Larry Dale Hit The Nail On Its Head

About 50 people came out on a rainy Saturday morning to see U.S. Sen. Rand Paul rally for Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin. [H-L]

Last week, the Taliban began the process of retaking Afghanistan, starting with the northern city of Kunduz. [HuffPo]

Republican Whitney Westerfield and Democrat Andy Beshear are locked in a dead heat for attorney general with just over a month before election day, according to a new Bluegrass Poll. [C-J/AKN]

Vice President Joe Biden on Saturday praised gay rights activists for the progress they have made in recent years. The vice president gave the keynote address at the Human Rights Campaign National Dinner, during which he honored past civil rights leaders and commended current ones for working to fulfill the principles embodied the Declaration of Independence. [The Hill]

While it’s not the winter just yet, area homeless shelters are bracing for their busiest months now before their supplies run out. “With the winter coming, what we have isn’t going to last,” Beacon of Hope Emergency Shelter director Michele Bradford said. “It won’t last.” Employees at the 24-hour Beacon of Hope shelter in Winchester say their food supply is quickly dwindling. [WKYT]

The Associated Press properly identified Liberty Counsel — the legal group defending Kentucky’s Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis — as an anti-LGBT hate group, in an all-too-rare example of a major news outlet accurately informing its audience about Liberty’s extreme views. [MMFA]

What no one is saying here? Rand Paul and his wife, Kelly, are miffed at Matt Bevin over some nasty remarks Bevin allegedly made to Kelly some time ago. It’s a big enough rift that the McConnell crew talk about it all the time. [CN|Toot]

The nine justices of the U.S. Supreme Court are set to wade into contentious social matters in their new term beginning on Monday including affirmative action, union powers and voting rights, and could add major cases involving abortion and birth control. [Reuters]

The head of the high tech company coming to Morehead was a guest speaker at Wednesday’s meeting of the Kentucky House Special Committee on Advanced Communications and Information Technology. Robert Schena, CEO and cofounder of Rajant Corporation, told committee members that his company’s technology aboard MSU’s miniature satellites could create a network in space that could be used to keep military defense systems running if the U.S. were ever attacked. [The Morehead News]

The National Rifle Association and other anti-gun-control groups are formidable, but political trends may be loosening their grip on lawmakers. [ProPublica]

Barren County magistrates voted to adopt an ordinance on second reading Friday to set the county’s real estate tax rate for for the current fiscal year during a special-called Fiscal Court meeting. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Edward Snowden is still waiting on the Justice Department to take up his offer of a plea deal, the former National Security Agency contractor who leaked thousands of classified documents says. [Politico]

Bevin is the most inept candidate in either party since Peppy Martin won the 1999 GOP nomination after Republicans decided to make a statement about public financing of gubernatorial campaigns by not fielding any legitimate contenders. Still, given Kentucky’s anti-Obama sentiment, Conway cannot win in November unless he gets the Democratic base to turn out 100 percent. So far, he has done little or nothing to make this happen. His campaign has been only marginally better than Bevin’s. [Larry Dale Keeling]

The Supreme Court on Friday issued a posthumous response to Alfredo Prieto, a serial killer on Virginia’s death row whose lawyers had petitioned the court several times to put his execution on hold. [HuffPo]

Community Wifi Should Be A Bigger Deal

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! Help us pay ridiculous the fees these shysters caused. [CLICK HERE]

It’s back to the drawing board for the state Transportation Cabinet on its proposed regulations to allow more digital LED billboards throughout the state and let billboard owners cut trees on public rights of way that block their outdoor advertisements. [H-L]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A huge array of ice age fossils, including the bones of mammoths, turtles and horses, were uncovered at a Southern California construction site this summer. [HuffPo]

More communities should be following Greg Fischer’s lead on this wifi matter. [C-J/AKN]

President Obama was in Alaska last week witnessing and warning of a warming world. After a powerful speech at an international Arctic conference hosted by Secretary of State John Kerry for foreign ministers, native leaders, and other dignitaries from 20 countries, President Obama toured the state to see staggering climate changes up close. [ThinkProgress]

Kim Davis is apparently taking time to enjoy being reunited with her family after a federal judge released her from jail Tuesday. [Ronnie Ellis]

The oil-rich West African nation of Angola has a dubious distinction. Its child morality rate is the world’s worst: 157 kids out of every 1,000 die before their 5th birthday. By comparison the child mortality rate in the U.S. is 7 deaths per 1,000. In Europe it’s between 3 and 4. [NPR]

A new event called Third Thursday Shindig has proven to be profitable for downtown businesses. Ann Stewart, marketing director of the Glasgow-Barren County Tourist and Convention Commission, gave a report Tuesday during the commission meeting. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Former National Security Agency chief Keith Alexander said Wednesday that the ex parte, non-adversarial nature of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act court made for a “great debate” and that he was in favor of allowing third-party, friend-of-the-court observations on proceedings — amicus curiae — though he “forgot what you call it.” [The Intercept]

