Corruption? Fine. Prostitution? FREAK OUT!

How long will it take this guy to turn a blind eye to the things people like Joshua Powell have done in the name of education? Will he clean house? Let’s not hold our breath, now. [H-L]

A deal that allows thousands of companies to transfer data from Europe to the United States is invalid, the highest EU court said on Tuesday in a landmark ruling that follows revelations of mass U.S. government snooping. [HuffPo]

The veteran journalist who co-authored a book filled with explosive allegations against the University of Louisville men’s basketball program said Monday that the escort he wrote with is “pretty damn credible.” [C-J/AKN]

GOP strategists say McConnell’s strategy for protecting vulnerable incumbents is to show that the Republican Congress knows how to govern, especially in battleground states such as Ohio and New Hampshire, where swing voters will decide the outcome. [The Hill]

A former inmate at the Boyle County Detention Center has filed a lawsuit, saying he received “significant bodily injuries” while being detained at the jail. [WKYT]

Amtrak has told U.S. lawmakers that it will suspend service on its national network in mid-December unless Congress extends a Dec. 31 deadline for implementing advanced safety technology, according to an Oct. 5 letter from Amtrak reviewed by Reuters. [Reuters]

A Massey Energy safety official warned former CEO Don Blankenship about the severity of the safety violations at Massey mines, according to a June 2009 memo the prosecution plans to use to show the “warlike” relationship between Massey and the Mine Safety and Health Administration. [Richmond Register]

Hillary Rodham Clinton’s campaign is grappling with a pressing and difficult question: How can she contrast herself to Bernie Sanders in next week’s Democratic presidential debate and beyond, without employing the sort of attacks that could boomerang to harm her? [NY Times]

Residents of Russell will see an increase in property taxes after City Council voted to approve the ordinance Monday morning. [Ashland Independent]

Powerful interest groups are already lining up to oppose various provisions in the Trans-Pacific Partnership — the sweeping trade agreement reached Monday by the United States, Japan and 10 other Pacific Rim nations — in hopes they can sway the votes of enough wavering lawmakers to have the deal rejected by Congress. [WaPo]

Members of the Rowan County Historical Society, Rowan County Arts Center Board, Morehead Tourism Commission, Rowan County Veterans Foundation, Morehead Theatre Guild and other concerned citizens met Thursday to discuss a proposal to tear down two historic structures. [The Morehead News]

John Boehner’s speakership is not ending quietly. With less than four weeks left in his decades-long congressional career, Boehner is maneuvering to shape the House Republican Conference on his way out. [Politico]

Kentucky’s education commissioner is appointed by the state board of education, but a state lawmaker wants to change that. State Rep. Kenny Imes, R-Murray, has prefiled a bill for the 2016 General Assembly that would require the commissioner to be confirmed by the state Senate. For another option, he said, he’s also drafting a bill that would require the education commissioner to be elected by a statewide public vote. [H-L]

A top U.S. commander said Tuesday that the bombing of a Doctors Without Borders hospital in northern Afghanistan was accidental — but the humanitarian group, also known as Médecins Sans Frontières, claims otherwise. [HuffPo]

Larry Dale Hit The Nail On Its Head

About 50 people came out on a rainy Saturday morning to see U.S. Sen. Rand Paul rally for Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin. [H-L]

Last week, the Taliban began the process of retaking Afghanistan, starting with the northern city of Kunduz. [HuffPo]

Republican Whitney Westerfield and Democrat Andy Beshear are locked in a dead heat for attorney general with just over a month before election day, according to a new Bluegrass Poll. [C-J/AKN]

Vice President Joe Biden on Saturday praised gay rights activists for the progress they have made in recent years. The vice president gave the keynote address at the Human Rights Campaign National Dinner, during which he honored past civil rights leaders and commended current ones for working to fulfill the principles embodied the Declaration of Independence. [The Hill]

