David James: Quit It With The Dumb

Eight counties in Eastern Kentucky had the biggest decline in life expectancy in the country between 1980 and 2014, according to a study released Monday. Owsley County had the biggest drop in the nation at 2.3 years, or 3 percent, the study said, followed by Lee, Leslie, Breathitt, Clay, Powell, Estill and Perry. The other two counties with the biggest declines were in Oklahoma and Alabama. [H-L]

PEE ALERT! A geologist affiliated with the Creation Museum and Ark Encounter amusement park in Kentucky has sued the Grand Canyon National Park after it denied him a permit to test rocks that he believes are less than 10,000 years old. [Linda Blackford]

The top Democrat on the Senate intelligence committee has accused Donald Trump of obstructing investigators probing Russia’s efforts to influence the 2016 election by firing FBI director James Comey. [Financial Times]

Can we just call David James what he is already? No one else wants to because they fear retaliation from he and his wife, who does a lot of his bidding. (Source: She’s always the person who messages me when I criticize him.) He’s a fucking idiot. From his “fact finding” mission of going to a gay bath house (GURL, PLEASE!) and then getting all homophobic after he was caught/called out to his dumb stunts with Louisville Metro Corrections, he’s giving the term ‘idiot’ credence. Oh… and what about his days at LMPD? Or his time working for the Attorney General? The Julian Carroll investigation ring a bell? Or ignorantly believing he could be both a police officer and a Metro Councilcritter at the same time? Idiot. Metro Councilman David James’ request to determine how often inmates are improperly released from Louisville’s jail is being postponed by a legal opinion that suggests his request was improper. [C-J/AKN]

In an unusually personal speech, Janet L. Yellen, the Federal Reserve chairwoman, said Friday that policies making it easier for women to work could significantly improve the nation’s economic growth. [NY Times]

After years of coal industry decline, Kentucky has fallen from the nation’s third largest coal producer to the fifth. Federal data released last month shows the 42 million tons of coal the commonwealth produced in 2016 was eclipsed by Pennsylvania and Illinois. [WFPL]

The Environmental Protection Agency has sidelined a website aimed at teaching schoolchildren about climate change, a public watchdog group has determined, as part of the agency’s efforts to align online content with the new administration’s values. [WaPo]

The Richmond City Commission accepted the resignations of four police officers Tuesday night, and approved the hiring of another. [Richmond Register]

FBI Director James Comey is cleaning up testimony he gave to a Senate panel suggesting that former Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin forwarded thousands of potentially sensitive emails to her husband, former Rep. Anthony Weiner. [Politico]

A second Democrat has confirmed he’s seriously looking at challenging incumbent Republican U.S. Congressman Andy Barr in Kentucky’s Sixth District in 2018. [Ronnie Ellis]

Check out the list of words people came up with to describe Donald Trump in this long-trusted poll. [Quinnipiac]

The Boyd County Fiscal Court on Tuesday approved a measure to slice the seating requirement for restaurants to sell alcohol in half. [Ashland Independent]

The old saw that the cover-up is worse than the crime often obscures more than it reveals. But in the case of Donald Trump’s firing of FBI Director James Comey, it carries an important element of truth. It escalates the administration’s Russia scandal, and, for the first time, provides indications of impeachable offenses. [Vox]

A couple of former Kentucky State Police troopers will investigate the 2013 death of a Bardstown police officer and several other area cases. [H-L]

As Republicans narrowly voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act on Thursday, their Democratic colleagues immediately warned that they would face electoral consequences, singing “hey, hey, hey, goodbye” on the House floor. [HuffPo]

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Bevin’s Housing Mess Isn’t Going Away

Not since Watergate. How else can one start an article about President Donald Trump summarily firing FBI chief James Comey? [Mother Jones]

A company that supplies natural gas to homes in Floyd County overcharged customers and must cut its price and make refunds, the Kentucky Public Service Commission said in an order issued Thursday. [H-L]

Los Angeles City Council just joined a growing number of American cities to pass a resolution pressing for an investigation into potentially impeachable offenses by Donald Trump. [HuffPo]

