Kim Davis Is Still The Absolute Worst

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In the early 1880s, James M. Bond walked from Barbourville to Berea, leading a young steer that he sold to pay for tuition. Bond, who was born into slavery, graduated from Berea and later from Oberlin College with a divinity degree. [H-L]

For more than 20 years, conservative Christians have been building the case that laws protecting gay people and legalizing same-sex marriage place an unconstitutional burden on the rights of religious people who believe homosexuality is a sin. [HuffPo]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he still supports the idea of a caucus for Kentucky Republicans to choose their presidential nominee despite Sen. Rand Paul’s stalled campaign. [C-J/AKN]

The poor are treated like human ATM machines, and our politicians are actively encouraging their exploitation. In the 1960s, the Lyndon Johnson administration launched an official War on Poverty. Needless to say, poverty has emerged victorious. [Salon]

The attorney for Freddie Travis, who has sued Glasgow Independent Schools’ Board of Education claiming it violated Kentucky’s open meetings law, has filed a response to the board’s counterclaim against Travis. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is promising to level the playing field for the middle class in a new campaign ad released on Tuesday. [The Hill]

Big Run Landfill will begin cutting back rail-borne garbage from New York and New Jersey almost immediately and will eliminate it completely by the end of 2016, parent company EnviroSolutions announced Tuesday. [Ashland Independent]

Americans broadly support providing federal funding for free women’s health exams, screenings and contraception services, a Reuters/Ipsos poll has found, suggesting that Republicans could be in risky territory if they continue criticizing Planned Parenthood as a key part of 2016 campaigns. [Reuters]

Eastern Kentucky University President Michel Benson reminded faculty and staff at the University’s annual fall convocation Tuesday, “We can control our own destiny.” [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump clashed with Bill O’Reilly on Tuesday night over the part of his immigration plan that would take away citizenship from the children who were born in the United States but whose parents came to the country illegally. [Politico]

An old distillery in Kentucky soon will start spirits production again. In May 2014, Peristyle LLC announced plans to restore and reopen the historic Old Taylor Distillery in Woodford County. Work has been taking place at the facility since. [Business First]

Donald Trump regularly boasts that he was opposed to the Iraq War. [Mother Jones]

A Lexington council meeting to discuss raising the minimum wage will be postponed from Thursday until Sept. 10. [H-L]

Discussions of economic issues in policy circles often suffer from a “which way is up?” dilemma; it’s not clear what the problem is that needs to be solved. The massive fretting over China’s devaluation of its currency last week is one such example. [HuffPo]

Will A Republican Caucus Be A Thing?

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In April 2005, President George W. Bush hailed “clean coal” as a key to “greater energy independence,” pledging $2 billion in research funds that promised a new golden age for America’s most abundant energy resource. [H-L]

Whatever eventually happens to Donald Trump’s candidacy — and he stumbled personally as a candidate here Thursday night — this much should be clear to America and the world after the first Republican debate: Trumpism is taking over a political party that will have a good chance to win the presidency in next year’s election. [HuffPo]

You think this DCBS retaliation is unique to Northern Kentucky? One social worker we’re aware of was targeted for holding people accountable. Teresa James actually sat in on the worker’s hearing — something that came about after their supervisor, retaliating against them, accused them of stealing a cheap camera… despite having a fancy phone and even fancier camera of their own. Retaliation is the norm. Period. [C-J/AKN]

In America, only the rich can afford to write about poverty. There’s something wrong with the fact that a relatively affluent person can afford to write about minimum wage jobs while people experiencing them can’t. [The Guardian]

If Sen. Rand Paul wants a presidential caucus in Kentucky, state Republican Party leaders want to see the money to pay for it upfront. [WFPL]

Mitch McConnell is discretely laying the groundwork for the fall’s budget negotiations, which promise to be a major headache for the new Senate majority leader. The Kentucky Republican has three priorities for the year-end talks that will dominate Congress starting next month. [The Hill]

Kentucky’s proposed Republican presidential caucus would be March 5 and candidates would only need 5 percent of the vote to qualify for delegates as the state seeks to woo the large field of contenders and their millions of dollars amid Rand Paul’s sluggish campaign. [Ashland Independent]

A majority of Americans, white and black, believe that more needs to be done to fight racism in the United States, following a year of protests over the treatment of minorities by police, according to a Pew Research Center survey released on Wednesday. [Reuters]

After thinking about it overnight, Republican candidate for state auditor Mike Harmon announced Thursday Jesse Benton will cut ties to Harmon’s campaign. [Ronnie Ellis]

This is why we can’t have nice things in rural America. How a little known agency mishandled several billion dollars of stimulus money trying to expand broadband coverage to rural communities. [Politico]