Marriage licenses are still being issued. Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis is out of jail but not back to her office. [The Morehead News]

Dawn Johnson and her domestic partner, Mohamed Diallo, used to live in a shabby Bronx apartment, supported by his job as a mechanic. The building owner allowed the apartment to go weeks without running water and more than a year without heat. [NY Times]

A monkey escaped in Bath County and everybody lost their minds. [WKYT]

As Congress gets back to work this week, it’s facing a nearly unprecedented number of deadlines and political dramas. [WaPo]

More than seven years after public outcry over the demolition of a block of downtown buildings and discussions began on design standards for downtown Lexington, the city is no closer to passing those standards. [H-L]

More children than ever before are living to celebrate their 5th birthdays. But health advocates are disappointed that figures have fallen short of the U.N.’s child mortality goals. [HuffPo]

A Fun Terry Holliday Fluff Piece For Ya

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Burst pipes. Backed-up toilets. Cranky elevators. Those are the typical types of calls property managers receive on weekends. [H-L]

More than 15 years have passed since this small a share of Americans didn’t get medical care they needed because of the cost, a new federal government report reveals. [HuffPo]

Imagine a solar city in a leading coal state. Increasingly, advocates and some public officials are doing just that in Louisville, as the price of using the sun to keep the lights on continues to fall. [C-J/AKN]

In late July, the Senate Appropriations Committee approved a 2016 federal agency funding bill that came with instructions to the Internal Revenue Service to vastly expand the paperwork for the Earned Income Tax Credit. [Mother Jones]

This fluff from KET about Terry Holliday will make your eyes bleed. What the living eff? That entire thing is a case study in intellectual dishonesty. [KET]

The phrase “police militarization” conjures up an image of cops wrapped in Kevlar, barging into homes with semi-automatic weapons. [NPR]

Kentucky lags behind national averages for ACT college-readiness benchmarks in core subjects, with the biggest deficit in math. [WFPL]

A new report from Citibank found that acting on climate change by investing in low-carbon energy would save the world $1.8 trillion through 2040, as compared to a business-as-usual scenario. In addition, not acting will cost an additional $44 trillion by 2060 from the “negative effects” of climate change. [Think Progress]

At 4.7 percent, Madison was among the 11 Kentucky counties will the lowest jobless rates in July. [Richmond Register]

A U.S. appeals court on Friday threw out a judge’s ruling that would have blocked the National Security Agency from collecting phone metadata under a controversial program that has raised privacy concerns. [Reuters]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell made his first stop in Hazard since taking that position. [WYMT]

Legal watchdogs are calling on the Supreme Court to weigh in on whether it is constitutional for police to have access to telephone records without first obtaining a search warrant. [The Hill]

Watch a group of scared white people couch their fear of the gays in religion. [H-L]

This is the biggest duh ever. DUH. [HuffPo]

Jack Stops Sleepwalking For A Moment

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Seventy-two historians from 16 public and private colleges and universities in Kentucky want a controversial statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis removed from the state Capitol. [H-L]

The White House is considering applying sanctions against companies and individuals in China it believes have benefited from Chinese hacking of U.S. trade secrets, the Washington Post reported on Sunday. [HuffPo]

More proof that Kim Davis is dumb as hell. A transgender man and his wife stepped forward Saturday with paperwork showing that Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis apparently issued them a marriage license in February even though she has blocked forms for same-sex couples over the past two months. [C-J/AKN]

In July 2013, GCHQ, Britain’s equivalent of the U.S. National Security Agency, forced journalists at the London headquarters of The Guardian to completely obliterate the memory of the computers on which they kept copies of top-secret documents provided to them by former NSA contractor and whistleblower Edward Snowden. However, in its attempt to destroy information, GCHQ also revealed intriguing details about what it did and why. [The Intercept]

The University of Louisville’s chief lobbyist has resigned to join Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway’s campaign for governor. Maybe this is a sign that Jack Conway is no longer going to sleepwalk? [WDRB]

Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) is panning calls to build a wall along the nation’s northern border with Canada, something GOP rival, Gov. Scott Walker (R-Constipation Face), would not rule out. [The Hill]

The national campaign, Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over, runs through Labor Day weekend and is aimed at reducing deaths and injuries caused by motorists driving drunk or impaired by drugs. During the 2014 Labor Day holiday, there were six alcohol-related highway deaths on Kentucky roadways. Statewide, law enforcement officers arrested 55 people for DUI during that same time period. The 2015 Labor Day enforcement period begins at 6:00 p.m. on Friday, Sept.4 and extends through Monday, Sept. 7 at 11:59 p.m. [Press Release]

