Homophobia Harms Kentucky’s Economy

Could adding small units on lots with houses solve Lexington’s infill woes? Hell yes. Absolutely. Make tiny houses a thing! Even if they’re just accessory dwelling units. Get with the times, Kentucky. [H-L]

When the 10 members of Donald Trump’s Presidential Advisory Commission On Election Integrity met each other for the first time during a June 28 conference call, Mike Pence and Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach (R), the panel’s leaders, made it clear they wanted the committee’s work to be unbiased. [HuffPo]

Bigots like Matt Bevin and Jeff Hoover need to get it through their gay-panicked heads that economic disasters like this will continue to occur as long as they push homophobia as their official platform. The Omni Louisville Hotel would have hosted the two conventions that reportedly pulled out of negotiations as a result of California’s state-funded travel ban, the company’s general manager said Saturday. [C-J/AKN]

The number of opioid prescriptions written in the United States has declined in recent years, according to newly released federal data, but the number of people who have fallen victim to fatal overdoses from prescription painkillers or heroin continues to rise. [The Hill]

Facebook users searching for the City of Ashland’s page won’t be able to find it, and the account will likely remain dormant until after a public information officer is hired. [Ashland Independent]

The U.S. Department of Energy said on Friday it is helping U.S. firms defend against a hacking campaign that targeted power companies including at least one nuclear plant, saying the attacks have not impacted electricity generation or the grid. [Reuters]

As a young boy, Alan Barnett’s parents gave him a metal detector. A toy, really. It beeped on anything from gum wrappers to pennies. One day as he was walking past a baseball field near his home, he saw a man with a metal detector, digging in the ground. [Richmond Register]

As Republicans in Congress work to roll back the Affordable Care Act, they and some states are proposing major changes to the Medicaid program. Researchers say these changes would cost millions their health coverage. [ProPublica]

Kelly McKinney, 29, of Glasgow, held a megaphone on the public sidewalk in front of the Barren River Plaza shopping center midday on Thursday and chanted along with a group of area residents. [Glasgow Daily Times]

After a prolonged recovery that culminated in two years of record sales, the American auto industry is slowing down, with fewer buyers in dealer showrooms and fewer workers on the factory floor. [NY Times]

Warren County has been selected to receive $46,857 in federal funds through the Department of Homeland Security/Federal Emergency Management Agency under the Emergency Food and Shelter National Board Program to supplement emergency food and shelter programs in the county. [BGDN]

Iraq’s prime minister showed up Sunday in the city of Mosul to declare victory in the nine-month battle for control of the Islamic State’s former capital in Iraq, signaling the near-end of the most grueling campaign against the extremist group to date and dealing a near-fatal blow to the survival of its self-declared caliphate. [WaPo]

The head of Duke University’s physician practice plan will take over the University of Kentucky’s sprawling billion-dollar health enterprise, officials announced Friday morning. [H-L]

The final statement from Group of 20 leaders on Saturday exposed a divide between the United States and other G20 members on the Paris accord aimed at combating climate change. [HuffPo]

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Everything Bevin Touches Turns To Trash

Leave it to Matt Bevin to make stupid economic mistake after stupid economic mistake. Capital Plaza redevelopment is about to throw a 385,500-square-foot wrench into one of Franklin County’s biggest industries — office space. [H-L]

While serving as a top campaign aide to Donald Trump, former national security adviser Michael Flynn made tens of thousands of dollars on the side advising a company that sold surveillance technology that repressive governments used to monitor activists and journalists. [HuffPo]

Jefferson District Court judges too often allow cases to be delayed without good reason, creating unnecessary courthouse trips for witnesses, victims and defendants, according to a study of the busiest court in the state. [C-J/AKN]

U.S. immigration authorities have arrested and moved to deport 199 Iraqi immigrants, mostly from the Detroit area, in the last three weeks after Iraq agreed to accept deportees as part of a deal removing it from President Donald Trump’s travel ban, officials said on Wednesday. [Reuters]

