Ugh, We Can’t Even With This Today

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Jack Daniel’s continued to bring the heat for Brown-Forman in the first quarter. Sales were up 7 percent but gains were overshadowed by the impact of unfavorable foreign exchange rates, leading to an overall drop of 2 percent, to $900 million, compared to the previous year, Brown-Forman reported Wednesday morning. [H-L]

You won’t feel well after you read this. Not in the least. [HuffPo]

Can a high-fat diet lead to breast cancer in obese women? University of Kentucky researchers hope to help answer that question by studying the mechanisms behind the link between obesity and breast cancer. One of those researchers, Fredrick Onono, recently received a $750,000 grant from the National Cancer Institute for the work. [C-J/AKN]

As the U.S. government’s budget deficit has declined, so has anxiety about it in Congress and on the presidential campaign trail, but one family and the Washington “deficit hawk” community it bankrolls are unfazed. [Reuters]

What organizers believe will be the largest-ever gathering of Appalachian writers will take place Sept. 9-10 at Berea College. The Appalachian Symposium will include two days of public conversations focusing on the state of the region’s literature and will feature keynote addresses by famed feminist author and activist bell hooks as well as Pulitzer Prize finalist Maurice Manning. [Richmond Register]

Shortly before Attorney General Eric Holder announced his resignation last September, he told an interviewer: “Any attorney general who is not an activist is not doing his or her job.” One of Holder’s more activist initiatives received attention last week when The New York Times highlighted how Holder’s Justice Department began the novel practice of filing arguments in state and county courts. [ProPublica]

Two inebriated men were injured after being struck in the head by a hatchet-wielding man from Lexington around midnight Saturday in Central Park, according to the Ashland Police Department. [Ashland Independent]

People of all ages — not just the elderly — are more at risk of death and emergency room visits as the earth warms, a recent study has found. [ThinkProgress]

An opinion in writing from Glasgow’s city attorney affirmed the Glasgow Management Control Board’s interpretation of documents that say the director of the city’s 911 dispatch center has supervision, control and disciplinary authority over all the center’s employees – even the ones whose salaries and benefits are provided by a different agency. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Stock prices took another beating Tuesday, with all major stock measures falling. Two closely followed market indicators, the Dow Jones industrial average and the S&P 500, each fell roughly 1.3 percent, despite opening the day with big gains.

An Eastern Kentucky resident says he’ll sue the state and federal government next month over coal mining permits he says were illegally issued. [WFPL]

US scientists have identified the chemicals responsible for the mosquito-repelling activity of sweetgrass, a plant traditionally used by some Native Americans to fend off the bugs. [BBC]

Let’s just say it: Jean-Marie is dumb as hell. State Rep. Ryan Quarles, the Republican nominee for state agriculture commissioner, alleged Thursday that the father of his Democratic opponent, Jean-Marie Lawson Spann, has texted answers to her during their debates and forums. [H-L]

Andy Parker, the father of slain WDBJ journalist Alison Parker, is demanding that politicians restrict access to firearms, saying he will personally become a crusader for this issue if need be. [HuffPo]

No Puppies & Rainbows Here Today

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The Kentucky Kernel, the University of Kentucky’s independent campus newspaper, announced Monday that it will cut production of the print newspaper from five days a week to two in an effort to put more emphasis on its online products. [H-L]

This is just… sick. Two beloved Virginia journalists were shot and killed Wednesday morning when a gunman opened fire in a shocking moment caught on live television. [HuffPo]

A wildlife research organization that studies the expanding range of cougars in North America has come to a different conclusion from the one offered by state authorities on how an ill-fated mountain lion made its way into Kentucky. [C-J/AKN]

Here’s a real ruh ro moment for a few legislators… The chief executive of Rentboy.com and six employees running the website were arrested Tuesday and charged with promoting prostitution under the federal Travel Act. [The Hill]

The high fence surrounding a Purdue University research farm here was installed to keep out pesky deer, but this summer it served a second purpose: Keeping federal drug agents at bay. The research farm, 10 miles south of Purdue’s West Lafayette campus, is home to the first legally grown industrial hemp crop in Indiana in decades. [News & Tribune]