Backers of Vice President Joe Biden are reaching out to donors and activists in the gay and lesbian community to line up financial and political support if Biden, who endorsed same-sex marriage before Hillary Clinton, decides to run for president. [Reuters]

Will micro-breweries, distilleries or wineries be coming to Richmond? The small-scale, beverage-alcohol making businesses are becoming popular in urban areas. [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump is once again equating undocumented immigrants with criminals, this time through an attack ad released Monday against fellow 2016 Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush. [Think Progress]

The chair of the Rowan County Republican Executive Committee believes a Republican caucus could make Kentucky and Rowan County serious players in the 2016 presidential election. [The Morehead News]

Three top Jeb Bush fundraisers abruptly parted ways with his presidential campaign on Friday, amid internal personality conflicts and questions about the strength of his candidacy. [Politico]

An Alpha Natural Resources executive has left the coal producer amid a financial restructuring. [H-L]

A statue of Jefferson Davis was removed from its pedestal Sunday on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin, days after a court rejected an appeal from a Confederate heritage group. [HuffPo]

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled against a Kentucky county clerk who says her Christian faith should exempt her from having to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. The Supreme Court on Monday denied Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis’ request for a stay while she pursues an appeal. [AP]

Campaign Craziness Kicks Into Gear

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Even while fighting blindness in the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere this week, Republican presidential contender Rand Paul intensified political attacks against rivals in both parties, vowing to continue pressing billionaire businessman Donald Trump in particular as the Kentucky senator embraces the role as the GOP’s leading pit bull. [H-L]

Republican presidential hopeful Jeb Bush said Tuesday that the government should have broad surveillance powers of Americans and private technology firms should cooperate better with intelligence agencies to help combat “evildoers.” [HuffPo]

In a high-profile report issued in 2010, then-state Auditor Crit Luallen rebuked Passport Health Plan for wasteful spending of Medicaid funds on things like lobbying, travel, public relations, donations and sponsorships. But in May of this year, Passport made a $25,000 contribution to the Democratic Governors Association, an organization which already this year has given $600,000 to a Democratic super PAC supporting the election of Attorney General Jack Conway as governor. [C-J/AKN]

Hanni Fakhoury, a senior staff counsel with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, said courts have not yet settled the question of how specific or broad email search warrants should be, and this case is one of the most prominent illustrations of how users can fight back. [Mother Jones]

Seems like only yesterday Jack Conway and his people were touting a study indicating that testing welfare recipients was a waste of time and resources. Attorney General Jack Conway says he supports drug testing some welfare recipients in Kentucky, echoing the position of his Republican opponent. [WFPL]

Amid the horrors of war in Syria, Yemen and Iraq, it’s become easy to overlook Afghanistan. Remember Afghanistan? Back in the mid-2000s, it was known as the “forgotten war,” eclipsed by the bloodshed in Iraq. Now it’s overshadowed all over again. But there’s plenty of reason to pay attention. [NPR]

Two same-sex couples in this small eastern Kentucky county got everything they wanted in a ruling from a federal judge Monday, except for one sentence. [Ashland Independent]

Climate change is increasing the risk of severe ‘food shocks’ where crops fail and prices of staples rise rapidly around the world. [BBC]

Of course the racist rednecks are coming out of the woodwork at the state fair. [WAVE3]

Donald Trump’s immigration plan is huge in every aspect — including its price tag. Think $166 billion. And that’s on the low end. [Politico]

Just weeks after a Kentucky man gained national attention for shooting down a drone in his backyard, a state lawmaker is proposing new legislation. [WDRB]

As concerns rise about a security menace posed by rogue drone flights, U.S. government agencies are working with state and local police forces to develop high-tech systems to protect vulnerable sites, according to sources familiar with the matter. [Reuters]

Lyman T. Johnson was a grandson of slaves who grew up in the deeply segregated community of Columbia, Tenn. One day, his father, the principal of the segregated black school, sent him on an errand to the white school, where Johnson saw for the first time the truth of Jim Crow laws that created separate and unequal facilities. [H-L]

A year ago, after 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, police responded to even peaceful daytime protests in the St. Louis suburb by deploying attack dogs and tactical vehicles, pointing sniper rifles at peaceful protesters, arresting people for simply standing still on public sidewalks, flooding demonstrators with tear gas — often without warning — and shooting them with bean bags, wooden pellets and balls filled with pepper spray. [HuffPo]

Even The Muslins Love The Environment

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

A federal judge on Wednesday set an Aug. 31 deadline for his delay in ordering Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis to resume issuing marriage licenses. [H-L]

More than $1 billion in U.S. military equipment quietly began flowing to the Lebanese military over the last year. [HuffPo]

The operators of the massive, troubled and stinky landfill near Ashland, Ky., announced Tuesday that they will phase out all rail deliveries of out-of-state trash by the end of next year. [C-J/AKN]

