Some Folks Really Mad At Rand Paul

More than a million gallons of raw sewage has been pouring each day into the Levisa Fork of the Big Sandy River near Pike County for nearly three months. [H-L]

Edgar Nernberg is a creationist. And he won’t let a little thing like discovering a crucial link in the evolutionary chain change his mind. [HuffPo]

After years of planning and several public protests, police body cameras will start recording in Louisville within days. [C-J/AKN]

Here’s an interactive database of all the people killed by police this year. [The Guardian]

The Madison County Schools filled the vacant district positions of director of financial services, director of food services, and district assessment coordinator. [Richmond Register]

Former Gov. Jeb Bush (R-Fla.) said in an interview broadcast Sunday that a National Security Agency (NSA) program that collects information on Americans’ phone calls is “not a violation of civil liberties.” [The Hill]

City officials in South Shore formally opened a new city building Friday after being without one for the past few years. [Ashland Independent]

Rand Paul may have taken his stand against government surveillance a little too far in his presidential campaign. In a campaign video released on Friday that includes explicit links to a campaign donation page, Paul (R-Ky.) extensively uses footage from his lengthy speech on the Senate floor on May 20 against bulk data collection and surveillance in the PATRIOT Act. The Senate “strictly” prohibits any use of its proceedings for campaign activities. [Politico]

Glasgow High School seniors earned more than $3.4 million in scholarships this year and were celebrated Wednesday in the school’s auditorium. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Gruesome photographs on cigarette packages may deliver more effective anti-smoking messages than words, a new analysis finds. [Reuters]

Professional storytellers coming together to share personal stories, ghost stories, and tall tales; sprinkled with just the right amount of music, all heard in a beautiful natural setting— THAT is the Cave Run Storytelling Festival. [The Morehead News]

It’s an argument we hear frequently from gun rights activists and conservative lawmakers: Mass shooters select places to attack where citizens are banned from carrying firearms—so-called “gun-free zones.” All the available data shows that this claim is just plain wrong. [Mother Jones]

I (Jake) grew up reading Merlene Davis and can’t imagine the Herald-Leader without her. For a different kid hidden deep on rural Appalachia, Merlene’s tenacity was everything. [Paul Prather]

U.S. police have shot and killed 385 people during the first five months of this year, a rate of more than two a day, the Washington Post reported on Saturday. [HuffPo]

How Will Martin O’Malley Do In KY?

Rand Paul stood before nearly 200 fans Saturday afternoon and made clear his intentions to force the expiration of the Patriot Act when the U.S. Senate meets for a rare session Sunday. [H-L]

Proponents of campaign finance reform are asking the Department of Justice to appoint an independent special prosecutor to investigate possible violations of campaign finance law by former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush as he seeks the Republican Party’s presidential nomination. [HuffPo]

A backup power generator at a pumping station could have prevented April’s massive flooding and a big sewage spill at Louisville’s Morris Forman Water Quality Treatment Center, state officials have concluded. [C-J/AKN]

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley (D) is scheduled to announce on Saturday at an event in Baltimore, the city he led as mayor for six years, that he is running for the Democratic nomination for president. [ThinkProgress]

Richmond’s 2015-16 city budget is far from finished, but according to an early draft reviewed by city commissioners this past week, it expects to continue trimming expenses, even as revenue grows slightly. [Richmond Register]

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley announced [Saturday] that he will seek the Democratic nomination for president, joining front-runner Hillary Clinton and dark horse candidate Bernie Sanders in the 2016 primary race. [NPR]

Under nearly ideal conditions, roughly two dozen hikers met and walked the W Hollow stomping grounds of author Jesse Stuart early Saturday morning for the first Health Hike hosted by the Greenup County Health Department. [Ashland Independent]

The wait is over. Martin O’Malley is running for president. The former Maryland governor formally kicked off his quest for the Democratic presidential nomination on Saturday in Baltimore, the city he served as mayor for six years. [Mother Jones]

Now we know the contest for governor is between Democrat Jack Conway and Republican Matt Bevin after James Comer conceded to Bevin on Friday. If Bevin has a credibility problem, Conway has a sincerity and image problem. [Ronnie Ellis]

“These shootings are grossly under­reported,” said Jim Bueermann, a former police chief and president of the Washington-based Police Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving law enforcement. “We are never going to reduce the number of police shootings if we don’t begin to accurately track this information.” [WaPo]

The Kentucky Department of Corrections is hoping to combat a high number of staff vacancies and turnover rates in state prisons by increasing compensation for correctional officers and other hazardous duty staff, according to a government release. [The Morehead News]

A 13-year tally of deaths and poisonings from ephedra show a spectacular decline after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned the sale of weight loss products containing the herb in 2004. [Reuters]

The reality is that Americans who need government aid, like Americans living below the poverty line, represent a shifting population. A parent who loses his job — and the health care that came with it — may need to rely on Medicaid temporarily. [H-L]

Are you ready to throw up in your mouth a little bit? Rand Paul (R-Eggplant Emoji) used some verbal aikido on Jon Stewart during Tuesday night’s “Daily Show,” deflecting questions about marriage equality, and even making an apparent joke about his penis. [HuffPo]

Let The Matt Bevin Funtimes Begin!