While it’s not the winter just yet, area homeless shelters are bracing for their busiest months now before their supplies run out. “With the winter coming, what we have isn’t going to last,” Beacon of Hope Emergency Shelter director Michele Bradford said. “It won’t last.” Employees at the 24-hour Beacon of Hope shelter in Winchester say their food supply is quickly dwindling. [WKYT]

The Associated Press properly identified Liberty Counsel — the legal group defending Kentucky’s Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis — as an anti-LGBT hate group, in an all-too-rare example of a major news outlet accurately informing its audience about Liberty’s extreme views. [MMFA]

What no one is saying here? Rand Paul and his wife, Kelly, are miffed at Matt Bevin over some nasty remarks Bevin allegedly made to Kelly some time ago. It’s a big enough rift that the McConnell crew talk about it all the time. [CN|Toot]

The nine justices of the U.S. Supreme Court are set to wade into contentious social matters in their new term beginning on Monday including affirmative action, union powers and voting rights, and could add major cases involving abortion and birth control. [Reuters]

The head of the high tech company coming to Morehead was a guest speaker at Wednesday’s meeting of the Kentucky House Special Committee on Advanced Communications and Information Technology. Robert Schena, CEO and cofounder of Rajant Corporation, told committee members that his company’s technology aboard MSU’s miniature satellites could create a network in space that could be used to keep military defense systems running if the U.S. were ever attacked. [The Morehead News]

The National Rifle Association and other anti-gun-control groups are formidable, but political trends may be loosening their grip on lawmakers. [ProPublica]

Barren County magistrates voted to adopt an ordinance on second reading Friday to set the county’s real estate tax rate for for the current fiscal year during a special-called Fiscal Court meeting. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Edward Snowden is still waiting on the Justice Department to take up his offer of a plea deal, the former National Security Agency contractor who leaked thousands of classified documents says. [Politico]

Bevin is the most inept candidate in either party since Peppy Martin won the 1999 GOP nomination after Republicans decided to make a statement about public financing of gubernatorial campaigns by not fielding any legitimate contenders. Still, given Kentucky’s anti-Obama sentiment, Conway cannot win in November unless he gets the Democratic base to turn out 100 percent. So far, he has done little or nothing to make this happen. His campaign has been only marginally better than Bevin’s. [Larry Dale Keeling]

The Supreme Court on Friday issued a posthumous response to Alfredo Prieto, a serial killer on Virginia’s death row whose lawyers had petitioned the court several times to put his execution on hold. [HuffPo]

Rand’s Crew To Abandon Matt Bevin?

Can you believe Jack Conway thought it was appropriate to fight this nonsense? [H-L]

Education Secretary Arne Duncan is stepping down in December after 7 years in the Obama administration. [HuffPo]

Privately, Rand Paul’s people tell a far less kind story about Matt Bevin. Calling it a “minor thing,” U.S. Sen. Rand Paul said on Saturday it doesn’t matter that Matt Bevin doesn’t support his presidential campaign. [C-J/AKN]

Polls released Sunday morning show real estate mogul Donald Trump holding his leads in the early voting states of Iowa and New Hampshire, although those leads are smaller than one more ago. [The Hill]

Maybe David Byerman, the new director of the Legislative Research Commission, is a fan of singer-songwriter Sam Cooke. On his first day on the job, Byerman, 44, the former secretary of the Nevada state senate, promised his new employees that change is gonna come. [Ronnie Ellis]

One Vatican official said there was “a sense of regret” that the pope had ever seen Kim Davis, a Kentucky county clerk who went to jail in September for refusing to honor a U.S. Supreme Court ruling and issue same-sex marriage licenses. [Reuters]

The Russell City Council will host a special meeting Monday morning to take a final vote on a slight increase in property taxes. [Ashland Independent]

Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul said Saturday that his home state of Kentucky needs a governor willing to stand up to the federal government he aspires to lead from the White House. [ABC News]

