People Still Losing Their Simple Minds

Redefining marriage for the nation, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Friday that same-sex couples have a constitutional right to wed one another. The 5-4 decision in Obergefell vs. Hodges reverses a Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals decision that upheld state bans of same-sex marriage in Kentucky, Ohio, Michigan and Tennessee. Lower courts in all four states had struck down the bans as unconstitutional. [H-L]

Paleontologists in South Africa have announced the name for a new dinosaur species, but they didn’t have to do any digging to find the creature’s bones. [HuffPo]

The charitable fundraising arm of the National Rifle Association — the NRA Foundation — is applying for a special license plate in Kentucky to help collect donations from the state’s myriad gun enthusiasts. [C-J/AKN]

U.S. President Barack Obama said on Friday that for too long Americans have been “blind” to the “unique mayhem” caused by gun violence in this country. [Reuters]

The Supreme Court’s decision that all states must validate marriages between same-sex couples did not surprise Kentucky county clerks. [Ashland Independent]

The authors of the 1968 Fair Housing Act wanted to reverse decades of government-fostered segregation. But presidents from both parties declined to enforce a law that stirred vehement opposition. [ProPublica]

If Kentucky landowners didn’t previously have a legal leg to stand on against energy giant Kinder Morgan’s plan to repurpose Tennessee Gas pipeline, they might have it now. [The Morehead News]

The House of Representatives passed a bill Wednesday that would delay and weaken the federal government’s proposed regulations on power plant emissions. [ThinkProgress]

Lt. Max Graves gives a new meaning to the phrase “protecting the children.” While it is ultimately the duty of law enforcement to protect the community, one of his main duties is to ensure the safety of students inside the school. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

The newest gay rights icon wears a drab black robe and got his job from Ronald Reagan. [Politico]

Police say a tiny amount of bath salts…mixed with a form of methamphetamine called “Ice” is enough to send a person into fits of rage and almost instant insanity. [WKYT]

The famous lemurs of Madagascar face such severe threats to their survival that none of them may be left in the wild within 25 years. [BBC]

A room of government retirees grilled Republican gubernatorial nominee Matt Bevin for more than an hour Friday afternoon in Lexington, but many left unconvinced that his “tough love” proposals would fix the state’s cash-strapped pension systems. [H-L]

An ancient reptile that doesn’t have a shell is an important link in the evolutionary history of the turtle, according to new research. [HuffPo]

Trickle-Down Economics. Who Knew???

Kentucky GOP gubernatorial hopeful Matt Bevin wants his state to remove a statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis from its statehouse. [The Hill]

More than 90 cases involving possible child abuse or neglect in Northern Kentucky have been lost, with some languishing for months before being recently discovered, state social service officials said. [H-L]

Really, the stupid is thing with these presidential candidates. Huckabee refused to take a real position on the confederate flag. Probably because he has quite a history of palling around with racist organizations. [HuffPo & TDB]

How much should you worry when your young athlete gets headaches? Dr. Tad Seifert, a neurologist for Norton Healthcare, hoped to help answer that question through a recent study. [C-J/AKN]

The International Monetary Fund says trickle-down economics don’t work. The lending group usually known for its pro-market stance is realizing that growing income inequality can actually undermine an economy. [Fast Company]

Matt Bevin, the upset winner of the Republican gubernatorial primary, said at the statewide Lincoln Day Dinner on May 30 that he had reached out to Republican state lawmakers in an effort to get the party solidly behind his fall campaign against Democrat Jack Conway. [Ronnie Ellis]

The Earth has entered a “new period of extinction”, a study by three US universities concludes, and humans could be among the first casualties. [BBC]

Before stopping at 761.12 feet above sea level, Cave Run Lake took in a record amount of runoff water this spring. By the first week of June, however, the lake reached its ideal summer pool level, thanks to the efforts of Anthony Orr, natural resources project manager for the Army Corps of Engineers. [The Morehead News]

During the school year, over 21 million children receive free and reduced-price breakfast and lunch each day through the USDA’s National School Lunch Program. But, when school is out, many children who rely on these meals go hungry. The challenge is particularly great in rural areas and Indian Country, where 15 percent of households are food insecure. In these areas, children and teens often live long distances from designated summer meal sites and lack access to public transportation. [White House]

A new lawsuit filed in Floyd Circuit Court this week has shed more light on the tragic events surrounding a former Eric C. Conn client who committed suicide in depression over losing his Social Security disability benefits. [Hazard Herald]

