Some Folks Really Mad At Rand Paul

More than a million gallons of raw sewage has been pouring each day into the Levisa Fork of the Big Sandy River near Pike County for nearly three months. [H-L]

Edgar Nernberg is a creationist. And he won’t let a little thing like discovering a crucial link in the evolutionary chain change his mind. [HuffPo]

After years of planning and several public protests, police body cameras will start recording in Louisville within days. [C-J/AKN]

Here’s an interactive database of all the people killed by police this year. [The Guardian]

The Madison County Schools filled the vacant district positions of director of financial services, director of food services, and district assessment coordinator. [Richmond Register]

Former Gov. Jeb Bush (R-Fla.) said in an interview broadcast Sunday that a National Security Agency (NSA) program that collects information on Americans’ phone calls is “not a violation of civil liberties.” [The Hill]

City officials in South Shore formally opened a new city building Friday after being without one for the past few years. [Ashland Independent]

Rand Paul may have taken his stand against government surveillance a little too far in his presidential campaign. In a campaign video released on Friday that includes explicit links to a campaign donation page, Paul (R-Ky.) extensively uses footage from his lengthy speech on the Senate floor on May 20 against bulk data collection and surveillance in the PATRIOT Act. The Senate “strictly” prohibits any use of its proceedings for campaign activities. [Politico]

Glasgow High School seniors earned more than $3.4 million in scholarships this year and were celebrated Wednesday in the school’s auditorium. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Gruesome photographs on cigarette packages may deliver more effective anti-smoking messages than words, a new analysis finds. [Reuters]

Professional storytellers coming together to share personal stories, ghost stories, and tall tales; sprinkled with just the right amount of music, all heard in a beautiful natural setting— THAT is the Cave Run Storytelling Festival. [The Morehead News]

It’s an argument we hear frequently from gun rights activists and conservative lawmakers: Mass shooters select places to attack where citizens are banned from carrying firearms—so-called “gun-free zones.” All the available data shows that this claim is just plain wrong. [Mother Jones]

I (Jake) grew up reading Merlene Davis and can’t imagine the Herald-Leader without her. For a different kid hidden deep on rural Appalachia, Merlene’s tenacity was everything. [Paul Prather]

U.S. police have shot and killed 385 people during the first five months of this year, a rate of more than two a day, the Washington Post reported on Saturday. [HuffPo]

Let The Matt Bevin Funtimes Begin!

Daniel Boone National Forest officials have some advice on avoiding encounters with black bears. [H-L]

The United States might just be on the verge of a wind power revolution. Or, at least, the newest generation of wind turbines, featuring taller towers and longer blades, have the potential to push the country in that direction. [HuffPo]

Kentucky and Indiana are among the fattest states in the nation. [C-J/AKN]

How on earth can a majority of people support something that is secret? A majority of Americans support new trade deals, a Reuters/Ipsos poll showed on Wednesday, even as President Barack Obama struggles to win support for legislation key to sealing a signature Pacific Rim trade agreement. [Reuters]

Glasgow’s city attorney responded Wednesday to a lawsuit filed by former Glasgow police chief Guy Turcotte against the city and interim chief James Duff by saying the lawsuit will provide an opportunity for the public to look closer at Turcotte’s record with the Glasgow Police Department. [Glasgow Daily Times]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A human skull from a deep cave in northern Spain shows evidence of a lethal violent attack 430,000 years ago, a study shows. [BBC]

First Lady of Kentucky Jane Beshear didn’t seem to mind getting her hands dirty in order to promote agriculture at the dedication of a Governor’s Garden at Morehead State University on Wednesday. [Ashland Independent]

With new businesses sprouting up left and right, there’s a lot of talk these days about Detroit being on the comeback trail. [NPR]

An un-named source within the Laurel County school district told WKYT that South Laurel High School was threatened with legal action if they allowed prayer at their graduation this weekend. [WKYT]

Kevin Drum doesn’t write much about guns, which is why I’m going to keep on it a bit here and honor him by rolling out the red carpet for a bunch of grating 2A trolls to stampede into the comments thread. [Mother Jones]

Jack Conway on the nomination of Matt Bevin: I welcome Matt Bevin to the governor’s race as the Republican nominee. I look forward to a spirited race with my opponent and a conversation with voters over the next five months about the issues that matter most to Kentucky families. / This campaign is about standing up for their interests and values. It’s about moving Kentucky forward by creating good-paying jobs and growing our economy, investing in our education system at all levels, and building out our infrastructure. I’m the only candidate with a proven record of putting people over politics, and that’s a commitment I promise to keep. / Sannie Overly, our families and I are incredibly grateful to those who have opened their hearts and homes to us thus far, lending their friendship and support throughout this journey. We are excited to continue crisscrossing the state, visiting our counties and sharing our vision for Kentucky’s future with voters this summer and fall. [Press Release]

