Lil Randy Pretends To Be Serious Again

Ed Whitfield is retiring, which Republicans have gossiped about for months. Now Jamie Comer can do more than toy with a run. He’ll have to make a quick decision because other Republicans are ready to jump in. [Deep Thoughts]

The University of Kentucky’s College of Health Sciences has received a $4.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense to research injury prevention in U.S. Special Forces. [H-L]

Relations between Afghanistan and the U.S. are better than ever, Afghan Chief Executive Abdullah Abdullah said Friday at the Council on Foreign Relations. [HuffPo]

Most public employees in Kentucky — including those of state government and Metro Louisville — will see a bit less in their paychecks starting in 2017 when the Internal Revenue Service will begin applying Social Security and Medicare tax to the employees’ contributions to their retirement funds. [C-J/AKN]

A photographer has snapped the ancient post offices and abandoned mailboxes of the South as symbols of the once invaluable postal system’s gradual disappearance as she documents the US Postal Service’s struggle to survive in the 21st century. [Daily Mail]

State Sen. Whitney Sweaterfield (R-Gay Panicked), Republican candidate for Kentucky attorney general, was the guest speaker at Tuesday’s meeting of the Rowan County Republican Party at the public library. [The Morehead News]

Races for the top House Republican leadership spots began firming up Monday as Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) made official his bid for the Speakership, and Rep. Tom Price (R-Ga.) won two key endorsements for the No. 2 GOP post. [The Hill]

Some local law enforcement officers wonder why the fund used to provide training and salary supplements has grown but the stipend they receive hasn’t for more than 10 years. [Ronnie Ellis]

Barring extraordinary events, Richard Glossip will be executed on Wednesday, despite deep uncertainty about whether he is actually guilty of the crime that led to his murder conviction. [ThinkProgress]

Philip Bianchi knew something had gone wrong. Bianchi, a second-generation funeral director and Harlan County’s elected coroner, set out last November with a team that included the Kentucky State Police to exhume the remains of a young woman found murdered in 1969. [WFPL]

Rand Paul says he is “absolutely” in the presidential race for the long haul, despite sagging poll numbers and his early debate struggles. [Politico]

As you can see, Louisville loves killing its people. Totally compassionately, of course, says Greg Fischer. [WHAS11]

Scientists think they can now tie dark streaks seen on the surface of Mars to periodic flows of liquid water. [BBC]

The Kentucky Economic Development Finance Authority earlier [last] week approved tax incentives for companies including Georgetown’s Creform Corp., FedEx Ground Package System and Air Hydro Power. [H-L]

They lost their daughter to a mass shooter and now owe more than $200,000 her killer’s ammunition dealer. [HuffPo]

KY Is F’d On All Fronts. But How Badly?

Fees will be waived at several recreation areas in the Daniel Boone National Forest this weekend to celebrate National Public Lands Day. [H-L]

Plans by President Barack Obama’s administration to allow thousands more refugees into the United States faced stiff opposition on Monday in the U.S. Congress, where Republican lawmakers demanded the right to review, and reject, the effort, citing fears of terrorism. [HuffPo]

Ten Kentucky children died last year from abuse and neglect and another 32 suffered life-threatening injuries, according to the latest annual report of such statistics from the Cabinet for Health and Family Services. [C-J/AKN]

Time Warner Cable Inc’s shareholders approved the company’s $56 billion takeover by Charter Communications Inc, according to preliminary votes at a special shareholder meeting. [Reuters]

A new report shows fewer children in Kentucky died from abuse and neglect last year, but the state remains among the top 10 worst states for child abuse. [WLKY]

Recently filed court documents show the makers of Tylenol planned to enlist the White House and lawmakers to block the Food and Drug Administration from imposing tough new safety restrictions on acetaminophen, the iconic painkiller’s chief ingredient. [ProPublica]

As temperatures start to cool down and the leaves begin to fall, Norma Justice and others are gearing up for the annual Flatwoods Fall Festival. [Ashland Independent]

