Education: Not A Real Thing In Kentucky

US authorities have prepared charges to seek the arrest of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. [CNN]

The Kentucky commission responsible for investigating judicial misconduct has the fewest resources available to it in comparison to neighboring states, and before 2010, the commission was run out of its secretary’s basement in Lexington. [H-L]

Donald Trump is contemplating a new strategy to get repeal of the Affordable Care Act through Congress: threatening to torpedo insurance for millions of Americans unless Democrats agree to negotiate with him. [HuffPo]

The U.S. attorney’s office had decided it won’t prosecute Dr. David Dunn and two other former University of Louisville executives who were under investigation for allegedly misusing federal money for non-university purposes, their lawyers say. [C-J/AKN]

American corporations scored far worse than their European counterparts in the rankings, which were developed by the Geneva-based UN Global Sustainability Index Institute. [QZ]

Kentucky is one of the least educated states in the country, according to a recent study by WalletHub, a personal finance website that gathered data from the U.S. Census Bureau, National Center for Education Statistics, The Chronicle of Higher Education and U.S. News and World Report. [Glasgow Daily Times]

In case you missed it… A Russian government think tank controlled by Vladimir Putin developed a plan to swing the 2016 U.S. presidential election to Donald Trump and undermine voters’ faith in the American electoral system, three current and four former U.S. officials told Reuters. [Reuters]

A local environmental coalition is urging the state to include fence line monitoring of odor emissions in Big Run Landfill’s new air quality permit, which will be discussed Friday in a public hearing in the Boyd County High School auditorium. [Ashland Independent]

The Muscogee County School Board in Columbus, Georgia, dealt another blow to embattled Camelot Education when it voted Monday night to delay for three months a decision on whether to hire the company to run its alternative education programs. The delay in awarding the $6.4 million annual contract comes in the wake of a recent report by ProPublica and Slate that more than a dozen Camelot students were allegedly shoved, beaten or thrown by staff members — incidents almost always referred to as “slamming.” [ProPublica]

The Berea City Council adopted a resolution denouncing acts of discrimination, violence and harassment in city limits and greater Madison County. Council member Billy Wooten stated the measure was partly in response to a recent incident in which a county resident’s property was vandalized with homophobic graffiti. [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump has yet to nominate the State Department official who oversees diplomatic security abroad — despite having made the 2012 Benghazi attacks a centerpiece of his campaign against Hillary Clinton. [Politico]

A researcher at the University of Louisville wants to know whether coal ash is in homes in Southwest Louisville and how it’s potentially affecting the children living there. [WFPL]

The March for Science is not a partisan event. But it’s political. That’s the recurring message of the organizers, who insist that this is a line the scientific community and its supporters will be able to walk. It may prove too delicate a distinction, though, when people show up in droves on Saturday with their signs and their passions. [WaPo]

Attorney General Andy Beshear on Wednesday announced a settlement with Kentucky Utilities and Louisville Gas & Electric that would reduce a large rate increase the companies requested in November. It also would shelve the utilities’ controversial plan to more than double the fixed monthly charge that all customers must pay, regardless of how much electricity they use. [John Cheves]

Stephen Miller, a senior adviser to President Donald Trump, is now working on women’s issues in the White House despite having once forcefully argued against paid maternity leave and equal pay legislation, according to unnamed White House officials. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for mobile service and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets up! [CLICK HERE]

We’re Not Even 100 Days In Yet…

The University of Kentucky has received $11.2 million from the National Institutes of Health to finance a new center that studies the links between obesity and cancer. [Linda Blackford]

Whiny little Mitch, indeed. Kentuckians have known this for years but it’s fun to watch the rest of the world find out just what a butthurt little baby these people are. [HuffPo]

A researcher at the University of Louisville is stepping up her study into whether coal ash from power plants may be making children in Louisville sick with a new study backed by federal research dollars. [C-J/AKN]

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau announced Monday that it filed a lawsuit against Weltman, Weinberg & Reis, accusing the debt collection firm of falsely representing in millions of collection letters that attorneys were involved in collection for overdue accounts. The firm collects on overdue credit card, installment loans, mortgage loans, and student loans debt nationwide, but only files lawsuit in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, New Jersey, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. [Consumerist]