Months after the Estill County Jail was forced to close due to safety issues, Jailer Bo Morris says everything is “about the same.” To his knowledge, there have been no moves to reopen the facility, however, he said the jail is getting a new transport van to haul prisoners to and from outside detention facilities holding its inmates. [Richmond Register]

Before he was named Trump’s health secretary, Price took a congressional trip to Australia and pressed officials to extend protections for drug companies in an international trade agreement. [ProPublica]

The City of Ashland may hire a spokesperson to answer citizen concerns more efficiently and handle its website and social media accounts. [Ashland Independent]

Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller is investigating the finances and business dealings of Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law and adviser, as part of the probe into Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential election, according to officials familiar with the matter. [WaPo]

There sure are some fascinating things happening in Morehead, according to its messy mayor. [The Morehead News]

Watergate prosecutors had evidence that operatives for then-President Richard Nixon planned an assault on anti-war demonstrators in 1972, including potentially physically attacking Vietnam whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg, according to a never-before-published memo obtained by NBC News. [NBC News]

The average cost of a four-year degree in Kentucky will be more than $39,000 this fall after state regulators approved tuition increases at most of the state’s public universities. All but two schools asked for the maximum increase allowed by the Council on Postsecondary Education. The University of Louisville did not raise tuition, and Kentucky State University’s board of trustees has not had a meeting yet to ask for an increase. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Sensitive personal details relating to almost 200 million US citizens have been accidentally exposed by a marketing firm contracted by the Republican National Committee. [BBC]

The University of Kentucky Board of Trustees voted Friday to approve a land swap with a private developer that could potentially create two new mixed-use developments and give UK a key block of land near its campus. [H-L]

The insurance industry’s annual confab last week was supposed to be a dry, stoic affair. [HuffPo]

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Bevin In Charge = $113 Million Shortfall

A federal appeals court has reinstated a claim for damages against Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis for refusing to grant marriage licenses to same-sex couples during the summer of 2015. [John Cheves]

In late August 2014, Tom Frieden, then director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, traveled to West Africa to assess the raging Ebola crisis. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin is so terrible at leadership that Kentucky’s going under again. Kentucky’s budget director is predicting the state will suffer a $113 million revenue shortfall when the state’s fiscal year ends June 30. [C-J/AKN]

The burden of substance abuse disorders can fall heavily on the families and friends of those who battle addictions. But society also pays a great deal through increased crime. Treatment programs can reduce those costs. [NY Times]

Surprise! The fat, old, white racists of the Bowling Green Daily News are still panicking over President Barack Obama and are trying to suggest he’s still gonna take yer guns. It’s this special brand of stupid that keeps Kentucky in the dark ages. [BGDN]

Trump on Tuesday called for a “good shutdown” in September to fix the “mess” in government. [The Hill]

Mary Beth Burkes lives in Buchanan County, Va., a depressed coal-mining region where 1 in 4 families lives in poverty and where her autistic son gets extra help in the after-school program at his school. [WFPL]

A pro-Donald Trump biker gang’s physical handling of protesters at a weekend rally could add to the president’s legal woes, with one attendee considering a fresh lawsuit as protesters already suing over violence at rallies last year plan to cite the recent events as proof of an ongoing pattern. A federal judge late last month ruled that Trump’s calls of “get ’em out of here!” may have constituted “incitement to riot” at a March 2016 rally in Louisville, Kentucky, at which three protesters allege in a lawsuit they were assaulted by Trump supporters. [Politico]

The sequel to a successful spy film will focus heavily on bourbon distilling, and Louisville-based Brown-Forman Corp. is taking advantage of the exposure. [Business First]

A Texas police department has changed a key detail in the shooting of an unarmed black teenager, amid mounting calls for the officer to be arrested. [BBC]

The University of Kentucky announced on Monday afternoon that Commonwealth Stadium will become Kroger Field. [WKYT]

African-Americans are generally living longer than in 2000, but health disparities mean they are still more likely to die at a younger age on average than whites, a federal study showed on Tuesday. [Reuters]

