Bevin: Like A Domestic Violence Perp

Andy Barr never would have taken a position contrary to Trump if he weren’t under extreme pressure. [H-L]

Former first lady Laura Bush issued a rare castigation of the Trump administration on Sunday, calling family separations at the U.S. border with Mexico “immoral” and drawing parallels to World War II internment camps. [HuffPo]

Before Wathaniel Woods was sentenced to 35 years in prison Friday for killing Louisville Metro Police Officer Nick Rodman during a police chase, Rodman’s widow told the judge how their 3-year-old son now plays with his toy police cruiser, banging it with another car and saying, “Bad guy hit my daddy. My daddy died.” [C-J/AKN]

The first legal challenge to the Trump administration’s crusade for Medicaid work requirements came before a federal judge in Washington on Friday, where attorneys representing 16 low-income Kentuckians argued they would be unlawfully stripped of Medicaid coverage should the court allow the state’s waiver to take effect in July. The groups challenging the policy said the work requirements violate Congress’ original intent for the Medicaid program and instead are a mere cover for cutting tens of thousands of people from the rolls. [TPM]

Authorities are investigating the death of a female inmate found unresponsive at the Boyd County Detention Center Saturday night. [Ashland Independent]

For most Americans, access to decent, affordable rental housing remains cruelly beyond reach. Only in 22 counties in the United States is a one-bedroom home affordable to someone working 40 hours per week at federal minimum wage. [CityLab]

County officials are looking at ways to address an issue with equipment that causes damage to roadway pavement. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Amid Donald Trump’s headaches confirming cabinet secretaries, from neophyte Rex Tillerson to conflict-prone Scott Pruitt to unprepared Betsy DeVos, all of whom squeezed through, Wilbur Ross was a tonic. [Forbes]

Attorney General Andy Beshear has asked Kentucky’s public pension systems to stop investing in companies that he says are fueling the opioid addiction epidemic in the state. [WFPL]

Historically, denaturalization has been an exceedingly rare occurrence, for good reason: by the time a person is naturalized, she has lived in this country for a number of years and has passed the hurdles of obtaining entry, legal permanent residency, and, finally, citizenship. [New Yorker]

The Berea City Council will hear the second reading of the fiscal year 2018-2019 budget on Tuesday, including proposals that could impact support for an opioid treatment program, a youth food program and tourism. [Richmond Register]

Amy McGrath doesn’t have what it takes, based on her recent half-assery, and it doesn’t seem like she has a shot. But who knows? [NY Times]

A Democratic lobbyist has been convicted of bribing Kentucky’s No. 2 law enforcement officer in a case voters are likely to see in political ads for next year’s race for governor. [H-L]

In the days and weeks following the suicides of celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain and handbag designer Kate Spade, a chorus of social media users urged people with depression to not be “afraid” to ask for help. But for most Americans, fear isn’t the thing that stands in the way of therapy. It’s having no one to turn to. [HuffPo]

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Greg Fischer Is An Out-Of-Touch Elitist

A veteran lobbyist says his multiple cash payments to a high-ranking state official were loans between friends and not bribes meant to maintain a lucrative state contract for his corporate client. [H-L]

America’s largest shelter for migrant children looks more like a jail than a safe space for kids. On Wednesday, journalists were allowed inside the former Walmart store in Brownsville, Texas, now filled with more than 1,400 boys ages 10 to 17, and their reports are harrowing. [HuffPo]

A Louisville civil rights leader revealed Thursday that one of the secret guests that Mayor Greg Fischer spent $109,000 to entertain during Kentucky Derby week was the president of the National Urban League. [C-J/AKN]

A major construction company owned by the Chinese government was awarded another contract this week to work on the Trump golf club development in Dubai, further raising questions about potential conflicts of interest between Donald Trump’s presidency and his vast real estate empire. [McClatchy]

Kentucky ranks 48th for seniors’ health in the most recent America’s Health Rankings Report — a potential source of great concern, since the senior population in Kentucky, and the rest of the nation, is only growing larger. Only Mississippi and Louisiana ranked worse than Kentucky. [Richmond Register]

“The economy,” Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell declared this week, “is doing very well.” Yet the numbers that collectively sketch a picture of a vibrant economy don’t reflect reality for a range of Americans who still feel far from financially secure even nine years into an economic expansion. From drivers paying more for gas and families bearing heavier child care costs to workers still awaiting decent pay raises and couples struggling to afford a home, people throughout the economy are straining to succeed despite the economy’s gains. [AP]

