Education: Not A Real Thing In Kentucky

US authorities have prepared charges to seek the arrest of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. [CNN]

The Kentucky commission responsible for investigating judicial misconduct has the fewest resources available to it in comparison to neighboring states, and before 2010, the commission was run out of its secretary’s basement in Lexington. [H-L]

Donald Trump is contemplating a new strategy to get repeal of the Affordable Care Act through Congress: threatening to torpedo insurance for millions of Americans unless Democrats agree to negotiate with him. [HuffPo]

The U.S. attorney’s office had decided it won’t prosecute Dr. David Dunn and two other former University of Louisville executives who were under investigation for allegedly misusing federal money for non-university purposes, their lawyers say. [C-J/AKN]

American corporations scored far worse than their European counterparts in the rankings, which were developed by the Geneva-based UN Global Sustainability Index Institute. [QZ]

Kentucky is one of the least educated states in the country, according to a recent study by WalletHub, a personal finance website that gathered data from the U.S. Census Bureau, National Center for Education Statistics, The Chronicle of Higher Education and U.S. News and World Report. [Glasgow Daily Times]

In case you missed it… A Russian government think tank controlled by Vladimir Putin developed a plan to swing the 2016 U.S. presidential election to Donald Trump and undermine voters’ faith in the American electoral system, three current and four former U.S. officials told Reuters. [Reuters]

A local environmental coalition is urging the state to include fence line monitoring of odor emissions in Big Run Landfill’s new air quality permit, which will be discussed Friday in a public hearing in the Boyd County High School auditorium. [Ashland Independent]

The Muscogee County School Board in Columbus, Georgia, dealt another blow to embattled Camelot Education when it voted Monday night to delay for three months a decision on whether to hire the company to run its alternative education programs. The delay in awarding the $6.4 million annual contract comes in the wake of a recent report by ProPublica and Slate that more than a dozen Camelot students were allegedly shoved, beaten or thrown by staff members — incidents almost always referred to as “slamming.” [ProPublica]

The Berea City Council adopted a resolution denouncing acts of discrimination, violence and harassment in city limits and greater Madison County. Council member Billy Wooten stated the measure was partly in response to a recent incident in which a county resident’s property was vandalized with homophobic graffiti. [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump has yet to nominate the State Department official who oversees diplomatic security abroad — despite having made the 2012 Benghazi attacks a centerpiece of his campaign against Hillary Clinton. [Politico]

A researcher at the University of Louisville wants to know whether coal ash is in homes in Southwest Louisville and how it’s potentially affecting the children living there. [WFPL]

The March for Science is not a partisan event. But it’s political. That’s the recurring message of the organizers, who insist that this is a line the scientific community and its supporters will be able to walk. It may prove too delicate a distinction, though, when people show up in droves on Saturday with their signs and their passions. [WaPo]

Attorney General Andy Beshear on Wednesday announced a settlement with Kentucky Utilities and Louisville Gas & Electric that would reduce a large rate increase the companies requested in November. It also would shelve the utilities’ controversial plan to more than double the fixed monthly charge that all customers must pay, regardless of how much electricity they use. [John Cheves]

Stephen Miller, a senior adviser to President Donald Trump, is now working on women’s issues in the White House despite having once forcefully argued against paid maternity leave and equal pay legislation, according to unnamed White House officials. [HuffPo]

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Another Day, More Messy Russian Stuff

Tanya Torp had enough of the Kentucky Democratic Party when she saw one of the state’s politicians, Alison Lundergan Grimes, holding a gun. [H-L]

White House press secretary Sean Spicer insisted on Wednesday that a U.S. aircraft carrier was heading toward North Korea last week, even though a U.S. Navy photo from the time showed it was actually traveling in the opposite direction. [HuffPo]

Out-of-state groups pushing for charter schools joined the traditional Kentucky big business and other interests this year on the list of organizations that spent the most lobbying the Kentucky General Assembly. [C-J/AKN]