In a presidential campaign defined by billionaire sugar daddy donors, Rand Paul has a problem: He doesn’t seem to have one. [Politico]

A Lexington man was shot eight times during an officer-involved shooting in Richmond in September after he pointed a Taser stun gun at police, Kentucky State Police concluded in an investigation. [H-L]

Poverty, which affects a growing number of American students, begins its negative impact on learning as early as the beginning of kindergarten, according to a National Center for Education Statistics report released Thursday. [HuffPo]

Frankfort Loves (Hates) The Environment

Matt Bevin was running out of time. Less than a year after he got shellacked in his first political campaign, Bevin had his eye on running for governor, but he was running into a problem — he couldn’t find a running mate. [H-L]

What? Coal kills? Surely not. Surely all that hype wasn’t just the Coal Association using PR hacks to claim otherwise. [HuffPo]

Proposed state regulations would give billboard companies the authority to cut trees that block the view of their signs — a power the companies have sought, but failed to get, from the General Assembly for years. But environmental groups raised a wide range of objections to the proposal Friday at a hearing at the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet. [C-J/AKN]

U.S. Republicans have had to watch from the sidelines as the Obama White House has taken political credit for America’s unexpected energy boom and tumbling gas prices. Now it has left their presidential candidates scrambling for a way to reclaim leadership on an issue the party once seemed to own. [Reuters]

By a split vote, the Rowan County Board of Education has approved purchasing the Rowan Campus of Maysville Community and Technical College for $5 million. [The Morehead News]

Satellites have seen a sudden dramatic change in the behaviour of glaciers on the Antarctica Peninsula, according to a Bristol University-led study. [BBC]

The Inspector General is investigating after a 21-month-old boy was found wandering in the street near a Louisville day care. But when that happened in Montgomery County, the former superintendent and crew were able to scam the IG into believing it was no big deal. Even though the kid was in more danger, crossed a massive by-pass with moving traffic and such. [WAVE3]

America is more liberal than politicians think. [Mother Jones]

In what many people in the area have said would be a step toward justice, Perry County Clerk Haven King has been charged and indicted this month in relation to an alleged incident of harassment and abuse of power caught on video by a Hazard Community and Technical College (HCTC) student in April. [Hazard Herald]

A ruling against pension cuts and political divisions have made a dire situation worse for the state, as well as Chicago and its schools, which face shortfalls of their own. [NY Times]

On Tuesday night, some members of the Lexington Fayette NAACP chapter voiced their concerns to the Fayette County Public School Board regarding next year’s budget. [WKYT]

Yet another study suggests that regular glimpses of nature can have psychological benefits. [WaPo]

The search for Fayette County Schools’ next superintendent has entered a new phase, according to board chairman John Price. PROACT Search, the Illinois-based firm Fayette County terminated a few weeks ago, has transferred electronic files on candidates to Lynda McNamara, the president of McNamara Search Associates of Lexington, Price told the Herald-Leader Friday. [H-L]

The parents unsuccessfully sued the retailers who made the firearm that killed their daughter. Colorado state law requires that plaintiffs who sue the manufacturers of gun products pay the companies’ legal fees if they lose. [HuffPo]

Jack Is No Alison Daddy’s Name Grimes

It’s no secret that we despise Jack Conway’s campaign people (his office staff is terrific, even if he doesn’t let them do their jobs). But it’s a stretch to compare Jack to Alison Grimes in her mind-bogglingly awful 2014 campaign. Conway had his own bad campaign in 2010 but he still doesn’t compare to the embarrassment that was Grimes. [H-L]

Decades after the U.S. Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board of Education ruling declared segregated schooling of black students unconstitutional, many American schools with high minority populations continue to receive fewer resources and provide an education that’s inferior to schools with large white populations. Kentucky’s in a terrible spot and Frankfort doesn’t care. [HuffPo]

In a push for better Internet service across Kentucky, state government is poised to become a large-scale owner of broadband infrastructure over the next four years, raising new questions about digital privacy and the potential for censorship or bureaucratic snooping. [C-J/AKN]

Leaked video reveals omissions in official account of police shooting. [The Intercept]

A woman who works in Washington, D.C., has accused a visiting Richmond Police officer of “catcalling.” [Richmond Register & Popville]

National Rifle Association board member Ted Nugent attacked President Obama and gun safety advocates for calling attention to the deaths of children from guns, calling such efforts “The Big Lie” — a phrase associated with Nazi propaganda. [MMFA]

At a time when most states are restoring funding for higher education after the deep and sustained cuts of the recession, Kentucky has continued to reduce funding and lags behind in several funding categories, according to a new study. [Ashland Independent]