At 8:36 p.m. Monday night, Glasgow Police Chief Guy Howie released information on the woman who was found dead Monday morning on the rooftop of a building located on the west side of Glasgow’s public square. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Lost amid the uproar over the Trump administration’s crackdown on undocumented immigrants is a change coming to the legal immigration system that’s expected to be costly for both U.S. companies and the government itself. [ProPublica]

New preschool and vocational school buildings are at the top of a construction priority list the Boyd County Board of Education is expected to adopt Wednesday. [Ashland Independent]

Donald Trump has congratulated Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on his victory in Sunday’s referendum that gave him sweeping new powers. The US president’s phone call contrasts with European concern that the result – 51.4% in favour of the changes – has exposed deep splits in Turkish society. [BBC]

With a meeting on his proposal for a new, comprehensive approach to the drug epidemic only a week away, Madison Judge/Executive Reagan Taylor got the opportunity to present his ideas directly to U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell as he met Monday with local leaders. [Richmond Register]

If this doesn’t scare the crap out of you, nothing will. How does the surge in drug overdoses compare with other causes of death in the U.S.? [NY Times]

In the first project of its kind, a Kentucky coal company is partnering with a global renewable energy giant to explore putting a major solar installation on a former mountaintop removal coal mine. [WFPL]

Racism motivated Trump voters more than authoritarianism. Which surprises absolutely no one who isn’t in denial. [WaPo]

Knox County and Barbourville Independent schools were closed Tuesday after a threat was called in Monday night to a West Coast police agency, according to a statement from the school system. [H-L]

Donald Trump, like most New Republican Nazis, doesn’t actually know who is running North Korea. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for mobile service and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets up! [CLICK HERE]

Matt Bevin: The Opposite Of Transparent

***Care about the future of Kentucky? Help us cover FOIA and open records request fees relating to Matt Bevin and Jamie Comer.*** [CLICK HERE]

Robert Stivers doth protest too much, henny. The only ignorant and arrogant person involved is him. His bigoted self. He’s the kind of coward who fears shaking hands with a gay person. The disgusting, small (obviously not talking about his massive weight) man who spreads good old boy racism and misogyny left and right. [H-L]

The only way to fix this kind of Republican stupidity is with education. Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas), chairman of the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology, has challenged the credibility of Science magazine — one of the world’s most respected science publications. “That is not known as an objective writer or magazine,” Smith said during a hearing Wednesday on climate change, which Smith denies. [HuffPo]

It appears Matt Bevin is once again playing a shady game of secrecy and your taxpayer dollars are funding it. [C-J/AKN]

Budget documents released on Politico this week detailing the Trump administration’s proposed budget moving forward into 2017 reveal some horrifying truths, including but not limited to $342 million in cuts to HIV/AIDS prevention and research. [OUT]

University of Louisville Foundation leaders put an end Tuesday to a controversial deferred compensation plan that doled out an extra $20 million to U of L administrators. [WFPL]

Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, said Sunday that “alarm bells” should go off whenever President Trump calls something “fake,” adding the White House is trying to mislead the country into believing there is no connection between Russian officials and Trump campaign associates. [The Hill]

It looked like a slam dunk, but as the clock ticked past 11:30 p.m. on the final day of the 2017 General Assembly, it suddenly became clear a bill to limit the power of Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear wasn’t going to get a vote. [Ronnie Ellis]

Michael Flynn, Donald Trump’s former national security adviser, failed to disclose payments from a Russian television network and two other firms linked to Russia in a February financial disclosure form, according to documents released by the White House. [Reuters]

A settlement was reached in a civil lawsuit against the Boyd County clerk and fiscal court that alleged a former deputy clerk was terminated under conditions that violated the Kentucky Whistleblower Act. [Ashland Independent]

When Trump welcomes President Xi Jinping of China to his palm-fringed Florida club for two days of meetings on Thursday, the studied informality of the gathering will bear the handiwork of two people: China’s ambassador to Washington and Mr. Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner. [NY Times]

A man shot his girlfriend in the head then killed himself during a gunfight with police Tuesday night, after a two-day, cross-state crime spree in which they allegedly stabbed an elderly widower to death and stole two cars and a gun, police say. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Republicans know that drug testing before giving poor people access to life-saving health care doesn’t work. So what do they want to do? Drug test people who need Medicaid in order to survive. Now that House Republicans have squandered their shot at reordering Medicaid, governors who want conservative changes in the health program for ­low-income Americans must get special permission from the Trump administration. [WaPo]