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday in favor of husband-and-wife farmers in California who had been left with nothing but sour grapes by a Depression-era federal program requiring raisin producers to put aside some of their crop without guaranteed compensation. [Reuters]

An issue of who is responsible for collecting restaurant taxes due the city came up in a recent meeting of the Cumberland Tourist Commission meeting. Chair Cleon Cornett said he feels it is “the city’s sole responsibility to initiate efforts to collect restaurant tax.” [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

The Council of Conservative Citizens, an organization with white supremacist leanings, has issued a statement defending the “legitimate grievances” expressed by Charleston shooting suspect Dylann Roof. [Mother Jones]

Health officials in Louisville say 57 intravenous drug users visited the city’s needle exchange program during its first week of operation. [H-L]

A substantial share of America’s youth remains economically disconnected, even as the economy continues to recover. [HuffPo]

Kentucky Kids Always Seem To Lose

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray applauded the work of the Urban County Council in its deliberation of his proposed $323 million budget on Tuesday but declined to say if he would veto any changes council made to the budget. [H-L]

Former Detective Joe Crystal sat at a back table in Martin’s West Ballroom last Thursday, scanning the room filled with police officers for any friends he still had left. [HuffPo]

The number of Kentucky children removed from homes because of abuse or neglect has reached more than 8,000 — the highest in memory for child advocates who find the increase alarming. [C-J/AKN]

Roughly half of deaths from 12 smoking-related cancers may be linked directly to cigarette use, a U.S. study estimates. [Reuters]

Just fewer than 100 new laws take effect in Kentucky next week, laws that loosen regulations on telephone providers, allow hunters to donate game meat to those who feed the hungry and one that restricts who can distribute beer. [Ronnie Ellis]

Jeb Bush said Tuesday that the enhanced interrogation techniques deployed by his brother after Sept. 11 attacks were no longer appropriate, that he hoped the Supreme Court would rule against same-sex marriage, and mocked Hillary Rodham Clinton for passing few laws during her eight years in the Senate. [NY Times]

For four days, 413 teenagers and volunteers have come to Madison County to change the homes — and lives — of at least 28 area residents. [Richmond Register]

A new study from the University of Colorado Denver finds that there has already been scientific consensus on same-sex parenting for decades. [ThinkProgress]

Three months later and still no arrests. Investigators tell us they need your help as they try to figure out who killed a Laurel County couple and set their home on fire. [WKYT]

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio appears to be giving Hillary Clinton the best competition among Republican presidential contenders in his home state and in Pennsylvania, in the latest Quinnipiac University poll of swing states released Wednesday. [Politico]

“I need a motion for Fiscal Court to approve a survey of the East Kentucky Tobacco Warehouse to be performed in anticipation of purchase for Rowan County Detention site.” That is what Cecil Watkins, county attorney, said Tuesday in Rowan Fiscal Court’s regular meeting. [The Morehead News]

Federal officials have spent years locked in a secret legal battle with UnitedHealth Group, the nation’s biggest Medicare Advantage insurer, after a government audit detected widespread overbilling at one of the company’s health plans, newly released records show. [NPR]

A southern Kentucky doctor has been arrested in Tennessee after being indicted by a federal grand jury on charges of unlawful distribution of controlled substances, health care fraud, conspiracy and money laundering. [H-L]

Don’t call Chris Christie rich. The Clintons say they still have bills to pay. And Mike Huckabee? Despite his wealth, he was born “blue collar, not blue blood.” [HuffPo]

Let The Matt Bevin Funtimes Begin!

Daniel Boone National Forest officials have some advice on avoiding encounters with black bears. [H-L]

The United States might just be on the verge of a wind power revolution. Or, at least, the newest generation of wind turbines, featuring taller towers and longer blades, have the potential to push the country in that direction. [HuffPo]

Kentucky and Indiana are among the fattest states in the nation. [C-J/AKN]

How on earth can a majority of people support something that is secret? A majority of Americans support new trade deals, a Reuters/Ipsos poll showed on Wednesday, even as President Barack Obama struggles to win support for legislation key to sealing a signature Pacific Rim trade agreement. [Reuters]

Glasgow’s city attorney responded Wednesday to a lawsuit filed by former Glasgow police chief Guy Turcotte against the city and interim chief James Duff by saying the lawsuit will provide an opportunity for the public to look closer at Turcotte’s record with the Glasgow Police Department. [Glasgow Daily Times]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A human skull from a deep cave in northern Spain shows evidence of a lethal violent attack 430,000 years ago, a study shows. [BBC]