The mother of an 11-year-old girl from Kentucky who was shot dead by her father in a murder-suicide this week was on the phone with her and heard the child’s anguished last words moments before gunfire erupted on the other end of the line. [Daily Mail]

Barren County Schools is working to combat what is commonly called the “summer learning loss” or “summer slide” again this summer with its 21st Century Summer Camps. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The House is looking to use an overwhelming bipartisan vote to raise pressure on the Senate over a medical cures bill on which the upper chamber has been lagging. The House is moving forward on its 21st Century Cures measure, aimed at speeding up the FDA’s approval of new drugs and increasing funding for the National Institutes of Health. [The Hill]

Rowan County Fiscal Court is facing the possibility that the projected $15 million cost of a new jail might not be enough for the proposed 300-bed facility. [The Morehead News]

Of course the Republican National Committee is as backward and anti-gay as Kentucky Democrats. [ThinkProgress]

This is the extent of coverage that’s been provided to the Terry Holliday situation. No wonder people in Kentucky feel like they’ve been kept in the dark. [H-L]

President Barack Obama said that LGBT rights “are human rights” in a statement released Saturday to commemorate the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia. [HuffPo]

The Downfall Of Jamie Comer Continues

Jamie Comer is lying again. He absolutely knew the effects of the bill. Quite a few people spelled it out for him. P.S. Yes, Rogers, McConnell & crew are now supporting Heiner. [H-L]

In the years since “Mission Accomplished,” some 149,053 civilians have been killed, compared to about 7,412 prior to the speech, according to the website Iraq Body Count. Since the speech, 4,637 military members in the Iraq War coalition led by the U.S. have lost their lives, versus 172 prior, according to the Iraq Coalition Casualty Count. As of September 2014, total U.S. expenditures on the war in Iraq totaled $815.8 billion, about 93 percent of which was spent after 2003. That cost is more than 16 times the Bush administration’s original projection. [HuffPo]

Truth is generally a casualty in political battles and there’s not an issue that’s suffered more wounds in this year’s Kentucky governor’s race than the Common Core academic standards that Kentucky adopted in 2010. [C-J/AKN]

Will the Supreme Court look behind the curtain of lethal injection? [The Intercept]

Adam Edelen needs to recuse himself immediately. Here’s why: he’s been asked to join the UofL Foundation board and once asked me for my opinion about it. I told him to run quickly away. But that means he’s got a conflict of interest. [WDRB]

When a member of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s security detail left his Glock and magazine stuffed in the toilet seat cover holder of a Capitol Visitor Center bathroom stall, a CVC worker found the gun, according to a source familiar with the Jan. 29 incident and two other disturbing instances when Capitol Police left loaded firearms in problematic places. A 7- or 8-year-old child visiting the Capitol with his parents found the next loaded Glock lost by a dignitary protection officer, according to the source. A member of the security detail for John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, allegedly left the firearm in the bathroom of the Speaker’s Suite on March 24. [Roll Call]

It was a record-breaking 141st running of the $1 million Longines Kentucky Oaks (Grade I) at Churchill Downs Racetrack which culminated as 123,763 fans, the highest attendance of all time, watched a memorable win by Lovely Maria. The prior attendance record was 116,046, set in 2010, during the 136th running of the Kentucky Oaks. [Press Release]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell faces a tough choice this week on how to move forward with a controversial bill that would allow Congress to review and vote on a nuclear deal with Iran. [The Hill]

Most eyes were fixed on the Kentucky Derby this weekend, but the Republican gubernatorial primary began last week to look as if it might be headed for its own photo finish. [Ronnie Ellis]

Her campaign barely three weeks old, Hillary Clinton already has been attacked by Republicans on everything from donations to her family’s charitable foundation, to her tenure as secretary of state and her ties to Wall Street. But her rivals, and the political action committees that support them, are treading more carefully on one incendiary subject: her age. [Reuters]

While previous media reports led to the return – or at least the documentation – of several military surplus items missing from the Glasgow Police Department, more than 100 such items remain unaccounted for, and fingers seem to be pointing at a former member of the GPD. [Glasgow Daily Times]

What the Kentucky Derby owes to China. If it weren’t for KFC’s giant Asian consumer base, the annual classic would be a much poorer event. [Politico]

The Fayette County Public Schools board voted Sunday to terminate its contract with superintendent search firm PROACT Search Inc. The board went into closed session shortly before 9 a.m. Sunday to discuss possible litigation against the search firm. [H-L]

The Tata group, one of India’s largest conglomerates, promised to be a good neighbor when it took on the job of building the nation’s first “ultra mega” coal-fired power plant. [HuffPo]

Election 2015 Sure Is Awfully Meh

The four men seeking the Republican nomination for governor agreed on many key points in a debate Wednesday night, including their support for the coal industry and “right to work” legislation that would end workplace requirements for union membership. [H-L]

