Fancy Farm Sleepy Times In 3, 2…

Marshall County voters have chosen by a slim margin to allow alcohol sales for the first time since 1938. [H-L]

Sen. Bernie Sanders blasted Senate Republicans Wednesday for working to defund Planned Parenthood, calling it “an attack on women’s health.” [HuffPo]

When Gov. Steve Beshear replaced the Rev. Kevin Cosby on the University of Louisville’s Board of Trustees last month, he did more than remove his only African-American appointment on the board. He also removed his only appointee who has not been a strong and steady contributor to Beshear’s political causes. Note: You’ll love seeing Terry Sebastian deliberately and purposefully lie to Tom Loftus. [C-J/AKN]

Could an excess of caution hurt Hillary Clinton? This query is coming to the fore again after she dodged a question on Tuesday over whether she supports or opposes building the Keystone XL Pipeline. It’s like watching the Grimes Campaign on a national stage. [The Hill]

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer says food stamp benefits can be used at an increasing number of farmers’ markets in the state. Which means ignorant people in, say, West Liberty are going to scream about how all benefits recipients ought to be drug tested. [WLKY]

Some Republicans gleefully scripted Donald Trump’s political obituary in the wake of his scathing comments about Sen. John McCain’s military service earlier this month, hoping that his freewheeling presidential campaign had finally imploded. [Reuters]

Republican Matt Bevin said Tuesday that if elected governor he would not immediately end the state’s expansion of eligibility for the federal-state Medicaid program, contrary to what he said for months. [Al Cross]

In the US, poverty, deprivation and exploitation draw thousands of its own children down into a dark underworld that offers few ways out. [BBC]

Rowan County argued it is “immune from suit” and that a recent federal lawsuit against the county and its clerk Kim Davis fails to find fault with the county government since Davis decided not to issue marriage licenses last month. [Ashland Independent]

Senator Rand Paul is invested in a fund that would skyrocket in value if the United States economy were to default. He’d also like your vote for president. [The Nation]

Christopher D. Steward, a former Barren County magistrate, was served with an arrest warrant early Thursday morning and charged with third-degree terroristic threatening, fourth-degree assault (minor injury) and menacing, according to documents released by the Barren County Sheriff’s Office. [Glasgow Daily Times]

It’s not easy being the DEA these days. After an unprecedented losing streak on Capitol Hill, the once-untouchable Drug Enforcement Administration suffered last week what might be considered the ultimate indignity: A Senate panel, for the first time, voted in favor of legal, recreational marijuana. [Higdon/Politico]

Convenient that this AP story doesn’t mention that people dressed up as Native Americans will chase you for a fee. Because Kentucky can’t do anything without a touch of racism, apparently. [H-L]

Seven in 10 homeowners who apply for help under the federal government’s signature mortgage aid program are rejected, according to a government report released Wednesday. The program, called the Home Affordable Modification Program, is meant to help homeowners who are at risk of foreclosure stay in their homes by reducing their monthly mortgage. [HuffPo]

EKY Medicaid Fraud Mess Is Not Over

Told ya Jack’s probably gonna win. Conway, the Democratic nominee, leads Bevin 45 percent to 42 percent, with 13 percent of voters undecided. Curtis polled at 8 percent, leaving Conway with 43 percent and Bevin with 38 percent. [H-L]

The Kentucky Derby was very good for Churchill Downs, but Big Fish has been even better. The Louisville-based gambling and racetrack company announced late Wednesday that it had record revenue of more than $409 million in the quarter that ended June 30. [H-L]

There’s a simple, popular solution that Republican leaders in Congress could grab hold of to get themselves out of their embarrassing public fight over the highway bill, and President Barack Obama could help force them to do it. [HuffPo]

A federal judge has dismissed most of a whistleblower suit filed by two federal employees who alleged that Eastern Kentucky disability lawyer Eric Conn colluded with a judge to rig Social Security cases in favor of Conn and his clients. [C-J/AKN]