The house that could save the world. The next generation of ultra-efficient houses will redefine how we fight climate change — and how we live. [Politico]

Gov. Rick Scott will fly to Kentucky early Tuesday for two days of private meetings in Lexington and Louisville with unidentified business owners about moving or expanding to Florida. There won’t be any warm welcome from the top executive of the Bluegrass State for Scott, who has already has lined up at least one Kentucky company to say it’s bringing jobs to Florida. [Palm Beach Post]

If we’re handcuffing autistic children at the elbows or throwing them in jail overnight, then we’re failing them. If we’re hitting kids with felony weapons charges for bringing fishing tackle to school, then we’re failing them. And if we’re using suspensions (which absolutely do not work) against students who build clocks, or twirl pencils, or write about pot, or chew their Pop-Tarts into the shape of a gun, then we’re failing them. [Click this Clicky]

Attorneys for Kim Davis are as backward as she and her ilk. [WKYT]

If you haven’t seen the Kim Davis interview on the teevee, you’re really missing out. She’s great at playing the victim and great and projecting. Just like Joshua Powell. Birds of a feather. [ABC News]

The University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville have won a $3.76 million grant to create a national center of excellence in micro/nanotechnology, one of just 16 awarded by the National Science Foundation. [H-L]

Is this Dong Trump’s Sarah The Quitter Palin moment? Probably not. Because we all know we haven’t seen the worst of him yet. [HuffPo]

All Eyes Are On Kim Davis Once Again

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! Help us pay ridiculous the fees these shysters caused. [CLICK HERE]

Nearly 5 percent of University of Kentucky students — 1,053 — said they were sexually assaulted in one year, but very few of them reported the assaults to any authorities, according to preliminary data from a broad new survey of students released Monday. [H-L]

The U.S. government just made its largest renewable energy purchase to date. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin truly might be the dumbest man to run for governor in Kentucky history. His lack of basic civics sense is alarming. The man has no concept that the First Amendment protects people from the government, not the government (Kim Davis) from people. Bevin really ought to be more careful because the McConnell folks are close to castrating him again. We all know Jack Conway doesn’t have the guts to cut him down a notch. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump got his start in real estate and over the years he’s owned and sold many of New York City’s great buildings, including the Plaza Hotel and the St. Moritz. His image as a developer endures, even though these days, Trump’s real estate holdings are surprisingly sparse. [NPR]

When he goes to public meetings, St. Joseph Berea Hospital’s director of operations Scott Thompson expects to be asked two questions: When is the Berea hospital closing, or, when will it be moving? [Richmond Register]

Here’s how law enforcement agencies impersonate your friends. We recently received a handbook from the DEA, in response to a Freedom of Information Act request, seeking information about the use of impersonation as an investigative technique. [ACLU]

Kim Davis was ordered to face a federal judge in Ashland after she defied a second U.S. Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage. [Ashland Independent]

Every year, thousands of high school students get ready for the SAT by using The Princeton Review’s test preparation services. [ProPublica]

If the legal battle against Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis were to ultimately end in her removal from office, Judge-Executive Walter Blevins would have the sole authority to appoint someone until a successor can be elected. [The Morehead News]

Mitch McConnell is about to lose again and he’s panicked. The Kentucky Republican is facing an uphill battle to reject Obama’s deal with Iran. [The Hill]

A public hearing regarding the proposed General Fund tax levy became a sometimes contentious exchange between members of the Glasgow Independent Board of Education and a group of South Green Elementary School teachers on Tuesday in the Glasgow High School media center. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Donald Trump unleashed his latest Twitter fire against Club for Growth, an anti-tax conservative 501(c)4 group that Republican candidates usually seek out as allies. [Politico]

Before she ignited a firestorm over gay marriage, Kim Davis was known, for decades, as a woman behind the counter of a small county clerk’s office: a mild-mannered conduit for auto tag renewals, lien releases, land records and marriage certificates. [H-L]

