Kim Davis Is A Kentucky Embarrassment

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Kim Davis, who, like her mother, has hired half the family, is an Eastern Kentucky disgrace. A proud, lazy bigot set on making life hell for an entire community while she rakes in her taxpayer-funded salary and her hate group attorneys get attention. Rowan County ought to get it together and oust her. Now. People like Walter Blevins, who has plenty of gay relatives, should stop playing the role of coward and kick her ass to the curb. Stand up, Morehead. [H-L]

The Obamacare health insurance exchanges appear to be doing a good job when it comes to one of their most important yet underappreciated functions: offering a fallback option to people who lose their health coverage during the year. [HuffPo]

The University of Louisville has been named one of the most LGBTQ-friendly campuses in the South by Campus Pride Index. [C-J/AKN]

Bruised by criticism after a reality TV show surreptitiously recorded and aired a man’s death, New York City hospitals will no longer allow patients to be filmed without getting prior consent. [ProPublica]

Barren Circuit Judge Phillip R. Patton has decided he will retire by the end of this year. [Glasgow Daily Times]

What? Bush Republicans are showing their racism? Surely not! [ThinkProgress]

It should be easy to come up with a weekly column during a governor’s race, but the 2015 election between Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway is unlike any I’ve ever seen. [Ronnie Ellis]

A close American friend tells the story of her son’s graduation from Georgetown University. To celebrate they had booked a restaurant close to the campus, and as they are walking in, who is coming out but “Veep” – Vice President Joe Biden. [BBC]

Virgil and Bonnie Cornett are still cleaning up after a major flood affected their home in mid-July. [The Morehead News]

Two murders in California are stoking debate about undocumented immigrants and how state and local authorities cooperate — or don’t — with federal officials. [NPR]

Responding to backlash over his leadership changes at the North American International Livestock Exposition in Louisville, Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear says he will appoint Prospect cattle breeder Jack Ragsdale as chairman emeritus of the committee he led for 41 years. [WFPL]

Every year, thousands of innocent people are sent to jail only because they can’t afford to post bail, putting them at risk of losing their jobs, custody of their children — even their lives. [NY Times]

Voters in Berea will have an opportunity Sept. 29 to determine whether they want alcohol sold by the drink in certain restaurants. [H-L]

Rand Paul may have forgotten that he represents Kentucky. We live in the greatest, freest, richest, most humanitarian country on earth — and I’ll be damned if I sit around and watch my generation screw up the future of our nation’s young people. [HuffPo]

Not Much Of A Change At Top Of KDE

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Rand Paul’s summer just went from bad to worse. After a series of missteps and frequent bad press, the Kentucky senator already was limping into the first Republican presidential debate of the 2016 election cycle. [H-L]

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau filed a lawsuit against an offshore payday lender on Tuesday. The bureau alleges that NDG Enterprise illegally collected loan payments that consumers did not have to pay — violating the Dodd-Frank Act, which Congress passed in 2010 to reform the country’s financial system. [HuffPo]

With less than four weeks to go before state Education Commissioner Terry Holliday retires, the Kentucky Board of Education has named Kevin Brown to be the interim commissioner as the board continues to search for a permanent replacement. [C-J/AKN]

The Obama administration has drafted an executive order forcing any company that contracts with the federal government to issue paid leave to employees who are sick, are seeking medical attention or need to care for a sick relative. [NY Times]

The Boyd County Fiscal Court will only seek closure of Big Run Landfill by eliminating the remaining total capacity of trash at the site. [Ashland Independent]

A long-simmering dispute between automakers and U.S. regulators over policies to promote electric vehicles spilled into the open on Tuesday, in the high stakes struggle over the future of automotive technology. [Reuters]

Morehead’s status as the third Kentucky Trail Town has been recertified for another year, it was announced Monday. [The Morehead News]

A century’s worth of data. That’s how much researchers looked at for a new study — which showed that the world’s glaciers are melting faster than scientists think they ever have before, and that even if global warming stopped today, they would continue to melt. [ThinkProgress]

The 19-year-old Cave City woman accused of being involved in the setting of a fire at the Happy Valley Learning Center in late January was in Barren Circuit Court on Monday for her final sentencing in that and another case. [Glasgow Daily Times]

In the early morning hours of June 30, 1995, a fire sparked to life in Kristine Bunch’s mobile home. It fanned out across the floor and climbed up the walls, then formed an impassable barrier across the middle of the trailer. Bunch, 21, snapped awake in the living room. Her three-year-old son, Tony, shrieked for her on the other side of the flames. [Mother Jones]

