KY Is F’d On All Fronts. But How Badly?

Fees will be waived at several recreation areas in the Daniel Boone National Forest this weekend to celebrate National Public Lands Day. [H-L]

Plans by President Barack Obama’s administration to allow thousands more refugees into the United States faced stiff opposition on Monday in the U.S. Congress, where Republican lawmakers demanded the right to review, and reject, the effort, citing fears of terrorism. [HuffPo]

Ten Kentucky children died last year from abuse and neglect and another 32 suffered life-threatening injuries, according to the latest annual report of such statistics from the Cabinet for Health and Family Services. [C-J/AKN]

Time Warner Cable Inc’s shareholders approved the company’s $56 billion takeover by Charter Communications Inc, according to preliminary votes at a special shareholder meeting. [Reuters]

A new report shows fewer children in Kentucky died from abuse and neglect last year, but the state remains among the top 10 worst states for child abuse. [WLKY]

Recently filed court documents show the makers of Tylenol planned to enlist the White House and lawmakers to block the Food and Drug Administration from imposing tough new safety restrictions on acetaminophen, the iconic painkiller’s chief ingredient. [ProPublica]

As temperatures start to cool down and the leaves begin to fall, Norma Justice and others are gearing up for the annual Flatwoods Fall Festival. [Ashland Independent]

The house that could save the world. The next generation of ultra-efficient houses will redefine how we fight climate change — and how we live. [Politico]

Gov. Rick Scott will fly to Kentucky early Tuesday for two days of private meetings in Lexington and Louisville with unidentified business owners about moving or expanding to Florida. There won’t be any warm welcome from the top executive of the Bluegrass State for Scott, who has already has lined up at least one Kentucky company to say it’s bringing jobs to Florida. [Palm Beach Post]

If we’re handcuffing autistic children at the elbows or throwing them in jail overnight, then we’re failing them. If we’re hitting kids with felony weapons charges for bringing fishing tackle to school, then we’re failing them. And if we’re using suspensions (which absolutely do not work) against students who build clocks, or twirl pencils, or write about pot, or chew their Pop-Tarts into the shape of a gun, then we’re failing them. [Click this Clicky]

Attorneys for Kim Davis are as backward as she and her ilk. [WKYT]

If you haven’t seen the Kim Davis interview on the teevee, you’re really missing out. She’s great at playing the victim and great and projecting. Just like Joshua Powell. Birds of a feather. [ABC News]

The University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville have won a $3.76 million grant to create a national center of excellence in micro/nanotechnology, one of just 16 awarded by the National Science Foundation. [H-L]

Is this Dong Trump’s Sarah The Quitter Palin moment? Probably not. Because we all know we haven’t seen the worst of him yet. [HuffPo]

We Knew UofL Was Messy 8 Years Ago

The federal mine-safety agency opened a new Kentucky center Friday aimed at improving its capacity to handle rescues, with a response truck, communication systems and portable, high-tech equipment to test for poisonous and explosive gases. [H-L]

Military officials on Friday denied the request of Army whistleblower Chelsea Manning to grow her hair in accordance with female grooming standards. [HuffPo]

African Americans living in Kentucky saw their average yearly incomes drop by more than 11 percent in one year, according to U.S. Census Bureau data released this week. The poverty rate also rose for black Kentuckians at a rate four times more than the rest of the state from 2013 to 2014. [C-J/AKN]

Exxon’s research laid the groundwork for a 1982 corporate primer on carbon dioxide and climate change prepared by its environmental affairs office. [ICN]

The attorney for the man accused of abusing public trust while employed with the City of Ashland has been given more time for discovery in the case. [Ashland Independent]

The White House said on Monday there was a surprising increase in August in the number of children entering the country illegally after those figures fell steadily since the child migrant crisis a year ago. [Reuters]

This is not how Kathy Jones envisioned her retirement years. [Glasgow Daily Times]

For nearly 15 years, voters have been able to click a mouse to view an up-to-date list of who’s contributed to candidates for the presidency and the U.S. House, and how those funds have been spent. [ProPublica]

The more the media hype this guy up, the more they’re contributing to his mental health issues and substance abuse problems. It’s just a spectacle and is beyond unnecessary. They won’t stop until he’s dead and then they’ll turn a blind eye. [WKYT]

Jeb Bush stood before supporters in Tallahassee, the Florida capital over which he presided for eight years, and vowed in his first policy speech as a presidential candidate last June to halt the “revolving door” between Congress and K Street. But the promise was undercut both by the audience to which Bush spoke — which included numerous lobbyists from his days as governor — and by the intensity with which Bush replenished his personal bank accounts upon leaving office by cashing in on the connections he had made. [Politico]