He’s been criticized by Catholics and conservatives. He was even called the “most dangerous person on the planet” for his views on climate change. But Pope Francis is refusing to back down on the matter. On Tuesday, the head of the Catholic Church expressed his thoughts on the deteriorating health of the planet, this time urging the rich and the powerful to take care of Mother Earth. [HuffPo]

Ugh, We Can’t Even With This Today

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Jack Daniel’s continued to bring the heat for Brown-Forman in the first quarter. Sales were up 7 percent but gains were overshadowed by the impact of unfavorable foreign exchange rates, leading to an overall drop of 2 percent, to $900 million, compared to the previous year, Brown-Forman reported Wednesday morning. [H-L]

You won’t feel well after you read this. Not in the least. [HuffPo]

Can a high-fat diet lead to breast cancer in obese women? University of Kentucky researchers hope to help answer that question by studying the mechanisms behind the link between obesity and breast cancer. One of those researchers, Fredrick Onono, recently received a $750,000 grant from the National Cancer Institute for the work. [C-J/AKN]

As the U.S. government’s budget deficit has declined, so has anxiety about it in Congress and on the presidential campaign trail, but one family and the Washington “deficit hawk” community it bankrolls are unfazed. [Reuters]

What organizers believe will be the largest-ever gathering of Appalachian writers will take place Sept. 9-10 at Berea College. The Appalachian Symposium will include two days of public conversations focusing on the state of the region’s literature and will feature keynote addresses by famed feminist author and activist bell hooks as well as Pulitzer Prize finalist Maurice Manning. [Richmond Register]

Shortly before Attorney General Eric Holder announced his resignation last September, he told an interviewer: “Any attorney general who is not an activist is not doing his or her job.” One of Holder’s more activist initiatives received attention last week when The New York Times highlighted how Holder’s Justice Department began the novel practice of filing arguments in state and county courts. [ProPublica]

Two inebriated men were injured after being struck in the head by a hatchet-wielding man from Lexington around midnight Saturday in Central Park, according to the Ashland Police Department. [Ashland Independent]

People of all ages — not just the elderly — are more at risk of death and emergency room visits as the earth warms, a recent study has found. [ThinkProgress]

An opinion in writing from Glasgow’s city attorney affirmed the Glasgow Management Control Board’s interpretation of documents that say the director of the city’s 911 dispatch center has supervision, control and disciplinary authority over all the center’s employees – even the ones whose salaries and benefits are provided by a different agency. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Stock prices took another beating Tuesday, with all major stock measures falling. Two closely followed market indicators, the Dow Jones industrial average and the S&P 500, each fell roughly 1.3 percent, despite opening the day with big gains.

An Eastern Kentucky resident says he’ll sue the state and federal government next month over coal mining permits he says were illegally issued. [WFPL]

US scientists have identified the chemicals responsible for the mosquito-repelling activity of sweetgrass, a plant traditionally used by some Native Americans to fend off the bugs. [BBC]

Let’s just say it: Jean-Marie is dumb as hell. State Rep. Ryan Quarles, the Republican nominee for state agriculture commissioner, alleged Thursday that the father of his Democratic opponent, Jean-Marie Lawson Spann, has texted answers to her during their debates and forums. [H-L]

Andy Parker, the father of slain WDBJ journalist Alison Parker, is demanding that politicians restrict access to firearms, saying he will personally become a crusader for this issue if need be. [HuffPo]

No Puppies & Rainbows Here Today

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

The Kentucky Kernel, the University of Kentucky’s independent campus newspaper, announced Monday that it will cut production of the print newspaper from five days a week to two in an effort to put more emphasis on its online products. [H-L]

This is just… sick. Two beloved Virginia journalists were shot and killed Wednesday morning when a gunman opened fire in a shocking moment caught on live television. [HuffPo]