The Obama administration is poised to change some deadlines for states to comply with its climate rule for power plants when the regulation is made final. [The Hill]

The Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet will hold a public hearing on the Big Run Landfill permit renewal next month at the Boyd County Community Center. [Ashland Independent & Press Release]

Republican Donald Trump on Wednesday pushed back against a lawyer he had berated when she requested a break to pump breast milk for her infant, the latest controversial remark to emerge in his presidential campaign. [Reuters]

After several tense exchanges between Kentucky’s candidates for governor, Republican Matt Bevin during a media interview accused a WAVE 3 News reporter of working for his rival. [WAVE3]

Great news like this hits and inevitably some wingnut GMO-denier crawls out of the woodwork to yell. [ThinkProgress]

Rowan County has thrown bigoted hypocrite Kim Davis to the wolves. [WFPL]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A human tooth dating to around 565,000 years ago has been found by a 16-year-old volunteer in France. [BBC]

His story made national headlines in less than 12 hours and a lot of people are standing behind the Bullitt County man who was arrested after shooting down a drone. [WDRB]

The United States is emerging as the world’s hog farm—the country where massive foreign meat companies like Brazil’s JBS and China’s WH Group (formerly Shuanghui) alight when they want to take advantage of rising global demand for pork. [Mother Jones]

Woodford County residents like the small-town atmosphere of where they live, but they say the lack of available goods and services is a major downside, according to the results of a countywide survey released Tuesday. [H-L]

A fight over an incarcerated Alabama woman’s ability to have an abortion took a strange turn as the state moved to terminate the woman’s parental rights in order to prevent her from accessing the procedure. [HuffPo]

Mailbox Economy Freakout Under Way

Dexter Conn needs a lawyer. So do 1,500 of his neighbors. The 57-year-old from Dana is one of the 1,500 people, mostly in eastern Kentucky, whose federal disability benefits are in jeopardy after the federal government ordered a review of cases handled by attorney Eric Conn. [H-L]

Americans’ views of Sen. Bernie Sanders have grown more favorable as they continue to learn more about him, according to a new Gallup poll. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin has said he opposes gambling on all levels but it looks like when it comes to providing healthcare to working poor families in Kentucky, he’s betting that they either don’t hear what he’s saying or are going to stay home on Election Day. [C-J/AKN]

The Obama administration is planning to devote an additional $100 million to fight the national drug addiction epidemic as deaths from substances like heroin and prescription painkillers reach record-breaking levels. [The Hill]

We’re a week away from the best day of any Kentucky political season, the Fancy Farm Picnic which takes place Saturday in the midst of the oddest governor’s race I can recall. [Ronnie Ellis]

A planet believed to be remarkably similar to Earth has been discovered orbiting a distant sun-like star, bolstering hopes of finding life elsewhere in the universe, U.S. scientists said on Thursday. [Reuters]

Rick Whelan is the new chair of the Rowan County Board of Education. He was elected Tuesday to succeed Bill Redwine, who resigned in June. [The Morehead News]

The American Red Cross met a deadline this week to answer congressional questions about how it spent nearly half a billion dollars donated after the 2010 Haiti earthquake, but the group says details can’t yet be released publicly. And the senator who posed the questions is not satisfied. [ProPublica]

At Tuesday’s regular Fiscal Court meeting, Magistrate Charlie Winkleman recommended the county pay for the new Rowan County Detention Center site out of the general fund carryover from the last fiscal year rather than waiting on the county’s $15 million bond issue. [The Morehead News]

Despite widespread belief to the contrary, no federal law explicitly protects LGBT people from discrimination. Thursday marks the introduction of The Equality Act, a comprehensive bill that would, if passed, add “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” to the protections that already exist based on race, color, religion, sex, and national origin. But it also would do more than that. [ThinkProgress]

