Of Course Racism Is A Big Problem

In 2006, senators of the University of Kentucky’s student government passed a resolution to remove a mural in Memorial Hall that showed scenes of state history, including black workers in a tobacco field, black musicians playing for white dancers, and a Native American with a tomahawk. They told then-President Lee Todd that it was degrading to ethnic and racial groups. [H-L]

More than half of Americans know someone who has abused prescription painkillers or died from an overdose, or has taken these medications themselves to get high, as the opioid epidemic continues to spread, according to a new poll. [HuffPo]

The chief justice of the Kentucky Supreme Court has delayed until next week his decision on whether to remove Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens from all criminal cases. [C-J/AKN]

Six decades after the Brown v. Board of Education decision that determined that segregating white and black children is unconstitutional, American schools are drifting back toward racial segregation. [ThinkProgress]

With most of its Phase 1 expansion plans complete, the soon to be renamed Madison Airport board unveiled its Phase 2 plans Monday, including a new terminal building. [Richmond Register]

The state of Arkansas must record the names of both partners in a same-sex marriage on the birth certificates of their children, a judge ruled on Monday. [Reuters]

Drugs and addiction in the workplace are common in this area, Mike Wirzfeld, an occupational-medicine administrator at Our Lady of Bellefonte Hospital told members of the Rotary Club of Ashland during a meetin Monday. [Ashland Independent]

Veteran European law enforcement officials, one of them Muslim, reflect on the roots of the Paris attacks, the tense aftermath and the debate about the effectiveness of counterterror forces. [ProPublica]

Oh, look, teevee lady has done another “investigation” that’s been done countless times. This time it’s a look at special deputies in Kentucky — something she learned about on Page One, according to her colleagues. Seems there’s a bunch of bad blood among those at WKYT. [WKYT]

About half of Americans, 49 percent, say that racism is “a big problem,” according to a new national poll conducted by CNN and the Kaiser Family Foundation. [The Hill]

The Tri-Cities was awarded the designation of Kentucky Trail Town at a ceremony held at the Betty Howard Memorial Coal Miner’s Theater in Benham on Monday. The designation is the culmination of several years of work on the part of the cities of Benham, Lynch and Cumberland. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

NPR’s Rachel Martin speaks with Anne Richard, Assistant Secretary of State for Population, Refugees and Migration, about the screening process refugees go through before entering the United States. [NPR]

Students and citizens lined Chestnut Street on Monday to affirm their unity in the wake of racial and homophobic slurs and harassment directed toward Berea College students during homecoming weekend this month. [H-L]

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Kentucky Leaders Embarrass Thinking People

They took time to write about all this but are still ignoring the dozens of scandals in Montgomery County. Powell County Superintendent Michael Tate said Saturday that school district officials contacted Kentucky State Police after investigating allegations of inappropriate conduct by members of Powell County High School’s boys basketball team. [H-L]

Rand Paul’s (R-Racist Cookie Tree) tough proposals aimed at limiting the admission of refugees in the wake of the Paris terror attacks are disappointing libertarian opinion leaders, days after a presidential debate performance in which he appeared to return to his independent roots. [HuffPo]

Wasn’t this news a few weeks back? An evangelist who organized rallies in support of Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis is planning to run for the state House of Representatives against Democratic House Majority Leader Rocky Adkins. [C-J/AKN]

We’re looking at you, Rand Paul, and the rest of the bigoted cowards this state sends to Washington. Acutely aware of the consequences to Jews who were unable to flee Nazism, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum looks with concern upon the current refugee crisis. While recognizing that security concerns must be fully addressed, we should not turn our backs on the thousands of legitimate refugees. [United States Holocaust Memorial Museum]

The Barren County School district took another step toward breaking ground on the long-awaited Red Cross Elementary School renovation at Wednesday’s special-called Board of Education and Barren County School District Finance Corp. meeting. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Billionaire Donald Trump continues to dominate the polls and drive the debate in the Republican presidential nomination, staying a step ahead of his competitors on the issues of immigration, border security and the Syrian refugee crisis. [BBC]

