The Kim Davis Media Circus Continues

Shouts of joy erupted outside the Rowan County Courthouse Friday morning as William Smith and James Yates obtained a marriage license in Rowan County Friday morning from deputy county clerk Brian Mason. [H-L]

U.S. job growth rose less than expected in August, which could dim prospects of a Federal Reserve interest rate hike later this month, even as the unemployment rate dropped to a near 7-1/2- year low of 5.1 percent and wages accelerated. [HuffPo]

The city is asking residents to help Louisville’s homeless veterans take better care of their feet as more former military service members living on the street come forward. [C-J/AKN]

Many in the West are backing an effort to keep the greater sage grouse off the endangered species list. By saving the bird, they feel they can save the culture and customs of the West as well. [NPR]

In case you missed it: Rand Paul’s top guy, Mr. Morality who was “called by God” is all over Ashley Madison. [Page One]

Murder rates have increased sharply across the US in 2015, with at least 30 cities reporting a rise in violence. [BBC]

Residents offered their two-minute takes in Lexington Thursday on a thousand-page federal coal mining regulation that’s been years in the making. [WFPL]

It was a show of respect to Native Americans when President Obama on Sunday restored the name of the nation’s tallest mountain, formerly called Mount McKinley, to Denali. So it makes a lot of sense that presidential candidate Donald Trump didn’t like it. [ThinkProgress]

Rowan County residents James Yates and William Smith Jr. were the first same-sex couple to obtain a marriage license in their home county. It was also the first license issued in the office since a controversial U.S. Supreme Court ruling in June. [Ashland Independent]

Holding hands, James Yates and William Smith Jr. entered the media-filled courthouse shortly after 8, and began the process of applying for a marriage license for at least the sixth time. By 8:15, the couple had obtained their license. [Jim Higdon for the WaPo]

James Yates and Will Smith Jr. walked out of the Rowan County Courthouse this morning at 8:30 a.m. with their marriage license. [The Morehead News]

The US military has reopened a criminal investigation into some of the most serious accusations of war crimes against US forces in Afghanistan since 2001. [The Nation]

Fascinating how quickly the powerful few give up on talks of holding the University of Louisville Foundation accountable. [H-L]

The GOP presidential candidates love to warn voters of the threat of Islamic terrorists. Not a day goes by without Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) bemoaning the threat of “radical Islamic terrorism.” But amid all of the fear-mongering about terrorists, it might be wise for presidential candidates to be able to identify the names of actual terrorists, like the head of the Islamic State, Abu Bakr al Baghdadi, and the head of al Qaeda, Ayman al Zawahiri. [HuffPo]

Rand & RPK Melted Everybody’s Brain

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Magoffin County Judge-Executive Charles “Doc” Hardin has hired a man with a felony vote-buying conviction to be an administrative assistant in his office. [H-L]

Jeb Bush said while he supports granting birthright citizenship to the children of immigrants, the policy needs “greater enforcement” to prevent “abuse.” [HuffPo]

These poor, dumb people think their religion is under threat because their government isn’t permitted to discriminate on the basis of hate. Get it together, you jackasses, because you’re really harming what little bit of a positive image Kentucky was developing. [C-J/AKN]

Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) can run for both the White House and to keep his Senate seat in 2016, the Republican Party in Kentucky decided Saturday. [The Hill]

Richard Nelson, founder and executive director of the Commonwealth Policy Center, told the group of people who came Thursday evening to hear him at Immanuel Baptist Church that our culture is in a moral freefall and in a period of spiritual darkness. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The Kentucky GOP’s central committee voted Saturday to adopt a presidential caucus system next year, clearing the way Republican Sen. Rand Paul to run for president and reelection at the same time. [Politico]

This is written on Friday, the day before Kentucky Republicans were to decide whether to conduct a presidential caucus next year rather than a primary. [Ronnie Ellis]

While Donald Trump’s recent position paper on immigration dominates headlines, a new study of unauthorized immigrants in the U.S. digs into the latest numbers. [NPR]