Residents expressed concerns this week that the potential expansion of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in Kentucky would pollute the water and air and bring earthquakes to the region. [WFPL]

Americans will have just three big companies to choose their health insurance from rather than five if the latest deals get the go ahead. [BBC]

Fayette County Public Schools have until Sept. 1 to give the Kentucky Department of Education a plan to provide more support for low-achieving schools. [H-L]

When did humans first begin farming? Scientists have long thought that our prehistoric ancestors didn’t start raising crops until some 12,000 years ago. But a new study suggests that the age of agriculture might have dawned much earlier. [HuffPo]

Thursday Evening Dept Of Awful

Democrats are pulling out the long knives, questioning Bevin’s commitment to agriculture and pressing the theme that Bevin “can’t be trusted.” During a conference call Wednesday morning organized by the Kentucky Democratic Party, one Kentucky farmer even made note of Bevin’s New Hampshire upbringing. [H-L]

Veterans were exposed to toxic chemicals and they’re accusing the VA of dragging its feet. [HuffPo]

West Virginia coal operator Jim Justice, who invited Gov. Steve Beshear to play a round of golf with the great Tiger Woods at Justice’s Greenbrier resort early this month, was the biggest contributor to the Kentucky Democratic Party last month. [C-J/AKN]

Hillary Clinton trails three top Republican presidential candidates in matchups in three key swing states — Iowa, Colorado and Virginia — a new Quinnipiac poll finds. [The Hill]

Rowan County resident Serena Smith has supported Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis and her decision not to issue marriage licenses since the day protests began in late June. [Ashland Independent]

Michigan’s Wayne County, home to Detroit, is in a financial emergency due to chronic budget deficits and a big unfunded healthcare liability, a state-appointed review team announced on Tuesday. [Reuters]

U.S. Rep. Brett Guthrie, R-Bowling Green, met Monday with constituents at a Glasgow restaurant. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Missouri cattle farmer Greg Fleshman became so concerned about keeping his local hospital open that in 2011 he joined its governing board. “I mean they’ve saved my dad’s life twice,” Fleshman says. “He had a heart attack and a stroke and they life-flighted him out of here both times.” Keeping the doors open at Putnam County Memorial Hospital in Unionville, Mo., seemed crucial to the community — but maybe an impossible task. [NPR]

Turns out Greg Fischer has another director-level hire with a drinking and driving in their city vehicle problem. [The ‘Ville Voice]

Though most states are slowing their emissions, the report shows eight states moving in the opposite direction, each seeing an increase in its emissions rate between 2008 and 2015. They include Kentucky, Louisiana, Arkansas, Nebraska, Utah, Idaho and Alaska. [Climate Central]

The Casey County Fiscal Court says homophobic County Clerk Casey Davis is wrong. May be behind a paywall but the headline and sub-head will tell you everything you need to know. [Casey County News]

Logically, Iraqi refugees shouldn’t exist, according to Sen. Rand Paul, because the United States already “won” the Iraq War. In an interview with Boston Herald Radio this week, Paul attempted to justify why he wanted to restrict the number of refugees the United States takes in, particularly from certain areas of the world like the Middle East. [ThinkProgress]

The Boyd County Fiscal Court unanimously voted Tuesday to seek closure of Big Run Landfill. [More Ashland Independent]

With a little over one week left before funding for the nation’s transportation infrastructure dries up, the Senate has reached a deal on a multiyear bill, parting ways with the House. However, the bill immediately hit some bumps. [HuffPo]

Please accept my apologies for the caching issue that made the site appear to have stopped publication on July 16. Everything should be getting back to normal. If not, clear your browser’s cache and you should be good to go. [Jake]

Faux Family Foundation Hit A Big Nerve

The only reason not allow the demonstration is because they know it harms their case when people see it’s just slot machines by a different name. Franklin Circuit Judge Thomas Wingate denied a motion by The Family Foundation to require racetracks to provide an in-court demonstration of historical wagering, or instant racing. [H-L]

