]

The Twitterverse exploded in a spyware panic after a Dutch journalist in Singapore posted a photo of a press kit freebie of a tiny fan that connects to computers via the USB portal. It was part of a goodie bag for the journalists covering Donald Trump’s meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. [HuffPo]

Adam Edelen is right about health care but dangerously wrong about the work he did as Auditor. There were hundreds of cases he refused to push with Jack Conway. So many, in fact, that his office kept a spreadsheet of cases he was afraid to have the Attorney General investigate. Because of politics. Feel free to dig through the archives here to find those stories. He’s the wrong voice for health care. Or anything, really. He’s wrong for Kentucky and can’t beat Matt Bevin. [C-J/AKN]

Many of us have distinct memories of our own childhood homes. That’s not the case for hundreds of children trapped in Illinois psychiatric hospitals. [ProPublica]

Mark Filburn had a fairly simple message about preventing school shootings for the Interim Joint Education Committee Monday. [Ronnie Ellis]

Diplomacy cannot be dictated by “fits of anger”, French President Emmanuel Macron has warned after the G7 summit in Canada ended in acrimony. [BBC]

The Boyd County Public Library has purchased three acres in Summit and plans to build a branch on the land, director Debbie Cosper said. [Ashland Independent]

After failing to repeal the Affordable Care Act with a Republican-controlled Congress, the Trump administration is seizing on a different strategy for dismantling the law, one fraught with political risk. It is asking a court to throw out major elements, including hugely popular provisions that protect sick people from being denied health insurance or charged higher rates. [NY Times]

After he posed several questions about the proposed budget for the 2018-19 fiscal year for Glasgow government and proposed an amendment that failed with a tie-breaking vote by the mayor, Councilman Jake Dickinson cast the sole vote against the budget as a whole. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Donald Trump’s last-minute refusal to sign a joint statement with America’s closest allies was met with shock but also resignation in Europe, where leaders have grudgingly accepted an increasingly isolated U.S. presence on the world stage. [WaPo]

The Louisville Metro Police Department has formally closed its sexual assault investigation into the late Kentucky state Rep. Dan Johnson, roughly five months after his death. [WFPL]

Hundreds of protesters, including survivors from two of Florida’s deadliest modern mass shootings, staged a rally in Orlando on Monday to call for tougher firearms restrictions two years after a gunman killed 49 people at the Pulse nightclub. [Reuters]

The University of Kentucky is raising tuition for Kentucky students by the smallest amount in more than a decade, but the 2.5 percent increase will push the sticker price for undergraduate students above $12,000 a year. [H-L]

When Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross announced that the Trump administration would add a question asking about citizenship to the 2020 census in March, he pointed to a Census Bureau analysis saying there was no empirical evidence that adding the question would cause people not to respond to the survey. [HuffPo]

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Will Martin County Finally Get Justice?

After a plea from a citizens activist group, Attorney General Andy Beshear announced his office will investigate the current and past management of the Martin County Water District. [H-L]

Most Americans feel overwhelmed or exhausted by the amount of news there is, a new survey by the Pew Research Center finds. [HuffPo]

Manbaby Damon Thayer is once again in unethical hot water. A Kentucky lawmaker says he complied with “the letter and the spirit” of the state’s ethics code in taking a four-day trip to England that’s now at the heart of an FBI investigation that has led to the resignation of Ohio’s House speaker. [C-J/AKN]

An acute shortage of affordable homes in the United States will continue over the coming year, according to a majority of property market analysts polled by Reuters, driving prices up faster than inflation and wage growth. [Reuters]

More than six years after acquiring the land and home on Lancaster Avenue known as Elmwood, Eastern Kentucky University is looking at putting a walking trail around the property. [Richmond Register]

Bloodstain-pattern analysis has been accepted as reliable evidence by appellate courts in one state after another with little or no examination of its scientific accuracy. [ProPublica]

The Boyd County School District is facing some additional expenses in the coming year and will draw on its contingency fund to meet them, the district’s top finance official said. [Ashland Independent]

This is not good news for Kentucky’s economy. Mexico has announced new tariffs on US products in response to Donald Trump’s decision to impose steep duties on imports of steel and aluminium. [BBC]

Republicans can’t handle losing. Freddie Joe Wilkerson, the Republican candidate for the judge-executive’s seat in the May primary election, has filed a lawsuit in Barren County Circuit Court contesting the results of the race and is asking for a recount. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Let’s not act like anyone is surprised about Donald Trump’s diplomats behaving undiplomatically. [NY Times]

A new government report says that the federal black lung trust fund that helps sick and dying coal miners pay living and medical expenses could incur a $15 billion deficit in the next 30 years. [WFPL]

A new survey finds significant anxiety and fear among teenagers who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer. [WaPo]

Forty-two police recruits graduated Thursday from the Lexington Police Training Academy. Several recruits have military experience and many have a family connection in the department or other public safety agencies. [H-L]

A private contractor working at the White House was arrested for an outstanding warrant linked to an attempted murder charge on Tuesday, according to the Secret Service. [HuffPo]

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Woo, Another School District Scandal

A woman who worked as payroll manager in a Kentucky school district says officials want to get rid of her because she’s a whistleblower who complained about employees abusing a new time-clock system. [H-L]

Over 4,600 people died in Puerto Rico during the aftermath of Hurricane Maria ― more than 70 times the official death toll ― according to a new Harvard study released Tuesday. [HuffPo]

