Republican Treason Sure Is Tons Of Fun

Mitch McConnell has had nearly a decade to come up with a health care alternative and he’s still yet to do so. Still. NEARLY A DECADE! [H-L]

Donald Trump’s son, son-in law, and campaign chairman met secretly in June 2016 with a woman they’d been told was a Russian government attorney who could provide documents that, as part of “Russia and its government’s support for Mr. Trump,” would “incriminate” Hillary Clinton, according to emails released by Donald Trump Jr. on Twitter Tuesday morning. [HuffPo]

OH MY GOD! Oh my god. Oh my god. Move all liquids away from whatever screen you’re reading this on before clicking. Oh. My. God. You’ll wet yourself. [C-J/AKN]

The bombshell New York Times report from Sunday afternoon might not the smoking gun in the Trump-Russia 2016 story, but it sure looks close to one. According to the Times, President Trump’s oldest son, Donald Trump Jr., met with a Kremlin-connected lawyer in June 2016 after being promised damaging information on Hillary Clinton — “the first public indication that at least some in the campaign were willing to accept Russian help.” To put this June 9, 2016 meeting into perspective, here’s a handy timeline of what happened before and after the meeting. [NBC News]

Kentucky ended the 2017 fiscal year on June 30 with a $138.5 million shortfall in its General Fund. [Ronnie Ellis]

The Donald Trump-Russia timeline sure is interesting. [TPM]

This is a hidden gem in Eastern Kentucky. You don’t have to know what a carabiner is or the advantages of passive vs. active protection to climb or descend from rocks at Carter Caves State Resort Park. [Ashland Independent]

Schaaaaaaadenfreeeeeeude! The revelation of these emails immediately sent shockwaves through the White House. “This is sum of all fears stuff. It’s what we’ve all been dreading,” said one White House official who is now exploring the possibility of retaining an attorney, a step described as purely precautionary. [TDB]

Deterrent. That’s the word Rowan County Sheriff Matt Sparks to describe the reasoning behind seizing a 59-acre property in a remote area in the southwestern part of the county. [The Morehead News]

The June 3, 2016, email sent to Donald Trump Jr. could hardly have been more explicit: One of his father’s former Russian business partners had been contacted by a senior Russian government official and was offering to provide the Trump campaign with dirt on Hillary Clinton. The documents “would incriminate Hillary and her dealings with Russia and would be very useful to your father,” read the email, written by a trusted intermediary, who added, “This is obviously very high level and sensitive information but is part of Russia and its government’s support for Mr. Trump.” [NY Times]

Come on, wealthy folks, help make this happen. The Bounty of the Barrens Farmers Market is a big step closer to having a permanent home, but plenty remains to be done before it becomes a reality, not the least of which is raising an estimated $600,000-plus. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Donald Trump Jr. agreed to take a meeting during the 2016 presidential campaign with a woman he was told was a “Russian government lawyer” who could provide damaging information about Hillary Clinton as part of “Russia and its government’s support” for his father’s presidential campaign, according to emails tweeted by the president’s son on Tuesday. [WaPo]

A contractor paid bribes and kickbacks to St. Joseph Hospital’s executive director of facilities, who was responsible for assigning general contracting work, a federal indictment said. As part of the scheme, contractor Rocky Williams of Jessamine County bought a motorcycle, an all-terrain vehicle, vacations, golf club memberships and furniture for James Newton of Lexington, according to court records. Neither man works at or for St. Joseph now. [H-L]

Donald Trump Jr. released images of an email exchange Tuesday that show he was contacted in June 2016 about a meeting with a Kremlin-linked lawyer. At that meeting, he was told, he could obtain “some official documents and information that would incriminate” former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. [HuffPo]

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Bigots In Frankfort Are Harming Kentucky’s Economy But Wealthy Liberals Aren’t Much Better

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A bit player in the bribery scandal involving former Kentucky Personnnel Cabinet Secretary Tim Longmeyer was sentenced Friday to two years in prison. Myron Harrod must report to prison by 2 p.m. Sept. 13 under the order from U.S. District Judge Karen K. Caldwell. [H-L]

Vladimir Putin said on Saturday he thought his U.S. counterpart Donald Trump had been satisfied with his assertions that Russia had not meddled in the U.S. presidential election. Speaking at the end of a G20 summit in Germany where the two leaders met face-to-face for the first time, Putin said he believed he had been able to establish a personal relationship with Trump, and that the initial groundwork had been laid for an improvement in U.S.-Russian ties. [HuffPo]

