Floyd County Will Make You Go Hmmm

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says an Ohio County property contaminated with arsenic is about to get cleaned up. [H-L]

Eight years after the Virginia Tech massacre led to tighter security at colleges across the U.S., some schools make “active shooter” training mandatory for incoming students, while others offer little more than brief online guidance on what to do if there’s a gunman on the loose. [HuffPo]

About 100 anti-abortion protesters decried the federal funding of Planned Parenthood during a rally Saturday, waving sometimes graphic signs in front of the Second Street clinic while neighborhood residents, some clearly disconcerted, looked on. [C-J/AKN]

President Obama’s renewed push for executive action on gun control is almost certain to be challenged in court, experts say, setting up another high-stakes battle over the Second Amendment. [The Hill]

The Cave Region Trails Initiative Steering Committee met for the first time Thursday night after receiving word it had been awarded a grant by the National Park Service to receive technical planning assistance in the development of a master plan it can use as a guide to connect trails in and around 11 communities in Barren, Edmonson, Hart and Warren counties. [Glasgow Daily Times]

A bankruptcy plan for Patriot Coal Corp. would have thrown into question the medical coverage of 208 miners, wives and widows. [ProPublica]

Morehead State University Student Life Tuesday hosted a second community meeting to open lines of communication in hopes of uniting the university, the city and the county. [The Morehead News]

Whale Rock. It’s got quite a story to tell. When scientists first saw it in images returned from Nasa’s Curiosity rover on Mars, they really weren’t sure what to make of it. [BBC]

Rob Napier, a displaced coal miner, has an accent that is the audio equivalent to chummy handshake. His speech and phrases are folksy and polite, until he starts talking about what Washington and Charleston, W.Va., are doing to the coal industry. [Richmond Register]

We’ll go ahead and ruin this one for you: Pawpaws are disgusting. [NPR]

Sensibility is winning out over bravado in terms of how local high school football players and coaches view concussion risk, according to the physician tasked with evaluating and treating players from 23 local high schools and three universities. [Ashland Independent]

California Governor Jerry Brown on Friday signed into law the state’s first comprehensive regulations of medical marijuana, two decades after legalization fueled a wild west of disparate local rules, a gray market in cultivation and concerns about the ease of obtaining the drug. The package of three laws, viewed by some as a possible framework for the eventual legalization of recreational marijuana in the most populous U.S. state, would establish a Bureau of Medical Marijuana Regulation and oversee such activities as cultivation and dispensary licensing. [Reuters]

For more than two decades, the Floyd County public schools and the state of Kentucky were at war. [H-L]

Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson defended his controversial comments that the Holocaust could have been prevented if only the Jewish people in Europe had been armed. [HuffPo]

Another Day, Same Crap At The EPSB

The Education Professional Standards Board yesterday appointed Jimmy Adams as its executive director. He’d been serving as the interim for some time and insiders tell us he’s the reason there was a mass exodus of staffers. Aaaaand a few little birdies tell us he’s started some beef with the court reporter on the Joshua Powell case and that’s why the transcript from his 22-day hearing remains in “draft” form. Meaning the case likely won’t be resolved until mid-2016, if ever. [Did Kentucky Kids Lose Again?]

Kentucky community colleges have plans in place and routinely test for all emergencies, including shooters on campus. [H-L]

Black men from around the nation are gathering on the National Mall to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Million Man March and call for policing reforms and changes in black communities. [HuffPo]

Louisville, the city Greg Fischer claims is the most compassionate city on earth, killed three people over the weekend. [C-J/AKN]

Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul won the Republican Liberty Caucus straw poll late Saturday in New Hampshire. [The Hill]

At a recent meeting of the Metcalfe County Fiscal Court, Judge-Executive Greg Wilson shared some good news with magistrates regarding the county’s economic climate. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Once you stop laughing at Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree), you can kinda feel sorry for him for being dumb enough to allow Doug Ashley Madison Stafford to run his life. [Politico]

The Rowan County Detention Center Committee met Thursday with the architect and construction manager for the new detention center to discuss several design options, including how the county would handle storm water runoff into Triplett Creek. [The Morehead News]

On the evening of April 29th last year, in the southern Minnesota town of Waseca, a woman was doing the dishes when she looked out her kitchen window and saw a young man walking through her back yard. [New Yorker]

Jack Conway answered some questions at Bowling Green Teabagger Central. [BGDN]

The Shell Farms & Greenhouses is an expansive 1,000-acre property in Garrard County, 37 miles south of Lexington, Kentucky. The five-generation family farm is operated by 31-year-old Giles Shell and his 60-year-old father, Gary. The two are whizzes at making ornamental flowers flourish, and like most farmers in the area, the family has grown tobacco for years. [Newsweek]

