The US Loves It Some Mass Shootings

Rand Paul’s presidential campaign raised only about $2.5 million in the third quarter of the year, according to a published report Thursday afternoon. [H-L]

The nation was once again confronted with the horror of a deadly school shooting on Thursday, this time a massacre at a community college in Roseburg, Oregon. [HuffPo]

After a fiery confrontation with County Attorney Mike O’Connell, Jefferson District Judge Sean Delahanty promised to rule within a week about the fate of 2,300 motorists whose cases he has held hostage because of his concerns about Drive Safe Louisville, which has generated $1.3 million for O’Connell’s office. [C-J/AKN]

Californians have really stepped up water conservation due to the drought. Some cities are selling almost half as much water as they normally do. But there’s a big downside for water agencies — lost revenue. People using less water means major budget shortfalls. [NPR]

Whitley County Clerk Kay Schwartz says she is granting licenses to “bride and groom” couples – and claims she never stopped issuing them – but not to same-sex couples. [WKYT]

Congress is blocking legal marijuana in Washington, D.C. and maybe causing a spike in murders. [Mother Jones]

A new report details the differences in health care costs and patient usages in metro areas across the country. And Kentucky fares fairly well. [WFPL]

A woman in the US state of Georgia has been executed despite a number of last-ditch appeals, including one by the Pope, to try to block her execution. [BBC]

Democratic state Sen. Dorsey Ridley of Henderson says he’s close to jumping into the race to succeed retiring Republican U.S. Congressman Ed Whitfield. [Ronnie Ellis]

The CEO of Alpha Natural Resources is defending his coal company’s financing of harassment of climate scientists. [The Intercept]

Former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship was met by a swarm of reporters and photographers as he walked into the federal courthouse Thursday morning for the first day of jury selection in his criminal trial. [Ashland Independent]

Pope Francis’ encounter with Kim Davis last week in Washington, which was interpreted by many as a subtle intervention in the United States’ same-sex marriage debate, was part of a series of private meetings with dozens of guests and did not amount to an endorsement of her views, the Vatican said on Friday. So Kim Davis DID fame whore it up while mischaracterizing her encounter with the pope. Imagine that. [NY Times]

The biggest spenders in Kentucky’s competitive race for governor are a pair of Louisville millionaires who want to see a Republican elected as the state’s chief executive. But it’s not what you think. [H-L]

U.S. employers slammed the brakes on hiring over the last two months and wages fell in September, raising new doubts the economy is strong enough for the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates by the end of this year. [HuffPo]

Kim Davis Just Won’t Effing Quit It

Despite Kentucky’s socially conservative streak, more than half of the state’s voters think Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis should have to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [H-L]

In a speech last week, Federal Reserve Board Chair Janet Yellen inadvertently told us why Congress should set a 4 percent unemployment target for the Fed in its conduct of monetary policy, as is proposed in a new bill put forward by Michigan Representative John Conyers. The context was Yellen’s dismissal of such a target. [HuffPo]

Don Childers and others affiliated with Childers Oil Co. combined to give $4,000 to the Kentucky Democratic Party this summer while Governor Steve Beshear’s administration was negotiating a secret settlement with the company over a 2011 spill of diesel fuel into the North Fork of the Kentucky River. [C-J/AKN]

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) is the favorite to succeed John Boehner (R-OH) after his surprise resignation as the House Speaker last week. The appointment of McCarthy, who represents a heavily Latino district, to preside over a more radically conservative Republican caucus could have implications for immigration reform. [ThinkProgress]

Ann Stewart, executive director of the Glasgow-Barren County Tourist and Convention Commission, has been reappointed to serve another term on the Kentucky Travel Industry Association’s board of directors. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The Secret Service reportedly leaked sensitive personal information to the press about Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Jason Chaffetz as the Utah Republican was investigating the beleaguered agency. [Politico]

Steve Beshear’s lawyers are using the words “absurd,” ”forlorn” and “obtuse” to describe the legal arguments a county clerk has used to avoid issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [WAVE3]

Can we quit it with calling Drew Curtis “quirky”? It’s an insult from a bunch of old-ass white men and seems to get thrown around a lot lately. The only people who think he is quirky are people who have no idea what “URL” means. And can we quit acting like the RGA pulled out because Bevin sucks? Sure, he sucks, but the RGA’s man on the ground said six months ago their budget was $3 million. RGA never thought Bevin could win, really. Which is worse than abandoning him now. [Larry Sabato]

Kentuckians are continuing to default on federal student loans at one of the highest rates in the nation. [WFPL]

Rand Paul’s (R-Cookie Tree) daddy hauled in more money in one day than he’s raised in three months. Surprising that anyone thinks his presidential campaign is anything more than a stunt to raise his senate campaign profile. [Mother Jones]