A Russian government think tank controlled by Vladimir Putin developed a plan to swing the 2016 U.S. presidential election to Donald Trump and undermine voters’ faith in the American electoral system, three current and four former U.S. officials told Reuters. [Reuters]

She was the first woman to become a member of East Barren Volunteer Fire Department, and one of scant few female firefighters in the entire county two decades ago. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Republican actions speak louder than their words. Their racism shines brightly. [USA Today]

A civil case between American Legion Post 76 and the post’s building corporation may be headed toward mediation. [Ashland Independent]

Exxon Mobil Corp has applied to the Treasury Department for a waiver from U.S. sanctions on Russia in a bid to resume its joint venture with state oil giant PAO Rosneft, according to people familiar with the matter. [WSJ]

Another man accused of assaulting protesters at a Donald Trump campaign rally in Louisville last year has countersued the president, saying he was following Trump’s urging to remove them. [WFPL]

Barack Obama warned President Trump that North Korea would be the gravest foreign threat he faced — and why a solution has proved so hard to find. [NY Times]

An ordinance that holds property owners responsible for minors drinking alcohol on their property with their knowledge or when they should have known minors were drinking failed to pass in Barren County Fiscal Court. [BGDN]

Instead of steaming toward the Korean Peninsula as Trump had said, the Carl Vinson strike group was actually headed in the opposite direction to take part in “scheduled exercises” more than 3,000 miles away. [WaPo]

April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month. Unfortunately for Kentucky children, reports of abuse and neglect have increased dramatically in recent years, in part because of rampant drug abuse. These numbers illustrate the problem. [John Cheves]

Bill O’Reilly weathered sexual harassment charges for more than a decade, but not this time: Fox News has fired the controversial host. [HuffPo]

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We’re Not Even 100 Days In Yet…

The University of Kentucky has received $11.2 million from the National Institutes of Health to finance a new center that studies the links between obesity and cancer. [Linda Blackford]

Whiny little Mitch, indeed. Kentuckians have known this for years but it’s fun to watch the rest of the world find out just what a butthurt little baby these people are. [HuffPo]

A researcher at the University of Louisville is stepping up her study into whether coal ash from power plants may be making children in Louisville sick with a new study backed by federal research dollars. [C-J/AKN]

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau announced Monday that it filed a lawsuit against Weltman, Weinberg & Reis, accusing the debt collection firm of falsely representing in millions of collection letters that attorneys were involved in collection for overdue accounts. The firm collects on overdue credit card, installment loans, mortgage loans, and student loans debt nationwide, but only files lawsuit in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, New Jersey, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. [Consumerist]

At 8:36 p.m. Monday night, Glasgow Police Chief Guy Howie released information on the woman who was found dead Monday morning on the rooftop of a building located on the west side of Glasgow’s public square. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Lost amid the uproar over the Trump administration’s crackdown on undocumented immigrants is a change coming to the legal immigration system that’s expected to be costly for both U.S. companies and the government itself. [ProPublica]

New preschool and vocational school buildings are at the top of a construction priority list the Boyd County Board of Education is expected to adopt Wednesday. [Ashland Independent]

Donald Trump has congratulated Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on his victory in Sunday’s referendum that gave him sweeping new powers. The US president’s phone call contrasts with European concern that the result – 51.4% in favour of the changes – has exposed deep splits in Turkish society. [BBC]

With a meeting on his proposal for a new, comprehensive approach to the drug epidemic only a week away, Madison Judge/Executive Reagan Taylor got the opportunity to present his ideas directly to U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell as he met Monday with local leaders. [Richmond Register]

If this doesn’t scare the crap out of you, nothing will. How does the surge in drug overdoses compare with other causes of death in the U.S.? [NY Times]

In the first project of its kind, a Kentucky coal company is partnering with a global renewable energy giant to explore putting a major solar installation on a former mountaintop removal coal mine. [WFPL]