The wife of Republican nominee for governor Matt Bevin is defending him in a new 30-second TV ad that began airing Monday. [WKYT]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A fossilised foetus belonging to an early relative of the horse has been described by scientists. The unborn foal was identified among the remains of its mother – a 48-million-year-old horse-like animal found in Germany’s Messel pit in 2000. [BBC]

Wondering why the Jessamine County crew gets away with operating a fun, oh, drug ring that’s ignored by law enforcement? Because small town “Christians” turn a blind eye once their back has been scratched. The longtime mayor of Wilmore said Sunday that a lighted white cross that sits on top of the city’s water tower will not be moved despite a legal threat by a Madison, Wisconsin, group that says the cross is unconstitutional. [H-L]

Will body cameras be a tool for police reform? Only if bad policy doesn’t get in the way. [HuffPo]

Ronnie Ellis Schooled Matt Bevin

Coal companies controlled by a billionaire running for governor of West Virginia owe $3.5 million in delinquent property taxes in Eastern Kentucky, shortchanging schools and other public agencies at a time many are struggling. [H-L]

A Fox News contributor has offered a bizarre defense of Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson’s assertion that the Holocaust was the result of Nazi gun control. [HuffPo]

Kentucky’s race for attorney general is a contrast in old school politics and modern politics. It’s also a case study for the potential of old school corruption and the potential for modern corruption. [C-J/AKN]

U.S. law enforcement agencies could have a tougher time operating in the European Union after a bombshell court ruling struck down a key data transfer agreement between the two governments. [The Hill]

The more small town newspapers promote these bigots, the more harm people like Kim Davis cause. We’re looking at you, CNHI. [Ashland Independent]

Joshua Powell was deposed for longer than Bill Cosby. Let that sink in. [Reuters]

You can thank Kim Davis for drawing Westboro Baptist Church to Morehead State University. [The Morehead News]

Drugmakers disclose their payments to doctors, dentists, even chiropractors. But spending on nurse practitioners and physician assistants is excluded. Legislation in the Senate would change that. [ProPublica]

Don’t worry, that $68.6 million will grow over time. Change order after change order will drive the cost up beyond belief. A Glasgow company has been awarded a construction contract to complete the widening of Interstate 65 in Kentucky. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Hillary Clinton sat down with Black Lives Matter activists Friday for a policy-centered discussion of criminal justice in the African American community. According to an aide to the former secretary of state and 2016 Democratic frontrunner, the discussion centered on the roles of police in communities, allocation of police resources in areas that need them the most, and “violence against transgender Americans.” [Politico]

Maybe Matt Bevin isn’t old enough to recall Orville Faubus or George Wallace but I am. Bevin, the Republican running for governor, frequently invokes the 10th Amendment, promising to tell the federal government to “pound sand” on such issues as environmental regulations if he’s elected. [Ronnie Ellis]

Russia has agreed to resume talks with the US on air safety during Syria bombing campaigns, says the Pentagon. [BBC]

Plans are proceeding to build in Mercer County the largest solar-powered generating facility in Kentucky. Louisville Gas & Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities announced Friday that they have secured a contract for engineering, procurement and construction of the facility, and that construction is expected to begin in November. [H-L]

A white Cleveland police officer was justified in fatally shooting a black 12-year-old boy holding a pellet gun moments after pulling up beside him, according to two outside reviews conducted at the request of the prosecutor investigating the death. [HuffPo]

Coal Pandering’s Worse Than Child Abuse, Right? Surely It’s Worse Than That. Or Maybe Elder Abuse?

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway tried to reinforce his friend-of-coal credentials Thursday, pledging to promote the industry and look for tax incentives to boost production as he distanced himself from a president routinely blamed for coal’s downturn. [H-L]

If you want to stop violence against people, stop violence against animals. [HuffPo]

Because of course they are. Some of Kentucky’s most vulnerable people — frail, elderly and disabled individuals in nursing homes — have been threatened, ridiculed, slapped, injured or sexually abused, but the state’s nursing home industry is seeking relief from what it calls heavy-handed state oversight. [C-J/AKN]

The lack of accurate information about police-involved shootings is roiling the nation’s law enforcement community, leaving officials unable to say whether high-profile killings are isolated events or part of an alarming trend, FBI Director James B. Comey said Wednesday. [WaPo]

What this means is Mark Hebert is prolly spilling the hooker tea. A former University of Louisville basketball player has given investigators a version of events that indicates strippers were in the players’ dorm on at least one occasion, a source close to the investigation told WDRB News. [WDRB]

Leading theologians from the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) are making news this week for again speaking out against ex-gay therapy, also known as reparative or conversion therapy. But what these theologians have been saying at the annual Association of Certified Biblical Counselors (ACBC) conference about how to respond to LGBT people belies the supposed progress of rejecting these harmful, ineffective treatments. [ThinkProgress]

