All Eyes On Appalachia As Stivers Embarrasses, Abandons His Suffering Constituents

Construction on a Noah’s Ark attraction in northern Kentucky is sailing along, and the builders say they’re ready to announce an opening date. [H-L]

The prevailing view that addiction is a disease, just like depression or diabetes, is wrong, according to a leading neuroscientist. Marc Lewis, the author of Memoirs of an Addicted Brain and The Biology of Desire, insists that addiction is not a disease and that presenting it as such is harmful. [HuffPo]

Oh, man, Dan Johnson really let Jack Conway have it in his letter to the editor. [C-J/AKN]

America’s poorest white town: abandoned by coal, swallowed by drugs. In the first of a series of dispatches from the US’s poorest communities, we visit Beattyville, Kentucky, blighted by a lack of jobs and addiction to ‘hillbilly heroin’. [The Guardian]

Gov.-elect Matt Bevin’s pledge to scale back the Medicaid expansion and dismantle Kynect, Kentucky’s award-winning health insurance exchange, has caused concern among health clinics. [Business First]

Senate Republicans are divided over how far to go with an ObamaCare repeal bill that they plan to send to the president’s desk by year’s end. [The Hill]

Bob Stivers, one of the most gluttonous hypocrites in Frankfort, represents one of Kentucky’s poorest regions. So here he is advocating FOR killing health care by claiming the savings will help shore up the troubled pension system. Still wondering why his staff have slowly abandoned him over the past few years? Now you know. [CN|Toot]

The advertisement portrays the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau as a roomful of bureaucratic automatons mercilessly stamping “DENIED” on loan applications, beneath Soviet-style banners depicting CFPB’s director, Richard Cordray, and its principal architect, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass. But the ad does not disclose that the group sponsoring it is led by lobbyists for Navient, a student loan company that the CFPB is currently investigating for allegedly cheating student loan borrowers. [The Intercept]

Kentucky’s latest quarterly coal report shows new recent lows in the state’s coal employment and production. During the third quarter of 2015, Kentucky’s mines employed only 9,356 workers — a more than 50 percent decline from this quarter in 2011. Coal production is also at the lowest point since the 1960s. [WFPL]

David Bass, who served 21 years in the U.S. Army, says he tried medical marijuana in a moment of desperation. He suffered from chronic pain and PTSD as a result of multiple active duty tours in Iraq, and his doctor at the VA gave him intense narcotic and psychotropic drugs. [ThinkProgress]

The Glasgow-Barren County Tourist and Convention Commission became one of two tourist commissions that have agreed to help fund the salary of an administrative assistant who will help with the development of a master plan to connect area trails. [Glasgow Daily Times]

At the end of June, ProPublica and The Virginian-Pilot kicked off an investigation into the potential effects of Agent Orange on the children and grandchildren of Vietnam War-era veterans. [ProPublica]

As Fox Business News was cutting away to commercial almost an hour into Tuesday night’s Republican debate, U.S. Sen. Rand Paul could be seen walking toward the moderators. [H-L]

Undercover video recorded by an animal rights activist at one of the largest U.S. pork producers appears to show pigs being beaten and dragged across the slaughterhouse floor as workers cheer and throw blood-soaked towels at one another. [HuffPo]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. [Ting]

KDP Needs To Clean House In Worst Way

Whatever Republican Matt Bevin has in mind for Kentucky’s health insurance reform efforts after he’s sworn in as governor Dec. 8, there are unlikely to be changes this winter while people enroll for their 2016 coverage. [H-L]

Ben Carson is truly crazier than anyone thought. Way crazier than Donald Trump. [HuffPo]

A daughter of “Breaking Cardinal Rules” author Katina Powell was cited for misdemeanor prostitution stemming from a 2014 incident, online court documents show. [C-J/AKN]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-Vt.) has introduced legislation to legalize the recreational use of marijuana. The Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act introduced Wednesday by Sanders would end the long-time federal prohibition on marijuana. This is the first Senate bill to propose legalizing recreational pot, according to marijuana advocates. [The Hill]