One of the nation’s most recognizable names in climate science, Dr. James Hansen, released a new paper this week warning that even 2 degrees Celsius of global warming may be “highly dangerous” for humanity. [HuffPo]

Despite the fact that Matt Bevin opposes gambling “on every level,” two companies that he operated invested heavily in casinos while he was in charge — sometimes owning more than $37 million in gambling stocks at any one time — according to Security and Exchange Commission filings. [C-J/AKN]

Nearly a decade after legislation was put in place to protect U.S. military personnel and their families from predatory financial products, the Military Lending Act received a much-needed update to close loopholes often exploited by shady lenders to skirt the rules and put the financial lives of servicemembers at risk. [Consumerist]

The Blue Grass Chemical Agent-Destruction Pilot Plant (BGCAPP) achieved another milestone this week as the facility’s control room began operating 24 hours per day, seven days per week. [Richmond Register]

Republican insiders are reconciling themselves to the idea that Donald Trump won’t be exiting the stage anytime soon — and their main concern now is limiting his damage to their party. [The Hill]

Kentucky State Police Trooper 1st Class Michael Murriell tackled the tough issue of modern-day perceptions about law enforcement officers during Monday’s Ashland Rotary Club meeting. [Ashland Independent]

President Obama is enjoying a winning streak lately, with the Supreme Court reaffirming his signature health care law and Iran agreeing to curbs on its nuclear program. But one longstanding goal continues to bedevil him: closing the wartime prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. [NY Times]

The Glasgow Independent Schools Board of Education voted this evening in a special-called meeting to accept a new proposal from Reddy Farms LLC that allows for the same donation of land known as the Foster property as in a prior agreement, but with no requirement to change the name of South Green Elementary School to “Reddy Elementary School.” [Glasgow Daily Times]

U.S. charter schools are defaulting on bonds at a rate of 3.3 percent, a level higher than that recorded three years ago but still not one which should concern investors, according to the co-publisher of a report made available on Tuesday. [Reuters]

Almost seven full months into the job, Jailer Wes Coldiron is keeping himself and Rowan County Detention Center inmates as busy as possible. [The Morehead News]

At the end of last year, a group of senators effectively killed the wind energy industry’s most important tax benefit — a $13 billion tax break to help the industry compete with fossil fuels. But now, another group of senators is trying to bring those tax breaks back. [ThinkProgress]

Kentucky Republicans will have their longtime standard-bearer at this year’s Fancy Farm picnic. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says he will attend Kentucky’s premier political event on Saturday, Aug. 1 in western Kentucky. [H-L]

Two wingnuts are arguing over when to start new wars. Because that’s what wingnuts do. [HuffPo]

Planned Parenthood Delusion Is Grand

On the same day Kevin Johnson buried his mother, searchers found the body of his 34-year-old son who drowned while trying to save his grandmother from flash flooding that ravaged their tiny Appalachian community. [H-L]

ExxonMobil spokesman Richard Keil told a carefully worded whopper last week. After the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) revealed that Exxon was aware of the threat posed by climate change as early as 1981 and has intentionally been deceiving the public for decades, reporters contacted Keil for comment. One reporter asked him about ExxonMobil’s long history of funding climate change denier groups. [HuffPo]

Rand Paul on Friday joined the chorus of conservative elected officials blasting Planned Parenthood based on the comments of one of its officials in a controversial video released this week by an anti-abortion group. [C-J/AKN]

Ten years ago, Barack Obama visited Detroit and delivered a speech to the city’s NAACP branch, which was celebrating its 50th annual “Fight for Freedom” dinner. He was introduced by the city’s then-popular Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick. While Obama went on to become president, Kilpatrick’s career ended after he was convicted of multiple corruption charges. And in October 2013, the former mayor was sentenced to 28 years in federal prison. [The Intercept]