State government began working on security improvements to the Anchorage mansion where Gov. Matt Bevin’s family is now living in late October, months before the home was purchased. [C-J/AKN]

The U.S. Defense Department is finalizing a lease on a privately owned apartment in New York’s Trump Tower for the White House Military Office to use for supporting Donald Trump without providing any benefit to Trump or his organization, according to a Pentagon letter seen by Reuters. [Reuters]

Kentucky’s youth usually get a bad reputation, but a new report indicates that most students aren’t focused on shirking the rules of the administration. [Richmond Register]

When teaching hospitals put pharmaceutical sales representatives on a shorter leash, their doctors tended to order fewer promoted brand-name drugs and used more generic versions instead, a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows. [ProPublica]

If somebody named Jim Tom in Eastern Kentucky is trying to remove members of a Planning Commission, you know something shady as hell is about to go down. Also, it’s Morehead, home of Kim Davis. While it’s a progressive little town? It’s still got quite a few good old boy holdouts. The community’s joint planning commission’s membership may soon be cut in half, according to Mayor Jim Tom Trent. [The Morehead News]

Scott Pruitt, the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, has removed himself from some of the most contentious cases facing it, including challenges to the Obama administration’s Clean Power Plan and a controversial rule related to the Clean Water Act. [NY Times]

The board of directors for the Barren County ambulance service taxing district met Charlie O’Neal, the new director of the Barren-Metcalfe County Emergency Medical Services, during their regular meeting Wednesday at the Barren County Government Center. [Glasgow Daily Times]

What started as a joke has turned into hundreds of applications to mail human ash to Republicans who voted to roll back Obamacare. [WaPo]

Yes, crime spikes in Louisville during the Kentucky Oaks and Kentucky Derby. Also, if you’re gonna write about law enforcement at Churchill Downs? Maybe put in the effort to get data and comments from the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office. JCSO had so many officers at Churchill Downs that individual horses had individual deputies assigned to them. Seems like that would be a no-brainer. [WFPL]

Eric Trump allegedly revealed in a 2014 interview that Russia funded the family’s golf resorts “all the time”. The President also reportedly told the same journalist that the family had “access to $100 million” for their newest course in North Carolina. [Independent]

A woman accused of threatening a Fayette County judge (Kathy Stein) and harassing an attorney appeared in court Friday. [H-L]

Rabbi Shmuley Boteach’s visit to the White House on Tuesday caused quite a stir, particularly after the former Republican congressional candidate and conservative columnist tweeted a photo revealing chief strategist Steve Bannon’s “to do” list. [HuffPo]

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Bevin In Charge = $113 Million Shortfall

A federal appeals court has reinstated a claim for damages against Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis for refusing to grant marriage licenses to same-sex couples during the summer of 2015. [John Cheves]

In late August 2014, Tom Frieden, then director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, traveled to West Africa to assess the raging Ebola crisis. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin is so terrible at leadership that Kentucky’s going under again. Kentucky’s budget director is predicting the state will suffer a $113 million revenue shortfall when the state’s fiscal year ends June 30. [C-J/AKN]

The burden of substance abuse disorders can fall heavily on the families and friends of those who battle addictions. But society also pays a great deal through increased crime. Treatment programs can reduce those costs. [NY Times]

Surprise! The fat, old, white racists of the Bowling Green Daily News are still panicking over President Barack Obama and are trying to suggest he’s still gonna take yer guns. It’s this special brand of stupid that keeps Kentucky in the dark ages. [BGDN]

Trump on Tuesday called for a “good shutdown” in September to fix the “mess” in government. [The Hill]

Mary Beth Burkes lives in Buchanan County, Va., a depressed coal-mining region where 1 in 4 families lives in poverty and where her autistic son gets extra help in the after-school program at his school. [WFPL]