Kentucky Republicans didn’t settle for Matt Bevin’s win in the governor’s race; the GOP scored a major upset with Mike Harmon defeating Democratic incumbent auditor Adam Edelen. [Ronnie Ellis]

ProPublica and Frontline reopen the investigation into a death squad run by former South Vietnamese military men that killed journalists, torched businesses and intimidated those who challenged its dream of re-starting the Vietnam War — all on American soil. [ProPublica]

The Rowan County Sheriff’s Office received a call around 5:45 p.m. Tuesday that Phillip Jent of Cold Springs Hollow Road off Christy Creek Road had been shot in the chest by his brother, Robert Jent. [The Morehead News]

After years of denying that American troops will deploy to Syria, President Obama has changed course and decided to send troops to help in the fight against ISIS, also known as ISIL or the Islamic State. [ThinkProgress]

The city of Berea had a very good financial year, according to the results of a recent financial audit. During a council session Tuesday evening, Jerry Hensley and Heather Cochran told officials the city increased its net value during fiscal year 2014-2015 by approximately $5 million. [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump has spent much of his presidential campaign bashing his GOP rivals as beholden to major donors, and, in recent weeks, he’s expanded his attacks to include three major donors in particular ― Sheldon Adelson, Paul Singer and the Koch brothers. But POLITICO has learned that Trump or his surrogates have sought to build relationships ― if not support ― from all three, calling into question the billionaire real estate showman’s repeated assertions that, because of his wealth, he has no use for major donors. [Politico]

Democratic leaders met in Frankfort Wednesday morning to talk about how they lost the Governor’s race and three other statewide offices, only winning Attorney General and Secretary of State. [WKYT]

The Rosetta spacecraft discovers molecular oxygen in the cloud of gas surrounding Comet 67P prompting a rethink on the origins of the Solar System. [BBC]

Offering harsh words for fellow Democrats, Kentucky Sports Radio host Matt Jones appeared to be of two minds Wednesday when discussing whether Tuesday’s enormous Republican victories in Kentucky will influence whether he runs for Congress. [H-L]

The U.S. electric sector is expected to hit its lowest carbon emissions since 1995 this year, partly due to the widespread closure of coal-powered power plants over the past five years, a Sierra Club report released Wednesday found. [HuffPo]

Democrats Still Playing The Blame Game

SurveyUSA has finally been kicked to the curb! [H-L & C-J/AKN]

Letcher Circuit Judge Sam Wright III defeated Court of Appeals Judge Janet Stumbo in the race for Eastern Kentucky’s 7th District Supreme Court seat. [H-L]

If France can do it, the United States can do it. France will end its ban on blood donations by gay men, its health minister said Wednesday, calling the move the end “of a taboo and discrimination.” [HuffPo]

Republican Matt Bevin has scheduled no press conference or public events on the day after his huge victory in the governor’s election that raises implications for every major issue facing the state, including healthcare, education and pensions. But the transition process is already taking shape in Frankfort. [C-J/AKN]

A few hours before their afternoon shift at the Marshall County Mine last spring, hundreds of coal miners were summoned to a mandatory meeting with their new boss, Bob Murray, CEO of Murray Energy Corp. At a training facility in Moundsville, West Virginia, the chief executive of the nation’s No. 1 underground coal producer sported his signature sweater vest and struck a confrontational tone. [IBT]

Opinions issued by a federal appeals court Monday will allow two major air pollution-related lawsuits in Louisville to move forward. [WFPL]

This is basically why everyone is skeptical of whatever it is the U.S. Justice Action Network is doing in D.C. with the Koch money. It’s a story political journalists couldn’t resist. Reporters at the New York Times, Politico, Yahoo News, and other outlets have been rhapsodizing lately about how the ultra-conservative billionaire Koch brothers are “braving the spotlight” and joining forces with “tree-hugging liberals” to dedicate themselves to the cause of ending America’s over-incarceration crisis. Meanwhile, however, Koch money continues to finance election-year efforts that promote tough-on-crime politics. [The Intercept]