A federal judge has ruled that Lexington cannot enforce a recently passed ordinance that restricts where advertising and other unsolicited printed materials can be delivered. [H-L]

Sebastian Gorka, a deputy assistant to President Donald Trump who generated controversy for his alleged ties to a Nazi-aligned group, is expected to accept a new role soon outside of the White House, according to multiple reports. [HuffPo]

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We’re Not Even 100 Days In Yet…

The University of Kentucky has received $11.2 million from the National Institutes of Health to finance a new center that studies the links between obesity and cancer. [Linda Blackford]

Whiny little Mitch, indeed. Kentuckians have known this for years but it’s fun to watch the rest of the world find out just what a butthurt little baby these people are. [HuffPo]

A researcher at the University of Louisville is stepping up her study into whether coal ash from power plants may be making children in Louisville sick with a new study backed by federal research dollars. [C-J/AKN]

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau announced Monday that it filed a lawsuit against Weltman, Weinberg & Reis, accusing the debt collection firm of falsely representing in millions of collection letters that attorneys were involved in collection for overdue accounts. The firm collects on overdue credit card, installment loans, mortgage loans, and student loans debt nationwide, but only files lawsuit in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, New Jersey, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. [Consumerist]

At 8:36 p.m. Monday night, Glasgow Police Chief Guy Howie released information on the woman who was found dead Monday morning on the rooftop of a building located on the west side of Glasgow’s public square. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Lost amid the uproar over the Trump administration’s crackdown on undocumented immigrants is a change coming to the legal immigration system that’s expected to be costly for both U.S. companies and the government itself. [ProPublica]

New preschool and vocational school buildings are at the top of a construction priority list the Boyd County Board of Education is expected to adopt Wednesday. [Ashland Independent]

Donald Trump has congratulated Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on his victory in Sunday’s referendum that gave him sweeping new powers. The US president’s phone call contrasts with European concern that the result – 51.4% in favour of the changes – has exposed deep splits in Turkish society. [BBC]

With a meeting on his proposal for a new, comprehensive approach to the drug epidemic only a week away, Madison Judge/Executive Reagan Taylor got the opportunity to present his ideas directly to U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell as he met Monday with local leaders. [Richmond Register]

If this doesn’t scare the crap out of you, nothing will. How does the surge in drug overdoses compare with other causes of death in the U.S.? [NY Times]

In the first project of its kind, a Kentucky coal company is partnering with a global renewable energy giant to explore putting a major solar installation on a former mountaintop removal coal mine. [WFPL]

Racism motivated Trump voters more than authoritarianism. Which surprises absolutely no one who isn’t in denial. [WaPo]

Knox County and Barbourville Independent schools were closed Tuesday after a threat was called in Monday night to a West Coast police agency, according to a statement from the school system. [H-L]

Donald Trump, like most New Republican Nazis, doesn’t actually know who is running North Korea. [HuffPo]

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If Beshear Had Behaved Like Bevin? He’d Have Been Pelted With Stones When In Public

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Matt Bevin this week named two men to vacant judgeships in Central Kentucky, one on the state’s Court of Appeals and the other in Fayette Circuit Court. [John Cheves]

Last June, John Mattes started noticing something coursing like a virus through the Facebook page he helped administer for Bernie Sanders fans in San Diego. People with no apparent ties to California were friending the page and sharing links from unfamiliar sites full of anti-Hillary Clinton propaganda. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin is a garbage person. A truly wretched individual who, like Donald Trump, believes he’s some gift from g-d. Garbage. His poor children will have to deal with his taint for the rest of their lives. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump is a compassionate, intelligent human being, eh? On what fucking planet? This is the person people like Scott Jennings, Andy Barr and Matt Bevin trust to make health care decisions. [New Yorker]

Jeff Hoover is still lying about Amazon’s decision to locate a facility in Kentucky. Trying to use right-to-work legislation as an excuse. If he’s not freaking about transgender kids trying to use the restroom in peace, he’s pushing what he knows to be bullshit. Rather than clean up Greg Stumbo’s messes? He’s creating messes of his own. He’ll end up with a legacy just as tainted. [Richmond Register]