The Boyd County Fiscal Court spent three hours in closed session trying to “fine tune” an agreement regarding future operations of the embattled Big Run Landfill. [Ashland Independent]

As President Obama tries to save his plan to shield some five million people from deportation, immigration activists have been marching and planning more demonstrations to support him. [NPR]

A racially-motivated threat found in a Madison Central High School boys’ bathroom stall Thursday has many parents upset, not so much because of the threat’s contents, but because they were not notified. [Richmond Register]

In recent days, presidential candidates and even the American Medical Association have griped about rising drug prices, pointing to brand-name blockbusters with splashy ad campaigns. [ProPublica]

The Rowan County Board of Education Tuesday discussed a plan to make changes to the district’s bullying policy. The changes deal primarily with cyber-bullying or harassment via social media and the Internet, hazing, and other forms of harassment. [The Morehead News]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Still Has No Health Care Alternative) is making a bull rush at the conservatives running for president who are withholding support from an ObamaCare repeal package that they feel doesn’t go far enough. [The Hill]

Fayette County had a higher rate of children living in foster care from 2012 to 2014 than the state rate, according to child well-being rankings released recently by Kentucky Youth Advocates. [H-L]

Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson said Saturday that he wants to expand the government’s surveillance operations aimed at potential terrorist threats, even beyond tracking American Muslims as rivalDonald Trump has suggested. [HuffPo]

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Harmon Likely To Buckle Under The Pressure?

The 66 percent of Owsley County that gets health coverage through Medicaid now must reconcile itself with the 70 percent that voted for Republican Governor-elect Matt Bevin, who pledged to cut the state’s Medicaid program and close the state-run Kynect health insurance exchange. The community’s largest-circulation newspaper, the Three Forks Tradition in Beattyville, did not say much about Kynect ahead of the election. Instead, its editorials roasted Obama and Hillary Clinton, gay marriage, Islam, “liberal race peddlers,” “liberal media,” black criminals and “the radical Black Lives Matter movement.” [John Cheves]

Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) has consistently voiced his disapproval of President Barack Obama’s foreign policy decisions, but on Thursday his criticism went a step further, implying the president is an “idiot” for how he’s handled U.S. involvement in the Syrian conflict during an Iowa campaign stop. [HuffPo]

Auditor-elect Mike Harmon said he will continue to push on the issue of untested rape kits, adopting a priority of outgoing state Auditor Adam Edelen, when he is sworn in in January. [C-J/AKN]

Global stocks are set for a short-term sell-off on Monday after Islamist militants launched coordinated attacks across Paris that killed 129 people, but few strategists expect a prolonged economic impact or change in prevailing market directions. [Reuters]

Kentucky Chamber of Commerce President Dave Adkisson says he’s at odds with Governor-elect Matt Bevin over dismantling Kentucky’s health care exchange. [WFPL]

Maybe Democrats avoiding saying “Islam” because they’re not backward-ass bigots? [Politico]

It may have come a little late, but outgoing Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear on Friday made a passionate defense of his decision to expand Medicaid and offer a state-run health exchange, programs Republican Gov.-elect Matt Bevin promised on the campaign trail to dismantle. [Ronnie Ellis]

For the first time, doctors have breached the human brain’s protective layer to deliver cancer-fighting drugs. [BBC]

The process of getting an interim judge appointed to fill the seat of District Judge John T. Alexander, who is moving to circuit court effective Dec. 2, is on hold until a member of the nominating commission can be replaced. The delay is due to the discovery that one of the nominating commission members is ineligible to serve. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The U.S. Supreme Court is once again entering the debate over abortion. The court said Friday that it will hear arguments later this term testing the constitutionality of a sweeping Texas abortion law that, if upheld, would allow the kind of major abortion restrictions not permitted in more than 40 years. [NPR]

During a Madison County School Board of Education meeting Thursday evening, Chair John Lackey announced that he would like to see the district “phase out” middle school contact sports. [Richmond Register]

