Rand’s Crew To Abandon Matt Bevin?

Can you believe Jack Conway thought it was appropriate to fight this nonsense? [H-L]

Education Secretary Arne Duncan is stepping down in December after 7 years in the Obama administration. [HuffPo]

Privately, Rand Paul’s people tell a far less kind story about Matt Bevin. Calling it a “minor thing,” U.S. Sen. Rand Paul said on Saturday it doesn’t matter that Matt Bevin doesn’t support his presidential campaign. [C-J/AKN]

Polls released Sunday morning show real estate mogul Donald Trump holding his leads in the early voting states of Iowa and New Hampshire, although those leads are smaller than one more ago. [The Hill]

Maybe David Byerman, the new director of the Legislative Research Commission, is a fan of singer-songwriter Sam Cooke. On his first day on the job, Byerman, 44, the former secretary of the Nevada state senate, promised his new employees that change is gonna come. [Ronnie Ellis]

One Vatican official said there was “a sense of regret” that the pope had ever seen Kim Davis, a Kentucky county clerk who went to jail in September for refusing to honor a U.S. Supreme Court ruling and issue same-sex marriage licenses. [Reuters]

The Russell City Council will host a special meeting Monday morning to take a final vote on a slight increase in property taxes. [Ashland Independent]

Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul said Saturday that his home state of Kentucky needs a governor willing to stand up to the federal government he aspires to lead from the White House. [ABC News]

Isn’t it fun watching the cowardly shitbirds at the Bowling Green Daily Toilet Paper lose their marbles over Jack Conway not hating the gays? If that’s the worst they can come up with after all the crap Matt Bevin has pulled, he’s a damn saint. And you know we think Jack Conway’s the slimiest cat turd in the sandbox. [Bowling Green Daily Toilet Paper]

On any given day, in any police department in the nation, 15 percent of officers will do the right thing no matter what is happening. [Vox]

What do you expect from a drunken party school? Now your tax dollars will be used to attack and belittle the person seeking relief. Western Kentucky University is being sued after a hazing scandal that shut down the school’s swim team. [WAVE3]

There was plenty in the complex deal to benefit bankers, lawyers, executives and hedge fund managers. Patriot Coal Corp. was bankrupt, but its mines would be auctioned to pay off mounting debts while financial engineering would generate enough cash to cover the cost of the proceedings. [ProPublica]

The archbishop, who was exiled to the United States in 2011 after losing a high-altitude Vatican power struggle that became public in an infamous leaks scandal, now finds himself at the center of another papal controversy. This time, the Vatican is suggesting that Viganò is responsible for giving papal face time to Kim Davis, the Kentucky clerk whose refusal to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples has made her a heroine to social conservatives. [H-L]

A Fox News host has come under fire this week for suggesting that Ahmed Mohamed, the 14-year-old Texas high schooler who was arrested last month for bringing a clock he built to school, was “not as innocent as he seems” because he was once allegedly caught “blowing soap bubbles” in school. [HuffPo]

Your Morning Dept Of Awful Things

Jack Conway stuck to the script and Matt Bevin continued his seemingly spontaneous campaign during an hour-long debate before the rabid fans of Big Blue Nation on the state’s most popular sports talk radio show. [H-L]

U.S. airstrikes hit Taliban positions overnight around a key northern city seized by insurgents this week as Afghan troops massed on the ground Wednesday ahead of what is likely to be a protracted battle to retake Kunduz. [HuffPo]

It wasn’t a miscommunication until they were called on the carpet. People trying to communicate with the Kentucky Division of Water on new water quality standards using email were told this week to buy a stamp and send their comments via snail mail. [C-J/AKN]

A bipartisan group of senators on the Judiciary Committee is preparing to unveil a criminal justice overhaul proposal as early as Thursday. [NPR]

Jack Conway, Kentucky’s Democratic Attorney General who is running for governor, and Greg Stumbo, Kentucky’s Speaker of the House, are in the same party and are on the same side when it comes to coal, which they both defend. But they don’t always agree. [Ronnie Ellis]

Pope Francis met privately in Washington last week with Kim Davis, the county clerk in Kentucky who defied a court order to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, a Vatican spokesman confirmed on Wendesday. [NY Times]

Last week, I was proud to join with the father of Kentucky State Police Trooper Joseph Cameron Ponder and other legislators as we stood together to advocate for additional safety measures for law enforcement. [Greg Stumbo]

LaserLock Technologies, a firm that sells anti-counterfeiting products, won a powerful congressional ally on Capitol Hill after recruiting a Kentucky congressman’s wife. Representative Ed Whitfield, a senior Republican lawmaker from western Kentucky, personally submitted company documents on behalf of LaserLock to the congressional record in support of legislation crucial to the firm’s business. [Lee Fang]