Attorneys for a Magoffin County judge have asked the Kentucky Supreme Court to review a lower court decision that would force the judge out of office for election fraud. [WKYT]

In an interview with NPR, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani says his country will use its added billions of dollars from the nuclear deal for boosting the Iranian economy. [NPR]

This year’s Historic Paris-Bourbon County house tour Sunday is at the boyhood home of one of Kentucky’s most interesting and least known Civil War generals, who ended his short life as an American diplomat in South America. [H-L]

Thirteen people were killed and as many as 20 were wounded Thursday in a shooting at a small community college in Roseburg, Oregon, according to multiple reports. Another day, another mass shooting. [HuffPo]

KSBA-Thayer Slap Fight Heating Up

The debate over when to begin the school year in Kentucky is revving up. The Kentucky School Boards Association board of directors is opposing a proposal by two lawmakers — Senate Majority Leader Damon Thayer, R-Georgetown, and state Sen. Chris Girdler, R-Somerset — that would prevent schools from starting classes each year earlier than the Monday closest to Aug. 26. [H-L]

Hillary Clinton on Tuesday announced she wants to eliminate the “Cadillac tax,” a key feature of the Affordable Care Act that economists love and pretty much everybody else says they hate. [HuffPo]

Coal-fired power plants will need to make sure they don’t exceed new limits on toxic effluent into waterways like the Ohio River or others across Kentucky and Indiana. [C-J/AKN]

The Irish were slaves too; slaves had it better than Northern factory workers; black people fought for the Confederacy; and other lies, half-truths, and irrelevancies. [Slate]

Hundreds of thousands of people who enrolled in health insurance coverage through the federal marketplace established by the Affordable Care Act lost coverage this year because of problems with their immigration and citizenship status. But for immigrants who have settled in Kentucky, there has been no similar enrollment problem or wave of cancellations, state officials say. [WFPL]

The Obama administration is poised this week to issue a final rule on ozone levels that business groups contend would be the single most expensive regulation ever imposed by the U.S. government. [The Hill]

Sheriff Bobby Jack Woods said, after nearly a year into his first term, his greatest accomplishment so far is fostering inter-department law enforcement cooperation with Boyd County agencies. [Ashland Independent]

U.S. airport security agents discovered a record 67 firearms in luggage passengers intended to carry on to airplanes during one week in September, according to the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). [Reuters]

Here comes more mainstream tripe ignoring the very real mental health issues at play. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The U.S. government has labeled as specially designated terrorists two French fugitives who during the past 15 years have risen from street crime to alleged front-line roles in the Charlie Hebdo attacks and terrorist violence in Tunisia and Syria. [ProPublica]

Preliminary reports show that student enrollment is down slightly for the fall semester at Morehead State University. [The Morehead News]

The U.S. veteran obesity rate has reached 80 percent, surpassing that of the general population. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) says that more than 165,000 veterans who use its health care services have a body mass index higher than 40, a threshold that interferes with basic physical functions and leads to chronic illness. [ThinkProgress]

Republican Presidential candidate Rand Paul will campaign with Kentucky’s Republican nominee for governor in Frankfort on Saturday. [H-L]

The federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said Tuesday it is weighing new rules governing the $1.3 trillion student loan market after releasing a stinging report documenting “widespread failures” in an industry largely overseen by the Obama administration. [HuffPo]

Lil Randy Pretends To Be Serious Again

Ed Whitfield is retiring, which Republicans have gossiped about for months. Now Jamie Comer can do more than toy with a run. He’ll have to make a quick decision because other Republicans are ready to jump in. [Deep Thoughts]

The University of Kentucky’s College of Health Sciences has received a $4.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense to research injury prevention in U.S. Special Forces. [H-L]

Relations between Afghanistan and the U.S. are better than ever, Afghan Chief Executive Abdullah Abdullah said Friday at the Council on Foreign Relations. [HuffPo]

Most public employees in Kentucky — including those of state government and Metro Louisville — will see a bit less in their paychecks starting in 2017 when the Internal Revenue Service will begin applying Social Security and Medicare tax to the employees’ contributions to their retirement funds. [C-J/AKN]

A photographer has snapped the ancient post offices and abandoned mailboxes of the South as symbols of the once invaluable postal system’s gradual disappearance as she documents the US Postal Service’s struggle to survive in the 21st century. [Daily Mail]

State Sen. Whitney Sweaterfield (R-Gay Panicked), Republican candidate for Kentucky attorney general, was the guest speaker at Tuesday’s meeting of the Rowan County Republican Party at the public library. [The Morehead News]

Races for the top House Republican leadership spots began firming up Monday as Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) made official his bid for the Speakership, and Rep. Tom Price (R-Ga.) won two key endorsements for the No. 2 GOP post. [The Hill]