The month before he killed 16 Afghan civilians in a shooting rampage, Army Staff Sergeant Robert Bales bloodied the nose of an Afghan truck driver in an assault that was not reported to his camp commanders, according to a report released on Tuesday. [Reuters]

During a visit with education leaders in Louisville on Tuesday, the Republican nominee for Kentucky governor talked about preschool, teacher pensions and charter schools. Matt Bevin met with the group of about 20 educators and community officials at the Jefferson County Public Schools Van Hoose Education Center for over an hour, outlining some of his goals for education in the state. [WDRB]

Birthright citizenship is enshrined in the 14th Amendment, but Donald Trump and other candidates are keeping alive the idea that some Americans should not have equal rights at birth. [The Nation]

The members of the Kentucky Coal Association want a private audience with the two major-party gubernatorial candidates, and it looks like they will get it. [Hopkinsville New Era]

Islamic leaders issued a Climate Change Declaration calling for world governments to adopt a new international climate agreement that would phase out fossil fuels and limit global warming to 1.5°C to 2°C. The collective statement of the leaders from 20 countries lays out a deadline for wealthy and oil-producing nations to phase out all greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. [International Business Times]

Kentucky’s preliminary July unemployment rate rose slightly to a seasonally adjusted 5.2 percent from a revised 5.1 percent in June 2015, and remained below the national rate, according to the Office of Employment and Training (OET), an agency of the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet. [Press Release]

New disclosures about the National Security Agency’s partnership with AT&T could reignite constitutional challenges to the spy agency’s efforts to wiretap the Internet. [ProPublica]

The hardest thing Phillip R. Patton has had to do in his 14-year tenure as a circuit court judge, he said, was “probably sentencing 16-year-old youthful offenders to live in the penitentiary.” And he’s had to do that several times with youths that were tried as adults, he said. [Glasgow Daily Times]

For the first time this presidential election cycle, six Republican candidates will be forced to talk about education — an issue that has taken a backseat to others for the last few election cycles. [Politico]

Rand Paul is ratcheting up pressure on Kentucky Republicans who will vote Saturday on whether to hold a presidential preference caucus next year. [H-L]

Scientists at Ohio State University say they’ve grown the first near-complete human brain in a lab. [HuffPo]

Way To Go, State Board Of Education

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Rand Paul has transferred $250,000 to the Republican Party of Kentucky as a down payment on the presidential caucuses he has asked the party to conduct next March, Paul told members of the state party’s central committee Monday in an email. [H-L]

The U.S. Department of Defense is sending a team to military installations in Kansas and South Carolina to investigate the possibility of relocating some Guantanamo Bay prisoners to U.S. soil, media outlets reported on Saturday. [HuffPo]

Changes are in the works to make the 2015 Kentucky State Fair, which opens Thursday, a bigger draw by offering new promotions, discounts and a strong concert lineup. [C-J/AKN]

The National Security Agency’s ability to spy on vast quantities of Internet traffic passing through the United States has relied on its extraordinary, decades-long partnership with a single company: the telecom giant AT&T. [NY Times]

The Barren County Board of Education will consider up to a 4 percent increase in the county property tax rate after voting unanimously against a motion to maintain the current tax revenue rate during Thursday’s regular meeting. [Glasgow Daily Times]

This past week saw a lot of changes in the world markets, with China’s currency devaluation and approval of another Greek bailout. [NPR]

A former Silver Creek Elementary School Parent-Teacher Organization treasurer was sentenced to five years in prison Thursday. [Richmond Register]

Less than a month after one of the University of Cincinnati’s police officers shot and killed an unarmed driver who was not a student during a traffic stop, the school said on Friday it would resume off-campus patrols. [Reuters]

A woman who lived in Kentucky is facing felony abuse charges in Michigan after police found her disabled sister living in filthy conditions while locked in a closet. [WKYT]

After a ProPublica investigation of USA Discounters’ lending practices last summer, a barrage of lawsuits, regulatory inquiries and changes to Defense Department policies followed. [ProPublica]

The Kentucky Board of Education violated the state’s open meeting law earlier this year in its quest to find a firm to assist in searching for a new education commissioner. [WDRB]

Former Florida governor and GOP presidential candidate Jeb Bush had an awkward conversation about Common Core education standards this week, calling the initiative’s name “poisonous” while attempting to appeal to conservatives who oppose the program — even though he supports it. [ThinkProgress]

Mitch McConnell said Monday that he hopes Congress can override a veto of a resolution that disapproves of President Barack Obama’s nuclear deal with the Iranians, but he acknowledged that the president has “still got a great likelihood of success.” [H-L]

This will freak Ken Ham out… Apes may be much closer to human speech than we realized. [HuffPo]