The former chairman of the Republican National Committee is upset he was quoted in a television ad for Kentucky gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway. Duncan – who is from Inez, Ky., and now heads the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity – told WYMT his comments were taken out of context. “The comments that I made were as the chief executive officer of the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity. It had nothing to do with the Republican National Committee,” Duncan said Tuesday night in a phone interview. [WYMT]

U.S. bombs somehow keep falling in the places where President Barack Obama “ended two wars.” [The Intercept]

Laurel County is back to being the worst place on earth. A woman has been arrested after sheriff’s deputies say they found a man’s body inside a freezer at her Laurel County home. [WKYT]

It could have been Hillary Clinton’s tweet that did it. Just after the US government had given the go-ahead for Shell to restart its exploration in Alaska, the Democratic presidential candidate took to the social media site. [BBC]

Every community in Kentucky should be serving alcohol and selling it by the package because it’s not the dark ages. Berea voters on Tuesday approved the sale of alcohol by the drink in certain restaurants. [H-L]

After enduring a marathon House hearing on Tuesday during which GOP representatives frequently interrupted her, Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards accused them of political grandstanding and using the hearing to demonstrate how “they are obsessed with ending access to reproductive health care for women in America.” [HuffPo]

Monday’s Debate Was Totally Terrifying

Remember all that crap in 2011? We hear Allison Martin was involved, which should surprise absolutely no one. Desperation in the Conway world always ends with them personally attacking critics when they have no one to blame but themselves. Thank goodness we recorded every conversation that wasn’t off-the-record we ever had with Jack… including the dozens of coffees and cookies with Allison at Blue Dog. [Fun Stuff]

Former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship hits the courtroom for a criminal trial Thursday, facing charges that he conspired to break safety laws and lied to financial regulators about safety practices at the site of the deadliest U.S. mine explosion in more than four decades. [H-L]

Congress may currently look like a bit of a mess after coming to the cliff of a government shutdown and backing away, but December will be the real test for the legislature. [HuffPo]

Monday’s debate between Democrat Sannie Overly and Republican Jenean Hampton was as remarkable for the questions that candidates wouldn’t answer as for the questions they would. Overly completely whiffed on a question about why she sought to have her deposition sealed in the case of former State Rep. John Arnold, who was accused of sexually harassing women who worked in the state legislature. And Hampton didn’t endeavor to answer what she meant when she recently said that she thinks the federal Head Start program is designed to “indoctrinate” children. [C-J/AKN]

Cuban President Raúl Castro took to the floor of the United Nations General Assembly on Monday to demand that the U.S. end its decades-long embargo. [The Hill]

At least two people will be vying to be appointed into the seat that will be vacated in just more than two months by Circuit Judge Phillip Patton when he retires effective Dec. 1. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The FBI will report more data on shootings involving police officers in the future, the head of the agency said on Monday as he released a report showing violent crime fell in 2014, continuing a 20-year trend. [Reuters]

Looking for the next American Pharoah? The place to be is at the annual Keeneland September Yearling Sale in Lexington, Kentucky, which ended this weekend. More than 2,700 yearlings were sold at this year’s Thoroughbred yearling auction, which is a cornerstone of the $39 billion horse industry. [Business First]

Sen. Charles Grassley is demanding more information about the American Red Cross and its “apparent unwillingness to fully cooperate” with a government investigation into its disaster relief work. [ProPublica]

Carter County Sheriff’s Office deputies are searching for a missing teenage girl from the Olive Hill area, according to a press release. [Ashland Independent]

The nation’s largest mortgage lenders are violating the terms of a punitive 2012 settlement that was meant to prevent unfair and unnecessary foreclosures that destroyed communities and pushed working families from their homes. [Politico]

Federal inspectors issued 193 citations and 13 orders at U.S. mine operations in August. [WLEX18]

For months, the presidential campaign of Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) has quietly been courting libertarian-leaning supporters — people who once supported Ron Paul and ostensibly would have been inclined to back his son, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) in the 2016 race. On Tuesday, Cruz released a video showing eight former Ron Paul liberty movement supporters — a number of them from Iowa — who are now backing Cruz. The campaign announced that former Congressman Bob Barr will chair a Liberty Leaders for Cruz” coalition comprised of libertarian-leaning Republicans. [WaPo]

A judge has ruled against a neighborhood group’s efforts to reverse the rezoning of land for an underground limestone quarry in Clark County. But an attorney for the Southwest Clark Neighborhood Association said an appeal is “likely.” [H-L]

Iraqi Foreign Minister Ibrahim al-Jaafari said Friday that he would like more U.S.-led coalition airstrikes against the Islamic State in Iraq. [HuffPo]

Remember The Jack-Kinder Morgan Fun?