Isn’t it fun watching the cowardly shitbirds at the Bowling Green Daily Toilet Paper lose their marbles over Jack Conway not hating the gays? If that’s the worst they can come up with after all the crap Matt Bevin has pulled, he’s a damn saint. And you know we think Jack Conway’s the slimiest cat turd in the sandbox. [Bowling Green Daily Toilet Paper]

On any given day, in any police department in the nation, 15 percent of officers will do the right thing no matter what is happening. [Vox]

What do you expect from a drunken party school? Now your tax dollars will be used to attack and belittle the person seeking relief. Western Kentucky University is being sued after a hazing scandal that shut down the school’s swim team. [WAVE3]

There was plenty in the complex deal to benefit bankers, lawyers, executives and hedge fund managers. Patriot Coal Corp. was bankrupt, but its mines would be auctioned to pay off mounting debts while financial engineering would generate enough cash to cover the cost of the proceedings. [ProPublica]

The archbishop, who was exiled to the United States in 2011 after losing a high-altitude Vatican power struggle that became public in an infamous leaks scandal, now finds himself at the center of another papal controversy. This time, the Vatican is suggesting that Viganò is responsible for giving papal face time to Kim Davis, the Kentucky clerk whose refusal to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples has made her a heroine to social conservatives. [H-L]

A Fox News host has come under fire this week for suggesting that Ahmed Mohamed, the 14-year-old Texas high schooler who was arrested last month for bringing a clock he built to school, was “not as innocent as he seems” because he was once allegedly caught “blowing soap bubbles” in school. [HuffPo]

KSBA-Thayer Slap Fight Heating Up

The debate over when to begin the school year in Kentucky is revving up. The Kentucky School Boards Association board of directors is opposing a proposal by two lawmakers — Senate Majority Leader Damon Thayer, R-Georgetown, and state Sen. Chris Girdler, R-Somerset — that would prevent schools from starting classes each year earlier than the Monday closest to Aug. 26. [H-L]

Hillary Clinton on Tuesday announced she wants to eliminate the “Cadillac tax,” a key feature of the Affordable Care Act that economists love and pretty much everybody else says they hate. [HuffPo]

Coal-fired power plants will need to make sure they don’t exceed new limits on toxic effluent into waterways like the Ohio River or others across Kentucky and Indiana. [C-J/AKN]

The Irish were slaves too; slaves had it better than Northern factory workers; black people fought for the Confederacy; and other lies, half-truths, and irrelevancies. [Slate]

Hundreds of thousands of people who enrolled in health insurance coverage through the federal marketplace established by the Affordable Care Act lost coverage this year because of problems with their immigration and citizenship status. But for immigrants who have settled in Kentucky, there has been no similar enrollment problem or wave of cancellations, state officials say. [WFPL]

The Obama administration is poised this week to issue a final rule on ozone levels that business groups contend would be the single most expensive regulation ever imposed by the U.S. government. [The Hill]

Sheriff Bobby Jack Woods said, after nearly a year into his first term, his greatest accomplishment so far is fostering inter-department law enforcement cooperation with Boyd County agencies. [Ashland Independent]

U.S. airport security agents discovered a record 67 firearms in luggage passengers intended to carry on to airplanes during one week in September, according to the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). [Reuters]

Here comes more mainstream tripe ignoring the very real mental health issues at play. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The U.S. government has labeled as specially designated terrorists two French fugitives who during the past 15 years have risen from street crime to alleged front-line roles in the Charlie Hebdo attacks and terrorist violence in Tunisia and Syria. [ProPublica]

Preliminary reports show that student enrollment is down slightly for the fall semester at Morehead State University. [The Morehead News]

The U.S. veteran obesity rate has reached 80 percent, surpassing that of the general population. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) says that more than 165,000 veterans who use its health care services have a body mass index higher than 40, a threshold that interferes with basic physical functions and leads to chronic illness. [ThinkProgress]

Republican Presidential candidate Rand Paul will campaign with Kentucky’s Republican nominee for governor in Frankfort on Saturday. [H-L]

The federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said Tuesday it is weighing new rules governing the $1.3 trillion student loan market after releasing a stinging report documenting “widespread failures” in an industry largely overseen by the Obama administration. [HuffPo]

Lil Randy Pretends To Be Serious Again

Ed Whitfield is retiring, which Republicans have gossiped about for months. Now Jamie Comer can do more than toy with a run. He’ll have to make a quick decision because other Republicans are ready to jump in. [Deep Thoughts]

The University of Kentucky’s College of Health Sciences has received a $4.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense to research injury prevention in U.S. Special Forces. [H-L]

Relations between Afghanistan and the U.S. are better than ever, Afghan Chief Executive Abdullah Abdullah said Friday at the Council on Foreign Relations. [HuffPo]

Most public employees in Kentucky — including those of state government and Metro Louisville — will see a bit less in their paychecks starting in 2017 when the Internal Revenue Service will begin applying Social Security and Medicare tax to the employees’ contributions to their retirement funds. [C-J/AKN]

A photographer has snapped the ancient post offices and abandoned mailboxes of the South as symbols of the once invaluable postal system’s gradual disappearance as she documents the US Postal Service’s struggle to survive in the 21st century. [Daily Mail]

State Sen. Whitney Sweaterfield (R-Gay Panicked), Republican candidate for Kentucky attorney general, was the guest speaker at Tuesday’s meeting of the Rowan County Republican Party at the public library. [The Morehead News]

Races for the top House Republican leadership spots began firming up Monday as Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) made official his bid for the Speakership, and Rep. Tom Price (R-Ga.) won two key endorsements for the No. 2 GOP post. [The Hill]

Some local law enforcement officers wonder why the fund used to provide training and salary supplements has grown but the stipend they receive hasn’t for more than 10 years. [Ronnie Ellis]

Barring extraordinary events, Richard Glossip will be executed on Wednesday, despite deep uncertainty about whether he is actually guilty of the crime that led to his murder conviction. [ThinkProgress]

Philip Bianchi knew something had gone wrong. Bianchi, a second-generation funeral director and Harlan County’s elected coroner, set out last November with a team that included the Kentucky State Police to exhume the remains of a young woman found murdered in 1969. [WFPL]

Rand Paul says he is “absolutely” in the presidential race for the long haul, despite sagging poll numbers and his early debate struggles. [Politico]

As you can see, Louisville loves killing its people. Totally compassionately, of course, says Greg Fischer. [WHAS11]

Scientists think they can now tie dark streaks seen on the surface of Mars to periodic flows of liquid water. [BBC]

The Kentucky Economic Development Finance Authority earlier [last] week approved tax incentives for companies including Georgetown’s Creform Corp., FedEx Ground Package System and Air Hydro Power. [H-L]

They lost their daughter to a mass shooter and now owe more than $200,000 her killer’s ammunition dealer. [HuffPo]

Remember The Jack-Kinder Morgan Fun?

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is taking the lead in an investigation of whether black Fayette County Public Schools employees are victims of discrimination. [H-L]

At CVS pharmacies in 12 states, friends and family members of people suffering from opiate addiction will now be able to get the overdose reversal drug naloxone without a prescription. Just not in Kentucky. [HuffPo]

Society may be getting more politically correct, but there’s new evidence that the trend hasn’t trickled down to operating rooms. [C-J/AKN]

Now random gays are trying to fame whore on the back of bigoted Kim Davis. And big city shysters are hyping it up. [TDB]

Members of a task force appointed by Gov. Steve Beshear to develop recommendations to shore up Kentucky’s teacher retirement system are fast learning it won’t be easy. The group’s consultant, William B. “Flick” Fornia of Pension Trust Advisors, ran through a number of potential options Friday but several of them met with concerned questions from members of the group. [Ronnie Ellis]

Rumors of Donald Trump’s demise may have been greatly exaggerated. Ever since rival Carly Fiorina was widely perceived to have bested Trump at the second GOP debate in California on Sept. 16, media outlets have been lining up to suggest that the front-runner is waning. [The Hill]