A wildlife research organization that studies the expanding range of cougars in North America has come to a different conclusion from the one offered by state authorities on how an ill-fated mountain lion made its way into Kentucky. [C-J/AKN]

Here’s a real ruh ro moment for a few legislators… The chief executive of and six employees running the website were arrested Tuesday and charged with promoting prostitution under the federal Travel Act. [The Hill]

The high fence surrounding a Purdue University research farm here was installed to keep out pesky deer, but this summer it served a second purpose: Keeping federal drug agents at bay. The research farm, 10 miles south of Purdue’s West Lafayette campus, is home to the first legally grown industrial hemp crop in Indiana in decades. [News & Tribune]

Often maligned for speaking too frankly, Vice President Joe Biden’s reputation for shooting from the lip might be one of his biggest weapons if he does decide to run against Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. [Reuters]

Three Kentuckians made Modern Healthcare’s “100 Most Influential People in Healthcare” list. [Business First]

Across the country, those who support abortion rights and those who oppose them are feuding in court over how much information should be disclosed about women undergoing abortions. Supporters say there’s no margin for error. Opponents say it’s about ensuring quality care. [ProPublica]

House Speaker Greg Stumbo will propose a constitutional amendment that would allow as many as seven casinos to open in Kentucky, with tax revenue from the businesses dedicated to public education, boosting the racing industry and shoring up the state’s ailing retirement system. [WFPL]

By 2050, an area of forests the size of India is set to be wiped off the planet if humans continue on their current path of deforestation, according to a new report. That’s bad news for the creatures that depend on these forest ecosystems for survival, but it’s also bad news for the climate, as the loss of these forests will release more than 100 gigatons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. [ThinkProgress]

Only the Madison County School Board and the fiscal court as well as the cities of Richmond and Berea, have not set property tax rates for 2015. [Richmond Register]

NPR’S Audie Cornish talks to Megan Greene, managing director and chief economist at Manulife, about how the interest rate hike will affect mortgages, auto and student loans, and consumer behavior. [NPR]

Visitors entering the Georgetown Police Department’s new $5 million headquarters on Bourbon Street might notice two details. [H-L]

White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest renewed the Obama administration’s call for Congress to take action on gun control after a gunman shot and killed a reporter and cameraman during a live television broadcast on Wednesday. [HuffPo]

JCPS Set Great Example For Rest Of KY

It wasn’t that long ago that U.S. Sen. Rand Paul declared that he had to win the early-voting state of New Hampshire to gain the momentum that would carry him to the Republican presidential nomination. [H-L]

Cat Kim, a recent graduate from Columbia Law School, had two missions this summer. One was studying for and taking the California bar exam. The other was preparing cases for immigrant women and children in Texas detention centers who, without the help of people like her, could be deported. [HuffPo]

Applause went up in the room Monday evening when the Jefferson County Board of Education approved expanding the policies of Kentucky’s largest school district to specifically protect students and employees regardless of gender expression and gender identity. [C-J/AKN]

Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump blasted hedge fund managers on Sunday as mere “paper pushers” who he said were “getting away with murder” by not paying their fair share of taxes. [Reuters]

Big Blue fans of the University of Kentucky athletic teams had things to talk about besides asking “How about them ‘Cats?” Monday morning. [Ronnie Ellis]

The tip came in at about 7 p.m. on Monday, July 27. It was an email from a woman named Patricia Cronan, a banker who lived next door to a group home in Long Beach, California. She said the home, run by a nonprofit called Bayfront Youth & Family Services, seemed to be in a perpetual state of chaos. [ProPublica]

Rand Paul, even with the Kentucky GOP Executive Committee approving a March U.S. presidential caucus Saturday, maintained today that the U.S. Constitution provides him a way to run both for the presidency and a Kentucky Senate seat. [BGDN]

Earlier this year, social work student Coraly León arrived at her research assistant job at the University of Puerto Rico to find her salary abruptly cut in half due to budget cuts. [ThinkProgress]