In a bold move, Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis filed a lawsuit Tuesday in federal court against Gov. Steve Beshear and Wayne Onkst, state librarian and commissioner of the Kentucky Department of Libraries and Archives. [The Morehead News]

Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush was forced to backtrack after saying funding for female health was too high. [BBC]

A multistate law firm has stepped into the effort to represent hundreds of people in Eastern Kentucky facing the potential loss of their Social Security disability payments. [H-L]

Ohio Gov. John Kasich drew applause during Thursday’s Republican presidential debate for saying that he accepted gay marriage even though it was counter to his “traditional” views. [HuffPo]

Covington Is Still Embarrassing Today

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Alpha Natural Resources is filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, the fourth big coal producer to do so within the last two years. [H-L]

Two congressmen behind a federal provision protecting state-legal medical marijuana operations are seeking an investigation into the Department of Justice’s continued crackdown on medical marijuana patients and providers, saying the DOJ may be in violation of federal law. [HuffPo]

Kentuckians are scared and ignorant and hate the gays. They can thank their elected leaders for that, probably. [C-J/AKN]

Senate Republican leaders this week narrowly averted an intra-party battle over ObamaCare by again promising to get a repeal bill to the president’s desk through budget reconciliation. [The Hill]

Democrats unleashed a barrage of attacks here Saturday on Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin, calling him nearly every name in the book. [Ronnie Ellis]

The American Civil Liberties Union filed a federal lawsuit accusing a school resource officer in Kentucky of handcuffing two disabled children to punish them for behavior related to their disabilities, ACLU officials said on Tuesday. [Reuters]

Each of the Lawrence County schools will have a nurse on site in the upcoming school year. [Ashland Independent]

We’ve said for years that schools in Covington are the worst. The American Civil Liberties Union, seeking to spotlight the use of handcuffs to restrain young children who act out in school, filed a federal lawsuit in Covington, Ky., on Monday alleging that a school resource officer there shackled an 8-year-old boy and a 9-year-old girl, both with disabilities, causing the children “pain, fear and emotional trauma.” [NY Times]

For the second time this summer, the water level at Cave Run Lake has risen above summer pool level. [The Morehead News]

The federal government is asking health inspectors nationwide to be on the lookout for errors by nursing homes in managing the blood thinner Coumadin, including those that lead to patient hospitalizations and deaths. [ProPublica]

Kentucky Chief Justice John Minton has ordered the temporary suspension of an eastern Kentucky circuit clerk pending an investigation into possible official misconduct. [WKYT]

The next few years are unprecedented in human history. We know with unusually high scientific certainty that the near-term choices we as a nation and a species make about carbon pollution will determine whether or not we will destroy our livable climate in the coming decades — thereby ruining the lives of billions of people irreversibly for centuries to come. [ThinkProgress]

The first Republican debate of the 2016 presidential election, said Sen. Rand Paul, will be between him and people who “want to blow up the world.” The Thursday night showdown will pit him against opponents who will “send half a million of your sons and daughters back” to Iraq. He promised that he will ask his Republican presidential rivals, face to face, whether they “want to always intervene in every civil war around the world.” [H-L]

Maybe congressional Democrats should just send their GOP colleagues a thank-you note. [HuffPo]

Still Recovering From Fancy Fark 2015?

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Democrats have at least a slight edge in all but one of Kentucky’s down-ticket races for statewide office, but plenty of likely voters say they remain undecided, according to a new Bluegrass Poll. [H-L]

The Obama administration will release final standards for power plants on Monday that are, in several key ways, tougher than the draft version of the plan. [HuffPo]

Way to go, Frankfort, you backward-ass hacks. A state social worker in Northern Kentucky has been suspended for her involvement in the case of a 7-year-old girl whose relatives alleged she was being mistreated at home. [C-J/AKN]

The U.S. Senate on Wednesday confirmed Marine General Joseph Dunford as the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the top officer in the U.S. military. [Reuters]

Bevin is entertaining and provocative, even when he is obviously wrong or making something up. Conway is dull, even when he is obviously right or stating an important fact. [John David D-Bag]

Senate Republicans are turning up the heat on Planned Parenthood, setting up a vote for Monday to defund the organization that is making some of their members squirm. [The Hill]

Ricky Handshoe has fought coal companies and state regulators for 10 years hoping to save his home. He has had to surrender the home, but he won’t give up the fight. [Ronnie Ellis]

Last fall, farmers working the flat land along the Colorado River outside Blythe, California, harvested a lucrative crop of oranges, lettuce and alfalfa from fields irrigated with river water. But that wasn’t their only source of income. They made almost as much per acre from the seemingly dead squares of dry earth abutting those orchards and row crops, fields left barren for the season. [ProPublica]

