The Gays Are Ruining Everything In KY

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When the U.S. Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage this summer, Kentucky and many other states tweaked their marriage license forms to give no hint of a person’s gender. [H-L]

GOP presidential candidate Mike Huckabee supports Paraguay’s decision to deny an abortion to a 10-year-old rape victim, he revealed in an interview Sunday. [HuffPo]

Previously sealed evidence filed in two cases related to a Central Kentucky bourbon and steroid organized crime ring has been released following a Franklin Circuit Court judge’s ruling. [C-J/AKN]

The Pentagon’s massive new Law of War Manual drew criticism from the New York Times editorial board on Monday for its section on how to treat journalists, which the Times said would “make their work more dangerous, cumbersome and subject to censorship.” [The Intercept]

More than 100 volunteers combed Boonesborough Beach on Saturday morning, picking up litter. They also picked up trash on the Clark County side of the Kentucky River. [Richmond Register]

Government employees have an obligation to follow the letter of the law despite their religious convictions—or else resign the offices they hold. [The Atlantic]

There have already been 10 suicides in Boyd County investigated by the coroner’s office, according to Coroner Mark Hammond. Four of these happened just in the month of July; two on the same day. [Ashland Independent]

With a rise nationally in fatal heroin overdoses, the White House on Monday will announce a plan pairing law enforcement officials with public health workers in an effort to emphasize treatment rather than prosecution of addicts, the Washington Post said. [Reuters]

A few times a year, Anna Lucio leaves her office and heads back to her roots. “Everybody’s got their own way of seeing it,” she said. Lucio grew up on a piece of land in Kentucky that welcomed the shade needed for Ginseng. “The first time we went in the woods- It’s that excitement that you can be able to find it, and even if you’ve seen a million, you’d be like, ‘Oh! I found one!'” [WKYT]

American Red Cross CEO Gail McGovern has long portrayed her organization as a beacon of openness, once declaring “we made a commitment that we want to lead the effort in transparency.” But when the Government Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress, opened an inquiry last year into the Red Cross’ disaster work, McGovern tried to get it killed behind the scenes. [ProPublica]

The Mayor of Shepherdsville was arraigned Tuesday morning on a prostitution charge. Shepherdsville Mayor Scott Ellis was not in court and was represented by his attorney. [WDRB]

Since last week’s indictments of three top political aides to Ron and Rand Paul, new details have emerged about the Ron Paul campaign’s scheme in 2012 to buy the endorsement of Kent Sorenson, who was then an influential Republican state senator in Iowa. [Mother Jones]

Some executives dream of retiring to a big boat on a big body of water, and that is just what James Street did. Since retiring as Eastern Kentucky University’s vice president for administration in July 2013, Street and his wife, Stacey, have spent a lot of time on their 34-foot Beneteau 331 sailboat on Kentucky Lake and their Catalina 22 on Cave Run. [H-L]

People who live in low-income urban areas tend not to have access to the green spaces that are more easily found in rural and suburban communities. But the lack of connection with nature in concrete jungles is changing, according to NPR’s Paige Pfleger. Across the country, various eco-non-profits are populating community centers and high schools with communal gardens. [HuffPo]

Rough Week In The Rand Paul World

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Kim Davis is a miserable bigot and a judge put her in her place. [H-L]

Let’s all just bite our tongues and allow our eyes to roll back in our heads. Democratic state Treasurer Todd Hollenbach was the odd man out of statewide elections this year, unable to seek re-election because of term limits while some of the biggest names in Kentucky politics are campaigning for governor and attorney general. But the 55-year-old hopes to stay in public office as he filed Tuesday to run for district judge in the 30th judicial district of Jefferson County. [H-L]

When Republicans carry on about what a “disaster” the Affordable Care Act is, they rarely acknowledge that the law is helping millions of people get health insurance. But we don’t need Republicans to tell us these things. We have data. [HuffPo]

Guessing this probably isn’t good news for the Rand Paul world. [C-J/AKN]

For Central American migrants, the journey through Mexico has become a gauntlet of violence at the hands of criminals, drug cartels—and even the authorities. [The Nation]

Magistrate Larry Combs, who represents Berea and southern Madison County on the fiscal court, said Tuesday his district was not getting a fair share of the $875,000 the county received this year for rural roads from the state fuel tax. [Richmond Register]