Who could have known, over the past eight years, that there’s a morale problem with faculty and staff at the University of Louisville??? Vicious and disrespectful: that’s how some faculty and staff describe the work environment at the University of Louisville. [WDRB]

US Army Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl left his post in Afghanistan six years ago to express concerns with his unit’s leadership, an officer has testified. [BBC]

A case alleging that Pike County Circuit Judge Steven D. Combs violated ethics standards ended Monday with an agreement for Combs to be suspended without pay for six months. [H-L]

Seventy-three law enforcement agencies across the country will receive $20 million in federal grants to help them purchase and implement the use of body cameras, the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Assistance announced Monday. [HuffPo]

Gubernatorial Race Will Melt Yer Brain

Kentucky’s next governor takes office Dec. 8 and gets just a few weeks to prepare the roughly $24 billion, two-year state budget that he’ll propose to the legislature this winter. [John Cheves]

When an execution is reported on in the media, coverage typically peaks during the few days before and after it is carried out. But the coverage often fails to go into any depth. [HuffPo]

Jack Conway went to western Louisville on Saturday and promised that he would appoint African Americans to the University of Louisville’s board of trustees if he were elected governor. [C-J/AKN]

The press has become more aggressive about reporting on national security in the post-Snowden world, ranking House Intelligence Committee member Adam Schiff said Thursday. [The Intercept]

Some tourism and economic development officials are squirming uncomfortably as the nation watches the events play out in Rowan County where Kim Davis, the county clerk, refused to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [Ronnie Ellis]

The scary stock market that we’ve seen since mid-August is a classic example of how reality keeps intruding on theory. And it shows how there really is no such thing as free money on Wall Street, no matter how beguiling the sales pitch. [ProPublica]

In about two months Rowan County property owners will receive property tax bills for 2015 and some could see a slight increase even if tax rates stay the same. [The Morehead News]

Rand Paul on Saturday signaled plans to ratchet up his attacks against Donald Trump during the next Republican primary debate Sept. 16 – and Trump fired back on Twitter. [Politico]

The number of Kentuckians receiving tax credits through the federal health care law to reduce the cost of insurance is among the lowest in the country. And a state official says that shows Kentucky’s health insurance exchange is working the way it’s supposed to. [WFPL]

Among the first firefighters on the scene when wildfires broke out in eastern Washington this summer was a crew of juveniles — inmates, actually. The crew, teens aged 15 to 19, were building fire lines and digging trenches. Hard work, in difficult conditions. [NPR]

Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis bowed to a federal court Monday morning – sort of. She said she will not allow her name to appear on marriage licenses issued by her deputies, but she also will not stop them from issuing licenses. [More Ronnie Ellis]

To listen to the way some Republicans tell it, America is a pretty awful place these days. [NY Times]

Every circus has clowns, and the carnival surrounding Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis’ claim that her religious beliefs should trump the rule of law and the civil rights of the people she is paid to serve has attracted more than its share of them. [Tom Eblen]

Most members of Congress had something to say about never forgetting the heroes of 9/11 as the 14th anniversary of those attacks passed Friday, but by the end of the day, only about a third of federal lawmakers had signed onto new legislation to aid those ailing responders. [HuffPo]

Community Wifi Should Be A Bigger Deal

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! Help us pay ridiculous the fees these shysters caused. [CLICK HERE]

It’s back to the drawing board for the state Transportation Cabinet on its proposed regulations to allow more digital LED billboards throughout the state and let billboard owners cut trees on public rights of way that block their outdoor advertisements. [H-L]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A huge array of ice age fossils, including the bones of mammoths, turtles and horses, were uncovered at a Southern California construction site this summer. [HuffPo]

More communities should be following Greg Fischer’s lead on this wifi matter. [C-J/AKN]

President Obama was in Alaska last week witnessing and warning of a warming world. After a powerful speech at an international Arctic conference hosted by Secretary of State John Kerry for foreign ministers, native leaders, and other dignitaries from 20 countries, President Obama toured the state to see staggering climate changes up close. [ThinkProgress]

Kim Davis is apparently taking time to enjoy being reunited with her family after a federal judge released her from jail Tuesday. [Ronnie Ellis]

The oil-rich West African nation of Angola has a dubious distinction. Its child morality rate is the world’s worst: 157 kids out of every 1,000 die before their 5th birthday. By comparison the child mortality rate in the U.S. is 7 deaths per 1,000. In Europe it’s between 3 and 4. [NPR]

A new event called Third Thursday Shindig has proven to be profitable for downtown businesses. Ann Stewart, marketing director of the Glasgow-Barren County Tourist and Convention Commission, gave a report Tuesday during the commission meeting. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Former National Security Agency chief Keith Alexander said Wednesday that the ex parte, non-adversarial nature of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act court made for a “great debate” and that he was in favor of allowing third-party, friend-of-the-court observations on proceedings — amicus curiae — though he “forgot what you call it.” [The Intercept]