Former Butler County Sheriff Joe Gaddie pleaded guilty Tuesday to second-degree criminal abuse, accepting a diversion agreement that will keep him out of jail. [BGDN]

Revelations of U.S. spying in Europe have soured transatlantic relations, prompting a White House apology and, as leak followed leak over the past two years, have fostered feelings of moral superiority among Europeans. Yet EU governments are stepping up surveillance of their own citizens. [Reuters]

About 100 homes overall will be affected by a new water line project geared toward improving water pressure levels in residences and at Ashland Middle School, City Engineer Ryan Eastwood said. [Ashland Independent]

A major new Pew Research Center study [last] week found that Americans and Europeans are only moderately worried about climate change while those in more vulnerable regions — Latin America, Africa, and Asia — expressed much higher levels of concern [ThinkProgress]

The Richmond City Commission made appointments to several city board Tuesday night, which usually are routine actions. But one appointment prompted questions and a dissenting vote. [Richmond Register]

Scientists have discovered a winged dinosaur – an ancestor of the velociraptor – that they say was on the cusp of becoming a bird. [BBC]

Michael Lovett spoke at the third quarterly Glasgow-Barren County Chamber of Commerce breakfast Friday and spoke about an initiative in south central Kentucky aimed at growing and improving the area’s workforce. [Glasgow Daily Times]

After an investigation by the Toronto Star, Canada’s top health agency considers whether to lower the maximum recommended daily dose of the active ingredient in Tylenol and other painkillers. [ProPublica]

The fourth drowning victim found after recent flooding in Johnson County reportedly helped several family members to safety before being swept away while trying to rescue his grandmother. [H-L]

Democratic presidential candidate Martin O’Malley on Thursday declared his support for raising the national minimum wage to $15 an hour, contrasting himself with frontrunner Hillary Clinton. [HuffPo]

Louisville Shootings Are Out-Of-Control

Lexington is crowding in on Louisville’s obsession with shootings. [H-L]

At no point in recent memory have consumers been as excited about bourbon as they are today. [HuffPo]

The old Cane Run power plant stacks that have towered above the Ohio River for decades are silent now, their coal burners no longer sending plumes of pollution across the Louisville sky. [C-J/AKN]

The U.S. trade deficit widened in May, fueled by a drop in exports that could heighten concerns over weak overseas demand and a strong U.S. dollar. [Reuters]

The Greenup Meals on Wheels program will cease activities at the end of the month because of issues in funding and attracting volunteers. [Ashland Independent]

Two years after going bankrupt, is Detroit still Detroit? [Mother Jones]

This is the big news in Glasgow. At 2:31 a.m. Tuesday, the Park City and Cave City Volunteer Fire departments, plus the Barren-Metcatcalfe Emergency Medical Service responded to a wreck with injuries at the 45 mile marker in the north bound lane of Interstate 65. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush is none too happy about the amount of money he’s had to hand over in federal taxes. [BBC]

A new effort to collect unpaid county occupational tax is underway by Rowan Fiscal Court. [The Morehead News]

Nineteen years after President Bill Clinton endorsed conservative ideas about fighting poverty and signed sweeping welfare reform into law, one of the most poorly thought out elements of that political pact is on the verge of crumbling. [ThinkProgress]

Eight shootings in a single weekend. Jones was shot and killed Saturday evening outside his home, one of eight weekend shootings that Louisville Metro Police are investigating. Jones and two other people, including a Louisville musician and a 60-year-old woman, died of their injuries. [WAVE3]

The GOP-controlled Senate is on track this year to confirm the fewest judges since 1969, a dramatic escalation of the long-running partisan feud over the ideological makeup of federal courts. [Politico]

As South Carolina lawmakers debate Monday on the the fate of the Confederate flag flying outside the Capitol, see the presidential candidates who support removing the flag. [H-L]

Nearly three months after Hillary Clinton announced her candidacy, she remains the favored choice of most Democratic voters, a new HuffPost/YouGov poll finds. [HuffPo]