Daniel Boone National Forest officials have some advice on avoiding encounters with black bears. [H-L]

The United States might just be on the verge of a wind power revolution. Or, at least, the newest generation of wind turbines, featuring taller towers and longer blades, have the potential to push the country in that direction. [HuffPo]

Kentucky and Indiana are among the fattest states in the nation. [C-J/AKN]

How on earth can a majority of people support something that is secret? A majority of Americans support new trade deals, a Reuters/Ipsos poll showed on Wednesday, even as President Barack Obama struggles to win support for legislation key to sealing a signature Pacific Rim trade agreement. [Reuters]

Glasgow’s city attorney responded Wednesday to a lawsuit filed by former Glasgow police chief Guy Turcotte against the city and interim chief James Duff by saying the lawsuit will provide an opportunity for the public to look closer at Turcotte’s record with the Glasgow Police Department. [Glasgow Daily Times]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A human skull from a deep cave in northern Spain shows evidence of a lethal violent attack 430,000 years ago, a study shows. [BBC]

First Lady of Kentucky Jane Beshear didn’t seem to mind getting her hands dirty in order to promote agriculture at the dedication of a Governor’s Garden at Morehead State University on Wednesday. [Ashland Independent]

With new businesses sprouting up left and right, there’s a lot of talk these days about Detroit being on the comeback trail. [NPR]

An un-named source within the Laurel County school district told WKYT that South Laurel High School was threatened with legal action if they allowed prayer at their graduation this weekend. [WKYT]

Kevin Drum doesn’t write much about guns, which is why I’m going to keep on it a bit here and honor him by rolling out the red carpet for a bunch of grating 2A trolls to stampede into the comments thread. [Mother Jones]

Jack Conway on the nomination of Matt Bevin: I welcome Matt Bevin to the governor’s race as the Republican nominee. I look forward to a spirited race with my opponent and a conversation with voters over the next five months about the issues that matter most to Kentucky families. / This campaign is about standing up for their interests and values. It’s about moving Kentucky forward by creating good-paying jobs and growing our economy, investing in our education system at all levels, and building out our infrastructure. I’m the only candidate with a proven record of putting people over politics, and that’s a commitment I promise to keep. / Sannie Overly, our families and I are incredibly grateful to those who have opened their hearts and homes to us thus far, lending their friendship and support throughout this journey. We are excited to continue crisscrossing the state, visiting our counties and sharing our vision for Kentucky’s future with voters this summer and fall. [Press Release]

In a presidential campaign defined by billionaire sugar daddy donors, Rand Paul has a problem: He doesn’t seem to have one. [Politico]

A Lexington man was shot eight times during an officer-involved shooting in Richmond in September after he pointed a Taser stun gun at police, Kentucky State Police concluded in an investigation. [H-L]

Poverty, which affects a growing number of American students, begins its negative impact on learning as early as the beginning of kindergarten, according to a National Center for Education Statistics report released Thursday. [HuffPo]

Frankfort Loves (Hates) The Environment

Matt Bevin was running out of time. Less than a year after he got shellacked in his first political campaign, Bevin had his eye on running for governor, but he was running into a problem — he couldn’t find a running mate. [H-L]

What? Coal kills? Surely not. Surely all that hype wasn’t just the Coal Association using PR hacks to claim otherwise. [HuffPo]

Proposed state regulations would give billboard companies the authority to cut trees that block the view of their signs — a power the companies have sought, but failed to get, from the General Assembly for years. But environmental groups raised a wide range of objections to the proposal Friday at a hearing at the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet. [C-J/AKN]

U.S. Republicans have had to watch from the sidelines as the Obama White House has taken political credit for America’s unexpected energy boom and tumbling gas prices. Now it has left their presidential candidates scrambling for a way to reclaim leadership on an issue the party once seemed to own. [Reuters]

By a split vote, the Rowan County Board of Education has approved purchasing the Rowan Campus of Maysville Community and Technical College for $5 million. [The Morehead News]