A pro-Donald Trump biker gang’s physical handling of protesters at a weekend rally could add to the president’s legal woes, with one attendee considering a fresh lawsuit as protesters already suing over violence at rallies last year plan to cite the recent events as proof of an ongoing pattern. A federal judge late last month ruled that Trump’s calls of “get ’em out of here!” may have constituted “incitement to riot” at a March 2016 rally in Louisville, Kentucky, at which three protesters allege in a lawsuit they were assaulted by Trump supporters. [Politico]

The sequel to a successful spy film will focus heavily on bourbon distilling, and Louisville-based Brown-Forman Corp. is taking advantage of the exposure. [Business First]

A Texas police department has changed a key detail in the shooting of an unarmed black teenager, amid mounting calls for the officer to be arrested. [BBC]

The University of Kentucky announced on Monday afternoon that Commonwealth Stadium will become Kroger Field. [WKYT]

African-Americans are generally living longer than in 2000, but health disparities mean they are still more likely to die at a younger age on average than whites, a federal study showed on Tuesday. [Reuters]

A federal judge has ruled that Lexington cannot enforce a recently passed ordinance that restricts where advertising and other unsolicited printed materials can be delivered. [H-L]

Sebastian Gorka, a deputy assistant to President Donald Trump who generated controversy for his alleged ties to a Nazi-aligned group, is expected to accept a new role soon outside of the White House, according to multiple reports. [HuffPo]

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Kentucky Makes Embarrassing National News For Probably The Millionth Time

On May 7, Leandro Braga and Deanna Chesser will graduate from Bluegrass Community and Technical College with associate degrees, big awards and scholarships to help them get four-year degrees at the University of Kentucky. [Linda Blackford]

U.S. congressional negotiators have hammered out a bipartisan agreement on a spending package to keep the federal government funded through the end of the current fiscal year on Sept. 30, a senior congressional aide said on Sunday. Aww, no wall for the racists. [HuffPo]

Nearly two years after a fire heavily damaged at least three of its buildings, city officials believe Whiskey Row may be on the cusp of becoming one of the “most engaging blocks in downtown Louisville.” [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump still doesn’t understand why the Civil War occurred or who Andrew Jackson was. [TPM]

Attorney General Andy Beshear’s office has appealed a judge’s ruling that wiped decades-old convictions from a Kentuckian’s criminal record, arguing they aren’t eligible under the state’s new felony expungement law. [WFPL]

Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives said on Tuesday they were closer to agreeing on a reworked bill to overhaul the nation’s healthcare system but still lacked the votes to pass it, as President Donald Trump pressed lawmakers for a vote. [Reuters]

The weather has turned sunny, and warm, so now is the time for that afternoon drive along the beautiful countryside of Madison County and surrounding areas. It’s amazing what one can find on that drive. [Richmond Register]

Because Kentucky’s New Republican Party is filled with mouth-breathing (Hey, Mac!) bigots, the Commonwealth could become the only state with no abortion clinic. [NY Times]

A permanent health-care fix for 22,000 retired coal miners has been agreed to by a bipartisan congressional budget committee, ending months of anxiety for the miners and their families. [Ashland Independent]

The charter flight left on a Wednesday with eight Iraqis on board. By the following evening, the large Iraqi immigrant community in this Detroit suburb was roiled with rumors about why, with news of the departure morphing as phone calls spun into horror. Some people were talking again about whether they should go into hiding. [WaPo]

Dennis Curry and his future husband learned quickly that adopting kids wasn’t easy. [Glasgow Daily Times]

New data suggests incidents of anti-Semitic hatred have spiked compared to this time last year, an ominous shift that advocates say signals a multi-year increase of vitriol directed at American Jews. [ThinkProgress]

The chief of Transylvania University’s public safety department and the president of the university worked together to take down a knife-wielding man who attacked students in a campus coffee shop Friday morning. [H-L]

Donald Trump this weekend called North Korean leader Kim Jong Un a “smart cookie” in his latest praise of a controversial dictator. Last week he didn’t even know his name. [HuffPo]

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Bevin’s Medicaid Mess Goes National

Will Hazard become the nation’s hub for drone research and development? No. It won’t. There. Saved you a click and time reading. [H-L]