In a move the state says would save money but cut another 9,000 people from Medicaid, Gov. Matt Snowflake Bevin’s administration is seeking permission from the federal government for more changes to the state-federal health plan that serves 1.4 million Kentuckians. [C-J/AKN]

Weeks after the Food and Drug Administration said opioid painkiller Opana ER should be removed from the market amid concerns about the potential for abuse, Endo Pharmaceuticals has agreed to pull the drug, which has been linked to serious outbreaks of HIV and hepatitis C. [Consumerist]

A catchy new brand and logo for Kentucky’s Adult Education Department represents more than a cosmetic name change, according to state officials and local educators. [Ashland Independent]

A senior Senate Republican on Sunday said President Trump’s plan to work with Russia on cybersecurity is “pretty close” to the “dumbest idea I’ve ever heard.” [The Hill]

The Madison County Detention Center housed its highest number of inmates ever Monday. The 184-bed facility held 409 inmates, according to Jailer Doug Thomas. That number did not include about 20 other inmates being housed in a separate county, Thomas said. [Richmond Register]

A U.S. appeals court on Friday rejected Hawaii’s request to issue an emergency order blocking parts of Donald Trump’s temporary travel ban while the state sought clarification over what groups of people would be barred from travel. [Reuters]

Protesters stood at one entrance of Barren River Plaza shopping center off L. Rogers Wells Boulevard on Thursday, holding signs and shouting “health care not wealth care” as they waited for U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Garbage, to arrive. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Two weeks after Donald J. Trump clinched the Republican presidential nomination last year, his eldest son arranged a meeting at Trump Tower in Manhattan with a Russian lawyer who has connections to the Kremlin, according to confidential government records described to The New York Times. [NY Times]

Louisville IS Kentucky and suggesting otherwise shows extreme ignorance on the part of Brandon Coan. Ditching that superiority complex that wealthy liberals like Coan in Louisville love to exude will be necessary if they ever want to stop being hated by the rest of the Commonwealth. And until they stop hanging around exclusively with other wealthy progressives? Nothing will change. Ever. They’ll never be able to beat people like idiot Matt Bevin or butthurt Jeff Hoover. Note: Coan, you may recall, is the guy from Greg Fischer’s 2010 race who spent every waking moment attacking anyone and everyone questioning Fischer. He’s now on the Louisville Metro Council thanks to sizable family fortune. Yes, money won that race. [WFPL]

Trump vowed Sunday to “move forward in working constructively with Russia,” including forming a “cyber security unit” between the two countries, after Russian President Vladimir Putin denied any involvement in Russia’s interference in the 2016 U.S. election. [WaPo]

A new state law aimed at limiting medical practice lawsuits in Kentucky is unconstitutional, a Kentucky woman claims in a lawsuit filed last week. [H-L]

Hackers have been targeting companies that operate nuclear power stations around America, prompting the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI to issue an urgent warning about the severity of the threat. [HuffPo]

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You Can Thank McConnell For Killing Poor Kentuckians In Droves. No, That’s Not An Exaggeration. That’s Health Care Reality.

***Care about the future of Kentucky? Help us cover FOIA and open records request fees relating to Matt Bevin and Jamie Comer.*** [CLICK HERE]

Dewey Gorman, a 59-year-old banker who has struggled with opioid addiction, had just gotten out of the hospital in this tiny central Appalachian city when he heard the word from Washington: His fellow Kentuckian, Sen. Mitch McConnell, had delayed a vote to repeal the Affordable Care Act. He felt torn about that. [H-L]

Following Orange Excrement Donald Trump’s latest inflammatory tweet that essentially promoted violence against journalists, top GOP lawmakers so far have responded with silence, perpetuating their pattern of doing little as the nation’s chief executive breaks more barriers in his war with the media. [HuffPo]

Can’t wait for the next terrible superintendent to take over Jefferson County Public Schools. On her last day as head of Jefferson County Public Schools, outgoing superintendent Donna Hargens wished the school system team “all the best.” [C-J/AKN]

Moscow believes its leader, ex-spy master Vladimir Putin, can extract major concessions from President Donald Trump when the two men meet for the first time next week. [TDB]