Hold on to your wigs, Republicans like Scott Jennings and Brett Guthrie. You shouldn’t tweet out screenshots of your mobile or home internet providers if you don’t want advocacy groups to come for your browsing history. If you’re displeased with the actions of your representatives in Congress, you typically have to wait until the next election to try to hold them accountable. But in light of the recent approval of Senate Joint Resolution 34, voters are fighting back in a more creative way. [H-L]

The failure of Donald Trump and congressional Republicans to repeal the Affordable Care Act could lead to an ironic result: the expansion of government-run health care. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for mobile service and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets up! [CLICK HERE]

Thank Goodness For Tennessee, Maybe…?

***Care about the future of Kentucky? Help us cover FOIA and open records request fees relating to Matt Bevin and Jamie Comer.*** [CLICK HERE]

Just in case you’d forgotten Tennessee was a million times worse than anything Kentucky has to offer? Steve Eimers knew something was wrong before he opened the envelope with his daughter’s name on it. [H-L]

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes (R-Calif.) met a source on White House grounds last week, one day before he alleged that President Donald Trump and his team were subjected to surveillance during the final months of the Obama administration. [HuffPo]

The University of Louisville alerted its community that gun advocates plan to walk around the perimeters of the Belknap Campus on Friday openly carrying firearms. [C-J/AKN]

State and local governments seeking Justice Department grants must certify they are not so-called sanctuary cities in order to receive the money, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced Monday. [The Hill]

The Ashland Board of City Commissioners pushed its meeting back to the evening on Thursday, and a swarm of local residents journeyed to the commission chambers to pitch ideas, raise concerns and observe the public servants conduct business. [Ashland Independent]

Roger Severino, the new head of the Office for Civil Rights within Health and Human Services, has opposed transgender patients’ rights, same-sex marriage and Planned Parenthood. [ProPublica]

Close to 100 people turned out Thursday night to learn what needs to be done to get Park City established as a trail town through the Kentucky Office of Adventure Tourism. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Donald Trump’s son-in-law and aide, Jared Kushner, will be questioned by a US committee investigating alleged ties between the Trump team and Moscow. [BBC]

House Minority Floor Leader Rocky Adkins, D-Sandy Hook, made it clear during a brief update to Rowan County Fiscal Court on Tuesday that it’s been a difficult last 28 legislative days. [The Morehead News]

Trump, looking for a flicker of hope after his Republican majority fell to pieces last week, predicted that the opposition party would eventually give in: “I honestly believe the Democrats will come to us and say let’s get together and get a great health care bill or plan,” he said. [NY Times]

Can you imagine how hard Greg Fischer would lose if Republicans had a non-wingnut candidate to run against him? Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer will seek a third term as the city’s mayor. But he’s not talking much about his decision. [WFPL]

The Trump administration is planning a much more assertive role in undertaking a broad overhaul of the tax code than it did during the failed effort to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, with some advisers working to craft a concrete blueprint for specific changes instead of letting Congress dictate details. [WaPo]

A jury has ruled that a male officer at the state prison in Elliott County sexually harassed four female guards and awarded $1.6 million to the women. [H-L]

“We’re roughly two months into the Trump Presidency, and it is the worst start to a time in office I have ever seen,” Dan Rather wrote in a Facebook post on Monday, noting that many historians have said the same thing. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for mobile service and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets up! [CLICK HERE]

Monday Ought To Be Relatively Gross

***Care about the future of Kentucky? Help us cover FOIA and open records request fees relating to Matt Bevin and Jamie Comer.*** [CLICK HERE]

A business owner and his two firms fined by the state for illegal dumping of radioactive waste have all filed for bankruptcy in federal court. [H-L]

Paul Ryan and the rest of the Republican Party either don’t understand how health care and health insurance work or they’re deliberately lying. Our money’s on lying. [HuffPo]

Mike Pence came to Kentucky and lied about the Affordable Care Act’s impact on the Commonwealth. Because that’s the New Republican way. [C-J/AKN]

Jared Kushner is keeping parts of his real estate empire. Given Kushner’s vast portfolio as an adviser to the president, it’s not clear how he’s going to avoid issues that could affect his bank account. The Trump administration has declined to give details. [ProPublica]