Marriage licenses are still being issued. Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis is out of jail but not back to her office. [The Morehead News]

Dawn Johnson and her domestic partner, Mohamed Diallo, used to live in a shabby Bronx apartment, supported by his job as a mechanic. The building owner allowed the apartment to go weeks without running water and more than a year without heat. [NY Times]

A monkey escaped in Bath County and everybody lost their minds. [WKYT]

As Congress gets back to work this week, it’s facing a nearly unprecedented number of deadlines and political dramas. [WaPo]

More than seven years after public outcry over the demolition of a block of downtown buildings and discussions began on design standards for downtown Lexington, the city is no closer to passing those standards. [H-L]

More children than ever before are living to celebrate their 5th birthdays. But health advocates are disappointed that figures have fallen short of the U.N.’s child mortality goals. [HuffPo]

Kim Will Not Have A Great Thursday

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! Help us pay ridiculous the fees these shysters caused. [CLICK HERE]

A federal judge has ordered Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis to appear in his courtroom Thursday and explain why she should not be held in contempt of court, according to Rowan County Attorney Cecil Watkins. All of her deputy clerks are supposed to join her, Watkins said. [H-L]

All across the country, Americans are finding that the prices of the prescription drugs they need are soaring. Tragically, doctors tell us that many of their patients can no longer afford their medicine. As a result, some get sicker. Others die. [HuffPo]

The weather during this year’s Kentucky State Fair has been ideal, the best in years, and will help push fair attendance back to a respectable level after a dismal dropoff last year, fair officials say. [C-J/AKN]

Yes, Kim Davis is being taken for a ride by her lawyers at Liberty Counsel. That’s why we call her dumb as hell. It’s not an attack on her person. She refuses to understand that we don’t hate her, we just want equality and safety. But Kim Davis knows what she’s doing, she knows she’s involved with people (Liberty Counsel) from an organization that believes gay people should be burned at the stake. [Slate]

The Northern Kentucky University student accused of bringing a gun into a school library on Thursday remains in jail after appearing in court Friday morning. []

Homeschooling has been legal throughout the United States for about 25 years, but regulations vary dramatically by state. Only two states require background checks for parents who choose to homeschool, and just ten require parents to have a high school degree. [ProPublica]

Jean-Marie went to Morehead and it was as embarrassingly bad as you’re imagining. [The Morehead News]

As many as 6.9 million Americans haven’t made payments on their student loans in nearly a year, which is up 6 percent from last year, according to data released last week by the U.S. Department of Education. A 2013 Federal Reserve Bank of New York report shows that the delinquency rate may actually be higher than people think because half of student loans are in forbearance, deferment or grace periods. [Think Progress]

Guess they learned their lesson with Terry Holliday and Joshua Powell? At least this story isn’t a puff piece about Holliday. [WDRB]

On a rare sunny morning in the northern Pacific Ocean, biologist Douglas Causey takes to the sea to conduct his research — binoculars in one hand, and a shotgun in the other. [NPR]

Ginseng harvest season in the Daniel Boone National Forest opens soon, but there are some rules to know before you go. [Ashland Independent]

Last Friday, in a courthouse in New Mexico, special prosecutor Randi McGinn asked police psychologist William Lewinski whether he advised investigators to wait several days before interviewing an officer involved in a shooting. [Mother Jones]

In a world grappling with pollution and imperiled species, Eastern Kentucky’s white-haired goldenrod shows the possibility of recovery. [H-L]

Chalk up another big win for public health: The smoking rate among U.S. adults appears to have hit a new low. [HuffPo]

Kim Davis: You’re So Dumb It Hurts

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Going to school saved James Mouser’s life in early April. Mouser, then a senior at Northpoint Academy in Pike County, cut his hand while at school on a Friday. Unable to see a doctor because he has no car, he lanced his own hand over the weekend after it became infected. [H-L]

Kim Davis, the Rowan County, Kentucky clerk who has received international attention for defying the U.S. Supreme Court, is still refusing to grant marriage licenses to gay and lesbian couples today, more than two months after the high court’s historic ruling in Obergefell. [HuffPo]

Neither Republican Matt Bevin nor his Democratic opponent, Jack Conway, seem to be exciting their parties’ bases. Jack Conway is sleepwalking once again. [C-J/AKN]

The pollution caused by China’s coal use gets a great deal of attention, and for good reason. It causes health problems in both China and America — helping to kill 4,000 Chinese people per day and traveling across the Pacific Ocean to increase smog levels in the western United States. [ThinkProgress]