For the first time in more than 40 years, not a single one of the Kentucky governor’s appointees to the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees is black. The urban university’s board is also the only one among the state’s public universities without a single governor-appointed racial minority since Gov. Steve Beshear’s most recent appointments in June. [WFPL]

It started so well. When Saddam Hussein’s Iraq invaded Kuwait on Aug. 2, 1990, the United States swiftly cobbled together a broad coalition, unleashed a stunning new generation of air power and waged a lightning ground offensive that lasted all of four days. Iraqi troops were so desperate to quit that some surrendered to Western journalists armed only with notebooks. [NPR]

A controversial statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis will remain in the Kentucky Capitol rotunda. [H-L]

The United Nations said on Wednesday that an increasing number of women and children were getting hurt or killed in Afghanistan’s war against the Taliban and other insurgents. [HuffPo]

Fancy Farm Sleepy Times In 3, 2…

Marshall County voters have chosen by a slim margin to allow alcohol sales for the first time since 1938. [H-L]

Sen. Bernie Sanders blasted Senate Republicans Wednesday for working to defund Planned Parenthood, calling it “an attack on women’s health.” [HuffPo]

When Gov. Steve Beshear replaced the Rev. Kevin Cosby on the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees last month, he did more than remove his only African-American appointment on the board. He also removed his only appointee who has not been a strong and steady contributor to Beshear’s political causes. Note: You’ll love seeing Terry Sebastian deliberately and purposefully lie to Tom Loftus. [C-J/AKN]

Could an excess of caution hurt Hillary Clinton? This query is coming to the fore again after she dodged a question on Tuesday over whether she supports or opposes building the Keystone XL Pipeline. It’s like watching the Grimes Campaign on a national stage. [The Hill]

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer says food stamp benefits can be used at an increasing number of farmers’ markets in the state. Which means ignorant people in, say, West Liberty are going to scream about how all benefits recipients ought to be drug tested. [WLKY]

Some Republicans gleefully scripted Donald Trump’s political obituary in the wake of his scathing comments about Sen. John McCain’s military service earlier this month, hoping that his freewheeling presidential campaign had finally imploded. [Reuters]

Republican Matt Bevin said Tuesday that if elected governor he would not immediately end the state’s expansion of eligibility for the federal-state Medicaid program, contrary to what he said for months. [Al Cross]

In the US, poverty, deprivation and exploitation draw thousands of its own children down into a dark underworld that offers few ways out. [BBC]

Rowan County argued it is “immune from suit” and that a recent federal lawsuit against the county and its clerk Kim Davis fails to find fault with the county government since Davis decided not to issue marriage licenses last month. [Ashland Independent]

Senator Rand Paul is invested in a fund that would skyrocket in value if the United States economy were to default. He’d also like your vote for president. [The Nation]

Christopher D. Steward, a former Barren County magistrate, was served with an arrest warrant early Thursday morning and charged with third-degree terroristic threatening, fourth-degree assault (minor injury) and menacing, according to documents released by the Barren County Sheriff’s Office. [Glasgow Daily Times]

It’s not easy being the DEA these days. After an unprecedented losing streak on Capitol Hill, the once-untouchable Drug Enforcement Administration suffered last week what might be considered the ultimate indignity: A Senate panel, for the first time, voted in favor of legal, recreational marijuana. [Higdon/Politico]

Convenient that this AP story doesn’t mention that people dressed up as Native Americans will chase you for a fee. Because Kentucky can’t do anything without a touch of racism, apparently. [H-L]

Seven in 10 homeowners who apply for help under the federal government’s signature mortgage aid program are rejected, according to a government report released Wednesday. The program, called the Home Affordable Modification Program, is meant to help homeowners who are at risk of foreclosure stay in their homes by reducing their monthly mortgage. [HuffPo]

UofL Messes Have Grown Since 2008

The University of Kentucky named longtime faculty member Lisa Cassis its vice president for research. [H-L]

The criminal justice system is “particularly skewed by race and by wealth,” President Barack Obama said on Tuesday in a speech at the NAACP Annual Convention in Philadelphia, citing a “long history of inequity in the criminal justice system in America.” [HuffPo]

Despite a consultant’s findings that University of Louisville President James Ramsey is paid above the market rate, the board of trustees’ compensation committee recommended Monday that he get a 6 percent merit pay increase and a bonus worth about $150,000. [C-J/AKN]

Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen urged lawmakers to tread lightly when it comes to overhauling the central bank, warning that proposed changes could undermine its ability to support the economy. [The Hill]