Greenup County recently approved a $13.9 million budget for fiscal year 2018-2019, which is less than the prior year. [Ashland Independent]

Donald Trump’s former election campaign manager, Paul Manafort, was sent to jail pending trial on Friday after being charged with witness tampering, the latest episode in his long fall from grace. [Reuters]

Mark Filburn had a fairly simple message about preventing school shootings for the Interim Joint Education Committee Monday. [Ronnie Ellis]

Only a few months ago, the global economy appeared to be humming, with all major nations growing in unison. Now, the world’s fortunes are imperiled by an unfolding trade war. [NY Times]

Tourist spending in Barren County continues to increase, as it climbed from $70.1 million in 2013 to $97 million in 2017. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The actions of a Customs and Border Protection agent who confronted a reporter covering national security issues about her confidential sources are being examined by the CBP’s Office of Professional Responsibility, the agency said in a statement Tuesday. [WaPo]

More people need to be screaming, “FUCK MATT BEVIN!” at every opportunity. A federal judge says he hopes to rule by July 1 on whether Kentucky can carry out its controversial overhaul of the state’s Medicaid program that will require some recipients to find jobs, volunteer or lose their benefits. [H-L]

Fuck that orange piece of shit. Are you looking for more substance to Donald Trump’s vague claim that North Korea “is no longer a nuclear threat”? So was CBS News correspondent Weijia Jiang as she jostled with other reporters outside the White House Friday morning trying to get in a question with the president. [HuffPo]

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This Tim Longmeyer Mess Is Bananas

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Denmark’s tax agency seeks to recover $41 million in allegedly fraudulent tax refunds paid to several Central Kentucky-based pension plans and their representatives. [H-L]

The Trump administration separated nearly 2,000 immigrant children from parents or guardians at the border over the span of six weeks, a Department of Homeland Security official said on Friday. [HuffPo]

Kentucky uses an unconstitutional and outdated test to determine whether defendants have the mental competence to get the death penalty, the Kentucky Supreme Court ruled Thursday. [C-J/AKN]

Paul Manafort is going to jail. Special counsel Robert Mueller’s office convinced a federal judge on Friday to revoke the bail of Donald Trump’s former campaign chief after he was accused of witness tampering. [NBC News]

Diane Artist Wallace, Miriam (Mim) R. Pride and Ken Koh have been elected to the Berea College Board of Trustees. [Richmond Register]

A cabinet secretary in former Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear’s administration said Wednesday that the governor’s chief of staff pressured him to award a lucrative state contract to a company that had helped him raise money. [AP]

The Boyd County Fiscal Court will discuss what the county’s unit-based fee should be to fund the Boyd County 911 Center at its upcoming meeting on Tuesday. [Ashland Independent]

Donald Trump’s immigration policies and hurricane response in Puerto Rico are having lethal consequences for nonwhites. This is real American carnage. [USA Today]

Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear announced Thursday he is suing Walgreens, contending the pharmaceutical company did nothing to stem the rise in opioid addiction despite “having a front-row seat as opioids flooded and devastated our communities.” [Ronnie Ellis]

The New York attorney general is suing Donald Trump’s charitable foundation along with its directors — the President, his sons Eric and Donald Jr. and daughter Ivanka, alleging they violated state and federal charities law. Attorney General Barbara Underwood alleges a pattern of persistent illegal conduct over more than a decade that includes extensive unlawful political coordination with the Trump presidential campaign. [CNN]

Barren County’s comprehensive plan contains information from more than 100 sources compiled in one place to provide an overview of where the county is now and project how it may change and where it is mostly likely to grow over the next two decades. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The former deputy defense secretary for both Barack Obama and Donald Trump is criticizing the substance and framing of Trump’s abrupt cancellation of joint military exercises with South Korea as a “pretty substantial concession” to North Korea—something that both Russia and China could turn to their advantage elsewhere. Although Work was out of the administration at the time, he said that “it was about six months ago that Russia and China floated this idea” for halting the U.S.-South Korean drills. [TDB]