First Lady of Kentucky Jane Beshear didn’t seem to mind getting her hands dirty in order to promote agriculture at the dedication of a Governor’s Garden at Morehead State University on Wednesday. [Ashland Independent]

With new businesses sprouting up left and right, there’s a lot of talk these days about Detroit being on the comeback trail. [NPR]

An un-named source within the Laurel County school district told WKYT that South Laurel High School was threatened with legal action if they allowed prayer at their graduation this weekend. [WKYT]

Kevin Drum doesn’t write much about guns, which is why I’m going to keep on it a bit here and honor him by rolling out the red carpet for a bunch of grating 2A trolls to stampede into the comments thread. [Mother Jones]

Jack Conway on the nomination of Matt Bevin: I welcome Matt Bevin to the governor’s race as the Republican nominee. I look forward to a spirited race with my opponent and a conversation with voters over the next five months about the issues that matter most to Kentucky families. / This campaign is about standing up for their interests and values. It’s about moving Kentucky forward by creating good-paying jobs and growing our economy, investing in our education system at all levels, and building out our infrastructure. I’m the only candidate with a proven record of putting people over politics, and that’s a commitment I promise to keep. / Sannie Overly, our families and I are incredibly grateful to those who have opened their hearts and homes to us thus far, lending their friendship and support throughout this journey. We are excited to continue crisscrossing the state, visiting our counties and sharing our vision for Kentucky’s future with voters this summer and fall. [Press Release]

In a presidential campaign defined by billionaire sugar daddy donors, Rand Paul has a problem: He doesn’t seem to have one. [Politico]

A Lexington man was shot eight times during an officer-involved shooting in Richmond in September after he pointed a Taser stun gun at police, Kentucky State Police concluded in an investigation. [H-L]

Poverty, which affects a growing number of American students, begins its negative impact on learning as early as the beginning of kindergarten, according to a National Center for Education Statistics report released Thursday. [HuffPo]

Terry Holliday Threatened Fayette Co

Carl Richards, director of Madison County’s emergency management agency, was suspended indefinitely this week after an internal audit revealed the theft of $341,757 from a federally funded emergency preparedness program, county Judge-Executive Reagan Taylor said Wednesday. [H-L]

Support for same-sex marriage has reached an all-time high, according to recent polls. A new survey from Gallup shows a record 60 percent of Americans now say they approve of legalized same-sex marriage. [HuffPo]

An assault case in Jefferson Circuit Court was dismissed Tuesday by a judge who ruled an assistant commonwealth’s attorney “altered” evidence that was “deliberately not disclosed and concealed” from the defense counsel. [C-J/AKN]

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration on Wednesday announced the results of a four-state crackdown aimed at stopping illegal distribution of addictive prescription medicines, such as opioid painkillers, that yielded 280 arrests. [Reuters]

An unnamed person, while under the influence of alcohol, stabbed a man with a piece of lattice while in Ashland on Saturday, according to Ashland Police reports. [Ashland Independent]

At a hearing in Washington, a renewed call for addressing the violence and neglect that plagues group homes for foster youth. [ProPublica]

While the Republican race for governor is getting most of the attention Wednesday morning, as fewer than 100 votes separated former Agricultural Commissioner James Comer and former U.S. Senate hopeful Matt Bevin, a Floyd County native has earned her place on November’s ballot. [Hazard Herald]

“Some of his weaknesses really didn’t get relitigated in this primary,” said Scott Jennings, a Republican strategist who has advised McConnell campaigns. “In a heads-up race against Conway, I fully expect them to relitigate cockfighting and everything else.” [NY Times]

Oh, look, another empty threat from Terry Holliday. The Kentucky Education Commissioner has warned that Fayette County Schools could face state actions if low-achieving schools don’t improve. [WKYT]

States lack accurate statistics on widespread heroin use. [NPR]

Kentucky’s economy is only sunny on paper. To suggest otherwise would mean you’ve never actually stepped foot outside the Golden Triangle or spoken with actual Kentuckians. [WFPL]

Organic farms act as a refuge for wild plants, offsetting the loss of biodiversity on conventional farms, a study suggests. Fields around organic farms have more types of wild plants, providing benefits for wildlife, say scientists. [BBC]

Why the hell is Sam Youngman pretending he doesn’t know why KC Crosbie thanked Danny Briscoe?! He’s the one who told anyone who would listen about his investigation of Scott Crosbie. Come on, Youngman, you’re better than that. [H-L]

Republican Jeb Bush said on Wednesday that the Earth’s climate is changing but that scientific research does not clearly show how much of the change is due to humans and how much is from natural causes. [HuffPo]