Rowan County argued it is “immune from suit” and that a recent federal lawsuit against the county and its clerk, Kim Davis, fails to find fault with the county government since Davis decided not to issue marriage licenses last month. [Ashland Independent]

The spacecraft which made a spectacular landing on a comet last year has discovered a rich array of carbon compounds. [BBC]

Glasgow Independent Schools filed its response Thursday to a lawsuit claiming its board of education violated Kentucky’s open meetings law. An appeal of an opinion from the Kentucky Office of the Attorney General was part of that response. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Donald Trump’s instinct for racially charged rhetoric, before his presidential bid. Once a racist buttcramp, always a racist buttcramp? [NY Times]

In a heated prelude to the barbed political comments at Saturday afternoon’s Fancy Farm political picnic, Republican gubernatorial nominee Matt Bevin accused Democrats of creating a “sexual harassment mess” in the state legislature. [H-L]

Two veterinarians serving in Congress, one a conservative Republican and the other a Democrat, came together late Tuesday to introduce a bill aimed at ending an especially horrific type of horse abuse. [HuffPo]

Fancy Farm Sleepy Times In 3, 2…

Marshall County voters have chosen by a slim margin to allow alcohol sales for the first time since 1938. [H-L]

Sen. Bernie Sanders blasted Senate Republicans Wednesday for working to defund Planned Parenthood, calling it “an attack on women’s health.” [HuffPo]

When Gov. Steve Beshear replaced the Rev. Kevin Cosby on the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees last month, he did more than remove his only African-American appointment on the board. He also removed his only appointee who has not been a strong and steady contributor to Beshear’s political causes. Note: You’ll love seeing Terry Sebastian deliberately and purposefully lie to Tom Loftus. [C-J/AKN]

Could an excess of caution hurt Hillary Clinton? This query is coming to the fore again after she dodged a question on Tuesday over whether she supports or opposes building the Keystone XL Pipeline. It’s like watching the Grimes Campaign on a national stage. [The Hill]

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer says food stamp benefits can be used at an increasing number of farmers’ markets in the state. Which means ignorant people in, say, West Liberty are going to scream about how all benefits recipients ought to be drug tested. [WLKY]

Some Republicans gleefully scripted Donald Trump’s political obituary in the wake of his scathing comments about Sen. John McCain’s military service earlier this month, hoping that his freewheeling presidential campaign had finally imploded. [Reuters]

Republican Matt Bevin said Tuesday that if elected governor he would not immediately end the state’s expansion of eligibility for the federal-state Medicaid program, contrary to what he said for months. [Al Cross]

In the US, poverty, deprivation and exploitation draw thousands of its own children down into a dark underworld that offers few ways out. [BBC]

Rowan County argued it is “immune from suit” and that a recent federal lawsuit against the county and its clerk Kim Davis fails to find fault with the county government since Davis decided not to issue marriage licenses last month. [Ashland Independent]

Senator Rand Paul is invested in a fund that would skyrocket in value if the United States economy were to default. He’d also like your vote for president. [The Nation]

Christopher D. Steward, a former Barren County magistrate, was served with an arrest warrant early Thursday morning and charged with third-degree terroristic threatening, fourth-degree assault (minor injury) and menacing, according to documents released by the Barren County Sheriff’s Office. [Glasgow Daily Times]

It’s not easy being the DEA these days. After an unprecedented losing streak on Capitol Hill, the once-untouchable Drug Enforcement Administration suffered last week what might be considered the ultimate indignity: A Senate panel, for the first time, voted in favor of legal, recreational marijuana. [Higdon/Politico]

Convenient that this AP story doesn’t mention that people dressed up as Native Americans will chase you for a fee. Because Kentucky can’t do anything without a touch of racism, apparently. [H-L]

Seven in 10 homeowners who apply for help under the federal government’s signature mortgage aid program are rejected, according to a government report released Wednesday. The program, called the Home Affordable Modification Program, is meant to help homeowners who are at risk of foreclosure stay in their homes by reducing their monthly mortgage. [HuffPo]

EKY Medicaid Fraud Mess Is Not Over

Told ya Jack’s probably gonna win. Conway, the Democratic nominee, leads Bevin 45 percent to 42 percent, with 13 percent of voters undecided. Curtis polled at 8 percent, leaving Conway with 43 percent and Bevin with 38 percent. [H-L]

The Kentucky Derby was very good for Churchill Downs, but Big Fish has been even better. The Louisville-based gambling and racetrack company announced late Wednesday that it had record revenue of more than $409 million in the quarter that ended June 30. [H-L]