Kathy Bartlett watched helplessly this spring as Kentucky lawmakers cut back on mine safety inspections and replaced them with coaching sessions on miners’ safety habits. She knows more than most what’s at stake. [Richmond Register]

Before the 2016 presidential election, a longtime Republican opposition researcher mounted an independent campaign to obtain emails he believed were stolen from Hillary Clinton’s private server, likely by Russian hackers. In conversations with members of his circle and with others he tried to recruit to help him, the GOP operative, Peter W. Smith, implied he was working with retired Lt. Gen. Mike Flynn, at the time a senior adviser to then-candidate Donald Trump. [WSJ]

Boyd County property owners will be expected this fall to pay an extra fee of $48 per parcel to fund the county’s financially-strapped 911 center, if a new ordinance gains final approval. [Ashland Independent]

A trove of internal documents sheds light on the algorithms that Facebook’s censors use to differentiate between hate speech and legitimate political expression. [ProPublica]

A voting precinct change in western Rowan County has resulted in an official complaint filed against the Rowan County Board of Elections. [The Morehead News]

Michael R. Bloomberg will throw his financial might into helping beleaguered American mayors, creating a $200 million philanthropic program aimed at backing inventive policies at the city level and giving mayors a stronger hand in national politics. [NY Times]

He won’t win because he’s not white and you know that’s the sad reality. Even though he’s probably one of the best people to ever run in that district. Promising to run a “campaign by the people and for the people,” state Sen. Reggie Thomas, a Lexington attorney, Saturday became the first Democrat to officially announce a challenge to Sixth District Republican U.S. Congressman Andy Barr of Lexington. [Ronnie Ellis]

The stupid is getting worse. Donald Trump stepped up his feud with the media on Sunday by tweeting a mock video of himself tackling and repeatedly striking a man with a CNN logo super-imposed in place of his head, followed by a logo saying “Fraud News Network.” [Reuters]

This will likely end up being one of the dumbest Republican moves yet. Party of personal responsibility? Not on your life. [H-L]

A top Justice Department corporate crime expert has quit, saying it’s impossible to hold suspected lawbreakers to standards that Elderly Shart Donald Trump is not meeting himself. [HuffPo]

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Kentucky To Get More Discriminatory On The 29th

Fugitive lawyer Eric C. Conn fled the country using a fake passport and help from someone overseas who has given him a job to support himself while on the lam, Conn told the Herald-Leader in an email exchange over the weekend. [H-L]

Thousands of federal workers at the Interior Department could soon find themselves out of a job as the Trump administration looks to reorganize the agency and cut its funding by 12 percent. [HuffPo]

Maybe a tiny little man with gay people really close to him in his family ought not complain hypocritically? These New Republican bigots are the reason Kentucky will remain forever in the dark, our economy will never rise with the rest of the nation and our children will never reach their full potential. Though, it’s fascinating that A Kentucky Newspaper is STILL neglecting to mention that Rand Paul opposes the Senate health plan because it doesn’t go far enough in cutting benefits. [C-J/AKN]

Don’t come for Joe Biden unless he sends for you. [NY Magazine]

Laws dealing with Bible literacy in schools, religious freedom, nuclear power, charter schools and making it a hate crime to assault police officers go into effect on June 29 in Kentucky. [Ronnie Ellis]

The Trump administration has taken little meaningful action to prevent Russian hacking, leaking and disruption in the next national election in 2018, despite warnings from intelligence officials that it will happen again, officials and experts told NBC News. [NBC News]

The Ashland Fire Department responded to three overdoses in the city, with all three patients being transported to the hospital, during its most recent reporting period. [Ashland Independent]

Not only did the Obama Administration try to do something about Russia, they pushed for sanctions. It was Republicans like Mitch McConnell who fought the Administration at every turn. Because Russian meddling benefited Republicans. And it’s the Trump Administration that’s pushed to reverse and weaken sanctions. [CBS News]

It’s been 17 years since Josh Gentry sustained a severe brain injury in a crash that nearly cost him his life. Josh was a passenger in the backseat of a pickup that wrecked on Ky. 249 at the Skagg’s Creek Bridge in Barren County. [Richmond Register]