A federal judge won’t drop charges against two of the six accused in a scheme to sell millions of dollars of untaxed cigarettes from a storefront in Russell, according to court records. [Ashland Independent]

A few days ago, the RAND Corporation published an opinion piece that raised questions about Surgeon Scorecard, our searchable online database of complication rates for surgeons performing several elective operations. We appreciate the authors’ intentions and plan to take some suggestions into account as we prepare Surgeon Scorecard 2.0. [ProPublica]

Barren Circuit Judge Phillip Patton has issued an order today agreeing with the decision of the Kentucky Office of the Attorney General that the Glasgow Independent Schools Board of Education violated the Open Meetings Act with its closed session on March 30, when it discussed a potential property agreement. [Glasgow Daily Times]

U.S. stocks ended higher on Thursday with the S&P 500 closing at a seven-week high as investors saw further signs of dovishness in the Federal Reserve’s September meeting minutes which shed light on its decision to keep interest rates near zero. [Reuters]

If Madison County institutes a needle-exchange program in an attempt to control infections such as HIV and hepatitis C among inter-venous drug users, it will benefit from the lessons learned by its neighbor to the north. [Richmond Register]

US presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has outlined her plan to curb Wall Street abuses. [BBC]

Preservation Kentucky will present its Excellence in Preservation Awards on Saturday at a particularly notable historic site: Traveler’s Rest, home place of Isaac Shelby, the first and fifth governor of Kentucky. [H-L]

Senior U.S. lawmakers have begun probing possible intelligence lapses over Moscow’s intervention in Syria, concerned that American spy agencies were slow to grasp the scope and intention of Russia’s dramatic military offensive there, U.S. congressional sources and other officials told Reuters. [HuffPo]

That KSP Situation Is Absolutely Fascinating

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray’s inauguration fund has paid a $510 fine for filing financial records 46 days late. [H-L]

President Barack Obama apologized to Doctors Without Borders on Wednesday for the American air attack that killed at least 22 people at its hospital in Afghanistan, and said the U.S. would examine military procedures to look for better ways to prevent such incidents. [HuffPo]

A lawsuit filed by a woman exonerated of a murder after serving eight years behind bars offers new details about how she alleges an overzealous Kentucky State Police detective framed her. [C-J/AKN]

Top House Democrats are accusing the chairman of the House Oversight Committee of refusing to share the unedited footage from the recent undercover videos targeting Planned Parenthood. [The Hill]

U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth, D-Louisville, is predicting low voter turnout for March’s Republican presidential caucus next year. Yarmuth expects turnout will be “pretty pathetic” because voters in the state have no history with caucuses. [WFPL]

U.S. stocks ended stronger after a volatile session on Wednesday, led by a rebound in biotechnology companies that pushed the S&P 500 to its highest level in three weeks. [Reuters]

An attorney for former Glasgow Fire Department Sgt. Roger Hampton has filed documents with the Kentucky Court of Appeals that attempt to get the case regarding his firing dismissed. [Glasgow Daily Times]

A new study published last month in Sociological Forum has found two important connections that demonstrate how discrimination has a negative impact on the health and well-being of transgender people. [ThinkProgress]

Casey County Clerk Casey Davis says his office is now issuing marriage licenses. [WKYT]

Verizon is merging its cellphone tracking supercookie with AOL’s ad tracking network to match users’ online habits with their offline details. [ProPublica]

When best-selling author Neil Gaiman was asked to give advice to aspiring authors at Western Kentucky University’s latest installment of the 2015-16 Cultural Enhancement Series on Tuesday night, his first piece of advice was only one word. [BGDN]

After years of drug addiction, Jayne Fuentes feels she’s close to getting her life back on track, as long as she doesn’t get arrested again — but not for using drugs. She fears it will be because she still owes court fines and fees, including hundreds of dollars for her public defender. [NPR]

With platoons of Republicans running for president, the Democratic National Committee has had too much on its plate to spend much time commenting on Kentucky’s gubernatorial race. [H-L]

The Affordable Care Act’s chief aim is to extend coverage to people without health insurance. One of the 2010 law’s primary means to achieve that goal is expanding Medicaid eligibility to more people near the poverty level. But a crucial court ruling in 2012 granted states the power to reject the Medicaid expansion. [HuffPo]

It’s Now Trendy To Hate Kim Davis

Hillary Rodham Clinton says that jail was the “right thing” for a Kentucky county clerk who refused to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [H-L]

Hillary Clinton came out against the Trans-Pacific Partnership Wednesday, breaking with President Barack Obama on the 12-nation trade deal that is set to become a key part of his legacy. [HuffPo]

Franklin Circuit Judge Thomas Wingate lectured the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet on Monday for recently agreeing to a confidentiality clause in a proposed settlement of a case against an Eastern Kentucky oil company for a leak of diesel fuel into the Kentucky River. [C-J/AKN]