Seven baffling moments from Donald Trump’s Associated Press interview. He’s dumber than you could have ever imagined. [HuffPo]

Just in case anyone needed another reason to avoid the Tim Faulkner Gallery, here’s him equating actual Nazis with people fighting racism. And the newspaper just casually hinting at it. [C-J/AKN]

Grifters are gonna grift. A U.S. State Department website published an article this month about President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, stoking criticism from prominent ethics experts. [Reuters]

A Georgia congressman who joined Martin Luther King Jr. in the historic Selma march will speak at Berea College’s commencement ceremony on Sunday, May 7. Rep. John Lewis helped organize the march in Selma, Alabama, in 1965 that demanded an end to voter registration discrimination. [Richmond Register]

A State Department website has removed a blog post about President Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort following criticism over ethical concerns. [The Hill]

Suggestions for changes to the Glasgow-Barren County Industrial Development Economic Authority’s inter-local agreement were discussed in detail Friday morning, after which IDEA’s board of directors voted to allow chairman Owen Lambert to compile the suggestions into a list and present it to the board’s attorney for inclusion in a new document to be reviewed by the board and eventually adopted. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Oh, look, the big city folks finally realized what Matt Bevin and his fellow New Republicans are trying to do with Medicaid in Kentucky. [ThinkProgress]

Lawmakers from coal-mining states are pushing to extend health benefits for more than 22,000 retired miners and widows whose medical coverage is set to expire at the end of April. [WFPL]

Former acting attorney general Sally Yates, fired from Donald Trump’s Justice Department in January, and former director of national intelligence James Clapper are set to testify on Russian meddling in the 2016 election at a May 8 hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee. [Politico]

For a boulder that has tried its best to mind its own business, the Indian Head Rock can’t seem to keep out of the limelight. [Ashland Independent]

Mike McCabe’s neighbors in rural Gillespie, Ill., consider him lucky. After being out of work for a year, he landed a job in January making cardboard boxes at a nearby Georgia-Pacific plant for $19.60 an hour. [NY Times]

Three men conspired to bring 80 pounds of cocaine and 40 pounds of methamphetamine by plane from California to Blue Grass Airport, a criminal complaint filed in federal court says. [H-L]

Harassment, vandalism and other hostile acts against Jewish people and sites in the U.S. increased by 34 percent last year and are up 86 percent through the first three months of 2017, according to data released on Monday. [HuffPo]

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Education: Not A Real Thing In Kentucky

US authorities have prepared charges to seek the arrest of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. [CNN]

The Kentucky commission responsible for investigating judicial misconduct has the fewest resources available to it in comparison to neighboring states, and before 2010, the commission was run out of its secretary’s basement in Lexington. [H-L]

Donald Trump is contemplating a new strategy to get repeal of the Affordable Care Act through Congress: threatening to torpedo insurance for millions of Americans unless Democrats agree to negotiate with him. [HuffPo]

The U.S. attorney’s office had decided it won’t prosecute Dr. David Dunn and two other former University of Louisville executives who were under investigation for allegedly misusing federal money for non-university purposes, their lawyers say. [C-J/AKN]

American corporations scored far worse than their European counterparts in the rankings, which were developed by the Geneva-based UN Global Sustainability Index Institute. [QZ]

Kentucky is one of the least educated states in the country, according to a recent study by WalletHub, a personal finance website that gathered data from the U.S. Census Bureau, National Center for Education Statistics, The Chronicle of Higher Education and U.S. News and World Report. [Glasgow Daily Times]

In case you missed it… A Russian government think tank controlled by Vladimir Putin developed a plan to swing the 2016 U.S. presidential election to Donald Trump and undermine voters’ faith in the American electoral system, three current and four former U.S. officials told Reuters. [Reuters]

A local environmental coalition is urging the state to include fence line monitoring of odor emissions in Big Run Landfill’s new air quality permit, which will be discussed Friday in a public hearing in the Boyd County High School auditorium. [Ashland Independent]