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway issued a press release Tuesday warning flood victims to be aware of potential price-gouging scams in areas affected by recent storms. [Ashland Independent]

A regional cap-and-trade program has added $1.3 billion in economic activity to nine New England and Mid-Atlantic states since 2011, while decreasing their carbon emissions by 15 percent, according to independent analysis released Tuesday. [ThinkProgress]

Will Russell sure is milking you-know-what out of his arrest in an attempt to gain publicity. [Glasgow Daily Times]

This sad Eastern Kentucky situation has made international news. Search teams in Kentucky are looking for six people missing after heavy floods that already killed two people. [BBC]

Rowan Fiscal Court hopes to cash in on state road and bridge funds before the end of the year. [The Morehead News]

The Supreme Court was definitive in its decision to legalize gay marriage nationwide, but what is far from clear is whether U.S. companies must offer corporate benefits to same-sex spouses. [Reuters]

Visitors to all five national parks in Kentucky can earn a special free commemorative patch in recognition of the National Park Service 2016 centennial. [WKYT]

Labor leaders said there was a clear understanding that no national unions would make an endorsement before July 30. But the American Federation of Teachers jumped the gun. [Politico]

It took only a few minutes for nearly everything James Martin owned to swirl away in a muddy torrent. [H-L]

For a while the Wisconsin governor, running for the GOP nomination for the presidency, has been engaging in his own version of dog-whistling to homophobes, as he and the GOP struggle with the reality that the base of their party is still in the Stone Age on LGBT rights, while most Americans support equality. [HuffPo]

Kim Davis: Come Outta Yer Hidey Hole!

Homophobic coward Kim Davis didn’t have the guts to show up in court yesterday. She hid out, tried to avoid being served, played the typical hate-filled victim role. [Deep Gay Thoughts]

Engaged couples in Rowan County will have to wait a little longer to get married. U.S. District Court Judge David Bunning will continue a hearing next week over Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis’ decision to stop issuing marriage licenses to anyone because of her personal objections to same-sex marriage. [H-L]

Police departments across the country that have spent years boasting about plummeting crime numbers are now scrambling to confront something many agencies have not seen in decades: more bloodshed. [HuffPo]

University of Louisville President James Ramsey last year was paid 2 ½ times more than the average of the Atlantic Coast Conference’s other 14 presidents and chancellors — all of whose universities are ranked far higher academically than U of L. [C-J/AKN]

Scores of Democrats are calling on President Obama to champion an expansion of Social Security benefits for millions of seniors nationwide. [The Hill]

Kentucky’s electricity generation landscape will look drastically different in the next five years, as coal-fired power plants retire or convert to natural gas. [WFPL]

U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton took swipes at Wall Street and her Republican rivals on Monday, promising to impose tougher regulations on banks and raise the wages of ordinary Americans if she wins the 2016 White House race. [Reuters]

The white church on the corner of Main Street and Prestonsburg Street here has officially returned. [Ashland Independent]

Climate change is threatening the survival of bumblebees, significantly reducing the habitats in which they can survive, researchers say. [BBC]

City commissioners agreed Monday night to continue working with the insurance company it has previously done business with, but one commissioner asked whether the city solicited bids for coverage. [Glasgow Daily Times]

When Chuck Rosenberg took the top job at the Drug Enforcement Administration two months ago, the longtime prosecutor had a reputation as “Mister Fix It.” [NPR]

Jimmy Hogg, Somerset budget director for the past 21 years, will be proposed as Richmond city manager at Tuesday’s city commission meeting. [Richmond Register]

Coming to Kentucky before you know it? Probably. Since Steve and Andy are tight with the payday loan sharks. [ThinkProgress]

Last spring, Marc H. Morial, the president of the National Urban League, found himself in a place he has come to know well over the years, across a desk from Sen. Mitch Mc-Connell, the majority leader, talking about public policy. [H-L]

Pope Francis left for Rome on Sunday at the end of a trip to South America during which he censured capitalism, championed the rights of the poor, warned of irreversible damage to the planet and urged youths to “make a mess.” [HuffPo]

Probably Not A Fun Time For Keith Hall

A jury convicted former state Rep. W. Keith Hall, D-Phelps, on Friday of bribing a state coal mine inspector to win favorable treatment for surface mines he owned in Pike County. [H-L]

Justice Antonin Scalia may have penned the most colorful dissent to Friday’s landmark Supreme Court ruling on marriage equality, but his colleague Clarence Thomas wrote the weirdest. [HuffPo]

Gov. Steve Beshear on Friday appointed two new members to the University of Louisville Board of Trustees, potentially tipping the balance of a board divided over the actions of the university’s foundation. [C-J/AKN]

