A Fun Terry Holliday Fluff Piece For Ya

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Burst pipes. Backed-up toilets. Cranky elevators. Those are the typical types of calls property managers receive on weekends. [H-L]

More than 15 years have passed since this small a share of Americans didn’t get medical care they needed because of the cost, a new federal government report reveals. [HuffPo]

Imagine a solar city in a leading coal state. Increasingly, advocates and some public officials are doing just that in Louisville, as the price of using the sun to keep the lights on continues to fall. [C-J/AKN]

In late July, the Senate Appropriations Committee approved a 2016 federal agency funding bill that came with instructions to the Internal Revenue Service to vastly expand the paperwork for the Earned Income Tax Credit. [Mother Jones]

This fluff from KET about Terry Holliday will make your eyes bleed. What the living eff? That entire thing is a case study in intellectual dishonesty. [KET]

The phrase “police militarization” conjures up an image of cops wrapped in Kevlar, barging into homes with semi-automatic weapons. [NPR]

Kentucky lags behind national averages for ACT college-readiness benchmarks in core subjects, with the biggest deficit in math. [WFPL]

A new report from Citibank found that acting on climate change by investing in low-carbon energy would save the world $1.8 trillion through 2040, as compared to a business-as-usual scenario. In addition, not acting will cost an additional $44 trillion by 2060 from the “negative effects” of climate change. [Think Progress]

At 4.7 percent, Madison was among the 11 Kentucky counties will the lowest jobless rates in July. [Richmond Register]

A U.S. appeals court on Friday threw out a judge’s ruling that would have blocked the National Security Agency from collecting phone metadata under a controversial program that has raised privacy concerns. [Reuters]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell made his first stop in Hazard since taking that position. [WYMT]

Legal watchdogs are calling on the Supreme Court to weigh in on whether it is constitutional for police to have access to telephone records without first obtaining a search warrant. [The Hill]

Watch a group of scared white people couch their fear of the gays in religion. [H-L]

This is the biggest duh ever. DUH. [HuffPo]

Kim Davis: You’re So Dumb It Hurts

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Going to school saved James Mouser’s life in early April. Mouser, then a senior at Northpoint Academy in Pike County, cut his hand while at school on a Friday. Unable to see a doctor because he has no car, he lanced his own hand over the weekend after it became infected. [H-L]

Kim Davis, the Rowan County, Kentucky clerk who has received international attention for defying the U.S. Supreme Court, is still refusing to grant marriage licenses to gay and lesbian couples today, more than two months after the high court’s historic ruling in Obergefell. [HuffPo]

Neither Republican Matt Bevin nor his Democratic opponent, Jack Conway, seem to be exciting their parties’ bases. Jack Conway is sleepwalking once again. [C-J/AKN]

The pollution caused by China’s coal use gets a great deal of attention, and for good reason. It causes health problems in both China and America — helping to kill 4,000 Chinese people per day and traveling across the Pacific Ocean to increase smog levels in the western United States. [ThinkProgress]

When Hardin County voters help pick their party’s presidential nominee next spring, Democrats will be assigned one of 60 polling places while Republicans will converge at one. That’s never happened before, according to Hardin County Clerk Debbie Donnelly. The only reason it’s happening now is because the GOP is holding its own primary, in the form of a caucus, which allows U.S. Sen. Rand Paul to bypass a state law banning candidates from appearing on a ballot more than once. Paul is seeking the presidency and re-election to his Senate seat. [News-Enterprise]

A federal appeals court in Kentucky on Wednesday affirmed a ruling ordering a county clerk who objects to same-sex marriage on religious grounds to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [NY Times]

The Kentucky Board of Education has chosen two finalists in its search for a new state education commissioner. It’ll be someone the opposite of great and, sadly, you know I’m right. [WKYT]

The go-to dealmaker in the market for tobacco bonds is gone from her post – a surprise departure that raises questions about the future direction of a once-burgeoning corner of Wall Street. [ProPublica]

Rowan County Attorney Cecil Watkins on Thursday referred a charge of official misconduct against clerk Kim Davis because of her two-month refusal to issue marriage licenses to the Kentucky Attorney General’s Office despite the ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court that same-sex marriage is legal. [Ashland Independent]

President Barack Obama on Saturday defended his decision to allow Royal Dutch Shell to drill for oil in the Arctic Ocean under what he said were rigorous standards, fending off criticism by environmental groups. [Reuters]

Here’s another supreme wasted of taxpayer dollars. A drug bust that featured the seizure of 77 marijuana plants resulted in a pair of arrests on Wednesday in Hart County near the community of Magnolia. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The two journalists killed by a gunman while broadcasting in Virginia were shot in the head, officials have said. [BBC]