The EPA recently announced the Clean Power Plan, which entails stricter emissions standards for states, and the Power+ Plan, which promises $1 billion in federal money to help coal country towns get back on their feet. I support both these plans wholeheartedly. They’re good for Kentucky communities, good for the economy, and good for the environment. [Drew Curtis]

Two American women have passed the gruelling training programme of the US Army Rangers – one of the military’s most elite special operations forces. [BBC]

Alison Daddy’s Name Grimes on Rand Paul and RPK this weekend: “It is unfortunate that today a few insiders were able to disenfranchise over 1.2 million Republican voters. One candidate should not be able to buy an election. Democracy demands that all eligible Kentuckians be a part of the election process. That didn’t happen today and won’t happen with a caucus.” [Press Release]

The phone rings just as Katrina Fingerson and Latoya McClary are about to leave to start their shift at the Goddard Riverside Community Center. [ThinkProgress]

It was like a Klan rally with an extra dose of fat, white homophobia. Headlined by Bob Stivers and Matt Bevin, of course. [H-L]

Americans use prescription drugs and they know these medicines help people, but they still don’t care much for pharmaceutical companies and think the industry is too money-hungry, according to a new survey. [HuffPo]

Maybe She’s Trying To Run For Office

Heather French Henry’s gig of playing veteran leader is basically just a re-hash of her husband’s past failed campaigns.

Right?

Get a load of the latest press release:

Free Gun Locks
for Military and Veterans
at State Fair Sunday

The Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs (KDVA) and the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office will be giving away gun locks to active-duty military service members and veterans on Military Appreciation Day at the Kentucky State Fair this Sunday, Aug. 23.

“We are happy to be able to provide these gun locks to veterans and military members,” said KDVA Commissioner Heather French Henry. “They know better than anyone the importance of gun safety. We are also passionate about decreasing the numbers of veterans who commit suicide each day and this is one way we can possibly help to do just that.”

Gun locks. Just like Steve.

It’s like she’s trying to ramp up her own failed campaign of some sort.

Gag.

At Least She’s Leaving Really Soon

Remember when Steve Henry used the personal health information from prostate cancer screening patients at the state fair for his political benefit?

Yeah?

Guess what his sweatshop dress-pushing wife is doing with your state government tax dollars.

Here’s the release:

Kentucky’s male veterans should not miss the opportunity to get free prostate cancer screening at the Kentucky State Fair, which opens Thursday.

Heather French Henry, commissioner of the Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs, has long been a strong advocate of prostate cancer screening for all men, and particularly veterans.

“Especially during this 50th Vietnam War Commemoration, Vietnam veterans who may have been exposed to Agent Orange should get screened because they are at risk,” Henry said. “With early detection, this is a survivable cancer. It’s free at the State Fair. Do it for your loved ones.”

The Kentucky Veterans Program Trust Fund Board of Directors granted $2,500 to the prostate screening program because of its importance to veterans.

Free prostate cancer screening will be available on Saturday, Aug. 22, Sunday, Aug. 23 (which is also Military Appreciation Day), Tuesday, Aug. 25 and Sunday, Aug. 29.

Screenings for other cancers and various health conditions will also be available at the State Fair.

-SNIP-

Commissioner Henry, along with First Lady Jane Beshear; Dr. Steve Henry, president of the Kentucky Prostate Cancer Coalition; Dr. Donald Miller, director of the James Graham Brown Cancer Center; and Mark Milburn, vice president of oncology services for KentuckyOne Health, will hold a news conference at 10 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 20, the opening day of the fair, to announce the screening program.

All screenings as well as the news conference are being held in the Health Horizons area of the South Wing.

Yep, she’s involving her husband in cancer screenings again.