Federal investigators and computer scientists continue to examine whether there was a computer server connection between the Trump Organization and a Russian bank, sources close to the investigation tell CNN. [CNN]

A fired Ashland police officer has appealed the city’s decision in Boyd County Circuit Court. [Ashland Independent]

Texas lawmakers drew up three U.S. congressional districts to undermine the influence of Hispanic voters, a divided panel of three federal judges ruled, in the latest development in a years-long battle over gerrymandering. [Reuters]

This kind of crap is going to continue to happen and we’re going to continue clogging our jails until marijuana is legalized and taxed. The discovery of about 10 pounds of marijuana worth an estimated $64,000 led to the arrest of a Glasgow man Thursday. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The president’s semi-public Florida retreat doesn’t follow the same strict background check protocol as the White House, creating an espionage risk. [Politico]

Long-term interim dean of the University of Louisville’s Brandeis School of Law will not get the permanent job, according to school officials. [Business First]

Trump said he made $21 million in income from his New York contracts. He actually made a lot less. [ProPublica]

The single “preferred” candidate for the University of Kentucky’s diversity chief has accepted the job, UK President Eli Capilouto announced Thursday. [Linda Blackford]

Remember when Scott Jennings had to appear before congress and pleaded the fifth re: the U.S. Attorneys/private email server funtimes in the Bush Misadministration? Preet Bharara, the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, and one of the most high profile federal prosecutors in the country, says he’s been fired after refusing to resign his post. [HuffPo]

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Ready For Actual Authoritarianism? Hold On To Your Wigs, Kentucky. You’re About To Reap What You’ve Sowed.

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Lexington Mayor Jim Gray asked for the community’s help in solving violent crimes and issued a plea for more mentors for youth in his seventh state of the city address on Tuesday. [H-L]

“When you see the full of extent of this,” he continued, “it’s clearly a very troubling situation. And I think in other countries, from what I understand, if this stuff would have come out, I think they probably would have redone the election. We don’t really have something necessarily in our laws to really look at it the same way given what’s out there. But the fact that [Donald Trump] has so flippantly dismissed the intelligence community — you know I’ve read this, and he’s seen the same thing I’ve seen, and he’s being disingenuous in his response.” [HuffPo]

Uh, Marilyn Parker is borderline mentally disabled. To be criticizing anyone for supporting women just proves how stupid she is. And if you’ve ever interacted with her in-person, you know what I’m saying. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump is expected to sign several executive orders on Wednesday restricting immigration from Syria and six other Middle Eastern or African countries, according to several congressional aides and immigration experts briefed on the matter. [Reuters]

Six months into the current fiscal year, Boyd County is on pace to stay under budget. County departments have spent about 48 percent of their allowances, according to a report filed by Boyd County Treasurer Patricia Ball. Overall, the county is operating on a $19.6 million budget. [Ashland Independent]

At a news conference last week, now-President Donald Trump said he and his daughter, Ivanka, had signed paperwork relinquishing control of all Trump-branded companies. Next to him were stacks of papers in manila envelopes — documents he said transferred “complete and total control” of his businesses to his two sons and another longtime employee. [ProPublica]

A recent report from the Centers for Disease Control offers a stark example of the declining power of medicine’s most important weapons against infectious disease. The CDC noted that a patient who died at a Nevada hospital last year had an infection that was resistant to 26 different antibiotic treatments. That’s essentially the entire antibiotic arsenal doctors had. [WFPL]

On Saturday, President Trump stood in front of the CIA’s Memorial Wall and gave a speech that said more about himself than those the wall commemorated, or the agency they served. [The Atlantic]

A Kentucky judge has sided with the state’s flagship university in an open-records dispute involving a student newspaper’s dogged pursuit of documents it wants to review in a sexual harassment investigation of a former professor. [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump holds the most powerful office in the world. But he’s dogged by insecurity over his loss of the popular vote in the election and a persistent frustration that the legitimacy of his presidency is being challenged by Democrats and the media, aides and associates say. [Associated Press]