Maybe Republican Matt Bevin isn’t going to burn down Frankfort after all. Nah, he’ll be just another Republican cut from the cloth of Ernie Fletcher. Rather, cut from the cloth of the Ernie Fletcher staffers who ended up getting half of Fletcher’s administration INDICTED! [Roll Call]

Nope, Matt Bevin isn’t going to care about conservation any time soon. You can put lipstick on a pig bug it’s still a pig. [H-L]

About three-quarters of the Earth’s surface is covered with water. But how did it get there? While some scientists believe water was delivered by icy space rocks smashing into the planet after it was formed, others have argued that water has been on Earth since its formation — and new research indicates they might be right. [HuffPo]

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Morehead Is Seriously Over Kim Davis

More than $3 million has been awarded to provide heroin and prescription drug abuse treatment for Kentucky jail inmates and for an injectable treatment designed to prevent relapse as offenders leave custody. [H-L]

Top Republicans’ growing support for privatization of the Department of Veterans Affairs health care system is frightening some veterans groups. [HuffPo]

An estimated 20,000 undocumented residents in Kentucky were left in limbo this week after a federal appeals court upheld an injunction on President Obama’s executive action meant to shield millions from deportation. [C-J/AKN]

U.S. District Court Judge Richard Leon ordered the NSA to immediately stop vacuuming up domestic telephone records on Monday, writing that “the loss of constitutional freedoms for even one day is significant harm.” But the order was limited to one plaintiff in the case: a California lawyer and his law firm. [The Intercept]

If each U.S. state were its own country, Kentucky would have the seventh-highest incarceration rate in the world, according to a recent analysis by the Prison Policy Initiative. [WFPL]

Surprise! Bloated, wealthy Republican refusing to have a conversation about race. [The Hill]

Progress is finally being made on two long-delayed county road/bridge repair projects. The Madison Fiscal Court meeting in Berea on Tuesday morning approved an agreement to accept $200,000 in state discretionary funds to redo work on a portion of Old Wilderness Trail done about two years ago that did not “hold up.” [Richmond Register]

Thousands of protesters took to the streets across the U.S. on Tuesday to demand a $15-an-hour minimum wage and union rights for fast food workers, a campaign intended to attract support from national political candidates ahead of the 2016 elections. [Reuters]

Members of the Grayson City Council met Tuesday night to further discuss the option of the city creating a smoke-free workplace environment. [Ashland Independent]

For at least one sergeant in the U.S. military, this year’s Veterans Day may take on more significance than any other day to commemorate military service members. [ThinkProgress]

Wondering how the hometown paper of Kim Davis is covering her shenanigans these days? Just barely. Because Morehead is not Kim Davis. Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis has been denied an appeal to reverse rulings made by U. S. District Judge David L. Bunning after she refused to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [The Morehead News]

Donald Trump has defended his hardline stance on immigration, a day after it was attacked by fellow Republican presidential candidates on national TV. [BBC]

The image that went viral last month of rapper Macklemore sleeping with his infant daughter next to him made Dr. Susan Pollack cringe. [H-L]

The G20 countries spend almost four times as much to prop up fossil fuel production as they do to subsidize renewable energy, calling into question their commitment to halting climate change, a think tank said on Thursday. [HuffPo]

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Will Andy Stand Up To Gov. Butt Cramp?

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Lexington’s police department hopes to have its officers equipped with body cameras by June. [H-L]

Winners and losers were hard to find, as the defining feature of Tuesday night’s Republican presidential debate was its lack of definition. In stark contrast to the first three GOP face-offs, each of which carved an underlying narrative that drove subsequent news coverage, Tuesday’s forum had many moments that stuck out, but few that appeared likely to have a lasting effect on the contours of the wide-open race. [HuffPo]

Amid a national push for more openness in law enforcement, the Louisville Metro Police Department has decided to regularly share information on such subjects as violent crime, crime victims, police shootings and assaults on officers. [C-J/AKN]

Interrupted midway through answering a question about how he would reform the nation’s tax code, Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul was reportedly escorted off stage roughly an hour into Tuesday’s GOP primary debate after falling below the minimum 2.5 percent polling threshold necessary for participating in the forum. [The Onion]