Often maligned for speaking too frankly, Vice President Joe Biden’s reputation for shooting from the lip might be one of his biggest weapons if he does decide to run against Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. [Reuters]

Three Kentuckians made Modern Healthcare’s “100 Most Influential People in Healthcare” list. [Business First]

Across the country, those who support abortion rights and those who oppose them are feuding in court over how much information should be disclosed about women undergoing abortions. Supporters say there’s no margin for error. Opponents say it’s about ensuring quality care. [ProPublica]

House Speaker Greg Stumbo will propose a constitutional amendment that would allow as many as seven casinos to open in Kentucky, with tax revenue from the businesses dedicated to public education, boosting the racing industry and shoring up the state’s ailing retirement system. [WFPL]

By 2050, an area of forests the size of India is set to be wiped off the planet if humans continue on their current path of deforestation, according to a new report. That’s bad news for the creatures that depend on these forest ecosystems for survival, but it’s also bad news for the climate, as the loss of these forests will release more than 100 gigatons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. [ThinkProgress]

Only the Madison County School Board and the fiscal court as well as the cities of Richmond and Berea, have not set property tax rates for 2015. [Richmond Register]

NPR’S Audie Cornish talks to Megan Greene, managing director and chief economist at Manulife, about how the interest rate hike will affect mortgages, auto and student loans, and consumer behavior. [NPR]

Visitors entering the Georgetown Police Department’s new $5 million headquarters on Bourbon Street might notice two details. [H-L]

White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest renewed the Obama administration’s call for Congress to take action on gun control after a gunman shot and killed a reporter and cameraman during a live television broadcast on Wednesday. [HuffPo]

JCPS Set Great Example For Rest Of KY

It wasn’t that long ago that U.S. Sen. Rand Paul declared that he had to win the early-voting state of New Hampshire to gain the momentum that would carry him to the Republican presidential nomination. [H-L]

Cat Kim, a recent graduate from Columbia Law School, had two missions this summer. One was studying for and taking the California bar exam. The other was preparing cases for immigrant women and children in Texas detention centers who, without the help of people like her, could be deported. [HuffPo]

Applause went up in the room Monday evening when the Jefferson County Board of Education approved expanding the policies of Kentucky’s largest school district to specifically protect students and employees regardless of gender expression and gender identity. [C-J/AKN]

Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump blasted hedge fund managers on Sunday as mere “paper pushers” who he said were “getting away with murder” by not paying their fair share of taxes. [Reuters]

Big Blue fans of the University of Kentucky athletic teams had things to talk about besides asking “How about them ‘Cats?” Monday morning. [Ronnie Ellis]

The tip came in at about 7 p.m. on Monday, July 27. It was an email from a woman named Patricia Cronan, a banker who lived next door to a group home in Long Beach, California. She said the home, run by a nonprofit called Bayfront Youth & Family Services, seemed to be in a perpetual state of chaos. [ProPublica]

Rand Paul, even with the Kentucky GOP Executive Committee approving a March U.S. presidential caucus Saturday, maintained today that the U.S. Constitution provides him a way to run both for the presidency and a Kentucky Senate seat. [BGDN]

Earlier this year, social work student Coraly León arrived at her research assistant job at the University of Puerto Rico to find her salary abruptly cut in half due to budget cuts. [ThinkProgress]

Glasgow City Council took the final step at its regular meeting Monday evening in the selection of the city’s next police chief. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Confusion over the types of coal being burned in Chinese power stations has caused a significant overestimation of the country’s carbon emissions. [BBC]

Evarts City Council decided not to raise taxes saying “residents are struggling with a downturn in the economy and now is not the time to add to their burden.” [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Same-sex married couples who were living in states that did not recognize their unions and who previously filed claims for Social Security benefits will be able to collect those payments, the government said on Thursday. [NY Times]

The University of Kentucky is opening its first office devoted full-time to the concerns of the LGBTQ community on campus. Created by UK’s Office of Institutional Diversity, the Office of LGBTQ Resources is aimed at creating a more inclusive environment for UK’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer population. [H-L]