Newly declassified snippets fo Haldeman’s diary highlight how much we still don’t know about Watergate and the Nixon Administration. [Jstor]

A trial date has been set in a lawsuit filed against the Glasgow Independent Schools Board of Education regarding a claim that the board violated Kentucky’s open meetings law. [Glasgow Daily Times]

China further devalued the yuan on Wednesday, adding more strains to Washington’s relations with Beijing after Tuesday’s surprise weakening of its currency drew condemnation from U.S. lawmakers. [WSJ]

The Kentucky Department of Insurance recently approved insurers’ requests for rate hikes. And all but one of the 13 insurers selling individual and small-group plans in the state are raising rates. [WFPL]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), a Democratic presidential candidate, snatched his first major union endorsement on Monday from the nation’s largest organization of nurses. [The Hill]

Attorney General Jack Conway on Tuesday joined Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi and 15 other states in a legal action against the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for illegally invalidating the individual air quality protection plans in each of those states. Because he wasn’t pandering enough already? [Ashland Independent]

Rand Paul, whose campaign is struggling with deep fundraising and organizational problems, has fixated on throwing grenades at GOP frontrunner Donald Trump, hardly the strategy of a thriving campaign. [Politico]

Some Somerset council members are not happy with the city’s lawsuit challenging the authority of the state auditor to do special examinations of city governments, but the court action will go forward. [H-L]

While many Republican presidential candidates continue to bash Planned Parenthood for controversial videos revealing its work on aborted fetal tissue research, frontrunner Donald Trump has decided zig where his rivals have zagged. [HuffPo]

Maybe Rand & Donald Will Slap Fight

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The Tricorder wielded by Star Trek’s Dr. Jim McCoy is the go-to, whiz-bang medical technology best known to the masses. Seemingly able to do everything but give birth to a human, the gadget continues to be a mostly unobtainable medical aspiration. But in ways that would have been no less fantastic 50 years ago, the digital age in medicine is changing lives. [H-L]

President Barack Obama isn’t backing down from comments linking Republicans and Iranian hard-liners, telling CNN in a recent interview that the comparison was accurate. [HuffPo]

Befitting the strangest competitive race for governor of Kentucky in living memory, the political speaking at the 135th Fancy Farm Picnic had its weird moments, brought to you mainly by Republican nominee Matt Bevin. But in saying hardly anything substantive, he did manage to illustrate the strange campaign he’s running. [Al Cross]

Several Planned Parenthood officials and three private bio-medical firms were targeted on Friday by a U.S. congressional panel as lawmakers dig deeper into a controversy swirling around the women’s health organization. [Reuters]

As students across WAVE Country get ready to head back to school two Republican state senators plan to renew their efforts on legislation that would prohibit Kentucky’s school districts from starting classes before Aug. 26. [WAVE3]

Robert Freeman has been helping people extract public information from New York state agencies for four decades. He is the executive director of the New York Committee on Open Government, a division of the New York Department of State that advises the public on the Freedom of Information Law — the state statute authorizing access to public records. [ProPublica]

The Lewis County clerk’s and sheriff’s offices lack adequate segregation of duties, according to Kentucky Auditor Adam Edelen. [Ashland Independent]

Gov. John Kasich (R-OH) is the rare GOP presidential candidate who has acknowledged that climate change is a real problem requiring us to “protect” the “creation that the Lord has given us.” But just days after earning plaudits for his relatively moderate-sounding approach in Thursday’s GOP presidential debate, Kasich adopted a climate-change denialist approach on Sunday. [ThinkProgress]

This caused an Ernie Fletcher flashback for some reason. The concept of noodling turns fishing on its head. Let me first say, I haven’t tried it, but I’m fascinated by the concept. [BGDN]

Wild bonobos use a single high-pitched call in a variety of contexts, showing a flexibility in their communication that was thought to be uniquely human. [BBC]

An area festival showcased the wide variety of hemp – a crop many are hoping to bring back to the Bluegrass. [WLKY]

Today there are 7.3 billion people on planet Earth, according to the United Nations. If you think that’s a lot … just wait. [NPR]

Less than a month ago, Rand Paul wouldn’t talk about Donald Trump. On a break from the presidential campaign trail in mid-July, Paul demurred as reporters asked him about the bombastic GOP frontrunner at events in Elizabethtown and Louisville. [H-L]

Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) preserved support from his hawkish pro-Israel base with his promise to vote down the Iran nuclear deal on Thursday night — but will now have to answer to a group of anti-war liberal advocacy organizations who claim that Schumer’s opposition to the diplomatic accord with Iran renders him unfit for the role of the party’s leader in the Senate. [HuffPo]

FBI Has Job Security In Kentucky Corruption

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Federal crime-fighters started an outreach campaign Friday to recruit Kentuckians to help uncover government corruption and end the state’s “fairly sordid” history of scandals that rob trust in government, law enforcement officials said. [H-L]

Kurdish militia fighting Islamic State in Syria accused Turkey on Saturday of targeting it at least four times in the past week, calling the attacks provocative and hostile. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin told a thoroughbred industry group Thursday that he supports the continuance of the historical horse racing games that opponents say are slot machines. [C-J/AKN]

Sen. Rand Paul is attributing GOP rival Donald Trump’s rise in the polls to a momentary “loss of sanity.” [The Hill]

We’re still effectively operating debtors prisons in Kentucky with taxpayer dollars. Jailing people who can’t afford to pay fines. [Richmond Register]

Woah, it’s like Steve Henry but in Pennsylvania. Fascinating how that always works. [Reuters]

The Boyd County School District is joining in the fight against a landfill that opponents say is a stinky nuisance. [Ashland Independent]

Democrat Hillary Clinton sought to persuade African-Americans on Friday to resist any temptation to side with Republican Jeb Bush in the 2016 presidential race as they offered differing visions on how to tackle economic and racial inequality. [More Reuters]

TWB Company, a Worthington Steel and WISCO Tailored Blanks joint venture company, received preliminary approval for $360,000 in state tax incentives for a new operation in Barren County. [Glasgow Daily Times]

In 2013, The New York Times asked readers in Southern states to share their experiences of being gay in the South. Now, in 2015, they reflect on their progress, struggles, hopes for the future, and what the Supreme Court ruling in favor of same-sex marriage means to them. [NY Times]

Miss the KTRS funding workgroup meeting last week? Check out the archived footage. [KET]

In 2006, Alabama lawmakers passed a bill aimed at punishing parents who turned their kitchens and garages into do-it-yourself meth labs, exposing their children to toxic chemicals and noxious fumes. Support was bipartisan, the vote was unanimous, and the bill was quickly signed into law. [ProPublica]

The historic slide in coal jobs that has undermined the economy of Eastern Kentucky continued in the second quarter of 2015, with the industry cutting another 10.6 percent of its workforce in the region. The layoffs left an estimated 5,889 employed at coal mines and facilities in Eastern Kentucky, the lowest total in more than a century. [H-L]

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said the concept of “choice” is an ephemeral one for low-income women who live in states that pass laws limiting access to abortion, as they may not be able to afford to travel to a state with less onerous restrictions. [HuffPo]

Fancy Farm Sleepy Times In 3, 2…

Marshall County voters have chosen by a slim margin to allow alcohol sales for the first time since 1938. [H-L]

Sen. Bernie Sanders blasted Senate Republicans Wednesday for working to defund Planned Parenthood, calling it “an attack on women’s health.” [HuffPo]

When Gov. Steve Beshear replaced the Rev. Kevin Cosby on the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees last month, he did more than remove his only African-American appointment on the board. He also removed his only appointee who has not been a strong and steady contributor to Beshear’s political causes. Note: You’ll love seeing Terry Sebastian deliberately and purposefully lie to Tom Loftus. [C-J/AKN]

Could an excess of caution hurt Hillary Clinton? This query is coming to the fore again after she dodged a question on Tuesday over whether she supports or opposes building the Keystone XL Pipeline. It’s like watching the Grimes Campaign on a national stage. [The Hill]

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer says food stamp benefits can be used at an increasing number of farmers’ markets in the state. Which means ignorant people in, say, West Liberty are going to scream about how all benefits recipients ought to be drug tested. [WLKY]

Some Republicans gleefully scripted Donald Trump’s political obituary in the wake of his scathing comments about Sen. John McCain’s military service earlier this month, hoping that his freewheeling presidential campaign had finally imploded. [Reuters]

Republican Matt Bevin said Tuesday that if elected governor he would not immediately end the state’s expansion of eligibility for the federal-state Medicaid program, contrary to what he said for months. [Al Cross]