The last time Kentucky elected a Republican governor he ran into trouble with the Democratic attorney general. [Ronnie Ellis]

The White House says it is making strides in its push to end homelessness among veterans and help returning service members get an education. [The Hill]

One of two Democrats to survive Election Day, attorney general-elect Andy Beshear, said the mission of the attorney general’s office has not changed during an announcement of his transition team Tuesday in the Capitol Rotunda. [State Journal]

All recent U.S. military veterans and their families will now be offered in-state tuition rates to public colleges and universities throughout the country, the White House said on Wednesday. [Reuters]

Academic standards may be working for students in Kentucky, Trey Grayson, but you’re ignoring the reality that there is almost no accountability for educators. Proof: everything published here on Page One. [Trey Grayson]

Republican Matt Bevin is the latest political newcomer to make a splash. The newly elected governor of Kentucky has never held office before and says he plans to shake up politics in the state. [NPR]

Oh, look, the Kentucky Baptist Convention is straight up lying about Planned Parenthood. Sooooo Christlike. Sickened and brokenhearted by reports of Planned Parenthood selling the remains of hundreds of thousands of aborted babies each year, Kentucky Baptists called on lawmakers to immediately defund the government-funded agency. [Ashland Independent]

The chief of the Justice Department’s civil rights division says “too many barriers still exist in courts across America” when it comes to providing lawyers to poor criminal defendants. [NPR]

Matt Bevin’s plans to repeal Steve Beshear’s health care reforms could face opposition from Beshear’s son, the newly elected attorney general. [H-L]

The growing calls for a $15 minimum wage have infiltrated not just the Democratic primary campaign, but now the Republican one as well. But while Democrats are debating how high it should be raised, Republicans are explaining why they think it should remain where it’s been since 2009. [HuffPo]

Some Monday Evening Gloom And Doom

The most important newspaper in the state has ignored scandal after scandal in Montgomery County, just 20 minutes away from its offices, but has focused non-stop on stupid issues like this. In places hours and hours away. Really, freaking out about a student prank involving bible verses? Really, it’s Nancy Rodriguez all over again. Maybe worse this time. [H-L]

Rand Paul’s (R-Cookie Tree) new book sold fewer than 500 copies in two weeks. TWO WEEKS! Can you imagine? More people wanted Jake’s Kim Davis magnets on Twitter than bought the little man’s new book. [HuffPo]

House Democrats met Friday to talk about moving forward following Tuesday’s devastating losses in statewide elections and to steel themselves against the possibility that some of their members may switch parties or take jobs in the Bevin administration, jeopardizing their party’s hold on the chamber. [C-J/AKN]

The fossil fuel industry had already managed to shape a bill moving rapidly through Congress last summer, gaining provisions to ease its ability to export natural gas. But one key objective remained elusive: a measure limiting the authority of local communities to slow the construction of pipelines because of environmental concerns. [IBT]

Matt London took some time off Thursday from his day job to harvest soybeans on a seven-acre plot near Hiseville-Bear Wallow Road. He, like other grain farmers in the area, is a little later in the year harvesting because of weather, which is the consistent seasonal variable in agriculture. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) says that when it comes to foreign policy, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), a fellow GOP presidential candidate, and Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton are “the same person.” [The Hill]

It’s not every day the richest man in the world visits eastern Kentucky. Bill Gates and his wife Melinda were spotted eating at Texas Roadhouse in Pikeville and snapped cell phone photos of Gates enjoying his meal went viral. [Ashland Independent]

U.S. and coalition forces are likely to increase air strikes against Islamic State targets in Iraq and Syria in coming weeks after a lull in September and October, the head of U.S. Air Forces Central Command said Saturday. [Reuters]

Dr. Scott Davison, a professor and department chair at Morehead State University, Tuesday won the three remaining years on the vacant seat on the Rowan County Board of Education. [The Morehead News]

The journalists were assassinated on American soil, one after another. Duong Trong Lam was the first. He was 27 years old and ran a Vietnamese-language publication called Cai Dinh Lang, which he mailed to immigrants around the country. A gunman found him as he walked out of his San Francisco apartment building one morning and shot him, a single bullet piercing his pulmonary artery, just above the heart. [ProPublica]

