The KY State Police Need Your Help

Danny Ray Burden fell asleep in mid-sentence as he was booked into the Grant County jail, toppling over on the bench where he sat. Prodded awake, he coughed, shook and pleaded for emergency medical attention. [H-L]

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton took a shot this week at President Barack Obama’s immigration strategy from his first years in office, saying it wouldn’t work with today’s GOP. [HuffPo]

A self-proclaimed prostitute says she was told that University of Louisville basketball coach Rick Pitino knew she and other escorts were being paid to have sex with players and recruits. [C-J/AKN]

Hillary Clinton holds double-digit leads nationally over all her Democratic challengers, including a dream team of contenders that remain on the sidelines, according to a new poll. [The Hill]

A few Kentucky counties are searching for poll workers for the upcoming Nov. 3 general election but not Rowan County. [The Morehead News]

The “Resolution Condemning Judicial Tyranny And Petitioning God’s Mercy” asks the state to join rural Blount County in fighting against the ruling and to “protect Natural Marriage from lawless court opinions and the financial schemes of the enemies of righteousness.” [Reuters]

Stephen l. Pruitt today officially became Kentucky’s sixth Commissioner of Education since passage of the landmark Kentucky Education Reform Act in 1990 that created the position. [Ronnie Ellis]

It’s hard to deny that the NRA has won the gun debate over the past 20 years. Despite mass shootings — and despite some 80 to 90 percent of Americans saying they are in favor of background checks — no legislation expanding on the 1993 Brady Bill has passed Congress. [NPR]

This will make your eyes roll back in your head. The Kentucky Executive Branch Ethics Commission described state Rep. Tanya Pullin, D-South Shore, as having demonstrated “the highest level of ethical standards.” [Ashland Independent]

The Justice Department is set to release about 6,000 inmates early from prison — the largest one-time release of federal prisoners — in an effort to reduce overcrowding and provide relief to drug offenders who received harsh sentences over the past three decades. [WaPo]

Habitat for Humanity of Madison and Clark Counties collected more than $58,200 in pledges for the coming five years during its annual Building Hope Community Breakfast. [Richmond Register]

Hillary Rodham Clinton, as she offered up a sheaf of new health care proposals, said she was “building on the Affordable Care Act.” But lurking in those proposals was a veiled criticism of President Obama’s signature domestic achievement: For many families, the Affordable Care Act has not made health care affordable. [NY Times]

Kentucky State Police are asking for help from the public as they search for a Knott County woman who has been missing since May. Natasha Fugate Jones was last seen by family on May 7, and state police began searching for her on June 7, according to a news release by Kentucky State Police. [H-L]

Three top officials with Ron Paul’s 2012 presidential campaign claim political motivations are behind charges alleging they violated federal financial disclosure laws by secretly paying an influential Iowa politician for his endorsement. Paul, a former Republican congressman from Texas, will be called as a prosecution witness at the trial, set for next Tuesday in Des Moines. [AP]

Larry Dale Hit The Nail On Its Head

About 50 people came out on a rainy Saturday morning to see U.S. Sen. Rand Paul rally for Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin. [H-L]

Last week, the Taliban began the process of retaking Afghanistan, starting with the northern city of Kunduz. [HuffPo]

Republican Whitney Westerfield and Democrat Andy Beshear are locked in a dead heat for attorney general with just over a month before election day, according to a new Bluegrass Poll. [C-J/AKN]

Vice President Joe Biden on Saturday praised gay rights activists for the progress they have made in recent years. The vice president gave the keynote address at the Human Rights Campaign National Dinner, during which he honored past civil rights leaders and commended current ones for working to fulfill the principles embodied the Declaration of Independence. [The Hill]

While it’s not the winter just yet, area homeless shelters are bracing for their busiest months now before their supplies run out. “With the winter coming, what we have isn’t going to last,” Beacon of Hope Emergency Shelter director Michele Bradford said. “It won’t last.” Employees at the 24-hour Beacon of Hope shelter in Winchester say their food supply is quickly dwindling. [WKYT]