All over Kentucky, you hear the same thing at almost every distillery: hammering. The state’s signature bourbon industry is building like never before, adding distilling capacity and warehouses to age whiskey. The new capital investments topped $1.5 billion in 2016 with no end in sight. Will trade tariffs from the European Union, Canada and other countries become a roadblock for bourbon? It’s hard to say. [H-L]

In the four months since a mass shooting at a Parkland, Florida, high school, the number of states with so-called red flag laws has doubled, expanding the ability of courts around the nation to temporarily remove guns from people who are found to be dangerous. [HuffPo]

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Strange How Almost No Democrat Is Talking About The Tim Longmeyer Mess

Federal prosecutors say a veteran Democratic consultant and lobbyist gave “Christmas presents” to a high-ranking state official as part of a pay-to-play scheme that “attempted to reach the highest levels of state government.” [H-L]

Brandon Wolf is one of a group of survivors who made it out of Pulse nightclub alive in the early hours of July 12, 2016. His best friend, Christopher Leinonen, did not ― and Wolf has spent the two years since the massacre fighting to honor Leinonen through his advocacy. [HuffPo]

It’s probably time for Rick Sanders to be fired. Two Kentucky State Police officers and a county coroner were indicted on multiple counts Thursday including stealing hundreds of rounds of ammo and more than a dozen weapons, and illegally transporting moonshine and eyeballs. [C-J/AKN]

Environmentalists on Friday accused the Trump administration of political interference and retaliation in the ouster of Yellowstone National Park’s chief after his disputes with U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke over the park’s celebrated bison. [Reuters]

Chief Operations Officer Randy Neeley was named interim superintendent Thursday, during a special called Madison County Board of Education meeting. [Richmond Register]

When immigration officers raided a rural Pennsylvania poultry transport company early last year, a lawyer for five undocumented men arrested saw plenty of evidence their rights had been violated. [ProPublica]

The Cannonsburg Water District is working to help six families get clean drinking water after their water wells were contaminated by old, abandoned oil wells. [Ashland Independent]

Special Counsel Robert Mueller has added more charges against Paul Manafort, the ex-chairman of the Trump 2016 campaign, and indicted a top aide. [BBC]

During a hearing on Thursday, the judge presiding over the lawsuit against Kentucky’s new pension law questioned why state lawmakers were able to pass the measure out of the legislature in just one day. [WFPL]

He’s an embarrassing idiot. Donald Trump upended two days of global economic diplomacy late Saturday, refusing to sign a joint statement with America’s allies, threatening to escalate his trade war on the country’s neighbors and deriding Canada’s prime minister as “very dishonest and weak.” [NY Times]

The board of directors for the Barren County special ambulance service taxing district is waiting for more information on cost distribution before making any further decisions regarding what it will pay toward the May deficit of Barren-Metcalfe County Emergency Medical Services. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Donald Trump feuded with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and threatened to impose penalties on foreign automobile imports Saturday, capping an acrimonious meeting of the Group of Seven industrial nations that further frayed ties between the United States and its closest allies. [WaPo]

Told ya so. A court filing in the federal case against a neighbor who tackled U.S. Sen. Rand Paul says the neighbor “lost his temper” over yard debris on the property line between their homes. [H-L]

We need more than vague promises – we need real diplomacy. The agreement doesn’t appear to contain any firm promises from Pyongyang to abandon its nuclear weapon program, but rather, opens the door to ongoing discussions. [H-L]

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Don’t Hold Your Breath On Broadband

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Sad about the cuts to higher education in Kentucky? There’s a funeral for that. [H-L]

It’s been almost two decades, but Jerome Rose still remembers his one and only brush with Donald Trump like it was yesterday. A fire in Rose’s South Park Tower apartment building had just killed four of his neighbors. [HuffPo]

Yetter is full of it and likely pulling a fast one. That’s not okay. The good old days of politics in education didn’t disappear under Steve Beshear and no one believes that unless they just haven’t been paying attention. Does no one remember Terry Holliday and the nightmares he okayed? Hellur? I got the guy fired. Matt Bevin’s crew is garbage – no question – but come on. Yetter reads this stuff, she knows what’s occurred, she just refuses to acknowledge it because it upsets her that it often reveals Democratic Party corruption. [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump told former FBI Director James Comey that he didn’t stay in Russia overnight during his 2013 visit to the country — part of his explanation for why the salacious allegations from the Steele dossier couldn’t be true, according to the Comey memos that were released Thursday evening. But public evidence — from previous news reports, as well as NBC News’ own reporting — strongly suggests that Trump did stay at least one night in Moscow in November 2013. [NBC News]