Satellites have seen a sudden dramatic change in the behaviour of glaciers on the Antarctica Peninsula, according to a Bristol University-led study. [BBC]

The Inspector General is investigating after a 21-month-old boy was found wandering in the street near a Louisville day care. But when that happened in Montgomery County, the former superintendent and crew were able to scam the IG into believing it was no big deal. Even though the kid was in more danger, crossed a massive by-pass with moving traffic and such. [WAVE3]

America is more liberal than politicians think. [Mother Jones]

In what many people in the area have said would be a step toward justice, Perry County Clerk Haven King has been charged and indicted this month in relation to an alleged incident of harassment and abuse of power caught on video by a Hazard Community and Technical College (HCTC) student in April. [Hazard Herald]

A ruling against pension cuts and political divisions have made a dire situation worse for the state, as well as Chicago and its schools, which face shortfalls of their own. [NY Times]

On Tuesday night, some members of the Lexington Fayette NAACP chapter voiced their concerns to the Fayette County Public School Board regarding next year’s budget. [WKYT]

Yet another study suggests that regular glimpses of nature can have psychological benefits. [WaPo]

The search for Fayette County Schools’ next superintendent has entered a new phase, according to board chairman John Price. PROACT Search, the Illinois-based firm Fayette County terminated a few weeks ago, has transferred electronic files on candidates to Lynda McNamara, the president of McNamara Search Associates of Lexington, Price told the Herald-Leader Friday. [H-L]

The parents unsuccessfully sued the retailers who made the firearm that killed their daughter. Colorado state law requires that plaintiffs who sue the manufacturers of gun products pay the companies’ legal fees if they lose. [HuffPo]

See, What Had Happened Was…

Republicans on Tuesday picked state Senate Judiciary Chairman Whitney Westerfield, 34, as their nominee for Kentucky attorney general. [H-L]

Defrauded student loan borrowers seeking relief from the Obama administration are confronting an Education Department process that a senior House Democrat compared to the government’s bungled response to the mortgage robo-signing crisis that shook the U.S. housing market. [HuffPo]

Marathon Petroleum isn’t having a good week. First, Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway filed suit over the company’s gas prices, claiming monopolistic practices that Conway said have forced Kentucky customers — particularly those in Louisville and Northern Kentucky — to pay more at the pump than they should. [C-J/AKN]

Outside conservative groups are pressuring GOP leaders to take up targeted immigration reforms ahead of the 2016 elections. [The Hill]

A total of 6,885 Madison County voters cast ballots in Tuesday’s primary election for statewide offices. No local or federal offices were on the ballot. [Richmond Register]

Suicide rates have fallen among young white children in the U.S. but they’ve gone up among black youngsters, according to a new study of suicides in kids under age 12. [Reuters]

The Fairview Board of Education named its new superintendent Tuesday, just days after a blistering report from the Kentucky Office of Educational Accountability found retiring superintendent Bill Musick had violated and impeded state education law in several areas. [Ashland Independent]

Partisan mudslinging breaks out, suggesting that lawmakers and cop-reform advocates have a long way to go to find agreement on new police standards. [Politico]

Barren County Fiscal Court’s proposed budget for the 2015-16 fiscal year got a couple of amendments Tuesday during the first reading of the ordinance adopting it, one of which has stirred confusion. [Glasgow Daily Times]

All 50 states could become wind energy producers, according to an Energy Department report released Tuesday, once the next generation of larger, taller turbines in development hits the market. [NY Times]

The disaster recovery center in Rowan County will close at 6 p.m. on Thursday, May 21. [The Morehead News]

A search for a racist word and “house” on Google takes you to the home of the US President, Barack Obama. [BBC]

A bankruptcy attorney and a state representative, both hailing from Eastern Kentucky, will face off for state treasurer this fall. [H-L]

After hearing story after story from voters on the campaign trail about heroin’s toll, Hillary Clinton instructed her policy team to draw up solutions to the burgeoning opiate epidemic. [HuffPo]

Everyone’s Numb Over That Crazy Race

This Woodford County city took the first step Monday toward becoming the eighth in Kentucky to adopt an ordinance to prohibit discrimination in housing, employment and public accommodations based on sexual orientation or gender identity. [H-L]

Louisiana residents may go gaga over Mark Wahlberg, Kurt Russell and Kate Hudson when they arrive in the state later this year to film a movie about the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion. But Louisiana and some other states are starting to question whether they are giving up too much to attract such star power. [HuffPo]