With the race for governor nearing the Labor Day starting gun, Americans for Prosperity will unleash significant attacks this week to try to tie Democrat Jack Conway to President Barack Obama and the Affordable Care Act. [H-L]

Kim Davis: dumb as hell. A county clerk in Kentucky who petitioned the Supreme Court to allow her to refuse to wed LGBT couples unknowingly married a trans man and a pansexual woman, the couple says. [HuffPo]

JCPS Set Great Example For Rest Of KY

It wasn’t that long ago that U.S. Sen. Rand Paul declared that he had to win the early-voting state of New Hampshire to gain the momentum that would carry him to the Republican presidential nomination. [H-L]

Cat Kim, a recent graduate from Columbia Law School, had two missions this summer. One was studying for and taking the California bar exam. The other was preparing cases for immigrant women and children in Texas detention centers who, without the help of people like her, could be deported. [HuffPo]

Applause went up in the room Monday evening when the Jefferson County Board of Education approved expanding the policies of Kentucky’s largest school district to specifically protect students and employees regardless of gender expression and gender identity. [C-J/AKN]

Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump blasted hedge fund managers on Sunday as mere “paper pushers” who he said were “getting away with murder” by not paying their fair share of taxes. [Reuters]

Big Blue fans of the University of Kentucky athletic teams had things to talk about besides asking “How about them ‘Cats?” Monday morning. [Ronnie Ellis]

The tip came in at about 7 p.m. on Monday, July 27. It was an email from a woman named Patricia Cronan, a banker who lived next door to a group home in Long Beach, California. She said the home, run by a nonprofit called Bayfront Youth & Family Services, seemed to be in a perpetual state of chaos. [ProPublica]

Rand Paul, even with the Kentucky GOP Executive Committee approving a March U.S. presidential caucus Saturday, maintained today that the U.S. Constitution provides him a way to run both for the presidency and a Kentucky Senate seat. [BGDN]

Earlier this year, social work student Coraly León arrived at her research assistant job at the University of Puerto Rico to find her salary abruptly cut in half due to budget cuts. [ThinkProgress]

Glasgow City Council took the final step at its regular meeting Monday evening in the selection of the city’s next police chief. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Confusion over the types of coal being burned in Chinese power stations has caused a significant overestimation of the country’s carbon emissions. [BBC]

Evarts City Council decided not to raise taxes saying “residents are struggling with a downturn in the economy and now is not the time to add to their burden.” [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Same-sex married couples who were living in states that did not recognize their unions and who previously filed claims for Social Security benefits will be able to collect those payments, the government said on Thursday. [NY Times]

The University of Kentucky is opening its first office devoted full-time to the concerns of the LGBTQ community on campus. Created by UK’s Office of Institutional Diversity, the Office of LGBTQ Resources is aimed at creating a more inclusive environment for UK’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer population. [H-L]

The issue is far from over, but a new report found that hunger in America has at least dropped below pre-recession levels. [HuffPo]

There’s A Literal Stink In Bullitt County

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A group of University of Kentucky trustees upheld the proposed revocation of a longtime surgeon’s clinical privileges Monday but modified the decision to allow him access to campus as a tenured professor. [H-L]

Fast-food workers who are hoping to raise the minimum wage will find an ally in the Obama White House this week, with Labor Secretary Tom Perez traveling to Detroit on Tuesday to show his solidarity with the so-called Fight for $15. [HuffPo]

The owner of a failed private wastewater treatment plant that serves more than 700 homes in Bullitt County filed papers late Friday to walk away from the system that’s caused raw sewage to flow into a tributary of popular Floyds Fork for 17 months since a massive tank breakdown. [C-J/AKN]

A U.S. appeals court said the Federal Trade Commission has authority to regulate corporate cybersecurity, and may pursue a lawsuit accusing hotel operator Wyndham Worldwide Corp of failing to properly safeguard consumers’ information. [Reuters]

Berea Mayor Steve Connelly called for changes in city personnel policy after several police officers questioned the fairness of recent salary increases. At the Berea City Council meeting Tuesday, Connelly proposed revising the procedure for employee evaluation and awarding raises. [Richmond Register]

It’s now or never for New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. That appears to be the view of his wealthy super-PAC backers, who are spending fast and hard to keep Christie in contention for the Republican presidential nomination. [The Hill]

A company offered a proposal to Barren County Fiscal Court on Tuesday to allow it to do a free evaluation of the county’s energy efficiency. [Glasgow Daily Times]