Kentucky farmers plan to grow the lowest amount of burley tobacco on record this year, according to a new report. [Richmond Register]

Rex Tillerson’s team was fighting again. “So, who’s going to go in with him?” Margaret Peterlin, his chief of staff, was saying. She looked me up and down with an expression that suggested she’d discovered a pest in the house. [New Yorker]

Surely no one is holding their breath. Construction crews will begin installing a fiber optic infrastructure in Boyd County this summer as part of the long-discussed Kentucky Wired high-speed internet project, according to a project liaison. [Ashland Independent]

The National Rifle Association (NRA) doesn’t want to talk about its relationship with Russia. For months, the gun lobby has avoided questions from lawmakers on its ties to Russian officials specifically sanctioned by Washington — all the more after the NRA’s primary contact in Russia, Alexander Torshin, was named in the latest round of U.S. sanctions. [ThinkProgress]

A Franklin Circuit Judge said Thursday he wants to proceed expeditiously toward a ruling in a suit challenging the legality and constitutionality of a pension reform bill recently enacted by the Kentucky General Assembly. [Ronnie Ellis]

Trump administration officials, seeking ways to lower drug costs, are targeting pharmaceutical companies that refuse to provide samples of their products to generic drug companies, making it impossible to create inexpensive generic copies of a brand-name medicine. [NY Times]

More cases in Hart Circuit Court were dismissed Friday on motions by the commonwealth regarding matters involving the Horse Cave Police Department. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The Democratic National Committee filed a multimillion-dollar lawsuit Friday against the Russian government, the Trump campaign and the WikiLeaks organization alleging a far-reaching conspiracy to disrupt the 2016 campaign and tilt the election to Donald Trump. [WaPo]

Gross. The polarizing nominee to lead the CIA is an avid University of Kentucky basketball fan, but she’s also been called “the head cheerleader of waterboarding” by one of the state’s Republican U.S. senators. [H-L]

A heavily militarized police force of some 400 officers aggressively patrolled a small neo-Nazi rally in this city 40 miles southwest of Atlanta on Saturday and arrested about 10 counterprotesters, many for the crime of wearing a mask. [HuffPo]

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Longtime Con Artist, Bill Ryan, Finally Got Kicked In His Corrupt Ass But He’s Still Walking Free

Criminal charges continue to pile up for a former judge accused of rape and human trafficking in Northern Kentucky. [H-L]

Repeal of the Affordable Care Act is back on the agenda, with Republicans suddenly talking about a bill that, until recently, few people in either party had taken all that seriously. [HuffPo]

Jefferson County Public Schools has changed the way it instructs kids at some schools after a state oversight group found that the district was breaking state law by letting noncertified staff teach classes. [C-J/AKN]

Trump addressed a full session of the United Nations General Assembly for the first time on Tuesday morning. [The Hill]

Mammoth Cave National Park has seen an increase in visitors this year, according to MCNP Superintendent Barclay Trimble, who spoke during the Barren County Fiscal Court’s regular meeting Tuesday. [Glasgow Daily Times]

As deaths mount in America’s opioid crisis, communities on the front lines face a hidden toll: the financial cost. [Reuters]

A member of former Gov. Steve Beshear’s administration violated the Executive Branch Code of Ethics by soliciting other state employees for contributions to Beshear’s 2011 re-election campaign, according to the Executive Branch Ethics Commission. If anyone wants to know why Bill Ryan got investigated? Feel free to ask me. [Ronnie Ellis]

On Friday, Donald Trump told pool reporters he still believes former National Security Adviser Susan Rice did something wrong when she unmasked Trump administration officials late last year. [ThinkProgress]

A utility tax in the Greenup County School District could bring in from $750,000 to $1 million yearly and largely offset anticipated state budget cuts and additional pension expenses, the school board learned Monday. [Ashland Independent]

Hiking, yoga, reading, prayer, chardonnay (but not Xanax): These are the things, along with family and friends, that helped Hillary Clinton after her stunning defeat in the presidential election last year. But these are gentle pastimes. What about kicking things — or weeping? [NY Times]

From different states and opposing parties, West Virginia’s Patrick Morrisey and Kentucky’s Andy Beshear have joined forces to go after something all too common in Appalachia: the scourge of drug addiction. [Richmond Register]