There’s a simple, popular solution that Republican leaders in Congress could grab hold of to get themselves out of their embarrassing public fight over the highway bill, and President Barack Obama could help force them to do it. [HuffPo]

A federal judge has dismissed most of a whistleblower suit filed by two federal employees who alleged that Eastern Kentucky disability lawyer Eric Conn colluded with a judge to rig Social Security cases in favor of Conn and his clients. [C-J/AKN]

The Obama administration is poised to change some deadlines for states to comply with its climate rule for power plants when the regulation is made final. [The Hill]

The Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet will hold a public hearing on the Big Run Landfill permit renewal next month at the Boyd County Community Center. [Ashland Independent & Press Release]

Republican Donald Trump on Wednesday pushed back against a lawyer he had berated when she requested a break to pump breast milk for her infant, the latest controversial remark to emerge in his presidential campaign. [Reuters]

After several tense exchanges between Kentucky’s candidates for governor, Republican Matt Bevin during a media interview accused a WAVE 3 News reporter of working for his rival. [WAVE3]

Great news like this hits and inevitably some wingnut GMO-denier crawls out of the woodwork to yell. [ThinkProgress]

Rowan County has thrown bigoted hypocrite Kim Davis to the wolves. [WFPL]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A human tooth dating to around 565,000 years ago has been found by a 16-year-old volunteer in France. [BBC]

His story made national headlines in less than 12 hours and a lot of people are standing behind the Bullitt County man who was arrested after shooting down a drone. [WDRB]

The United States is emerging as the world’s hog farm—the country where massive foreign meat companies like Brazil’s JBS and China’s WH Group (formerly Shuanghui) alight when they want to take advantage of rising global demand for pork. [Mother Jones]

Woodford County residents like the small-town atmosphere of where they live, but they say the lack of available goods and services is a major downside, according to the results of a countywide survey released Tuesday. [H-L]

A fight over an incarcerated Alabama woman’s ability to have an abortion took a strange turn as the state moved to terminate the woman’s parental rights in order to prevent her from accessing the procedure. [HuffPo]

Mailbox Economy Freakout Under Way

Dexter Conn needs a lawyer. So do 1,500 of his neighbors. The 57-year-old from Dana is one of the 1,500 people, mostly in eastern Kentucky, whose federal disability benefits are in jeopardy after the federal government ordered a review of cases handled by attorney Eric Conn. [H-L]

Americans’ views of Sen. Bernie Sanders have grown more favorable as they continue to learn more about him, according to a new Gallup poll. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin has said he opposes gambling on all levels but it looks like when it comes to providing healthcare to working poor families in Kentucky, he’s betting that they either don’t hear what he’s saying or are going to stay home on Election Day. [C-J/AKN]

The Obama administration is planning to devote an additional $100 million to fight the national drug addiction epidemic as deaths from substances like heroin and prescription painkillers reach record-breaking levels. [The Hill]

We’re a week away from the best day of any Kentucky political season, the Fancy Farm Picnic which takes place Saturday in the midst of the oddest governor’s race I can recall. [Ronnie Ellis]

A planet believed to be remarkably similar to Earth has been discovered orbiting a distant sun-like star, bolstering hopes of finding life elsewhere in the universe, U.S. scientists said on Thursday. [Reuters]

Rick Whelan is the new chair of the Rowan County Board of Education. He was elected Tuesday to succeed Bill Redwine, who resigned in June. [The Morehead News]

The American Red Cross met a deadline this week to answer congressional questions about how it spent nearly half a billion dollars donated after the 2010 Haiti earthquake, but the group says details can’t yet be released publicly. And the senator who posed the questions is not satisfied. [ProPublica]

At Tuesday’s regular Fiscal Court meeting, Magistrate Charlie Winkleman recommended the county pay for the new Rowan County Detention Center site out of the general fund carryover from the last fiscal year rather than waiting on the county’s $15 million bond issue. [The Morehead News]

Despite widespread belief to the contrary, no federal law explicitly protects LGBT people from discrimination. Thursday marks the introduction of The Equality Act, a comprehensive bill that would, if passed, add “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” to the protections that already exist based on race, color, religion, sex, and national origin. But it also would do more than that. [ThinkProgress]

Residents expressed concerns this week that the potential expansion of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in Kentucky would pollute the water and air and bring earthquakes to the region. [WFPL]

Americans will have just three big companies to choose their health insurance from rather than five if the latest deals get the go ahead. [BBC]

Fayette County Public Schools have until Sept. 1 to give the Kentucky Department of Education a plan to provide more support for low-achieving schools. [H-L]

When did humans first begin farming? Scientists have long thought that our prehistoric ancestors didn’t start raising crops until some 12,000 years ago. But a new study suggests that the age of agriculture might have dawned much earlier. [HuffPo]