In the US, poverty, deprivation and exploitation draw thousands of its own children down into a dark underworld that offers few ways out. [BBC]

Rowan County argued it is “immune from suit” and that a recent federal lawsuit against the county and its clerk Kim Davis fails to find fault with the county government since Davis decided not to issue marriage licenses last month. [Ashland Independent]

Senator Rand Paul is invested in a fund that would skyrocket in value if the United States economy were to default. He’d also like your vote for president. [The Nation]

Christopher D. Steward, a former Barren County magistrate, was served with an arrest warrant early Thursday morning and charged with third-degree terroristic threatening, fourth-degree assault (minor injury) and menacing, according to documents released by the Barren County Sheriff’s Office. [Glasgow Daily Times]

It’s not easy being the DEA these days. After an unprecedented losing streak on Capitol Hill, the once-untouchable Drug Enforcement Administration suffered last week what might be considered the ultimate indignity: A Senate panel, for the first time, voted in favor of legal, recreational marijuana. [Higdon/Politico]

Convenient that this AP story doesn’t mention that people dressed up as Native Americans will chase you for a fee. Because Kentucky can’t do anything without a touch of racism, apparently. [H-L]

Seven in 10 homeowners who apply for help under the federal government’s signature mortgage aid program are rejected, according to a government report released Wednesday. The program, called the Home Affordable Modification Program, is meant to help homeowners who are at risk of foreclosure stay in their homes by reducing their monthly mortgage. [HuffPo]

State Media Ignoring Glasgow Messes

A lawsuit filed in federal court in California against Maker’s Mark Distillery was dismissed on Monday. The plaintiffs had alleged that they were mislead by the premium bourbon’s claims on the label to be “handmade” but U.S. District Judge John A. Houston found that the claim “cannot reasonably be interpreted as meaning literally by hand nor that a reasonable consumer would understand the term to mean no equipment or automated process was used to manufacture the whisky.” [H-L]

New research indicates that Washington, D.C., is rapidly sinking into the ocean, news that might not make the rest of the country all that sad. [HuffPo]

Unless you’re traveling through Woodford County because Woodford County is the traffic devil. Kentucky speeders get off easier than drivers in other states, according to a 2015 WalletHub study that ranked the “Strictest and Most Lenient States on Speeding and Reckless Driving.” [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump’s explosive rise in the polls has come at the expense of every other GOP presidential candidate except for Jeb Bush and Scott Walker — who arguably have been helped by the businessman’s rise. [The Hill]

There weren’t many substantive insights drawn from Monday’s debate between Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway before a Kentucky Chamber of Commerce Business Summit crowd. [Ronnie Ellis]

Opponents of President Barack Obama’s soon-to-be-implemented policy to cut carbon emissions from power plants are planning to use an unlikely and potentially potent weapon against him: the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision that saved Obamacare. [Reuters]

A hearing has been set for next week regarding whether to take a former police chief’s lawsuit against the City of Glasgow and the current, interim chief outside Barren County. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Despite his plum position, Rogers finds himself at odds with GOP leadership on a path to stave off a government shutdown. [Politico]

The latest column Greg Stumbo’s LRC staffers have written for him is about drug abuse. [Floyd County Times]

The Eagle was built by the Nazis and fought for Hitler in World War Two – so how did a tall ship that once flew the swastika end up as a training vessel for new US Coast Guard cadets? [BBC]

The first extension of Mountain Parkway in a half-century is set to begin next year with the reconstruction of a wider, safer Restaurant Row in Salyersville. While visible road work is underway to the west, teams are busy finalizing construction plans, land acquisitions and utility relocation efforts to prepare for a summer start. [WTVQ]

The United States is emerging as the world’s hog farm—the country where massive foreign meat companies like Brazil’s JBS and China’s WH Group (formerly Shuanghui) alight when they want to take advantage of rising global demand for pork. [Mother Jones]

Lexington gets a lot of things right. The University of Kentucky opened a new bike path Wednesday at the Arboretum to connect bicyclists from south Lexington neighborhoods to campus and downtown. [H-L]

It was 50 years ago Thursday that President Lyndon Johnson signed the legislation that created Medicare, dramatically altering life for America’s seniors. But as debate over the program rages on, its conservative critics have learned to be more crafty about what alternatives they propose — and how to justify them. [HuffPo]