The issue is far from over, but a new report found that hunger in America has at least dropped below pre-recession levels. [HuffPo]

There’s A Literal Stink In Bullitt County

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A group of University of Kentucky trustees upheld the proposed revocation of a longtime surgeon’s clinical privileges Monday but modified the decision to allow him access to campus as a tenured professor. [H-L]

Fast-food workers who are hoping to raise the minimum wage will find an ally in the Obama White House this week, with Labor Secretary Tom Perez traveling to Detroit on Tuesday to show his solidarity with the so-called Fight for $15. [HuffPo]

The owner of a failed private wastewater treatment plant that serves more than 700 homes in Bullitt County filed papers late Friday to walk away from the system that’s caused raw sewage to flow into a tributary of popular Floyds Fork for 17 months since a massive tank breakdown. [C-J/AKN]

A U.S. appeals court said the Federal Trade Commission has authority to regulate corporate cybersecurity, and may pursue a lawsuit accusing hotel operator Wyndham Worldwide Corp of failing to properly safeguard consumers’ information. [Reuters]

Berea Mayor Steve Connelly called for changes in city personnel policy after several police officers questioned the fairness of recent salary increases. At the Berea City Council meeting Tuesday, Connelly proposed revising the procedure for employee evaluation and awarding raises. [Richmond Register]

It’s now or never for New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. That appears to be the view of his wealthy super-PAC backers, who are spending fast and hard to keep Christie in contention for the Republican presidential nomination. [The Hill]

A company offered a proposal to Barren County Fiscal Court on Tuesday to allow it to do a free evaluation of the county’s energy efficiency. [Glasgow Daily Times]

There’s an old saying in journalism that there are no new stories, everything’s been done before, ProPublica’s Joe Sexton says. But when he came across “The Outlaw Ocean,” investigative reporter Ian Urbina’s latest series for The New York Times, he couldn’t help but be “genuinely jealous” of the intriguing, outrageous world he uncovered. [ProPublica]

An Ashland man who until recently lived in Medellin, Colombia, is among defendants accused of selling millions of dollars worth of untaxed cigarettes from a Russell storefront. David White, who is free on bond and living with a friend in Ashland pending his January trial date, posted information about his arrest and alleged part in the cigarette scheme on Facebook and spoke on Friday to a reporter from The Independent. [Ashland Independent]

Scientists in the US have found a way to take carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air and make carbon nanofibres, a valuable manufacturing material. [BBC]

Rowan Fiscal Court agreed Tuesday to an inter-local agreement with the City of Morehead to form a city-county recreation commission. [The Morehead News]

After her two leading rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination became targets of the Black Lives Matter movement, Hillary Clinton came armed with policy arguments when she met with members of the African-American activist group last week. [Mother Jones]

Mathieux Saint Fleur has been virtually blind for two decades. In less than 24 hours, he will see again. [H-L]

Students in America’s schools are much, much poorer than they were nine years ago. In 2006, 31 percent of America’s students attended schools in “high-poverty” districts, meaning that 20 percent or more of the district’s students lived below the federal poverty line. [HuffPo]

Campaign Craziness Kicks Into Gear

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Even while fighting blindness in the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere this week, Republican presidential contender Rand Paul intensified political attacks against rivals in both parties, vowing to continue pressing billionaire businessman Donald Trump in particular as the Kentucky senator embraces the role as the GOP’s leading pit bull. [H-L]

Republican presidential hopeful Jeb Bush said Tuesday that the government should have broad surveillance powers of Americans and private technology firms should cooperate better with intelligence agencies to help combat “evildoers.” [HuffPo]

In a high-profile report issued in 2010, then-state Auditor Crit Luallen rebuked Passport Health Plan for wasteful spending of Medicaid funds on things like lobbying, travel, public relations, donations and sponsorships. But in May of this year, Passport made a $25,000 contribution to the Democratic Governors Association, an organization which already this year has given $600,000 to a Democratic super PAC supporting the election of Attorney General Jack Conway as governor. [C-J/AKN]

Hanni Fakhoury, a senior staff counsel with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, said courts have not yet settled the question of how specific or broad email search warrants should be, and this case is one of the most prominent illustrations of how users can fight back. [Mother Jones]