Some local law enforcement officers wonder why the fund used to provide training and salary supplements has grown but the stipend they receive hasn’t for more than 10 years. [Ronnie Ellis]

Barring extraordinary events, Richard Glossip will be executed on Wednesday, despite deep uncertainty about whether he is actually guilty of the crime that led to his murder conviction. [ThinkProgress]

Philip Bianchi knew something had gone wrong. Bianchi, a second-generation funeral director and Harlan County’s elected coroner, set out last November with a team that included the Kentucky State Police to exhume the remains of a young woman found murdered in 1969. [WFPL]

Rand Paul says he is “absolutely” in the presidential race for the long haul, despite sagging poll numbers and his early debate struggles. [Politico]

As you can see, Louisville loves killing its people. Totally compassionately, of course, says Greg Fischer. [WHAS11]

Scientists think they can now tie dark streaks seen on the surface of Mars to periodic flows of liquid water. [BBC]

The Kentucky Economic Development Finance Authority earlier [last] week approved tax incentives for companies including Georgetown’s Creform Corp., FedEx Ground Package System and Air Hydro Power. [H-L]

They lost their daughter to a mass shooter and now owe more than $200,000 her killer’s ammunition dealer. [HuffPo]

Rough Week For A Former Fletcher Guy

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! Help us pay ridiculous the fees these shysters caused. [CLICK HERE]

Federal regulators have proposed that equipment used to haul coal in underground mines be required to have technology designed to prevent miners from being run over or crushed. [H-L]

Warren Buffett doesn’t think any Americans should be poor anymore. In an economy that produces over $54,000 in gross domestic product per capita, the billionaire says, regulators must rein in the fast-widening gap between the poor and the super-rich. [HuffPo]

The Securities and Exchange Commission has accused former Kentucky Lt. Gov. Steve Pence of fraud. The civil charge against Pence, who also is a former U.S. attorney, accuses him of making misleading statements to auditors when he was the majority shareholder and chairman of a staffing services company called General Employment Enterprises. [C-J/AKN]


WARNING! RIDICULOUS AUTOPLAY VIDEO! Two arrests in an animal cruelty investigation in Florida has ties to a similar case in Kentucky and other states. One of the two womens’ many aliases will sound familiar. [WLEX18]

The bipartisan leadership of the House Energy and Commerce Committee is asking the Food and Drug Administration how it monitors the safety of the popular blood thinner Coumadin, particularly in light of deaths and hospitalizations of nursing home residents taking the drug. [ProPublica]

Louisville Metro police are conducting a death investigation after a 50-year-old woman was found dead in West Louisville, but neighbors said they don’t believe her death was an accident. [WAVE3]

More than 90 percent of Americans support expanding background checks on gun purchases. Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush is one of those supporters — but only when it comes to his own state. [ThinkProgress]

A Warren County couple will soon open the doors of Drake Country Store for their fourth stint as owners. [BGDN]

In July, the BBC published a video showing that not only are US workers not guaranteed vacation time by law, but that 40% choose not to take all of the days to which they are entitled. [BBC]

A report from the Kentucky State Police released late last month revealed that in 2014 there were 127,326 reported vehicle collisions within the state. That figure is a 3.3 percent increase from the number that was reported in 2013. [Times-Tribune]

After faring poorly in recent polls amid a crowded GOP presidential field, Jeb Bush has begun aggressively courting former US diplomats, who he hopes will make public endorsements for him and encourage wealthy American expats to donate to his campaign. [Mother Jones]

Predictions on how long it takes Salato to let the bobcat and bald eagle die? [H-L]

Jeb Bush is copying Donald Trump — and Hillary Clinton, and President Barack Obama. [HuffPo]

Conway Didn’t Really Care About Equality

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! Help us pay ridiculous the fees these shysters caused. [CLICK HERE]

It’s now clear that Jack Conway didn’t feel strongly about equality — he felt strongly about politics. He cried because he knew the bigots were going to come for him politically. Attorney General Jack Conway says he won’t appoint a special prosecutor to pursue a criminal case of official misconduct against Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis, despite a request from the Rowan County attorney. [H-L]

Things are getting worse for the American worker. A new report out by the National Employment Law Project shows declining real median wages for occupations across the income spectrum — and the lowest-paid workers have been hit the hardest. [HuffPo]

For thousands of people in Jefferson County, the public school system was desegregated 40 years ago simply to fulfill a court order. But for supporters, it was a remedy to inequalities between poor, predominantly black schools in the city of Louisville — where some teachers even had to check out a pair of scissors to use for a couple of hours because there weren’t enough to go around — and the mostly white and wealthy schools in Jefferson County. [C-J/AKN]