The Trump administration opposes a bid to use unclaimed money from a legal settlement over the government’s infamous Tuskegee syphilis study to fund a museum honoring victims of the research project. [Associated Press]

Barren County Middle School students assisted with a study on Thursday in which Mammoth Cave National Park is participating to help determine mercury levels in lakes, rivers and streams across the country. [Glasgow Daily Times]

“About five or six sentences in, I noticed that all of his sentences had both nouns and verbs in them,” Carol Foyler, another student, said. “I couldn’t believe he was going after Trump like that.” [New Yorker]

The Kentucky Legislative Ethics Commission unanimously voted Wednesday to appeal a recent federal court ruling that allows lobbyists to give gifts and campaign donations to state lawmakers. [H-L]

Senior officials across the government became convinced in January that the incoming national security adviser, Michael T. Flynn, had become vulnerable to Russian blackmail. [NY Times]

The city of Ferguson, Missouri, has settled a wrongful-death lawsuit filed by the parents of Michael Brown, the unarmed black 18-year-old who was fatally shot by former Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in 2014. [HuffPo]

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The Herald-Leader Repeatedly Failed Montgomery County For Years And Here’s A Perfect Reminder

***Care about the future of Kentucky? Help us cover FOIA and open records request fees relating to Matt Bevin and Jamie Comer.*** [CLICK HERE]

The best part about this story is that Valarie Honeycutt Spears didn’t bother to mention how all of these victims spent years reaching out to her for help. Only to be told that there was no story there, that Jake was mistaken, that there was nothing to see, move along. Welp, how bout them apples? More than four years of investigative journalism produced these results and the Herald-Leader couldn’t be bothered to mention that this isn’t new news. Partially out of bitterness toward someone doing their job for them and calling them lazy for missing the biggest education scandal in our lifetime… and partially out of trying to save face. [H-L]

Mitch McConnell is a lesser person than you thought. Capitol Police forcibly removed protesters gathered outside Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s office on Thursday, with at least one photo showing drops of blood on the hallway floor. [HuffPo]

In recent days, American Airlines has been forced to cancel more than 40 flights in Phoenix. The reason: With daytime highs hovering around 120 degrees, it was simply too hot for some smaller jets to take off. Hotter air is thinner air, which makes it more difficult — and sometimes impossible — for planes to generate enough lift. As the global climate changes, disruptions like these are likely to become more frequent, researchers say, potentially making air travel costlier and less predictable with a greater risk of injury to travelers from increased turbulence. [NY Times]

Leave it to Matt Bevin to have a lesser understanding of the freedom of speech than the Kentucky Democratic Party. The Supreme Court reserves the highest scrutiny for content-based restrictions on speech. Blocking only those Twitter users with whom Bevin disagrees is a content-based restriction on speech. [C-J/AKN]

Taxpayers’ money “will not be used to let people travel to states who chose to discriminate,” California Attorney General Xavier Becerra told the Associated Press Thursday upon adding Texas, Alabama, South Dakota, and Kentucky to the list of places where state employee travel is restricted. [The Advocate]

The battle over Indian Head Rock, the eight-ton sandstone bolder that once sat in the Ohio River between Portsmouth and South Shore, is the focus of a new independent film airing on Kentucky Educational Television. “Between the Rock and the Commonwealth,” airing at 9 p.m. July 3 on KET and 8 p.m. July 9 on KET2, details the controversial removal of Indian Head Rock from the river in 2007, and the ensuing legal battle between Ohio and Kentucky about ownership rights. [Ashland Independent]

A Homeland Security (DHS) official told a Senate panel that election systems in 21 states were targeted in Russian cyber attacks in the 2016 presidential election. [CBS News]

Sure is fascinating to see Ann Oldfather defend this criminal junta. It’s like she wants her law firm to lose all credibility. It’s one thing for her to stand up for her well-paying client but a different thing entirely to attack the taxpayers for daring suggest these shysters get their fat asses kicked to the curb for being corrupt as hell. [Business First]

The hacking of state and local election databases in 2016 was more extensive than previously reported, including at least one successful attempt to alter voter information, and the theft of thousands of voter records that contain private information like partial Social Security numbers, current and former officials tell TIME. [TIME]

Journalism isn’t a profession. It’s a calling. And a strange feeling rises in my stomach as I see my retirement approaching on Wednesday. [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump doesn’t have recordings of his conversations with then-FBI Director James Comey, according to a person familiar with the matter, capping weeks of speculation about whether such tapes exist. [Bloomberg]