Two Kentucky district court judges illegally refused to let motorists participate in the Jefferson County attorney’s traffic school, the Kentucky Court of Appeals said in affirming a lower court ruling. The court in a 3-0 ruling Friday upheld an opinion by Jefferson Circuit Judge McKay Chauvin that District Judges Sean Delahanty and Stephanie Pearce Burke improperly blocked alleged traffic scofflaws from Drive Safe Louisville. [C-J/AKN]

How does one “lose” almost 1,500 children? Last month, Steven Wagner, the acting assistant secretary of the administration for children and families (ACF), announced at a Senate hearing that the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Refugee Resettlement — which is to say, an office he oversees — was “unable to determine with certainty the whereabouts of 1,475 children between October and December.” [ThinkProgress]

Almost all of northeast Kentucky’s top school officials earn six-figure salaries, but for almost all of them their salaries are lower than the state average. [Ashland Independent]

After the landmark nuclear agreement of 2015, hundreds of European, Asian and even American companies rushed to enter Iran’s largely untapped market of 80 million people, assured by the United States and the other signatories that their investments would be safe for at least a decade. [ NY Times]

A former Morehead State University recreation center may just be Rowan County’s “newest” if Morehead City Council has its way and it’s not too much of a burden on taxpayers. [The Morehead News]

The gun-control group Giffords has released a short documentary on students affected by shootings — two students from Parkland, Fla., and a Chicago teenager whose brother was killed. [WaPo]

This, like all things Matt Bevin touches, will be a disaster. Derrick Ramsey will be calling the signals for the Kentucky Cabinet for Education and Workforce Development. [Ronnie Ellis]

A new study published Tuesday estimates that Hurricane Maria killed over 5,000 people after striking Puerto Rico last September. That’s more than 75 times higher than the island’s previous official count, and if widely accepted would cement the storm as one of the most deadly natural disasters to ever affect US citizens. [Mother Jones]

The Jefferson County School board will appeal the state education department’s recommendation for a takeover of the district. [WFPL]

At a White House meeting last winter, leaders of the F.B.I. and the Justice Department made an urgent appeal to John F. Kelly, the White House chief of staff, to side with them against Republicans in Congress who were pressing for information about the Russia investigation that would compromise confidential sources. [More NY Times]

A Kentucky truck stop was evacuated Sunday after what was apparently a pipe bomb was found in a trash can, according to Kentucky State Police. [H-L]

Anti-trust nerds, consumer advocates and open internet campaigners and have been fighting to break up Facebook for years. But in their crusade against the social network’s online monopoly, the usual suspects have enlisted a growing coalition of allies: artists and progressive Muslim and Jewish activists. [HuffPo]

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Gentrification Is Bad For All Kentuckians

What can Lexington do about gentrification? Literally the opposite of everything Louisville is doing. Don’t let AirB&B take over. Don’t let wealthy people buy up neighborhoods like Portland and Butchertown. Just don’t. Yes, I’m talking about my own friends. Don’t do it. It’s not necessary. [H-L]

Amanda Painter sat at the kitchen table in an unfamiliar apartment with an absurd dilemma: She had nothing to wear to a vigil for her three dead children. Her clothes were at home, but her home was now a crime scene. [HuffPo]

Metro Council Democrats elbowed through a measure on Thursday that supporters says will help lower Louisville’s obesity rate by giving youngest restaurant patrons healthier options. [C-J/AKN]

A former Marine says he alerted the Corps to a white supremacist in its ranks last October. Six months later, he wonders how seriously the Corps is investigating. [ProPublica]

Many pension funds for public workers already owe far more in retirement benefits than they have in the bank, and the problem will only grow worse if the economy slows down, according to a report released Thursday. [Richmond Register]

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) took to the Sunday morning shows to push back on the Trump administration’s narrative that the FBI’s investigation into the Trump campaign was a political witch hunt. To the contrary, Rubio said, it was a totally appropriate investigation into suspicious individuals involved in the campaign. [ThinkProgress]

Becky Miller has officially filed a complaint against Ashland City Commissioner Marty Gute surrounding her recent claims that Gute no longer resides in the city. [Ashland Independent]

When Congress decided not to take significant action after a spate of mass shootings this year and last, some big banks opted to take matters into their own hands by restricting financing for gun sellers. Now, Republican lawmakers are pressing regulators to stop banks from doing so, over concerns they are veering too far into social activism. [NY Times]

Teachers flexed their political muscle Tuesday night, especially in Rockcastle County, spurring a surprise upset win by Travis Brenda over fellow Republican and incumbent state House Majority Leader Jonathan Shell. [Ronnie Ellis]

Ralph Stepney’s home on a quiet street in north Baltimore has a welcoming front porch and large rooms, with plenty of space for his comfortable recliner and vast collection of action movies. The house is owned by Joann West, a licensed caregiver who shares it with Stepney and his fellow Vietnam War veteran Frank Hundt. [WaPo]

The seemingly long-awaited analysis on surveys and other community input for a master plan for Glasgow Parks and Recreation was presented to the master plan steering committee this week. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Scott Pruitt, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency, spent roughly $3.5 million in taxpayer funds on his personal security detail during his first year in office, 1.7 times what his predecessors spent each year on average, according to records made public Friday by the agency. Those figures included $2.7 million on salaries and overtime for security staff and more than $760,000 on travel for security agents. [More NY Times]

Al Dilley of Glasgow owns Goat Browsers, an “environmentally friendly land enhancement service.” Dilly and his 17 goats are under contract with the city to goatscape (clean up) an overgrown, two-acre area of the park. [H-L]

Katia Hills, a healthy 27-year-old married woman, said she was afraid to have another child after what happened the last time. [HuffPo]

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