A new report says more than one in 10 babies are born premature in Kentucky. The state has a premature birth rate of 10.7 percent, ranking it 38th in the U.S., according to the 2015 Premature Birth Rate Report Card. The report gave Kentucky a “D” grade for its premature birth rate. [WFPL]

The State Department has released a new chronology adding perspective to how the diplomatic agency, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and other elements of the U.S. government scrambled to respond to the attack on the U.S. facilities in Benghazi, Libya, on September 11, 2012. [Politico]

Handguns, narcotics and $30,000 in cash were stolen during a break-in of the Simpsonville Police Department, Kentucky State Police said in a release. [H-L]

Surprise! There are a bunch of Kentuckians on this list. The hackivist collective Anonymous released a much-anticipated list of people it claims are members or supporters of the Ku Klux Klan on Thursday night. [HuffPo]

Like It Or Not, Coal Is Quickly Dying

The latest report on coal production and employment in Kentucky reinforces how far and fast the industry has fallen. [H-L]

Former President George H.W. Bush takes some unexpected swipes at Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld, key members of his son’s administration, over their reaction to the Sept. 11 attacks, in a new biography of the 41st president. [HuffPo]

The State Capitol saw the first steps Wednesday in a dramatic five-week transition of power that is spreading both hope and concern across the commonwealth. [C-J/AKN]

Matt Bevin may have won his race for Kentucky governor on a vow to dismantle Obamacare, but he’s already backpedaling from his promise to uproot the law that is providing health care to nearly 1 in 10 people in his state. [Politico]

AT&T has filed a protest against a Kentucky state government project to expand broadband fiber throughout the state. The telecommunications giant claims KentuckyWired has an unfair advantage in the bidding process. In its protest, AT&T states KentuckyWired “almost certainly has confidential, inside information that no other bidder could have.” AT&T said KentuckyWired Executive Director Steve Rucker was deputy secretary of the state’s Finance and Administration Cabinet when the agency started developing its request for proposal. [WFPL]

America is undergoing a religious polarization. With more adults shedding their religious affiliations, as evidenced in the latest from the Pew Research Center, the country is becoming more secular. In the past seven years, using the new Pew data, Americans who identify with a religion declined six points. Overall, belief in God, praying daily and religious service attendance have all dropped since 2007. [WaPo]

Tuesday a picture of Bill Gates and his wife eating in Pikeville shared all over social media left many wondering why one of the richest men alive was in the area.

Accreditation agencies are supposed to make sure that colleges are putting students in a position to succeed. That’s not happening at schools overseen by one accreditor in particular. [ProPublica]

The easy explanation is that Democrat Jack Conway lost Tuesday’s election but Republican Matt Bevin also won it. [Ronnie Ellis]

If Rep. Steve King (R-IA) has his way, undocumented immigrants could be deported for protesting in congressional buildings in Washington, D.C. His office is circulating a bill titled “Ending the Sanctuary Capitol Policy Act of 2015,” which would authorize the Capitol Police to turn over undocumented immigrants protesting or rallying on Capitol Hill grounds for potential deportation proceedings, according to a copy of the bill obtained by ThinkProgress. [ThinkProgress]

Access to affordable health care and finances – with some common ground between parties on fixing retirement funds – were among the top issues on the minds of area residents as they went to the polls to vote in Tuesday’s general election. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Thousands of federal inmates are getting out of prison because of a change in the way the U.S. government sentences drug criminals. It’s part of a broader movement to reconsider tough-on-crime laws that were passed during the War on Drugs. [NPR]

The man accused of shooting Richmond police officer Daniel Ellis Wednesday had absconded parole after serving a prison sentence for manufacturing methamphetamine, records show. [H-L]

The long-awaited text of a landmark U.S.-backed Pacific trade deal was released on Thursday, revealing the details of a pact aimed at freeing up commerce in 40 percent of the world’s economy but criticized for its opacity. [HuffPo]