Racism motivated Trump voters more than authoritarianism. Which surprises absolutely no one who isn’t in denial. [WaPo]

Knox County and Barbourville Independent schools were closed Tuesday after a threat was called in Monday night to a West Coast police agency, according to a statement from the school system. [H-L]

Donald Trump, like most New Republican Nazis, doesn’t actually know who is running North Korea. [HuffPo]

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Shocking Just How Dumb Matt Bevin Has Turned Out To Be

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Matt Bevin says Kentucky media is pathetic. But he’s obviously projecting, as it’s his administration that is so pathetic it has one of its RPK lackeys huddle up with the personnel secretary to go on a Democratic Party witch hunt, digging through personnel files, calling me up asking for information about people (I refused to assist). Spoiler alert: there were so many stories about his wife’s silly doll because his staff went insane trying to get people to cover the doll. [H-L]

Even before Trump, the Republican Party was reluctant to push out Nazi-linked officials. [HuffPo]

This story will make you hate people. Like straight up hate them. [C-J/AKN]

If this is true, it’s impeachment-level insanity. One source suggested the official investigation was making progress. “They now have specific concrete and corroborative evidence of collusion,” the source said. “This is between people in the Trump campaign and agents of [Russian] influence relating to the use of hacked material.” [The Guardian]

Carter County Fiscal Court is facing a lawsuit aimed at preventing the location of a medical waste facility in the East Park industrial complex. [Ashland Independent]

The United Airlines passenger dragged from a plane in Chicago in an incident that sparked international outrage and turned into a corporate public relations nightmare suffered a concussion and broken nose and will likely sue, his attorney said on Thursday. [Reuters]

The U.S. has dropped the largest conventional weapon ever used in combat to hit an underground ISIS complex in Afghanistan, Pentagon officials say. [WFPL]

When North Korea launched its Kwangmyongsong-4 satellite into space last February, officials heralded the event as a birthday gift for dead leader Kim Jong Il. But the day also brought an unexpected prize for the country’s adversaries: priceless intelligence in the form of rocket parts that fell into the Yellow Sea. [WaPo]

Matt Bevin wants to revise the state tax code in a way that produces more revenue that can stabilize the state’s troubled public pension systems. [Ronnie Ellis]

For more than 15 years, jails that hold immigrants facing deportation have had to follow a growing list of requirements: Notify immigration officials if a detainee spends two weeks or longer in solitary confinement. Check on suicidal inmates every 15 minutes, and evaluate their mental health every day. Inform detainees, in languages they can understand, how to obtain medical care. In disciplinary hearings, provide a staff member who can advocate in English on the detainee’s behalf. [NY Times]

More Kentucky adults favor syringe exchanges than oppose them, and the more they know about them, the more likely they are to support them, according to the latest Kentucky Health Issues Poll. [Richmond Register]

We found insurers such as Allstate, Geico and Liberty Mutual were charging premiums that were as much as 30 percent higher in zip codes where most residents are minorities than in whiter neighborhoods with similar accident costs. [ProPublica]

Attorney General Andy Beshear’s office has opened an investigation into employee-only vehicle auctions held by the Administrative Office of the Courts. [H-L]

Donald Trump signed a resolution on Thursday that will allow states to withhold Title X family planning funds from Planned Parenthood and other abortion providers. [HuffPo]

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Massie Won’t Really Stand Up To Trump

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Federal investigators raided a Lexington paving and asphalt company in late March seeking information on bids and the sales of asphalt to paving contractors, documents filed in federal court in Lexington show. [H-L]

Seth Meyers pointed out the similarities between the U.S. political climate under President Donald Trump and the TV show “The Americans” on Tuesday.[HuffPo]

What bullshit spin. Thomas Massie is no more battling Donald Trump than Rand Paul is standing up for his constituents. He refuses to hold Trump accountable and hides from his constituents. [C-J/AKN]