Seems like only yesterday Jack Conway and his people were touting a study indicating that testing welfare recipients was a waste of time and resources. Attorney General Jack Conway says he supports drug testing some welfare recipients in Kentucky, echoing the position of his Republican opponent. [WFPL]

Amid the horrors of war in Syria, Yemen and Iraq, it’s become easy to overlook Afghanistan. Remember Afghanistan? Back in the mid-2000s, it was known as the “forgotten war,” eclipsed by the bloodshed in Iraq. Now it’s overshadowed all over again. But there’s plenty of reason to pay attention. [NPR]

Two same-sex couples in this small eastern Kentucky county got everything they wanted in a ruling from a federal judge Monday, except for one sentence. [Ashland Independent]

Climate change is increasing the risk of severe ‘food shocks’ where crops fail and prices of staples rise rapidly around the world. [BBC]

Of course the racist rednecks are coming out of the woodwork at the state fair. [WAVE3]

Donald Trump’s immigration plan is huge in every aspect — including its price tag. Think $166 billion. And that’s on the low end. [Politico]

Just weeks after a Kentucky man gained national attention for shooting down a drone in his backyard, a state lawmaker is proposing new legislation. [WDRB]

As concerns rise about a security menace posed by rogue drone flights, U.S. government agencies are working with state and local police forces to develop high-tech systems to protect vulnerable sites, according to sources familiar with the matter. [Reuters]

Lyman T. Johnson was a grandson of slaves who grew up in the deeply segregated community of Columbia, Tenn. One day, his father, the principal of the segregated black school, sent him on an errand to the white school, where Johnson saw for the first time the truth of Jim Crow laws that created separate and unequal facilities. [H-L]

A year ago, after 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, police responded to even peaceful daytime protests in the St. Louis suburb by deploying attack dogs and tactical vehicles, pointing sniper rifles at peaceful protesters, arresting people for simply standing still on public sidewalks, flooding demonstrators with tear gas — often without warning — and shooting them with bean bags, wooden pellets and balls filled with pepper spray. [HuffPo]

Kentucky Bigots Flying Hate Flag High

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This summer, Zachary Schwarzkopf spent five weeks at Morehead State University in the prestigious Governor’s Scholars Program. In addition to enrichment classes in civics, economics and leadership, the program provides a huge perk: a $40,000 Presidential Scholarship to the University of Kentucky, provided you have a 28 ACT score and a grade-point average of 3.3. [H-L]

Famed neurosurgeon Ben Carson says that most medical research can be conducted without using fetal tissue, which has been in the news recently after a series of secretly taped but edited videos showed Planned Parenthood officials discussing how to legally provide aborted tissue to researchers. [HuffPo]

Pushing a toxic mixture of natural gas liquids through an aging pipeline near Mammoth Cave National Park threatens the world-famous cave’s unique and fragile ecological systems, the National Park Service is warning. [C-J/AKN]

Way to go, Kentucky bigots, way to go. Betsy Layne High School in rural Kentucky this year had a two-page yearbook spread that featured all of the seniors on the boys basketball team. Except, one senior was left out of the tribute: Dalton Maldonado, the team’s starting point guard who came out publicly as gay a couple months ago. [Out Sports]

The stupid is still thick with Kim Davis. She employs Nathan Davis just like her mother employed her — nepotism runs in the family. A Kentucky clerk’s office turned away a gay couple seeking a marriage license on Thursday, defying a federal judge’s order that dismissed her argument involving religious freedom. [AP]

On July 24, Turkey launched a massive military campaign that included sweeping attacks against Kurdish forces as well as minor strikes on Islamic State positions south of its border. Just five days later, the Turkish government inked a contract to hire a team of prominent lobbyists to add to its already formidable army of influence peddlers in Washington. [The Intercept]

A classic Barry Manilow song inspired state employees to dig deep for the kickoff of the Kentucky Employees Charitable Campaign Tuesday. [WHAS11]

In a new partnership with Yelp, ProPublica has been given unprecedented access to the rating site’s 1.3 million reviews of healthcare providers. One dental chain attracted 3,000 reviews, the vast majority bad. [ProPublica]