The Muscogee County School Board in Columbus, Georgia, dealt another blow to embattled Camelot Education when it voted Monday night to delay for three months a decision on whether to hire the company to run its alternative education programs. The delay in awarding the $6.4 million annual contract comes in the wake of a recent report by ProPublica and Slate that more than a dozen Camelot students were allegedly shoved, beaten or thrown by staff members — incidents almost always referred to as “slamming.” [ProPublica]

The Berea City Council adopted a resolution denouncing acts of discrimination, violence and harassment in city limits and greater Madison County. Council member Billy Wooten stated the measure was partly in response to a recent incident in which a county resident’s property was vandalized with homophobic graffiti. [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump has yet to nominate the State Department official who oversees diplomatic security abroad — despite having made the 2012 Benghazi attacks a centerpiece of his campaign against Hillary Clinton. [Politico]

A researcher at the University of Louisville wants to know whether coal ash is in homes in Southwest Louisville and how it’s potentially affecting the children living there. [WFPL]

The March for Science is not a partisan event. But it’s political. That’s the recurring message of the organizers, who insist that this is a line the scientific community and its supporters will be able to walk. It may prove too delicate a distinction, though, when people show up in droves on Saturday with their signs and their passions. [WaPo]

Attorney General Andy Beshear on Wednesday announced a settlement with Kentucky Utilities and Louisville Gas & Electric that would reduce a large rate increase the companies requested in November. It also would shelve the utilities’ controversial plan to more than double the fixed monthly charge that all customers must pay, regardless of how much electricity they use. [John Cheves]

Stephen Miller, a senior adviser to President Donald Trump, is now working on women’s issues in the White House despite having once forcefully argued against paid maternity leave and equal pay legislation, according to unnamed White House officials. [HuffPo]

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Another Day, More Messy Russian Stuff

Tanya Torp had enough of the Kentucky Democratic Party when she saw one of the state’s politicians, Alison Lundergan Grimes, holding a gun. [H-L]

White House press secretary Sean Spicer insisted on Wednesday that a U.S. aircraft carrier was heading toward North Korea last week, even though a U.S. Navy photo from the time showed it was actually traveling in the opposite direction. [HuffPo]

Out-of-state groups pushing for charter schools joined the traditional Kentucky big business and other interests this year on the list of organizations that spent the most lobbying the Kentucky General Assembly. [C-J/AKN]

A Russian government think tank controlled by Vladimir Putin developed a plan to swing the 2016 U.S. presidential election to Donald Trump and undermine voters’ faith in the American electoral system, three current and four former U.S. officials told Reuters. [Reuters]

She was the first woman to become a member of East Barren Volunteer Fire Department, and one of scant few female firefighters in the entire county two decades ago. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Republican actions speak louder than their words. Their racism shines brightly. [USA Today]

A civil case between American Legion Post 76 and the post’s building corporation may be headed toward mediation. [Ashland Independent]

Exxon Mobil Corp has applied to the Treasury Department for a waiver from U.S. sanctions on Russia in a bid to resume its joint venture with state oil giant PAO Rosneft, according to people familiar with the matter. [WSJ]

Another man accused of assaulting protesters at a Donald Trump campaign rally in Louisville last year has countersued the president, saying he was following Trump’s urging to remove them. [WFPL]

Barack Obama warned President Trump that North Korea would be the gravest foreign threat he faced — and why a solution has proved so hard to find. [NY Times]

An ordinance that holds property owners responsible for minors drinking alcohol on their property with their knowledge or when they should have known minors were drinking failed to pass in Barren County Fiscal Court. [BGDN]

Instead of steaming toward the Korean Peninsula as Trump had said, the Carl Vinson strike group was actually headed in the opposite direction to take part in “scheduled exercises” more than 3,000 miles away. [WaPo]

April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month. Unfortunately for Kentucky children, reports of abuse and neglect have increased dramatically in recent years, in part because of rampant drug abuse. These numbers illustrate the problem. [John Cheves]

Bill O’Reilly weathered sexual harassment charges for more than a decade, but not this time: Fox News has fired the controversial host. [HuffPo]

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