The Associated Press properly identified Liberty Counsel — the legal group defending Kentucky’s Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis — as an anti-LGBT hate group, in an all-too-rare example of a major news outlet accurately informing its audience about Liberty’s extreme views. [MMFA]

What no one is saying here? Rand Paul and his wife, Kelly, are miffed at Matt Bevin over some nasty remarks Bevin allegedly made to Kelly some time ago. It’s a big enough rift that the McConnell crew talk about it all the time. [CN|Toot]

The nine justices of the U.S. Supreme Court are set to wade into contentious social matters in their new term beginning on Monday including affirmative action, union powers and voting rights, and could add major cases involving abortion and birth control. [Reuters]

The head of the high tech company coming to Morehead was a guest speaker at Wednesday’s meeting of the Kentucky House Special Committee on Advanced Communications and Information Technology. Robert Schena, CEO and cofounder of Rajant Corporation, told committee members that his company’s technology aboard MSU’s miniature satellites could create a network in space that could be used to keep military defense systems running if the U.S. were ever attacked. [The Morehead News]

The National Rifle Association and other anti-gun-control groups are formidable, but political trends may be loosening their grip on lawmakers. [ProPublica]

Barren County magistrates voted to adopt an ordinance on second reading Friday to set the county’s real estate tax rate for for the current fiscal year during a special-called Fiscal Court meeting. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Edward Snowden is still waiting on the Justice Department to take up his offer of a plea deal, the former National Security Agency contractor who leaked thousands of classified documents says. [Politico]

Bevin is the most inept candidate in either party since Peppy Martin won the 1999 GOP nomination after Republicans decided to make a statement about public financing of gubernatorial campaigns by not fielding any legitimate contenders. Still, given Kentucky’s anti-Obama sentiment, Conway cannot win in November unless he gets the Democratic base to turn out 100 percent. So far, he has done little or nothing to make this happen. His campaign has been only marginally better than Bevin’s. [Larry Dale Keeling]

The Supreme Court on Friday issued a posthumous response to Alfredo Prieto, a serial killer on Virginia’s death row whose lawyers had petitioned the court several times to put his execution on hold. [HuffPo]

Rand’s Crew To Abandon Matt Bevin?

Can you believe Jack Conway thought it was appropriate to fight this nonsense? [H-L]

Education Secretary Arne Duncan is stepping down in December after 7 years in the Obama administration. [HuffPo]

Privately, Rand Paul’s people tell a far less kind story about Matt Bevin. Calling it a “minor thing,” U.S. Sen. Rand Paul said on Saturday it doesn’t matter that Matt Bevin doesn’t support his presidential campaign. [C-J/AKN]

Polls released Sunday morning show real estate mogul Donald Trump holding his leads in the early voting states of Iowa and New Hampshire, although those leads are smaller than one more ago. [The Hill]

Maybe David Byerman, the new director of the Legislative Research Commission, is a fan of singer-songwriter Sam Cooke. On his first day on the job, Byerman, 44, the former secretary of the Nevada state senate, promised his new employees that change is gonna come. [Ronnie Ellis]

One Vatican official said there was “a sense of regret” that the pope had ever seen Kim Davis, a Kentucky county clerk who went to jail in September for refusing to honor a U.S. Supreme Court ruling and issue same-sex marriage licenses. [Reuters]

The Russell City Council will host a special meeting Monday morning to take a final vote on a slight increase in property taxes. [Ashland Independent]

Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul said Saturday that his home state of Kentucky needs a governor willing to stand up to the federal government he aspires to lead from the White House. [ABC News]

Isn’t it fun watching the cowardly shitbirds at the Bowling Green Daily Toilet Paper lose their marbles over Jack Conway not hating the gays? If that’s the worst they can come up with after all the crap Matt Bevin has pulled, he’s a damn saint. And you know we think Jack Conway’s the slimiest cat turd in the sandbox. [Bowling Green Daily Toilet Paper]