WATB Kim Davis Gets Even More Whiny

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis, who is being sued for refusing to issue marriage licenses because of her religious opposition to same-sex marriage, is now suing Gov. Steve Beshear for infringing on her religious freedom. [H-L]

The Department of Veterans Affairs announced plans on Monday to begin revising how it grants disability benefits for veterans who lived at Camp Lejeune, a Marine Corps base in North Carolina, during the 30-plus years that toxic chemicals tainted the base’s drinking water. [HuffPo]

Myliah Rose Davis slept on a blanket in her mother’s lap, her tiny hands moving every now and then, as if orchestrating a dream. [C-J/AKN]

Thomas Jefferson’s vision of democracy has endured in one of the defining documents of U.S. history. But the 607 slaves who toiled in his Monticello estate have left few traces to remember them by. [NPR]

A Blue Grass Chemical Activity mobile laboratory detected a low-level mustard vapor reading during weekly routine analysis of the chemical weapons stockpile at the Blue Grass Army Depot. [Richmond Register]

A Wisconsin Supreme Court ruling on Gov. Scott Walker’s campaign practices clears the way for state candidates to work more closely with legally independent political groups and their enormous war chests. The big unanswered question is how ripples from the case might spread beyond the state’s borders. [ProPublica]

It wouldn’t be a genuine Fancy Farm Picnic without colorful characters and barbs delivered by various politicos, and this year was no different. [Ronnie Ellis]

The Securities and Exchange Commission on Wednesday made it official: Public companies will soon have to say exactly how their chief executives’ payday compares with a typical employee’s. [WaPo]

Two county jail projects underway in Kentucky – Rowan and Oldham – are near mirror images in terms of proposed size, budget, and where both counties currently stand in constructing their facilities. [The Morehead News]

An outside group that sought to mar Senator Rand Paul’s presidential campaign kickoff with a television advertisement linking him to President Obama’s Iran policy is going on the air with a new spot about the candidate and the recent nuclear deal. [NY Times]

Chad Lewis works on his family’s farm in the Horse Cave area – where they raise pasture-fed cattle, pigs and chickens – and also as a barista at Mojaboax Coffee Co. on West Main Street in Glasgow. When Lewis, 20, has time between those responsibilities, he works as an artist. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Sunday marks the one-year anniversary of Michael Brown’s death at Officer Darren Wilson’s hands in Ferguson — the spark that ignited a national movement of protest against police violence and racial inequality. One year later, that movement is nowhere near finished. The cameras may have left, but dynamic grassroots programs are changing Ferguson while no one is watching. [ThinkProgress]

Ninety days ago, city officials gave developer Dudley Webb 90 days to try to make a deal with an unidentified investor to rescue his long-stalled CentrePointe project. [H-L]

Real estate mogul Donald Trump supports shutting down the government as a way to defund Planned Parenthood, potentially setting the bar for the rest of his fellow GOP presidential candidates currently trailing him in the polls by a large margin. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin Gets More Lost By The Day

New TV ads in Kentucky’s race for governor focus not on the candidates but on Democratic President Barack Obama. [H-L]

A bill that critics say would make any significant new regulation all but impossible easily passed the House Tuesday. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin has no idea who his opponent is. His campaign staff is so incompetent they aren’t even aware of the most basic opposition research. [C-J/AKN]

Civil libertarians are worried about an increasingly common form of domestic surveillance that has nothing to do with listening to your phone calls or reading your emails; it has to do with looking through your garbage. [The Intercept]

When a festival benefits the humane society, you can presume pets are welcome. [Richmond Register]

For seven years, a Wisconsin telecom consultant has waged an unsuccessful legal fight against AT&T, alleging that the company long defrauded a federal program by overcharging the nation’s schools and libraries for Internet and telephone services. Now an appeals court in the District of Columbia has given new life to his case. [ProPublica]

It’s not just Kentucky’s Legislative Research Commission that will pay to settle a sexual harassment suit brought by three LRC staffers. [Ronnie Ellis]

Rather than being an effective manifesto of all the arguments against recognizing same-sex relationships as marriages, it serves as a guide for just how weak this already-lost case is, and why continued fights — including the ongoing struggle over using “religious liberty” to justify anti-gay discrimination — will likely not prevail either. Some extremists in Frankfort have been talking about this book. [ThinkProgress]

Cave City Council met in closed session Monday during a special-called meeting to discuss real estate. Upon returning to open session, a motion was made to purchase “the real estate in question,” but the council voted 3-2 not to buy the land. [Glasgow Daily Times]