Kentucky is known for many things — horses, basketball, Ale-8-One, hot browns and, of course, moonshine. And for the Arvin family, moonshine has become more than a sweet beverage. [Richmond Register]

What was that, again, about Republicans not being atrociously racist? [The Hill]

Donald Trump’s resolve to shakeup the Environmental Protection Agency by slashing its budget and shrinking government regulations has states that rely heavily on EPA funding on edge. [Ashland Independent]

A group of states renewed their effort on Monday to block President Donald Trump’s revised temporary ban on refugees and travelers from several Muslim-majority countries, arguing that his executive order is the same as the first one that was halted by federal courts. [Reuters]

Attorney General Andy Beshear on Thursday called for a $142 million reduction in the Kentucky Utilities’ rate request that’s pending before the Public Service Commission. [Glasgow Daily Times]

A new analysis from the Congressional Budget Office also predicts $337 billion in deficit reduction over the same period. [WaPo]

Budget shortfalls at the University of Louisville are starting to have firsthand impacts on students. [Last] week student employees for the Brandeis School of Law were let go from their jobs. [WAVE3]

What a dark history. Rare, century-old photographs help illustrate the story of 272 slaves sold by Jesuit priests to secure the future of Georgetown University. [NY Times]

Hold on to your wigs. Donald Trump plans to hold a rally in Louisville’s Freedom Hall on Monday, March 20, the president’s website said. [H-L]

The Republican plan to repeal and “replace” the Affordable Care Act would increase the number of Americans without health coverage by 24 million and reduce the federal budget deficit by $337 billion by 2026, according to a Congressional Budget Office report published Monday. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for mobile service and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets up! [CLICK HERE]

If Beshear Had Behaved Like Bevin? He’d Have Been Pelted With Stones When In Public

***Care about the future of Kentucky? Help us cover FOIA and open records request fees relating to Matt Bevin and Jamie Comer.*** [CLICK HERE]

Matt Bevin this week named two men to vacant judgeships in Central Kentucky, one on the state’s Court of Appeals and the other in Fayette Circuit Court. [John Cheves]

Last June, John Mattes started noticing something coursing like a virus through the Facebook page he helped administer for Bernie Sanders fans in San Diego. People with no apparent ties to California were friending the page and sharing links from unfamiliar sites full of anti-Hillary Clinton propaganda. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin is a garbage person. A truly wretched individual who, like Donald Trump, believes he’s some gift from g-d. Garbage. His poor children will have to deal with his taint for the rest of their lives. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump is a compassionate, intelligent human being, eh? On what fucking planet? This is the person people like Scott Jennings, Andy Barr and Matt Bevin trust to make health care decisions. [New Yorker]

Jeff Hoover is still lying about Amazon’s decision to locate a facility in Kentucky. Trying to use right-to-work legislation as an excuse. If he’s not freaking about transgender kids trying to use the restroom in peace, he’s pushing what he knows to be bullshit. Rather than clean up Greg Stumbo’s messes? He’s creating messes of his own. He’ll end up with a legacy just as tainted. [Richmond Register]

Federal investigators and computer scientists continue to examine whether there was a computer server connection between the Trump Organization and a Russian bank, sources close to the investigation tell CNN. [CNN]

A fired Ashland police officer has appealed the city’s decision in Boyd County Circuit Court. [Ashland Independent]

Texas lawmakers drew up three U.S. congressional districts to undermine the influence of Hispanic voters, a divided panel of three federal judges ruled, in the latest development in a years-long battle over gerrymandering. [Reuters]

This kind of crap is going to continue to happen and we’re going to continue clogging our jails until marijuana is legalized and taxed. The discovery of about 10 pounds of marijuana worth an estimated $64,000 led to the arrest of a Glasgow man Thursday. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The president’s semi-public Florida retreat doesn’t follow the same strict background check protocol as the White House, creating an espionage risk. [Politico]

Long-term interim dean of the University of Louisville’s Brandeis School of Law will not get the permanent job, according to school officials. [Business First]

Trump said he made $21 million in income from his New York contracts. He actually made a lot less. [ProPublica]

The single “preferred” candidate for the University of Kentucky’s diversity chief has accepted the job, UK President Eli Capilouto announced Thursday. [Linda Blackford]

Remember when Scott Jennings had to appear before congress and pleaded the fifth re: the U.S. Attorneys/private email server funtimes in the Bush Misadministration? Preet Bharara, the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, and one of the most high profile federal prosecutors in the country, says he’s been fired after refusing to resign his post. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for mobile service and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets up! [CLICK HERE]