In a groundbreaking, 8-3 decision, the full Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation violates federal civil rights law. [Lambda Legal]

Eastern Kentucky University announced Monday four finalists to become its next Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost. [Richmond Register]

Fake news? Not so much. The FBI is planning to create a special section based at its Washington headquarters to co-ordinate its investigation of Russian activities designed to influence the 2016 presidential election, according to a person familiar with the plan. [Financial Times]

A recent WalletHub study revealed Kentucky is the fifth most stressed state. West Virginia was ranked fourth overall. [Ashland Independent]

If you thought Republicans couldn’t get any more scummy, you were wrong! Now they want to conduct drug tests for people who file for UNEMPLOYMENT. [Congress]

This ought to be generally terrible – since Bevin’s office is participating. Rowan County will once again play host to a large Town and Country event. This year, the event will furnish a major keynote speaker from Gov. Bevin’s office. Warren Beeler, executive director of the Governor’s Office of Agriculture Policy, will speak at the event that begins at 5 p.m. on Thursday, April 13, at Rowan County Senior High School. [The Morehead News]

Republican Sen. Marco Rubio said Wednesday that he doesn’t think it’s a coincidence that a suspected chemical weapons attack in Syria occurred shortly after Secretary of State Rex Tillerson suggested Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad could remain in power. [CNN]

Edmonton City Councilwoman Cathy Nunn caught Edmonton Volunteer Fire Department Chief Jerry Clemmons, as well as some of her fellow city council members, by surprise Monday night when she told him the city council would like for the fire department to start paying its own utilities. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Yet again, the world is watching gut-wrenching images emerge from the site of a suspected chemical weapons attack in Syria. [WaPo]

A judge has denied a defense motion that sought to suppress evidence collected during a search that recovered stolen barrels of Wild Turkey and stolen bottles of rare Pappy Van Winkle. [H-L]

White House chief strategist Steve Bannon has been removed from the National Security Council, White House sources told The Huffington Post Wednesday. [HuffPo]

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Leave It To Republicans To Ignore Just How Bottom Of The Barrel Things Have Gotten

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The premature death rate improved in 12 Kentucky counties between 1997 and 2014 but got worse in 44 counties, in part because of increasing drug overdoses, according to a report released Wednesday. [H-L]

Of the many questions surrounding House Intelligence Committee Chair Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), and his conduct in investigating President Donald Trump’s ties to Russia, the most puzzling has to be his explanation for his recent visit to the White House grounds. People who have worked in the White House suggest that, on this matter, Nunes and the White House simply aren’t being credible. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin’s administration is seeking to shut down Kentucky’s only abortion provider, prompting a federal lawsuit by the clinic to block the move it says would have “a devastating impact on women.” [C-J/AKN]

FBI Director James Comey attempted to go public as early as the summer of 2016 with information on Russia’s campaign to influence the U.S. presidential election, but Obama administration officials blocked him from doing so, two sources with knowledge of the matter tell Newsweek. [Newsweek]

GET INVOLVED IN WHAT YOUR LOCAL GOVERNMENT IS DOING! Very few residents turned out for a town hall-style meeting Tuesday night at the South Barren Volunteer Fire Station on Steam Mill Road during which some elected and appointed Barren County officials shared information abut their responsibilities. [Glasgow Daily Times]

For the past half century, federal law has banned employers from discriminating against people based on their age. But since the early 1990s, corporate lawyers and conservative judges have sought to shrink what counts as discrimination, making it substantially harder to prove age bias. [ProPublica]

“Killing Coal Country,” a documentary about the decline of the coal industry in Appalachia, will debut at a film festival in Eastern Kentucky early next month. [Ashland Independent]

Trump lifted an Obama-era moratorium on new coal leases on public lands, but critics say it will benefit executives, not workers. [ThinkProgress]

Kentucky lawmakers gave final passage to another round of major education reform Wednesday which is aimed at changing how schools are held accountable for student achievement and how teachers are evaluated. [Ronnie Ellis]