Steve Beshear’s administration has paid $195,400 to a private law firm to defend the state’s gay marriage ban after Attorney General Jack Conway refused to do so. [C-J/AKN]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) is set to unveil legislation that would provide free tuition at four-year public colleges and universities on Tuesday. [The Hill]

Despite efforts by the city to seek a different auditing firm for the next fiscal year, the commission voted to accept a proposal from the same firm that has performed audits for the past 20 years. This move came after Kelley Galloway Smith Goolsby, PSC, in Ashland, was the only accounting firm to respond to the city’s requests for proposals. [Ashland Independent]

The dry, red earth could almost be mistaken for a Martian landscape. It is in fact the Atacama desert in Chile, one of the driest places on Earth. [BBC]

Morehead City Council approved first reading Monday of its 2015-16 budget ordinance which includes a 45-cents-per-hour pay raise for all city employees. [The Morehead News]

A coalition of public policy advocates warned on Tuesday that a group of armed conservative activists who have been guarding a mine in southern Oregon for over a month are a sign of an emerging violent anti-government movement. [Reuters]

The Energy and Environment Cabinet’s Division of Waste Management announced 46 recycling and 25 household hazardous waste (HHW) grants of more than $3.3 million. [Click the Clicky]

The bitter Kentucky Republican gubernatorial primary is going into overtime. [Politico]

In one of the most exciting and tightest statewide elections in history, Republican Matt Bevin apparently won a razor-thin, 83-vote win over James Comer in the primary race for the GOP nomination for governor. [Ronnie Ellis]

David Clarke, the sheriff in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin doesn’t think federal involvement in policing is going to change much. [NPR]

Nearly 1,300 of the 7,211 Kentucky children and youth in foster care are in group placements instead of with families, a news release from a child advocacy group said Tuesday. [H-L]

Leading Republican presidential candidates in the past week settled on an Iraq war narrative. Yes, the intelligence turned out to be faulty, so much so that there wouldn’t be a strong enough case to authorize the invasion in retrospect. But there was consensus that at the time President George W. Bush made the call, something had to be done about the threat posed by Iraq. [HuffPo]

It’s Post-Primary Hangover Time!

You should check out this interactive map of last night’s vote results from across Kentucky. [H-L]

As much as journalists may fancy themselves superhuman observers of history, the truth is that we are as susceptible to trauma as the victims whose stories we tell. [HuffPo]

A Franklin County grand jury Tuesday indicted former Buffalo Trace Distillery security guard Leslie M. Wright, 34, of Frankfort, on charges of being paid to look the other way as barrels were stolen for what authorities say was a bourbon theft criminal syndicate. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky hates old people. States with at least 40 percent of homes ranked on the bottom two rungs include North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York. [Newsweek]

The real reason Republicans running for governor didn’t have in-depth discussions is because two of the candidates were incapable. The other two, one a former state supreme court justice and the other, an evangelical extremist who is overcompensating like woah, have never been outside their respective bubbles. Ever. [Eye Roll]

After winning reelection and control of the U.S. Senate, Republican Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., appointed Hazen Marshall, a lobbyist for Koch Industries, as his new policy chief. [The Intercept]

A historic case against the iconic Wagner’s Pharmacy near Churchill Downs is likely to end, since the Kentucky Supreme Court has ruled that morbid obesity is not a state-protected disability. [Business First]

The White House on Monday called the fall of Ramadi to the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) a “setback,” but vowed the U.S. is determined to help retake the Iraqi city. [The Hill]

An online fundraising campaign was successful for the Louisville businessman who is set to buy Guntown Mountain, the Western-themed roadside attraction in Cave City. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Obese young adults may be more likely to have a stroke than people who aren’t overweight, a U.S. study suggests. [Reuters]

His first four and a half months in office have included two record-breaking winter storms, two instances of flooding, collapsed bridges and the arrest of a Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program employee on forgery and theft charges. “All that’s missing is for a plague of locusts to hit Madison County, and we would have faced all possible challenges,” Madison Judge/Executive Reagan Taylor said Friday in his first State of the County address. [Richmond Register]

Millions of Americans use GlaxoSmithKline’s purple inhaler. But whether Advair poses a higher risk of asthma-related death remains uncertain 15 years after regulators approved the drug. [ProPublica]

The University of Kentucky has begun a sweeping overhaul of its body bequeathal program after finding numerous problems with its administration and oversight, including a three to five year delay in burying the remains of people who’d given their bodies for scientific research. The overhaul includes eliminating the position of program director Gary Ginn, who is also the Fayette County Coroner. [H-L]

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg officiated a same-sex wedding over the weekend, and according to New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd, the Notorious R.B.G. gave a big shout-out to the U.S. Constitution. [HuffPo]