On any given day, in any police department in the nation, 15 percent of officers will do the right thing no matter what is happening. [Vox]

What do you expect from a drunken party school? Now your tax dollars will be used to attack and belittle the person seeking relief. Western Kentucky University is being sued after a hazing scandal that shut down the school’s swim team. [WAVE3]

There was plenty in the complex deal to benefit bankers, lawyers, executives and hedge fund managers. Patriot Coal Corp. was bankrupt, but its mines would be auctioned to pay off mounting debts while financial engineering would generate enough cash to cover the cost of the proceedings. [ProPublica]

The archbishop, who was exiled to the United States in 2011 after losing a high-altitude Vatican power struggle that became public in an infamous leaks scandal, now finds himself at the center of another papal controversy. This time, the Vatican is suggesting that Viganò is responsible for giving papal face time to Kim Davis, the Kentucky clerk whose refusal to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples has made her a heroine to social conservatives. [H-L]

A Fox News host has come under fire this week for suggesting that Ahmed Mohamed, the 14-year-old Texas high schooler who was arrested last month for bringing a clock he built to school, was “not as innocent as he seems” because he was once allegedly caught “blowing soap bubbles” in school. [HuffPo]

The US Loves It Some Mass Shootings

Rand Paul’s presidential campaign raised only about $2.5 million in the third quarter of the year, according to a published report Thursday afternoon. [H-L]

The nation was once again confronted with the horror of a deadly school shooting on Thursday, this time a massacre at a community college in Roseburg, Oregon. [HuffPo]

After a fiery confrontation with County Attorney Mike O’Connell, Jefferson District Judge Sean Delahanty promised to rule within a week about the fate of 2,300 motorists whose cases he has held hostage because of his concerns about Drive Safe Louisville, which has generated $1.3 million for O’Connell’s office. [C-J/AKN]

Californians have really stepped up water conservation due to the drought. Some cities are selling almost half as much water as they normally do. But there’s a big downside for water agencies — lost revenue. People using less water means major budget shortfalls. [NPR]

Whitley County Clerk Kay Schwartz says she is granting licenses to “bride and groom” couples – and claims she never stopped issuing them – but not to same-sex couples. [WKYT]

Congress is blocking legal marijuana in Washington, D.C. and maybe causing a spike in murders. [Mother Jones]

A new report details the differences in health care costs and patient usages in metro areas across the country. And Kentucky fares fairly well. [WFPL]

A woman in the US state of Georgia has been executed despite a number of last-ditch appeals, including one by the Pope, to try to block her execution. [BBC]

Democratic state Sen. Dorsey Ridley of Henderson says he’s close to jumping into the race to succeed retiring Republican U.S. Congressman Ed Whitfield. [Ronnie Ellis]

The CEO of Alpha Natural Resources is defending his coal company’s financing of harassment of climate scientists. [The Intercept]

Former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship was met by a swarm of reporters and photographers as he walked into the federal courthouse Thursday morning for the first day of jury selection in his criminal trial. [Ashland Independent]

Pope Francis’ encounter with Kim Davis last week in Washington, which was interpreted by many as a subtle intervention in the United States’ same-sex marriage debate, was part of a series of private meetings with dozens of guests and did not amount to an endorsement of her views, the Vatican said on Friday. So Kim Davis DID fame whore it up while mischaracterizing her encounter with the pope. Imagine that. [NY Times]

The biggest spenders in Kentucky’s competitive race for governor are a pair of Louisville millionaires who want to see a Republican elected as the state’s chief executive. But it’s not what you think. [H-L]

U.S. employers slammed the brakes on hiring over the last two months and wages fell in September, raising new doubts the economy is strong enough for the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates by the end of this year. [HuffPo]