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is taking the lead in an investigation of whether black Fayette County Public Schools employees are victims of discrimination. [H-L]

At CVS pharmacies in 12 states, friends and family members of people suffering from opiate addiction will now be able to get the overdose reversal drug naloxone without a prescription. Just not in Kentucky. [HuffPo]

Society may be getting more politically correct, but there’s new evidence that the trend hasn’t trickled down to operating rooms. [C-J/AKN]

Now random gays are trying to fame whore on the back of bigoted Kim Davis. And big city shysters are hyping it up. [TDB]

Members of a task force appointed by Gov. Steve Beshear to develop recommendations to shore up Kentucky’s teacher retirement system are fast learning it won’t be easy. The group’s consultant, William B. “Flick” Fornia of Pension Trust Advisors, ran through a number of potential options Friday but several of them met with concerned questions from members of the group. [Ronnie Ellis]

Rumors of Donald Trump’s demise may have been greatly exaggerated. Ever since rival Carly Fiorina was widely perceived to have bested Trump at the second GOP debate in California on Sept. 16, media outlets have been lining up to suggest that the front-runner is waning. [The Hill]

When Louisa West Elementary first-grade report cards go out on October 12, parents will not see the traditional A-B-C-D-F grading system. Instead, they will see a detailed list, written in plain English, assessing their children’s mastery of specific skills. [Ashland Independent]

A proposed four-year labor agreement between Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV and the United Auto Workers union encountered strong opposition from rank-and-file union members in early ratification voting. [Reuters]

The Madison County School District collected $238,720 less in property tax than state projections, according to a report during the district’s budget meeting Thursday evening. [Richmond Register]

For the second time this year, a speech by a foreign leader to Congress caused American politics to come to a standstill. But the pope’s remarks were the polar opposite of Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu’s on March 3—they united more people than they divided, and they spoke with such humility and other-centeredness that they seemed to be coming from a village priest, rather than the head of a church with 1.2 billion adherents. [Politico]

It’s been a few months since any new information has been released about Kinder Morgan’s plan to repurpose the Tennessee Gas pipeline through Rowan County. [The Morehead News]

Khaled Alkojak is one of the few Syrians to have made it to the U.S. since the start of the Syrian civil war. Even here, though, the 31-year-old remains in limbo, unsure of how long he’ll be allowed to stay. [NPR]

At the Red Mile, horse racing evolves into something that looks like a casino. Because that’s what it is — a casino. [H-L]

The day that Pope Francis asked Americans to respond humanely to refugees and other migrants, GOP presidential candidate Mike Huckabee dismissed the idea of being welcoming — insisting it could lead to admitting “some of the most violent and vicious people on Earth.” [HuffPo]

Morehead’s Kinda Maybe Stressed A Bit

A federal judge in Wyoming says it’s tough luck that the world’s largest private coal company doesn’t dig a 1970s-era protest song. [H-L]

Chinese president Xi Jinping is leaving behind a struggling economy as he visits the United States this week. That is worrying leaders of other countries that do business with China, including the United States, and is sure to be a topic of discussion when Xi meets with President Barack Obama on Thursday. [HuffPo]

Whenever one of these lobbyists tries to tell you they’re just a common man or woman? Laugh in their face. [C-J/AKN]

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel on Tuesday laid out a stark choice for the cash-strapped city as he proposed a 2016 budget aimed at resolving a financial crisis linked to unfunded pensions — either slash vital public safety and other services, or enact the biggest-ever property tax increase. [Reuters]

Guess we can all look forward to another couple years of only reporting fluff about the state’s Commissioner of Education, regardless of what happens. [WDRB]

After arguing last month that local ordinances criminalizing people for being homeless are unconstitutional, the Obama administration will now tie federal funding to whether municipalities are cracking down on criminalization measures. [ThinkProgress]

A day late means Barren County’s real estate tax revenue will be approximately $94,224 less this fiscal year than it could have been. [Glasgow Daily Times]

NPR follows up on the status of “AK,” one of many Afghan and Iraqi interpreters for the U.S. military still waiting for a visa, and why thousands of interpreters struggle with the process. [NPR]

Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes wants all eligible Kentucky voters to be able to register online by next year’s elections. [Ronnie Ellis]

Pope Francis waded into politics during brief remarks on Wednesday at the White House, touching on climate change, immigration and religious liberty before a packed South Lawn audience. [The Hill]

Much of Monday’s regular City Council meeting was discussion about issues facing Morehead. [The Morehead News]

Arne Duncan has tried to reshape American schools. Now will the backlash erase his legacy? [Politico]

Lexington is basically turning into the worst place on earth. [H-L]

A little over a year ago, Sister Mary Scullion received an unexpected call from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. The church, she was told, was making plans for the World Meeting of Families — the international Catholic festival that Pope Francis will visit in the city this week — and they needed her help. [HuffPo]