It has been two months since a head on crash destroyed Scott County Habitat for Humanity’s only pickup and delivery truck. [WKYT]

Instead of thanking Barack Obama, as these outsiders suggest, Matt Bevin should be thanking Kentucky Democrats for being to the right of national Republicans. It’s always some asshole outsider pontificating on Kentucky as if they’ve been here more than twice in their life. [WaPo]

The votes have all been counted, and Harlan County’s choice for circuit court clerk is incumbent Democrat Wendy Flanary. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

It is rare to hear a candidate for the United States Senate so earnestly quote rock lyrics. Rarer still, lyrics from a Canadian progressive-rock band. But Rand Paul quoted “The Spirit of Radio” by Rush — a group whose members were similarly influenced by the writings of Ayn Rand — everywhere he went during the Republican primary in Kentucky in 2010. [NY Times]

A Perry County man from the community of Chavies is facing multiple theft charges after Hazard Police say he stole a police cruiser. [Hazard Herald]

Hillary Clinton leaned as far as she ever has into making gun control a central focus of her presidential campaign on Tuesday, releasing a somber new 30-second television advertisement calling for more stringent gun policies. [Politico]

Ryan Quarles, a Republican state representative from Georgetown, will be the new commissioner of agriculture. [H-L]

Though 8,000 Detroit residents were foreclosed on this year, they’re finding inventive ways to deal with an ongoing crisis. Tynetta Sneed, 32, had been settled for years in a modest white bungalow, down the street from her mom and brother, when she got a notice saying that her house was going into foreclosure. [HuffPo]

You’ve Got The Worst Hangover Ever

Kentucky clerk Kim Davis has asked a federal appeals court to scrap a series of unfavorable rulings issued by the district judge who sent her to jail for refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [H-L]

Middle-aged white Americans are dying at increasing rates and half a million people are dead who should not be, according to a new report published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [HuffPo]

A former state social worker charged with making false child abuse complaints against her Elizabethtown neighbors now faces additional charges she made false abuse complaints against two people in Grayson County — one the husband of her longtime best friend and the other the pastor at the local Baptist church she attended. [C-J/AKN]

Matt Bevin, a Republican political novice, wealthy Louisville businessman and Tea Party favorite, was elected Kentucky’s next governor on Tuesday, a victory that could herald a new era in a state where Democrats have held the governor’s mansion for all but four of the last 44 years. The Associated Press declared Mr. Bevin the winner shortly after 8 p.m. [NY Times]

On the eve of Election Day, Kentucky voters received a phone call with an automated message from embattled Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis. [Ashland Independent]

In Kentucky, it’s hard to find many Republicans supporting Rand Paul’s bid for president. And that’s making GOP strategists nervous about his future prospects as a senator. [National Journal]

Roll out the maroon and white carpet. A documentary film that chronicles the history of Eastern Kentucky University premieres at the EKU Center for the Arts on Monday, Nov. 9. [Richmond Register]

President Obama on Monday mocked Republican presidential candidates as thin-skinned for lashing out at CNBC over the network’s handling of last week’s primary debate. [The Hill]

Hundreds if not thousands of details that take careful planning go into making an election happen, so there is always room for something to cause a kink. This year’s general election in Barren County had some of the usual issues but also at least one not-so-common one. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The journalists were assassinated on American soil, one after another. Duong Trong Lam was the first. He was 27 years old and ran a Vietnamese-language publication called Cai Dinh Lang, which he mailed to immigrants around the country. A gunman found him as he walked out of his San Francisco apartment building one morning and shot him, a single bullet piercing his pulmonary artery, just above the heart. [ProPublica]

Three mayors and a host of other officials gathered here last Thursday to announce a major auto racing event. [The Morehead News]

The influence industry is playing a larger role than meets the eye in raising money for Hillary Clinton and Jeb Bush. [Politico]

Frankfort Republicans are fearmongering over Planned Parenthood? Surely not! A dozen Republicans in the Kentucky House have pre-filed a bill for the 2016 General Assembly to end state funding for women’s health services at Planned Parenthood clinics in Lexington and Louisville, which this fiscal year totaled $331,309. [John Cheves]