Lawyers for Gov. Matt Bevin filed a motion in Franklin Circuit Court on Friday seeking to dismiss a suit by labor groups challenging the constitutionality of the recently passed Kentucky right-to-work law. [Ronnie Ellis]

Dumb. Donald Trump offered an explanation Wednesday for why he has one of the wealthiest Cabinets in history. “I love all people — rich or poor — but in those particular positions, I just don’t want a poor person,” he said at a rally in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. [CNN]

Matt Bevin and the Republican Party of Kentucky (Hello, you self-hating pieces of shit!) are costing the state millions upon millions of dollars. All because they’re super-homophobic and gay-panicked. And this Woody Maglinger? You know that gurl’s on Grindr more than me. [H-L]

White House huckster Kellyanne Conway on Sunday came right out and said what so many Republicans are probably thinking ― that taking Medicaid away from able-bodied adults is no big deal, because they can go out and find jobs that provide health insurance. [HuffPo]

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Oh Noes, Gambling Is Going To Ruin Everything Forever And Ever! Amen

The Kentucky Horse Racing Commission voted Tuesday to approve plans for Churchill Downs to build a $50 million to $60 million gambling parlor at a former training track in Louisville. [H-L]

The coroner’s office in Cincinnati, Ohio, launched an investigation into the death of Otto Warmbier, the 22-year-old American student who died Monday just days after being released from a North Korean prison. [HuffPo]

Translation: Scott Jennings called his friends at the paper and told them he was offered a job by Donald Trump but turned it down. [C-J/AKN]

Former Attorney General Eric Holder is poised to take a more active role in opposing President Trump, telling Yahoo News in an interview published Tuesday that “now is the time to be more visible” — including weighting a 2020 presidential bid. [The Hill]

Anti-hunger advocates fear the $193 billion reduction President Donald Trump proposes to the federal food stamp program over the next 10 years will hurt millions of needy Americans who rely on it for their daily sustenance. [Richmond Register]

Opponents of President Donald Trump’s ban on travelers from six Muslim-majority countries again urged the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday to reject his bid to revive it, saying his administration undermined its own arguments by amending the order last week. [Reuters]

Members heaved a sigh of relief when Michelle Veach told the Ashland Rotary taxes will not be going up this year. During their regular Monday meeting, members learned about city finances and the proposed budget that will get a first reading and vote Thursday at the city commission meeting. [Ashland Independent]

The pressure is growing to force President Trump to turn over his tax returns. The other day, for example, 200 Congressmen filed a suit in federal court, arguing that voters and lawmakers have a right to know whether Trump’s businesses are violating the Constitution’s emolument clause, which bars the president from accepting payments from foreign countries. [ProPublica]

In the wake of former Jailer Matt Mutter’s retirement and subsequent return as chief deputy jailer, a magistrate who voiced opposition to the action has proposed a county ordinance that would prevent such an action in the future. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Trump, who came into office courting labor unions and vowing to stand up for American workers, is taking a major step to alter the direction of federal labor policy, positioning the National Labor Relations Board to overturn a series of high-profile Obama-era decisions. [NY Times]

In a move to be more fiscally-conservative, the University of Louisville is suspending a contract designed to make the school’s facilities more energy efficient. The news comes only weeks after U of L touted the progress it’s made reducing the university’s greenhouse gas emissions — progress which was bolstered by the millions of dollars spent upgrading lighting, insulation and mechanical systems on the school’s three campuses. [WFPL]

A bipartisan bill extending financial sanctions on Russia and Iran and making it more difficult for Trump to ease Russian sanctions has encountered a major procedural snag, threatening its quick passage into law and prompting Democrats to accuse House Republicans of protecting Trump. [WaPo]

As students walked across the stage to receive their diplomas throughout Kentucky this spring, they could be confident they were entering a job-seekers’ market. [H-L]

In February, a cadre of Republican elder statesmen unveiled their plan to put a tax on carbon emissions, arguing that “mounting evidence of climate change is growing too strong to ignore.” That plan got the backing of Big Oil on Tuesday, as Exxon Mobil Corp., BP, Royal Dutch Shell and Total announced a new campaign to push Congress to consider passing a carbon tax. [HuffPo]