This is what happens when you put stupid people in charge of the most important parts of government. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said Sunday that the United States is considering closing the U.S. Embassy in Havana in response to mysterious hearing problems that have left at least 21 employees with serious health issues. [WaPo]

Six current or former members of a board that oversees a Fayette County farmland preservation program have received millions from the program, records show. [H-L]

In testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee originally scheduled for Tuesday, Donald Trump’s personal lawyer plans to insist he never colluded with Russia during the 2016 election and to outline the public scrutiny he and his family have faced. [HuffPo]

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Bigots In Frankfort Are Harming Kentucky’s Economy But Wealthy Liberals Aren’t Much Better

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A bit player in the bribery scandal involving former Kentucky Personnnel Cabinet Secretary Tim Longmeyer was sentenced Friday to two years in prison. Myron Harrod must report to prison by 2 p.m. Sept. 13 under the order from U.S. District Judge Karen K. Caldwell. [H-L]

Vladimir Putin said on Saturday he thought his U.S. counterpart Donald Trump had been satisfied with his assertions that Russia had not meddled in the U.S. presidential election. Speaking at the end of a G20 summit in Germany where the two leaders met face-to-face for the first time, Putin said he believed he had been able to establish a personal relationship with Trump, and that the initial groundwork had been laid for an improvement in U.S.-Russian ties. [HuffPo]

In a move the state says would save money but cut another 9,000 people from Medicaid, Gov. Matt Snowflake Bevin’s administration is seeking permission from the federal government for more changes to the state-federal health plan that serves 1.4 million Kentuckians. [C-J/AKN]

Weeks after the Food and Drug Administration said opioid painkiller Opana ER should be removed from the market amid concerns about the potential for abuse, Endo Pharmaceuticals has agreed to pull the drug, which has been linked to serious outbreaks of HIV and hepatitis C. [Consumerist]

A catchy new brand and logo for Kentucky’s Adult Education Department represents more than a cosmetic name change, according to state officials and local educators. [Ashland Independent]

A senior Senate Republican on Sunday said President Trump’s plan to work with Russia on cybersecurity is “pretty close” to the “dumbest idea I’ve ever heard.” [The Hill]

The Madison County Detention Center housed its highest number of inmates ever Monday. The 184-bed facility held 409 inmates, according to Jailer Doug Thomas. That number did not include about 20 other inmates being housed in a separate county, Thomas said. [Richmond Register]

A U.S. appeals court on Friday rejected Hawaii’s request to issue an emergency order blocking parts of Donald Trump’s temporary travel ban while the state sought clarification over what groups of people would be barred from travel. [Reuters]

Protesters stood at one entrance of Barren River Plaza shopping center off L. Rogers Wells Boulevard on Thursday, holding signs and shouting “health care not wealth care” as they waited for U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Garbage, to arrive. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Two weeks after Donald J. Trump clinched the Republican presidential nomination last year, his eldest son arranged a meeting at Trump Tower in Manhattan with a Russian lawyer who has connections to the Kremlin, according to confidential government records described to The New York Times. [NY Times]

Louisville IS Kentucky and suggesting otherwise shows extreme ignorance on the part of Brandon Coan. Ditching that superiority complex that wealthy liberals like Coan in Louisville love to exude will be necessary if they ever want to stop being hated by the rest of the Commonwealth. And until they stop hanging around exclusively with other wealthy progressives? Nothing will change. Ever. They’ll never be able to beat people like idiot Matt Bevin or butthurt Jeff Hoover. Note: Coan, you may recall, is the guy from Greg Fischer’s 2010 race who spent every waking moment attacking anyone and everyone questioning Fischer. He’s now on the Louisville Metro Council thanks to sizable family fortune. Yes, money won that race. [WFPL]

Trump vowed Sunday to “move forward in working constructively with Russia,” including forming a “cyber security unit” between the two countries, after Russian President Vladimir Putin denied any involvement in Russia’s interference in the 2016 U.S. election. [WaPo]

A new state law aimed at limiting medical practice lawsuits in Kentucky is unconstitutional, a Kentucky woman claims in a lawsuit filed last week. [H-L]

Hackers have been targeting companies that operate nuclear power stations around America, prompting the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI to issue an urgent warning about the severity of the threat. [HuffPo]

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