Glasgow City Council took the final step at its regular meeting Monday evening in the selection of the city’s next police chief. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Confusion over the types of coal being burned in Chinese power stations has caused a significant overestimation of the country’s carbon emissions. [BBC]

Evarts City Council decided not to raise taxes saying “residents are struggling with a downturn in the economy and now is not the time to add to their burden.” [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Same-sex married couples who were living in states that did not recognize their unions and who previously filed claims for Social Security benefits will be able to collect those payments, the government said on Thursday. [NY Times]

The University of Kentucky is opening its first office devoted full-time to the concerns of the LGBTQ community on campus. Created by UK’s Office of Institutional Diversity, the Office of LGBTQ Resources is aimed at creating a more inclusive environment for UK’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer population. [H-L]

The issue is far from over, but a new report found that hunger in America has at least dropped below pre-recession levels. [HuffPo]

There’s A Literal Stink In Bullitt County

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

A group of University of Kentucky trustees upheld the proposed revocation of a longtime surgeon’s clinical privileges Monday but modified the decision to allow him access to campus as a tenured professor. [H-L]

Fast-food workers who are hoping to raise the minimum wage will find an ally in the Obama White House this week, with Labor Secretary Tom Perez traveling to Detroit on Tuesday to show his solidarity with the so-called Fight for $15. [HuffPo]

The owner of a failed private wastewater treatment plant that serves more than 700 homes in Bullitt County filed papers late Friday to walk away from the system that’s caused raw sewage to flow into a tributary of popular Floyds Fork for 17 months since a massive tank breakdown. [C-J/AKN]

A U.S. appeals court said the Federal Trade Commission has authority to regulate corporate cybersecurity, and may pursue a lawsuit accusing hotel operator Wyndham Worldwide Corp of failing to properly safeguard consumers’ information. [Reuters]

Berea Mayor Steve Connelly called for changes in city personnel policy after several police officers questioned the fairness of recent salary increases. At the Berea City Council meeting Tuesday, Connelly proposed revising the procedure for employee evaluation and awarding raises. [Richmond Register]

It’s now or never for New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. That appears to be the view of his wealthy super-PAC backers, who are spending fast and hard to keep Christie in contention for the Republican presidential nomination. [The Hill]

A company offered a proposal to Barren County Fiscal Court on Tuesday to allow it to do a free evaluation of the county’s energy efficiency. [Glasgow Daily Times]

There’s an old saying in journalism that there are no new stories, everything’s been done before, ProPublica’s Joe Sexton says. But when he came across “The Outlaw Ocean,” investigative reporter Ian Urbina’s latest series for The New York Times, he couldn’t help but be “genuinely jealous” of the intriguing, outrageous world he uncovered. [ProPublica]

An Ashland man who until recently lived in Medellin, Colombia, is among defendants accused of selling millions of dollars worth of untaxed cigarettes from a Russell storefront. David White, who is free on bond and living with a friend in Ashland pending his January trial date, posted information about his arrest and alleged part in the cigarette scheme on Facebook and spoke on Friday to a reporter from The Independent. [Ashland Independent]

Scientists in the US have found a way to take carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air and make carbon nanofibres, a valuable manufacturing material. [BBC]

Rowan Fiscal Court agreed Tuesday to an inter-local agreement with the City of Morehead to form a city-county recreation commission. [The Morehead News]

After her two leading rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination became targets of the Black Lives Matter movement, Hillary Clinton came armed with policy arguments when she met with members of the African-American activist group last week. [Mother Jones]

Mathieux Saint Fleur has been virtually blind for two decades. In less than 24 hours, he will see again. [H-L]

Students in America’s schools are much, much poorer than they were nine years ago. In 2006, 31 percent of America’s students attended schools in “high-poverty” districts, meaning that 20 percent or more of the district’s students lived below the federal poverty line. [HuffPo]