There’s an old saying in journalism that there are no new stories, everything’s been done before, ProPublica’s Joe Sexton says. But when he came across “The Outlaw Ocean,” investigative reporter Ian Urbina’s latest series for The New York Times, he couldn’t help but be “genuinely jealous” of the intriguing, outrageous world he uncovered. [ProPublica]

An Ashland man who until recently lived in Medellin, Colombia, is among defendants accused of selling millions of dollars worth of untaxed cigarettes from a Russell storefront. David White, who is free on bond and living with a friend in Ashland pending his January trial date, posted information about his arrest and alleged part in the cigarette scheme on Facebook and spoke on Friday to a reporter from The Independent. [Ashland Independent]

Scientists in the US have found a way to take carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air and make carbon nanofibres, a valuable manufacturing material. [BBC]

Rowan Fiscal Court agreed Tuesday to an inter-local agreement with the City of Morehead to form a city-county recreation commission. [The Morehead News]

After her two leading rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination became targets of the Black Lives Matter movement, Hillary Clinton came armed with policy arguments when she met with members of the African-American activist group last week. [Mother Jones]

Mathieux Saint Fleur has been virtually blind for two decades. In less than 24 hours, he will see again. [H-L]

Students in America’s schools are much, much poorer than they were nine years ago. In 2006, 31 percent of America’s students attended schools in “high-poverty” districts, meaning that 20 percent or more of the district’s students lived below the federal poverty line. [HuffPo]

Rand & RPK Melted Everybody’s Brain

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Magoffin County Judge-Executive Charles “Doc” Hardin has hired a man with a felony vote-buying conviction to be an administrative assistant in his office. [H-L]

Jeb Bush said while he supports granting birthright citizenship to the children of immigrants, the policy needs “greater enforcement” to prevent “abuse.” [HuffPo]

These poor, dumb people think their religion is under threat because their government isn’t permitted to discriminate on the basis of hate. Get it together, you jackasses, because you’re really harming what little bit of a positive image Kentucky was developing. [C-J/AKN]

Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) can run for both the White House and to keep his Senate seat in 2016, the Republican Party in Kentucky decided Saturday. [The Hill]

Richard Nelson, founder and executive director of the Commonwealth Policy Center, told the group of people who came Thursday evening to hear him at Immanuel Baptist Church that our culture is in a moral freefall and in a period of spiritual darkness. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The Kentucky GOP’s central committee voted Saturday to adopt a presidential caucus system next year, clearing the way Republican Sen. Rand Paul to run for president and reelection at the same time. [Politico]

This is written on Friday, the day before Kentucky Republicans were to decide whether to conduct a presidential caucus next year rather than a primary. [Ronnie Ellis]

While Donald Trump’s recent position paper on immigration dominates headlines, a new study of unauthorized immigrants in the U.S. digs into the latest numbers. [NPR]

The EPA recently announced the Clean Power Plan, which entails stricter emissions standards for states, and the Power+ Plan, which promises $1 billion in federal money to help coal country towns get back on their feet. I support both these plans wholeheartedly. They’re good for Kentucky communities, good for the economy, and good for the environment. [Drew Curtis]

Two American women have passed the gruelling training programme of the US Army Rangers – one of the military’s most elite special operations forces. [BBC]

Alison Daddy’s Name Grimes on Rand Paul and RPK this weekend: “It is unfortunate that today a few insiders were able to disenfranchise over 1.2 million Republican voters. One candidate should not be able to buy an election. Democracy demands that all eligible Kentuckians be a part of the election process. That didn’t happen today and won’t happen with a caucus.” [Press Release]

The phone rings just as Katrina Fingerson and Latoya McClary are about to leave to start their shift at the Goddard Riverside Community Center. [ThinkProgress]

It was like a Klan rally with an extra dose of fat, white homophobia. Headlined by Bob Stivers and Matt Bevin, of course. [H-L]

Americans use prescription drugs and they know these medicines help people, but they still don’t care much for pharmaceutical companies and think the industry is too money-hungry, according to a new survey. [HuffPo]

Kim Davis Is Still The Absolute Worst

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In the early 1880s, James M. Bond walked from Barbourville to Berea, leading a young steer that he sold to pay for tuition. Bond, who was born into slavery, graduated from Berea and later from Oberlin College with a divinity degree. [H-L]

For more than 20 years, conservative Christians have been building the case that laws protecting gay people and legalizing same-sex marriage place an unconstitutional burden on the rights of religious people who believe homosexuality is a sin. [HuffPo]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he still supports the idea of a caucus for Kentucky Republicans to choose their presidential nominee despite Sen. Rand Paul’s stalled campaign. [C-J/AKN]