In a recent interview with the Huffington Post, Secretary of State John Kerry defended the Obama administration’s decision to allow Shell to drill for oil in the Arctic, pushing back against claims that such a decision is at odds with the administration’s action on climate change. [ThinkProgress]

Jamie Copas attended the Monroe County Watermelon Festival when she was a youngster, and now she brings her children to the event. [Glasgow Daily Times]

According to a new report from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, racial bias can affect the likelihood of people pulling the trigger of a gun—even if shooters don’t realize they were biased to begin with. Researchers found that, in studies conducted over the past decade, participants were more likely to shoot targets depicting black people than those depicting white people. [Mother Jones]

Kentucky Power is offering residential customers the opportunity to earn $55 and save energy when they recycle their old working refrigerator or freezer during 2015. After December 31, the participation incentive returns to $50. [Ashland Independent]

Wall Street opened higher on Wednesday as hopes for further stimulus in China cheered investors for a second day. [Reuters]

Survivors of July’s storms can register for federal disaster aid at a temporary site in Rowan County. The site will help people who were affected by the severe storms, tornadoes, straight-line winds, flooding, landslides and mudslides occurring July 11 through July 20. [The Morehead News]

Nearly a century ago, immigrants from Germany and Ireland founded St. Helena Church in a working-class neighborhood in north Philadelphia. [NPR]

At first glance, the statistics illustrating a significant decline in inmate GEDs earned could be alarming, but they are actually reflective of the population as a whole, according to adult education officials. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Of course a group of gluttonous, white Republican men are threatening shutdown over Planned Parenthood funding. [The Hill]

Keep dreaming, Ralph Alvarado, because it’s not happening. This is Kentucky. Progress is not an option. [H-L]

GOP presidential candidate Mike Huckabee blasted the Supreme Court on Tuesday for allegedly going beyond its authority to interpret the Constitution and making law. [HuffPo]

Will Kim’s Folks Do Their Jobs Today?

Faced with the threat of jail, five deputies of Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis told a federal judge Thursday that they will comply with his order to issue marriage licenses starting Friday morning. The only holdout was deputy clerk Nathan Davis, who is the son of Kim Davis. [H-L]

Kim Davis has already become a symbol for what is euphemistically called “Freedom of Religion,” which unfortunately in recent times has just become code for anti-LGBT bigotry. [HuffPo]

We’ve been saying it for years and there’s still hardly anyone discussing Kentucky’s pension disaster. Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services on Thursday lowered its credit rating for Kentucky by one notch — down to ‘A+’ from ‘AA-‘. “The downgrade reflects our view of Kentucky’s substantially underfunded pension liabilities that are the result of chronic underfunding and that we view as placing long-term pressures on the state’s finances,” said S&P credit analyst John Sugden in a news release. [C-J/AKN]

Their goal is not to gain fame or attention, say the Colens. They just want LGBT people to see that Kim Davis has already done what she refuses to do: marry two people of the same sex. [The Advocate]

In case you missed it: Rand Paul’s top guy, Mr. Morality who was “called by God” is all over Ashley Madison. [Page One]

Kim Davis and the anti-gay hate group representing her. Don’t be fooled — the organization representing the woman refusing to give out marriage licenses in Kentucky is no ordinary law firm. They have a history of anti-gay hate and bigotry. [Click the Clicky]

Jack Conway on Kim Davis choosing to go to jail instead of complying with the law: “I understand that passions are high on both sides of this issue, but we are nation of laws and no one can defy an order from a federal judge.” [Press Release]

Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) on Thursday blasted fellow GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump as the two continued a weeks-long feud. [The Hill]

Here’s Steve Beshear on Kim Davis: Judge Bunning’s decision today speaks for itself. The future of the Rowan County Clerk continues to be a matter between her and the courts. Deputy clerks have said they will commence issuing marriage licenses beginning tomorrow. It appears that the citizens of Rowan County will now have access to all the services from the clerk’s office to which they are entitled. [Press Release]

Advances in genetic testing may eventually allow for more tailored care for people with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), researchers say. [Reuters]

A published report has identified the two finalists for Kentucky education commissioner as Christopher Koch and Stephen Pruitt. [WLKY]

Both the Nasdaq and the Dow Jones index were hit by losses Tuesday, as concerns again rose about China’s economy. The Dow is now down nearly 10 percent in 2015, after falling 469 points Tuesday to close at 16,058. [NPR]

A needle exchange program, designed to combat the spread of blood-borne diseases, will begin taking used needles and distributing clean ones Friday at the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department. [H-L]

A Florida gun manufacturer is facing criticism for creating an assault rifle with a Bible verse on it that’s meant to stop “Muslim terrorists” from using it. [HuffPo]