Planned Parenthood has sought class action status for its Medicaid patients in Arkansas after a U.S. judge ordered the state to continue payments to three women who challenged Arkansas’ move to halt payments to the organization. [Reuters]

Already home to one of the most underfunded public pension plans in the nation, Kentucky Retirement Systems is losing further ground through its investment choices. [WFPL]

The myth of the good guy with the gun. [Politico]

If the prevailing judgment about the 2015 gubernatorial race is that no one is excited about it, then Tuesday evening’s debate between Republican Matt Bevin and Democrat Jack Conway probably didn’t set any fires under prospective voters. [Ronnie Ellis]

A Florida candidate for US Senate has come under criticism after it emerged that he once killed a goat and drank its blood. He’s a “Libertarian.” [BBC]

The proposed reconstruction of Berea City Hall is touted as a project that could meet the needs of city administration and emergency services for years to come. During a Tuesday meeting of the Berea City Council, however, Audit and Finance Committee chairman Jerry Little raised concerns about the project’s $11 million price tag. [Richmond Register]

U.S. Customs and Border Protection has issued nationwide custody standards governing how immigrants are treated when in U.S. Border Patrol custody. [NPR]

Status reports from Rowan County deputy clerks will now be filed monthly instead of every two weeks, according to a federal order filed Tuesday. [Ashland Independent]

Heads-up, Matt Bevin, you jackass. Tennessee’s first year of drug testing welfare recipients uncovered drug use by less than 0.2 percent of all applicants for the state’s public assistance system. [ThinkProgress]

Eastern Kentucky University canceled all classes on all of its campuses through Friday in part because of threatening graffiti on a bathroom wall on the Richmond campus. [H-L]

House Republicans created a special committee on Wednesday to investigate abortions, fetal tissue procurement and the use of federal funds at Planned Parenthood. [HuffPo]

The KY State Police Need Your Help

Danny Ray Burden fell asleep in mid-sentence as he was booked into the Grant County jail, toppling over on the bench where he sat. Prodded awake, he coughed, shook and pleaded for emergency medical attention. [H-L]

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton took a shot this week at President Barack Obama’s immigration strategy from his first years in office, saying it wouldn’t work with today’s GOP. [HuffPo]

A self-proclaimed prostitute says she was told that University of Louisville basketball coach Rick Pitino knew she and other escorts were being paid to have sex with players and recruits. [C-J/AKN]

Hillary Clinton holds double-digit leads nationally over all her Democratic challengers, including a dream team of contenders that remain on the sidelines, according to a new poll. [The Hill]

A few Kentucky counties are searching for poll workers for the upcoming Nov. 3 general election but not Rowan County. [The Morehead News]

The “Resolution Condemning Judicial Tyranny And Petitioning God’s Mercy” asks the state to join rural Blount County in fighting against the ruling and to “protect Natural Marriage from lawless court opinions and the financial schemes of the enemies of righteousness.” [Reuters]

Stephen l. Pruitt today officially became Kentucky’s sixth Commissioner of Education since passage of the landmark Kentucky Education Reform Act in 1990 that created the position. [Ronnie Ellis]

It’s hard to deny that the NRA has won the gun debate over the past 20 years. Despite mass shootings — and despite some 80 to 90 percent of Americans saying they are in favor of background checks — no legislation expanding on the 1993 Brady Bill has passed Congress. [NPR]

This will make your eyes roll back in your head. The Kentucky Executive Branch Ethics Commission described state Rep. Tanya Pullin, D-South Shore, as having demonstrated “the highest level of ethical standards.” [Ashland Independent]

The Justice Department is set to release about 6,000 inmates early from prison — the largest one-time release of federal prisoners — in an effort to reduce overcrowding and provide relief to drug offenders who received harsh sentences over the past three decades. [WaPo]

Habitat for Humanity of Madison and Clark Counties collected more than $58,200 in pledges for the coming five years during its annual Building Hope Community Breakfast. [Richmond Register]

Hillary Rodham Clinton, as she offered up a sheaf of new health care proposals, said she was “building on the Affordable Care Act.” But lurking in those proposals was a veiled criticism of President Obama’s signature domestic achievement: For many families, the Affordable Care Act has not made health care affordable. [NY Times]

Kentucky State Police are asking for help from the public as they search for a Knott County woman who has been missing since May. Natasha Fugate Jones was last seen by family on May 7, and state police began searching for her on June 7, according to a news release by Kentucky State Police. [H-L]

Three top officials with Ron Paul’s 2012 presidential campaign claim political motivations are behind charges alleging they violated federal financial disclosure laws by secretly paying an influential Iowa politician for his endorsement. Paul, a former Republican congressman from Texas, will be called as a prosecution witness at the trial, set for next Tuesday in Des Moines. [AP]