The poor are treated like human ATM machines, and our politicians are actively encouraging their exploitation. In the 1960s, the Lyndon Johnson administration launched an official War on Poverty. Needless to say, poverty has emerged victorious. [Salon]

The attorney for Freddie Travis, who has sued Glasgow Independent Schools’ Board of Education claiming it violated Kentucky’s open meetings law, has filed a response to the board’s counterclaim against Travis. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is promising to level the playing field for the middle class in a new campaign ad released on Tuesday. [The Hill]

Big Run Landfill will begin cutting back rail-borne garbage from New York and New Jersey almost immediately and will eliminate it completely by the end of 2016, parent company EnviroSolutions announced Tuesday. [Ashland Independent]

Americans broadly support providing federal funding for free women’s health exams, screenings and contraception services, a Reuters/Ipsos poll has found, suggesting that Republicans could be in risky territory if they continue criticizing Planned Parenthood as a key part of 2016 campaigns. [Reuters]

Eastern Kentucky University President Michel Benson reminded faculty and staff at the University’s annual fall convocation Tuesday, “We can control our own destiny.” [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump clashed with Bill O’Reilly on Tuesday night over the part of his immigration plan that would take away citizenship from the children who were born in the United States but whose parents came to the country illegally. [Politico]

An old distillery in Kentucky soon will start spirits production again. In May 2014, Peristyle LLC announced plans to restore and reopen the historic Old Taylor Distillery in Woodford County. Work has been taking place at the facility since. [Business First]

Donald Trump regularly boasts that he was opposed to the Iraq War. [Mother Jones]

A Lexington council meeting to discuss raising the minimum wage will be postponed from Thursday until Sept. 10. [H-L]

Discussions of economic issues in policy circles often suffer from a “which way is up?” dilemma; it’s not clear what the problem is that needs to be solved. The massive fretting over China’s devaluation of its currency last week is one such example. [HuffPo]

Will KentuckyWired Be A Real Thing?

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The American Academy of Pediatrics states the purpose of vaccines nicely: “The ultimate goal of immunization is the elimination of disease; the immediate goal is prevention of disease in people or groups.” [H-L]

Just when you thought you had gotten over last winter, be warned: The Old Farmer’s Almanac predicts it will be super cold with a slew of snow for much of the country, even in places that don’t usually see too much of it, like the Pacific Northwest. [HuffPo]

Kentuckians are getting health insurance at far higher numbers than their neighbors in surrounding states under the Affordable Care Act, initial results of a new study show. [C-J/AKN]

The dinner in the private upstairs dining room of the White House went so late that Reid Hoffman, the LinkedIn billionaire, finally suggested around midnight that President Obama might like to go to bed. [NY Times]

A Dayton, Ohio, man jailed Feb. 24, 2013, on a disorderly conduct charge has filed suit in federal court claiming he was assaulted by jail personnel as he was booked into the Madison County Detention Center. [Richmond Register]

Many of the families that were forced out of public housing by Hurricane Katrina now use government vouchers to subsidize their rents elsewhere. That shift was supposed to help de-concentrate poverty in the New Orleans area, but it hasn’t worked as planned. [NPR]

Morehead State University helped prepare incoming freshmen with a move-in day last week. [Ashland Independent]

Shale gas planning applications are to be fast-tracked under new government measures to crack down on councils that delay on making a decision. [BBC]

Attorney General Jack Conway announces a joint effort to bring state-level voices to a national debate on how best to help students victimized by Corinthian Colleges and other predatory for-profit schools. [Yesterday], 11 state attorneys general called on the U.S. Department of Education to cancel federal student loans in cases where schools have broken state law and provide clear processes for students seeking relief. Attorney General Conway joined the multistate effort making several recommendations to the U.S. Department of Education on the structure of its newly-formed debt relief program. [Press Release]

Conversations about institutional racism in the United States have recently focused on police brutality and socioeconomic disparities that keep families mired in intergenerational poverty. But the issues go beyond that, affecting other sectors of society that many Americans may not associate with racial justice. [ThinkProgress]

Governor Steve Beshear has signed an executive order creating the Kentucky Communications Network Authority (KCNA) and its governing board to manage the KentuckyWired open-access broadband network. [Press Release]

Hey, high schoolers, scared of bombing on the SATs and not getting into college? Don’t worry, a growing number of U.S. schools are scrapping standardized test scores as part of admission. [Reuters]

While Congress remains stalled on a long-term plan for funding highways, state lawmakers and governors aren’t waiting around. [H-L]

Two Pennsylvania-based nonprofits that have funded everything from a super PAC supporting Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) to education privatization efforts across the country are likely connected to the operators of the global investment firm Susquehanna International Group. [HuffPo]