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Watching The Planet Burn Is Fun Stuff

“Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris Accord makes clear that the United States is not only abdicating its role as a world leader but is staking a claim as one of the great threats to global progress. Last year, the world’s nations came together out of urgent necessity and agreed with near unanimity to work together in combating the most pressing crisis of our time. The President’s decision to now reverse course betrays our allies, undermines our credibility, and exacerbates a global catastrophe. There are no winners in this decision. America’s influence will now dwindle, the climate will continue to wreak havoc, and — despite the myths perpetuated by the President and his anti-science allies — our economy will suffer tremendously. Doubling down on denial will not bring back coal jobs, and the bliss of this ignorant misstep will be short-lived once the dire consequences begin to take their toll.” [Congressman John Yarmuth]

Last week, Russ Whitney’s electricity meter in Scott County started running backwards. The Newtown Pike homeowner completed construction of a solar array that converts sunlight into electric current — enough to power his 2 1/2 -story, 3,190-square-foot home. [H-L]

Quitting the Paris Agreement will have steep political and economic costs. But for an embattled president, it does do one thing: It fulfills a campaign promise popular with his base, and appeases the members of his administration who are ideologically opposed to anything that smacks of globalism or environmentalism. [HuffPo]

The findings, published in Nature Climate Change, detail how every state and several hundred cities or metro areas could be affected, including Louisville, Lexington, Indianapolis, Cincinnati and Nashville. [C-J/AKN]

Shifting from his previous blanket denials, President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia said on Thursday that “patriotically minded” private Russian hackers could have been involved in cyberattacks last year to help the presidential campaign of Donald J. Trump. [NY Times]

When it comes to health care, Americans may be having buyer’s remorse. More people approve of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, than the alternative health bill passed this month by House Republicans, according to a poll published Wednesday by the Kaiser Family Foundation. [WFPL]

This treasonous pigfucker and his supporters (like Scott Jennings) are more dumb than you thought. The Trump administration is moving toward handing back to Russia two diplomatic compounds, near New York City and on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, from which its officials were ejected in late December as punishment for Moscow’s interference in the 2016 presidential election. Then-President Barack Obama said Dec. 29 that the compounds were being “used by Russian personnel for intelligence-related purposes,” and gave Russia 24 hours to vacate them. Separately, Obama expelled from the United States what he said were 35 Russian “intelligence operatives.” [WaPo]

The Madison County School Board voted unanimously to an across-the-board 1.5 percent salary raise for its employees last week. [Richmond Register]

Nigel Farage is a “person of interest” in the US counter-intelligence investigation that is looking into possible collusion between the Kremlin and Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, the Guardian has been told. [The Guardian]

Unemployment rates rose in 83 Kentucky counties between April 2016 and April 2017, fell in 28 and stayed the same in nine counties, according to the Kentucky Office of Employment and Training, [Ashland Independent]

Remember THIS when the New Naz… Republican Party of Kentucky, headed by flesh blob bigot Mac Brown, praises Donald Trump’s decision to abandon efforts to combat climate change. They’re enabling civil war around the globe and empowering terrorists. [MMFA]

Morehead officially has its newest city planner and building inspector. On Monday, Morehead City Council unanimously confirmed Mayor Jim Tom Trent’s request to hire Rodney Fouch, 50, of Morehead, to fill the vacancy surrendered by Beth Day earlier this month. [The Morehead News]

When the city of Toledo temporarily lost access to clean drinking water several years ago after a bloom of toxic algae, the Environmental Protection Agency sent scientists from its Office of Research and Development to study health effects and formulate solutions. [ProPublica]

When Bill Hughes went to fight in Iraq in 2003, members of his Army unit lined their vehicles with scrap metal, sandbags and bulletproof vests to protect themselves from roadside bombs. By the time his younger brother Ryan Young was in Iraq in 2008, the vehicles were made of a high-purity aluminum alloy that was much more effective at absorbing the blast. [H-L]

Donald Trump has granted ethics waivers to at least 17 of his top White House aides, including chief strategist Steve Bannon, Chief of Staff Reince Priebus and senior counselor Kellyanne Conway, in addition to four former lobbyists. The waivers, released by the White House late Wednesday but granted on various dates, undermine Trump’s campaign pledge to “drain the swamp” in Washington. [HuffPo]

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