On the campaign trail, Jeb Bush has repeatedly emphasized his record overseeing Florida’s boom economy as the state’s governor. He says it’s an example of an economy that created a huge number of jobs and benefited the middle class — an example of what he could do as president. “I know how to do this,” he said in Maitland, Fla., on Monday. But according to interviews with economists and a review of data, Florida owed a substantial portion of its growth under Bush not to any state policies but to a massive and unsustainable housing bubble — one that ultimately benefited rich investors at the expense of middle-class families. [WaPo]

A grand jury has indicted Shepherdsville Mayor Scott Ellis on a misdemeanor criminal charge of solicitation to prostitution on July 28. [WHAS11]

A new study of veterans from the Vietnam War has troubling implications for troops who fought much more recently — in Afghanistan and Iraq. [NPR]

Courthouse Plaza Wednesday flared in the midday heat and fiery chants of a crowd that assembled in downtown Lexington to oppose Planned Parenthood and abortion. [H-L]

Russian government-backed hackers who penetrated high-profile U.S. government and defense industry computers this year used a method combining Twitter with data hidden in seemingly benign photographs, according to experts studying the campaign. [HuffPo]

Thursday Evening Dept Of Awful

Democrats are pulling out the long knives, questioning Bevin’s commitment to agriculture and pressing the theme that Bevin “can’t be trusted.” During a conference call Wednesday morning organized by the Kentucky Democratic Party, one Kentucky farmer even made note of Bevin’s New Hampshire upbringing. [H-L]

Veterans were exposed to toxic chemicals and they’re accusing the VA of dragging its feet. [HuffPo]

West Virginia coal operator Jim Justice, who invited Gov. Steve Beshear to play a round of golf with the great Tiger Woods at Justice’s Greenbrier resort early this month, was the biggest contributor to the Kentucky Democratic Party last month. [C-J/AKN]

Hillary Clinton trails three top Republican presidential candidates in matchups in three key swing states — Iowa, Colorado and Virginia — a new Quinnipiac poll finds. [The Hill]

Rowan County resident Serena Smith has supported Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis and her decision not to issue marriage licenses since the day protests began in late June. [Ashland Independent]

Michigan’s Wayne County, home to Detroit, is in a financial emergency due to chronic budget deficits and a big unfunded healthcare liability, a state-appointed review team announced on Tuesday. [Reuters]

U.S. Rep. Brett Guthrie, R-Bowling Green, met Monday with constituents at a Glasgow restaurant. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Missouri cattle farmer Greg Fleshman became so concerned about keeping his local hospital open that in 2011 he joined its governing board. “I mean they’ve saved my dad’s life twice,” Fleshman says. “He had a heart attack and a stroke and they life-flighted him out of here both times.” Keeping the doors open at Putnam County Memorial Hospital in Unionville, Mo., seemed crucial to the community — but maybe an impossible task. [NPR]

Turns out Greg Fischer has another director-level hire with a drinking and driving in their city vehicle problem. [The ‘Ville Voice]

Though most states are slowing their emissions, the report shows eight states moving in the opposite direction, each seeing an increase in its emissions rate between 2008 and 2015. They include Kentucky, Louisiana, Arkansas, Nebraska, Utah, Idaho and Alaska. [Climate Central]

The Casey County Fiscal Court says homophobic County Clerk Casey Davis is wrong. May be behind a paywall but the headline and sub-head will tell you everything you need to know. [Casey County News]

Logically, Iraqi refugees shouldn’t exist, according to Sen. Rand Paul, because the United States already “won” the Iraq War. In an interview with Boston Herald Radio this week, Paul attempted to justify why he wanted to restrict the number of refugees the United States takes in, particularly from certain areas of the world like the Middle East. [ThinkProgress]

The Boyd County Fiscal Court unanimously voted Tuesday to seek closure of Big Run Landfill. [More Ashland Independent]

With a little over one week left before funding for the nation’s transportation infrastructure dries up, the Senate has reached a deal on a multiyear bill, parting ways with the House. However, the bill immediately hit some bumps. [HuffPo]

Please accept my apologies for the caching issue that made the site appear to have stopped publication on July 16. Everything should be getting back to normal. If not, clear your browser’s cache and you should be good to go. [Jake]