Law enforcement officers accused of sexual misconduct have jumped from job to job — and at times faced fresh allegations that include raping women — because of a tattered network of laws and lax screening that allowed them to stay on the beat. [HuffPo]

Corrupt Tim Conley Whines From Prison

Corrupt as hell Tim Conley now wants to go back on the plea deal he took! Because of this asshole, Jake’s hometown is still in shambles, occupational taxes have had to be increased out the wazoo, countless people have lost their ability to maintain a home, countless more are still displaced and lives have been lost. WHAT THE ACTUAL FUCK? Fuck Tim Conley. Let him rot in prison. Let anyone defending him rot alongside him. [H-L]

The White House announced on Friday that a small number of U.S. troops are heading into northern Syria to assist local ground troops in the fight against the Islamic State. [HuffPo]

Looks like Scott Jennings and crew will be spending a lot of money for Brett Guthrie in 2016. And probably a little bit if someone credible runs against Candy Barr. [C-J/AKN]

Rand Paul’s heart isn’t even in filibustering anymore. Because he knows his presidential bid is dead in the water and knows he’s gonna have a tough time getting re-elected to the senate next year. [WaPo]

I wish I could say who will win the governor’s election Tuesday but I can’t. [Ronnie Ellis]

Donald Trump and Ben Carson together command more than half of voters’ preference atop the Republican field after Wednesday night’s debate, while Texas Sen. Ted Cruz rose to third place in the latest national NBC News/SurveyMonkey poll released Friday evening. [Politico]

Kentucky’s gubernatorial candidates responded to a questionnaire from Preservation Kentucky regarding Kentucky’s Historic Preservation Tax Credit. [Click the Clicky]

U.S. jobs data due in the coming week may hold the key to whether the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates for the first time since 2006 in December, signaling its intention to end an era of almost-free dollars. [Reuters]

Oh, look, the Kim Davis preacher is trying to run for office. “Citizens united for a better Kentucky for a better tomorrow.” That is what Randy Smith said about his bid for the Republican nomination for the 99th District House of Representatives seat. You might know him as the fiery preacher who led the rally cries against gay marriage over the summer on the lawn of the Rowan County Courthouse. [The Morehead News]

President Obama and his FBI director are sparring over whether the so-called “Ferguson Effect” is real, complicating the president’s push to loosen the nation’s sentencing laws. [The Hill]

Steve Beshear has appointed District Court Judge John T. Alexander as the interim circuit court judge, according to an executive order obtained Friday from the governor’s office. [Glasgow Daily Times]

I applaud the Democrats and Republicans who came together [Friday] morning to pass a responsible, long-term budget agreement that reflects our values, grows our economy and creates jobs. This agreement will strengthen the middle class by investing in education, job training, and basic research. It will keep us safe by investing in our national security. It protects our seniors by avoiding harmful cuts to Medicare and Social Security. It is paid for in a responsible, balanced way – in part with a measure to ensure that partnerships like hedge funds pay what they owe in taxes just like everybody else. It locks in two years of funding and should help break the cycle of shutdowns and manufactured crises that have harmed our economy. This agreement is a reminder that Washington can still choose to help, rather than hinder, America’s progress, and I look forward to signing it into law as soon as it reaches my desk. After that, Congress should build on this by getting to work on spending bills that invest in America’s priorities without getting sidetracked by ideological provisions that have no place in America’s budget process. If we can do that, we’ll help our workers and businesses keep growing the economy and building an America full of opportunity for all. [President Barack Obama]

This is big news for the state’s most important newspaper but the six lawsuits and myriad scandals in Montgomery County are not. It’s like Nancy Rodriguez all over again. A freshman course has been abruptly disbanded at Henry Clay High School and the principal has apologized to the school’s decision-making council, saying he gave students academic credit without necessary council permission. [H-L]

Paul Ryan said on Sunday it would be ridiculous to work with President Barack Obama on immigration reform, saying he cannot trust the president on the issue. [HuffPo]