When Louisa West Elementary first-grade report cards go out on October 12, parents will not see the traditional A-B-C-D-F grading system. Instead, they will see a detailed list, written in plain English, assessing their children’s mastery of specific skills. [Ashland Independent]

A proposed four-year labor agreement between Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV and the United Auto Workers union encountered strong opposition from rank-and-file union members in early ratification voting. [Reuters]

The Madison County School District collected $238,720 less in property tax than state projections, according to a report during the district’s budget meeting Thursday evening. [Richmond Register]

For the second time this year, a speech by a foreign leader to Congress caused American politics to come to a standstill. But the pope’s remarks were the polar opposite of Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu’s on March 3—they united more people than they divided, and they spoke with such humility and other-centeredness that they seemed to be coming from a village priest, rather than the head of a church with 1.2 billion adherents. [Politico]

It’s been a few months since any new information has been released about Kinder Morgan’s plan to repurpose the Tennessee Gas pipeline through Rowan County. [The Morehead News]

Khaled Alkojak is one of the few Syrians to have made it to the U.S. since the start of the Syrian civil war. Even here, though, the 31-year-old remains in limbo, unsure of how long he’ll be allowed to stay. [NPR]

At the Red Mile, horse racing evolves into something that looks like a casino. Because that’s what it is — a casino. [H-L]

The day that Pope Francis asked Americans to respond humanely to refugees and other migrants, GOP presidential candidate Mike Huckabee dismissed the idea of being welcoming — insisting it could lead to admitting “some of the most violent and vicious people on Earth.” [HuffPo]

It’s Official: Jack In 2010 Is Jack In 2015

“Grace under pressure. Country and institution before self,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Friday, describing his impressions of retiring Speaker John A. Boehner, R-Ohio. [H-L]

Bigoted fame whore Kim Davis lies again: Now she’s claiming Kentucky Democrats don’t hate the gays as hard as Kentucky Republicans. We all know they hate the gays equally. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin was supposed to be Republican he could beat in this race but as each day goes by, that’s looking less and less like a sure thing. [C-J/AKN]

Renewable energy has for the first time surpassed coal in supplying the UK’s electricity for a whole quarter, according to government statistics released on Thursday. [The Guardian]

Independent Stave Company announced last week that its fifth American oak stave mill – located on Cranston Road (KY 377) – now is fully operational as the second largest such facility in the world. [The Morehead News]

Advocates for abolishing the death penalty are hopeful that Pope Francis’s visit this week will give their cause a jolt of momentum. [The Hill]

The efforts of the Berea College Farm to reduce energy and waste and serve students and the community have been recognized as one of the top in the country. [Richmond Register]

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo renewed his call for national gun control legislation on Saturday as he delivered a eulogy for the top state attorney who was fatally wounded by a stray bullet in Brooklyn earlier this month. [Reuters]

Where the devil is Jack Conway? It’s customary for those who want to be governor to get out among voters and tell them why they should vote for him. Conway’s Republican opponent, Matt Bevin, is traveling the state talking to prospective voters, but unless you sneak into a Conway fundraiser as I did last weekend, it’s hard to find the Democrat. [Ronnie Ellis]

With their top object of scorn, John Boehner, about to leave the scene, conservatives are already training their ire across the Capitol on Mitch McConnell. [Politico]

A change to the Glasgow city ordinance pertaining to the humane treatment of animals that narrowly passed a first reading Sept. 14 is on Monday’s agenda for a second reading by the Glasgow City Council. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Pope Francis has urged a large gathering of world leaders at the United Nations in New York to respect humanity’s “right to the environment”. [BBC]

Republican presidential candidate Bobby Jindal is calling on the GOP’s top senator to step down. [H-L]

When poor defendants appeared in court over an unpaid fine, the ACLU found that judges did not assign them a lawyer, seek to determine whether they could afford their fine or inform them of their rights. [HuffPo]