When Hardin County voters help pick their party’s presidential nominee next spring, Democrats will be assigned one of 60 polling places while Republicans will converge at one. That’s never happened before, according to Hardin County Clerk Debbie Donnelly. The only reason it’s happening now is because the GOP is holding its own primary, in the form of a caucus, which allows U.S. Sen. Rand Paul to bypass a state law banning candidates from appearing on a ballot more than once. Paul is seeking the presidency and re-election to his Senate seat. [News-Enterprise]

A federal appeals court in Kentucky on Wednesday affirmed a ruling ordering a county clerk who objects to same-sex marriage on religious grounds to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [NY Times]

The Kentucky Board of Education has chosen two finalists in its search for a new state education commissioner. It’ll be someone the opposite of great and, sadly, you know I’m right. [WKYT]

The go-to dealmaker in the market for tobacco bonds is gone from her post – a surprise departure that raises questions about the future direction of a once-burgeoning corner of Wall Street. [ProPublica]

Rowan County Attorney Cecil Watkins on Thursday referred a charge of official misconduct against clerk Kim Davis because of her two-month refusal to issue marriage licenses to the Kentucky Attorney General’s Office despite the ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court that same-sex marriage is legal. [Ashland Independent]

President Barack Obama on Saturday defended his decision to allow Royal Dutch Shell to drill for oil in the Arctic Ocean under what he said were rigorous standards, fending off criticism by environmental groups. [Reuters]

Here’s another supreme wasted of taxpayer dollars. A drug bust that featured the seizure of 77 marijuana plants resulted in a pair of arrests on Wednesday in Hart County near the community of Magnolia. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The two journalists killed by a gunman while broadcasting in Virginia were shot in the head, officials have said. [BBC]

With the race for governor nearing the Labor Day starting gun, Americans for Prosperity will unleash significant attacks this week to try to tie Democrat Jack Conway to President Barack Obama and the Affordable Care Act. [H-L]

Kim Davis: dumb as hell. A county clerk in Kentucky who petitioned the Supreme Court to allow her to refuse to wed LGBT couples unknowingly married a trans man and a pansexual woman, the couple says. [HuffPo]

JCPS Set Great Example For Rest Of KY

It wasn’t that long ago that U.S. Sen. Rand Paul declared that he had to win the early-voting state of New Hampshire to gain the momentum that would carry him to the Republican presidential nomination. [H-L]

Cat Kim, a recent graduate from Columbia Law School, had two missions this summer. One was studying for and taking the California bar exam. The other was preparing cases for immigrant women and children in Texas detention centers who, without the help of people like her, could be deported. [HuffPo]

Applause went up in the room Monday evening when the Jefferson County Board of Education approved expanding the policies of Kentucky’s largest school district to specifically protect students and employees regardless of gender expression and gender identity. [C-J/AKN]

Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump blasted hedge fund managers on Sunday as mere “paper pushers” who he said were “getting away with murder” by not paying their fair share of taxes. [Reuters]

Big Blue fans of the University of Kentucky athletic teams had things to talk about besides asking “How about them ‘Cats?” Monday morning. [Ronnie Ellis]

The tip came in at about 7 p.m. on Monday, July 27. It was an email from a woman named Patricia Cronan, a banker who lived next door to a group home in Long Beach, California. She said the home, run by a nonprofit called Bayfront Youth & Family Services, seemed to be in a perpetual state of chaos. [ProPublica]

Rand Paul, even with the Kentucky GOP Executive Committee approving a March U.S. presidential caucus Saturday, maintained today that the U.S. Constitution provides him a way to run both for the presidency and a Kentucky Senate seat. [BGDN]

Earlier this year, social work student Coraly León arrived at her research assistant job at the University of Puerto Rico to find her salary abruptly cut in half due to budget cuts. [ThinkProgress]

Glasgow City Council took the final step at its regular meeting Monday evening in the selection of the city’s next police chief. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Confusion over the types of coal being burned in Chinese power stations has caused a significant overestimation of the country’s carbon emissions. [BBC]

Evarts City Council decided not to raise taxes saying “residents are struggling with a downturn in the economy and now is not the time to add to their burden.” [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Same-sex married couples who were living in states that did not recognize their unions and who previously filed claims for Social Security benefits will be able to collect those payments, the government said on Thursday. [NY Times]

The University of Kentucky is opening its first office devoted full-time to the concerns of the LGBTQ community on campus. Created by UK’s Office of Institutional Diversity, the Office of LGBTQ Resources is aimed at creating a more inclusive environment for UK’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer population. [H-L]

The issue is far from over, but a new report found that hunger in America has at least dropped below pre-recession levels. [HuffPo]