Republicans Tried & Failed To Refute Steve Beshear On Health Care Reality In Kentucky

***Care about the future of Kentucky? Help us cover FOIA and open records request fees relating to Matt Bevin and Jamie Comer.*** [CLICK HERE]

Remember death panels? Here’s the Republican version – supported by people like Jimmy Higdon and other folks who apparently has no moral compass after all – working to make it even more difficult to hold corrupt providers accountable. The Kentucky House will get a Senate bill that would establish “medical review panels” to intervene in malpractice or neglect lawsuits, with changes that its supporters hope will help it survive a constitutional challenge. [John Cheves]

Every mention of immigrants and immigration on Tuesday evening was negative. That’s what Republicans think was so positive and uplighting – they’re finally having their racism validated. [HuffPo]

Scott Jennings, like most conservatives, needs a new act. In his column railing against the mean old Democrats for opposing Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, he falls back on tired Republican tropes “Hypocrisy!, we are the true victims,” while conveniently ignoring the substance of the opposition. [C-J/AKN]

Former President George W. Bush says he dislikes the racial tensions simmering in the early days of President Trump’s administration. “Yes, I don’t like the racism and I don’t like the name-calling and I don’t like people feeling alienated,” he told People magazine Monday. “Nobody likes that.” [The Hill]

The Battle of Richmond Visitors Center is named one of the top Civil War museums in the nation in the current issue of the Civil War Monitor, a quarterly magazine circulated nationally. [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump signed an order on Tuesday directing regulators to review an Obama administration rule that expanded the number of federally protected waterways as the new president targets environmental regulations conservatives label as government overreach. [Reuters]

Recognizing that the escalating cost of demand-side management programs has “exacerbated an already bleak economic situation for many of Kentucky Power (Company’s) customers,” the Kentucky Public Service Commission has opened a review of the programs. [Ashland Independent]

Former Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear painted himself as an ordinary citizen Tuesday night as he blasted Trump’s economic policies and warned that Republicans are poised to “rip affordable health insurance away from millions of Americans who most need it.” Steve Beshear may have personally set quality back decades but he got it right on health care. It’s possible for people who do bigoted things to also do positive things, liberals. [Politico]

Usually, it’s the overabundance of snow days that can cause problems during a school year. This year, it’s a lack of snow days that is causing some concerns. After viewing the academic calendar at Tuesday’s meeting, the Rowan County Board of Education discussed Spring Break scheduling on the district calendar. [The Morehead News]

Really? That was an optimistic address? It’s optimistic to to spew out anti-Muslim, anti-Latinx fear about how immigrants are killing everyone and the country is on fire? This is proof that it’s beyond easy to sway journalists who live in idealistic bubbles. They’re the same people who attacked Steve Beshear for his accent instead of the content of his remarks. [NY Times]

The University of Louisville owes $96,000 to the Internal Revenue Service after an audit found it wasn’t paying taxes on Adidas freebies given to staffers in the athletics department. [WFPL]

The former British spy who authored a controversial dossier on behalf of Donald Trump’s political opponents alleging ties between Trump and Russia reached an agreement with the FBI a few weeks before the election for the bureau to pay him to continue his work, according to several people familiar with the arrangement. While Trump has derided the dossier as “fake news” compiled by his political opponents, the FBI’s arrangement with Steele shows that bureau investigators considered him credible and found his line of inquiry to be worthy of pursuit. [WaPo]

Some things Jack Brammer doesn’t mention – in part because he’s too oblivious to ask, in part because he just doesn’t want to understand what he’s writing about: the KDA used grant funds to funnel cash to Jonathan Miller. Miller lobbied law enforcement to get their support. And the Court of Appeals says Kentucky law requires a license. These hemp shenanigans (and the ongoing lawsuit) ought to be fun. [H-L]

Who is the bigger snowflake – Donald Trump or Scott Jennings? Donald Trump sat down for an interview with “Fox & Friends” and said that former President Barack Obama and “his people” are behind recent town hall protests. [HuffPo]

WANT TO HELP US? Use our Amazon links, sign up for mobile service and more. Check this page out to see how you can help us without ever giving us a dime of your own money. Or buy our silly magnets up! [CLICK HERE]