Here we go again — Mitch McConnell is still trying to repeal health care reform. Republicans in Congress are moving toward a plan to use a special budgetary process to repeal ObamaCare, after the Supreme Court ruled for a second time to uphold the controversial law. [The Hill]

Despite challenging lower court rulings throwing out Kentucky’s ban on same sex marriage, Gov. Steve Beshear moved quickly to comply with Friday’s historic U.S. Supreme Court ruling invalidating such bans in all 50 states. [Ronnie Ellis]

Keith Hall made the international news. A former Kentucky state lawmaker was convicted on Friday of bribing a former mining inspector not to cite his coal mining companies for violations. [Reuters]

The Morehead Tourism Commission agreed Thursday to pay a Lexington architectural firm to develop a master plan for the old SunnyBrook golf course. [The Morehead News]

The Supreme Court on Friday ruled 5-4 that same-sex couples nationwide have the constitutional right to marry, splitting the 2016 candidates sharply along partisan lines. [Politico]

The Board of Trustees of the Pine Mountain Settlement School has announced the appointment — effective June 1 — of Geoff Marietta as executive director. He succeeds Miriam Pride who has been serving as interim executive director since spring of last year. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

A battle is brewing in Mississippi, as the growing animosity directed against Confederate symbols following the church shooting in Charleston has led to calls to remove the rebel pattern from the state’s flag. [BBC]

After the Supreme Court ruled all 50 states must allow same-sex marriages, Republican Matt Bevin used the decision to criticize Attorney General Jack Conway as the two men battle to be the next Kentucky governor. [WKYT]

People from around the country react to Friday’s Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage. [NPR]

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has admonished South Carolina, Texas and Kentucky for failing to provide enough money from tobacco tax revenue or tobacco prevention efforts. [H-L]

President Barack Obama delivered a stirring eulogy at the funeral for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney, a South Carolina state senator and pastor who was one of nine people shot and killed at Charleston’s Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church last week. [HuffPo]

Edelen To Sniff Around UofL Foundation

Yesterday, State Auditor of Public Accounts Adam Edelen announced that he will examine the University of Louisville Foundation.

Here’s his statement:

Auditor Adam Edelen on Thursday announced his office would conduct an examination into the governance and oversight of the University of Louisville Foundation, an organization that manages the school’s $1.1 billion endowment.

The Auditor’s office also will examine the existing governance structure of the University of Louisville Board of Trustees, and the actions of the Foundation.

“The importance of the University of Louisville in regards to education and workforce development cannot be overstated,” Auditor Edelen said. “Dr. Ramsey has presided over a period of significant growth and achievement. I have heard from dozens of business and community leaders who believe that a review by my office will be a constructive exercise, resulting in easing tensions and a fact-based path for moving forward.”

The University of Louisville Foundation is a not-for-profit organization that holds, invests and allocates donations for the University. It is directed by a 15-member board of directors, the majority of whom are not members of the University’s Board of Trustees.

Under state law, University trustees are required to oversee the compensation of the school’s president, faculty and staff. The Foundation independently awarded compensation packages to the University president and other top officials during the 2012-13 fiscal year. The University itself has begun a Foundation board level review of those deferred compensation awards.

“The Foundation is critically important to the University, but it must be fully transparent,” Auditor Edelen said. “In addition, the Board of Trustees must have primacy in its governance and oversight roles in relation to University activities funded by the Foundation.”

Given the dramatic growth of the University and enhanced academic reputation in recent years, Auditor Edelen said it is important the review be conducted to ensure the Board of Trustees is in a position to meet its statutory and fiduciary obligations as the governing body of the institution.

Auditor Edelen said the process represents a significant undertaking by his office, and he expects it will take months to complete.

“We anticipate full cooperation from the boards of the University and its Foundation, as well as the University administration,” Auditor Edelen said. “At the end of the day, the number one priority for both organizations is to do what is best for the University and greater community of Louisville. I’m optimistic that a review by my office will provide a constructive, fact-based path for moving forward.”

What Edelen’s office didn’t clear up is concern about a potential conflict of interest. That being that he was at one point invited to become a member of that very foundation’s board of directors.

While that doesn’t mean there’s a real conflict, the appearance is pretty high and it’s something he should clear up to avoid any unease or confusion as foundation members keep talking about it. If only because the people who work so hard within the APA don’t have to deal with questions.

Also — it’s about dang time! The UofL Foundation has been a monster for a long time. This milquetoast review will finally open the doors a bit so the public can peek inside.