Grifters gonna grift. Ivanka Trump, the elder daughter of President Trump, is becoming an official government employee, joining her husband in serving as an unpaid adviser to her father in the White House. [NY Times]

Dr. Joseph “Jay” Morgan is officially Morehead State University’s 14th President. Morgan’s first day as President will be July 1. [The Morehead News]

If you think Paul Ryan is a policy wonk, you likely also believe the Bible is a work of science. [WaPo]

Elliott County’s fiscal court mismanaged its spending, debts and recordkeeping during fiscal 2015, state Auditor Mike Harmon said in a report released Tuesday. [John Cheves]

By undoing the Clean Power Plan, the Trump administration is putting projected carbon emissions back on an upward trajectory. It is also abandoning any hope of meeting the U.S. emissions reduction targets set out in 2015 in the 195-country Paris Agreement, the first global climate pact to include China and the U.S., the world’s top polluters. [HuffPo]

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When The Pope Rails Against Trump, You Know The Republican Party of Kentucky Is Waaaaay In The Dark Ages

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Kentucky was ranked the 9th worst state to retire — particularly for the 31 percent of adults with little to no retirement savings or pension — in a new study released Monday. [H-L]

Maybe one of the dumbest people to ever walk the planet? Kellyanne Conway, a counselor to President Donald Trump, said she didn’t understand why millions of people around the world attended protests Saturday, especially after the president’s “uplifting and unifying” inauguration speech. [HuffPo]

A federal judge in Washington D.C. has dealt a huge blow to health insurer Aetna’s $37 billion bid to acquire Louisville’s Humana, backing regulators who’d argued that combining the companies will stifle competition in hundreds of markets around the country. [C-J/AKN]

Screw the little people, the middle class and people who actually need support. [The Hill]

A woman who shot and wounded a man who allegedly attacked her one year ago inside a downtown Louisville parking garage has filed a lawsuit against the garage’s owners and others, claiming negligent security. [WAVE3]

Democratic state officials took a step on Monday to try to defend the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in a court battle that could defang it, worried that Republican President Donald Trump’s administration will not safeguard the agency. [Reuters]

Wondering why Eastern Kentuckians remain in the dark and surprised when shit hits the fan? It’s because people like Andrew Adkins – folks who serve as the only media sources – seek to normalize and soften people like Donald Trump. Yes, that’s exactly what he did, like it or not. Even if he’s wise enough to know not to support the man. And a pro-tip: “minority groups” does not equal “immigrants” – the folks who fear their time in the country could be cut short. [Ashland Independent]

Pope Francis has warned against a rise in populism and the dangers of allowing political crises to usher in dictators like Hitler. [BBC]

Exterior-upgrade work on several Housing Authority of Glasgow duplex units on Robinson Court is nearly finished, and work on a maintenance shop building is underway. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Donald Trump brought many conflicts of interest with him when he moved into the White House last week. Chief among them are the Trump Organization’s dealings with foreign power and players, including leasing office space to one Chinese state-owned bank and borrowing money from another. [Mother Jones]

Here’s a fun way to start killing off the most vulnerable. Republicans plan to turn control of Medicaid over to the states as part of their replacement for the Affordable Care Act, according to an adviser to President Donald Trump. [WFPL]

Kellyanne Conway, counselor to President Trump, said on NBC’s “Meet the Press” on Sunday that the White House had put forth “alternative facts” to ones reported by the news media about the size of Mr. Trump’s inauguration crowd. [NY Times]

As congressional Republicans meet this week to gut Barack Obama’s signature health-care law, they can look for guidance to Kentucky, where a big political promise met with reality to force the type of compromise national lawmakers might face. [H-L]

“A fact is a piece of information presented as having objective reality,” tweeted the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, who, having had the job of defining words since 1828, knows a thing or two about the English language. [HuffPo]

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