Looks like Frankfort’s bigots aren’t alone in hating the gays. [HuffPo]

Targeted for elimination just 15 years ago, syphilis has been rebounding in Kentucky and across the nation in recent years, mainly among men — part of an uptick that is leading public health officials to seek expanded testing and education. [C-J/AKN]

Orange man John Boehner wrote a thing about Mitch McConnell. [Time]

The Cumberland City Council performed the first reading of an animal control ordinance designed to allow for easier enforcement of animal control issues during a meeting on Tuesday. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

House Democrats on Thursday vowed to fight any attempt by Republicans to tuck gun provisions into government spending bills. [The Hill]

Last Tuesday, City of Hazard Mayor Jimmy Lindon and City of Buckhorn Mayor Pat Wooton approved a proclamation to set April 7 as National Service Recognition Day to celebrate volunteerism and to encourage residents to recognize the positive impact of national service in the region, to thank those who serve, and to find ways to give back to the community. [Hazard Herald]

As a historic constitutional showdown over gay marriage looms this month at the U.S. Supreme Court, attorneys are fighting over another bitterly disputed issue: their fees. [Reuters]

Churchill Downs Racetrack officials wanted to provide a little more “tender loving care” for owners of Kentucky Derby horses by improving their access to the track and their horses while also providing a better view and amenities. [Business First]

A blog hosting posts from former and current New York City officers reinforces the worst kinds of stereotypes. [ProPublica]

Here’s a bit of Greg Fischer-Animal Shelter shadenfreude for ya. [The ‘Ville Voice]

Partisan tensions over a human trafficking bill are bogging down another key piece of congressional business: patent reform. [Politico]

Kentucky officials say the state’s unemployment rate fell to 5.1 percent in March, the lowest rate since June 2001. [H-L]

The private prison industry’s growing role in immigrant detention is due in part to Congress’ requiring the federal government to maintain some 34,000 detention beds, according to a report released Wednesday. The report, drafted by Grassroots Leadership, a nonprofit based in Austin, Texas, calls on Congress to eliminate the immigrant detention quota from its 2016 appropriations request. [HuffPo]

Jim Holsinger’s Pals With Hal Heiner

A fire alarm forced the evacuation of the Fayette County Democratic Party’s awards dinner Tuesday night, but it didn’t stop gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway from finding the stump. [H-L]

Don’t listen to McConnell but pay attention to other Kentuckians. “Before you take advice about climate change from Senator McConnell please consider first what so many knowledgeable voices from the Bluegrass State are saying about climate change, and second how failing to act gives up your state’s right to set its own course of action toward a clean energy future,” states the letter spearheaded by Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.) and signed by four other senators in the Democratic Conference. [HuffPo]

A Monday fundraiser in Lexington for gubernatorial candidate Hal Heiner and his running mate KC Crosbie will look like an Ernie Fletcher reunion. Complete with bigot Jim Holsinger — remember that guy? [C-J/AKN]

Tens of millions of dollars and counting. That’s how much the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) has spent so far on a three-year campaign to improve the plight of low-wage retail and fast-food workers, an analysis of public filings shows. [Reuters]

After months of setbacks, frustrations and reformulations, the restaurant and microbrewery under development between Ashland’s signature bridges along Greenup Avenue took a major step forward Saturday with the delivery and initial installation of a batch of double-polished stainless steel equipment purpose-designed for the creation of craft beers. [Ashland Independent]

Campaigners in the Netherlands are taking the government to court for allegedly failing to protect its citizens from climate change. [BBC]

The Benham City Council took time during their meeting on Friday to discuss several items needing the panel’s attention, including an ordinance setting pay rates for city employees. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Presidential candidates are moving away from public financing. [NPR]

The Kentucky Valley Education Cooperative (KVEC) and Hazard Independent Schools have invited the public to attend an Action Research Summit at the Pikeville EXPO Center in Pikeville on April 21. The event is scheduled for 9 a.m. [Hazard Herald]

What does gun violence really cost? Apple’s worldwide revenue is $182 billion. The cost of gun violence is $229 billion. [Mother Jones]

Remember when media ignored the drugged-addled daughter of an elected official in Morehead stealing a man’s dog? Fascinating how that works. [WKYT]

Catholic officials announced on Tuesday plans for a landmark climate change-themed conference to be hosted at Vatican later this month, the latest in Pope Francis’ faith-rooted campaign to raise awareness about global warming. [Think Progress]

Johnny Bell can suck a frozen dog turd for the racist, sexist crap he’s allegedly done. [Bluegrass Politics]

A new poll reveals that public support for same-sex marriage is rising in all 50 states — including the ones that still haven’t legalized the institution for same-sex couples. [HuffPo]