This is political patronage at its finest. A governor’s order that triggered a leadership shakeup at the North American International Livestock Exposition in Louisville drew criticism and bewilderment Tuesday from members of the committee that oversees the 41-year-old event. [WFPL]

It appears that New Zealand is finally ready to throw their domestic coal habit into Mount Doom — by 2018, the country will cease to use coal as a source of domestic energy production. [ThinkProgress]

We’ve finally updated the massive document covering what really happened in Montgomery County. [Page One]

Rand Paul’s (R-Hopeless) campaign on Wednesday released a video highlighting fellow 2016 GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump’s past praise of Democrats. [The Hill]

Members of a Vermont legislative committee are going to be asking why Kentucky State Police weren’t informed in a timely manner about the death of a Vermont inmate who had been serving time in a private Kentucky prison. [H-L]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… In deep water off the coast of Sicily, scientists have found a large and very mysterious monolith that is believed to have been hewn from rock some 10,000 years ago. [HuffPo]

Maybe Rand & Donald Will Slap Fight

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The Tricorder wielded by Star Trek’s Dr. Jim McCoy is the go-to, whiz-bang medical technology best known to the masses. Seemingly able to do everything but give birth to a human, the gadget continues to be a mostly unobtainable medical aspiration. But in ways that would have been no less fantastic 50 years ago, the digital age in medicine is changing lives. [H-L]

President Barack Obama isn’t backing down from comments linking Republicans and Iranian hard-liners, telling CNN in a recent interview that the comparison was accurate. [HuffPo]

Befitting the strangest competitive race for governor of Kentucky in living memory, the political speaking at the 135th Fancy Farm Picnic had its weird moments, brought to you mainly by Republican nominee Matt Bevin. But in saying hardly anything substantive, he did manage to illustrate the strange campaign he’s running. [Al Cross]

Several Planned Parenthood officials and three private bio-medical firms were targeted on Friday by a U.S. congressional panel as lawmakers dig deeper into a controversy swirling around the women’s health organization. [Reuters]

As students across WAVE Country get ready to head back to school two Republican state senators plan to renew their efforts on legislation that would prohibit Kentucky’s school districts from starting classes before Aug. 26. [WAVE3]

Robert Freeman has been helping people extract public information from New York state agencies for four decades. He is the executive director of the New York Committee on Open Government, a division of the New York Department of State that advises the public on the Freedom of Information Law — the state statute authorizing access to public records. [ProPublica]

The Lewis County clerk’s and sheriff’s offices lack adequate segregation of duties, according to Kentucky Auditor Adam Edelen. [Ashland Independent]

Gov. John Kasich (R-OH) is the rare GOP presidential candidate who has acknowledged that climate change is a real problem requiring us to “protect” the “creation that the Lord has given us.” But just days after earning plaudits for his relatively moderate-sounding approach in Thursday’s GOP presidential debate, Kasich adopted a climate-change denialist approach on Sunday. [ThinkProgress]

This caused an Ernie Fletcher flashback for some reason. The concept of noodling turns fishing on its head. Let me first say, I haven’t tried it, but I’m fascinated by the concept. [BGDN]

Wild bonobos use a single high-pitched call in a variety of contexts, showing a flexibility in their communication that was thought to be uniquely human. [BBC]

An area festival showcased the wide variety of hemp – a crop many are hoping to bring back to the Bluegrass. [WLKY]

Today there are 7.3 billion people on planet Earth, according to the United Nations. If you think that’s a lot … just wait. [NPR]

Less than a month ago, Rand Paul wouldn’t talk about Donald Trump. On a break from the presidential campaign trail in mid-July, Paul demurred as reporters asked him about the bombastic GOP frontrunner at events in Elizabethtown and Louisville. [H-L]

Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) preserved support from his hawkish pro-Israel base with his promise to vote down the Iran nuclear deal on Thursday night — but will now have to answer to a group of anti-war liberal advocacy organizations who claim that Schumer’s opposition to the diplomatic accord with Iran renders him unfit for the role of the party’s leader in the Senate. [HuffPo]