Morehead resident Doug Morgan has been appointed vice-chairman of the Kentucky Land and Water Conservation Fund board. [The Morehead News]

I was at Trump’s inauguration. It was tiny. If it wasn’t for the thousands of protestors, the day would’ve had no life at all. [The Nation]

A proposed expansion to the Central Kentucky Landfill may have hit a snag. Joe Kane, director of the Georgetown-Scott County Planning Commission, sent a letter to officials at Waste Services of the Bluegrass last week stating that the Central Kentucky Landfill will need to be rezoned for a proposed expansion. [H-L]

Multiple federal agencies have told their employees to cease communications with members of Congress and the press, sources have told The Huffington Post. [HuffPo]

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Kentuckians Are Ignorant, Not Divided

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The threats started on Sept. 7, exactly one day after a grand jury indicted her alleged rapist. [H-L]

Jason Chaffetz, the Utah Republican who chairs the House Oversight and Government Reform committee, told reporters last week that a government ethics official who had criticized President-elect Donald Trump’s plan to deal with his potential conflicts of interest refused to meet with him. [HuffPo]

Way to go, Kentucky, for hating your waterways and the health of your environment and your citizenry. You can thank your ignorant governor. Kentucky’s environmental protection cabinet on Wednesday announced that it had joined other states in suing to overturn an Obama administration rule aimed at protecting streams from mining activities. [C-J/AKN]

Russia’s top diplomat on Tuesday said Moscow was looking forward to cooperating with the incoming administration of President-elect Donald Trump in the war on terrorism and bringing peace to Syria, and took a shot at the Obama administration for what he called “double standards.” [WaPo]

Don’t miss Scott Jennings’ latest rant about President Barack Obama. It’s laced with transphobia, borderline racism and filled with deliberate misinformation. Pay attention to this Mike Huckabee-wannabe because he’s the current brain trust of the Republican Party of Kentucky and it’s gonna get hilarious, to say the least. [Page One]

In one of his final acts in office, President Barack Obama granted clemency to 209 federal prisoners on Tuesday, almost all of whom were convicted of drug crimes. [HuffPo]

The WKU Board of Regents has selected Dr. Timothy Caboni, vice chancellor for public affairs at the University of Kansas, as the preferred candidate to be the 10th president of Western Kentucky University. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The hedge funds and insurance companies that want financially strapped Puerto Rico to pay them back in full may have found a new ally: Donald Trump’s former campaign manager, Corey Lewandowski. [ProPublica]

Kentuckians aren’t deeply divided over the ACA, they’re deeply ignorant. When half the people don’t realize the ACA and “Obamacare” are the same thing? That’s the problem. [Ronnie Ellis]

From the Department of Things Scott Jennings Is Too Pent Up To Comprehend… President Barack Obama said on Wednesday that former military intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning had served a tough prison term and his decision to commute her 35-year sentence to about seven years served would not signal leniency toward leakers of U.S. government secrets. [Reuters]

This should come as a surprise to absolutely no one because it’s not exactly a secret. Kentucky’s Energy and Environment Cabinet has finalized a controversial plan to let the state’s utilities virtually self-regulate the storing of hazardous coal ash near power plants. [WFPL]

News anchor Ben Swann aired a six-minute “investigation” into Pizzagate in America’s ninth-largest TV market on Tuesday night. Remember when this buttcramp was in Cincinnasti? [TDB]

Mitch McConnell meets ordinary folks as he grocery shops in Louisville’s Highlands neighborhood. They talk to him about their disdain for Obamacare. So how does he tell them things will get better? [H-L]

Tom Price (R-Ga.), President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee to head the Department of Health and Human Services, admitted on Wednesday that he decided to buy stock in an Australian biotech firm after receiving information from Rep. Chris Collins (R-N.Y.), a board member of that company. [HuffPo]

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