Morgan Co-Conley Meltdown Continues

First the Fredericks threatened the Herald-Leader with a lawsuit and then submitted this bizarre letter. What Daniel Frederick fails to do is realize that most assessments (something like 95.17%) by the PVA in Morgan County are spot-on. Specifically, from 2008-2012, all properties sold in Morgan County averaged out to be about 95% of the ultimate sales price. The state requires 90%. That’s pretty darn solid and the opposite of being grossly under-assessed. John Cheves didn’t mislead anyone. Pro-Tip: Daniel is the son of Joleen, former county attorney. And fun rumor: We hear the Fredericks pulled all of their money out of Commercial Bank when Standafer won the banking bid. So that’s fun. [H-L]

Militants attacked a remote guesthouse and killed nine Afghans working for a Czech charity on Tuesday, as a new report by a U.S. university warned that almost 100,000 people have been killed in Afghanistan since the 2001 U.S. invasion. [HuffPo]

University of Louisville trustees will decide Thursday whether parents and students will again have to shoulder a bit more of the school’s ever-inflating costs. [C-J/AKN]

Florida Senator Marco Rubio has one; Texas Senator Ted Cruz has one; even former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum, considered a longshot for the Republican presidential nomination in 2016, has a billionaire in his corner. Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker has two. [Reuters]

Attorney Ned Pillersdorf does not mince words about Eric C. Conn. He has called Conn’s actions “scheming,” “conniving,” and more, after hundreds of Eastern Kentuckians are seeing their Social Security benefits suspended due to suspicion of fraud. [Hazard Herald]

Turns out that Martin O’Malley, like every other politician, is a… politician. Politicians love to reinvent themselves. Clinton, Bush, O’Malley, Conway, Beshear, McConnell. They all do it. [Hullabaloo]

Routine business made up a large part of the Harlan City Council’s recent meeting for the month of May. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Rand Paul, the man of the hour when it comes to pushing back against government secrecy, is throwing his weight behind a fresh push to declassify 28 pages from a 2002 Senate inquiry into the causes of 9/11. [TDB]

Meanwhile, both Jamie Comer and Hal Heiner continued to raise campaign funds. [WKMS]

While Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Granny) and allies in his party ostracize the junior Bluegrass State senator, Rand Paul (R-Cookie Maker), for opposing the Patriot Act, the American people lean far more towards Paul’s position than McConnell’s. [Politico]

With just a slight breeze, the smell of bourbon and whiskey wafts into the noses of visitors to the Bulleit Frontier Whiskey Experience. [Business First]

The Antarctic ozone hole would have been 40% bigger and a hole over the Arctic would have opened up if ozone-depleting chemicals had not been phased out, according to research. [BBC]

Kentucky House Speaker Greg Stumbo is calling for a 140-mile extension of the Mountain Parkway from Prestonsburg to Beckley, W.Va., at a cost of $8 billion to $10 billion. [H-L]

College graduates, brace yourselves for some disappointing news. Wages for university grads are 2.5 percent lower than what they were 15 years ago, according to the latest edition of the Economic Policy Institute’s annual report on the labor market prospects of new workers. [HuffPo]

What’s Going On With The Glasgow PD?

A $62 million construction contract with D.W. Wilburn Inc. for a new Lexington high school has been approved by the Fayette County school board. [H-L]

The U.N.’s Paris climate conference, designed to reach a plan for curbing global warming, may instead become the graveyard for its defining goal: to stop temperatures rising more than 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. [HuffPo]

Imagine waking up after a serious accident to discover you’ve become an unwitting subject in a medical study without ever agreeing to participate. [C-J/AKN]

Among African American adults with low education and income levels, the increase in risk of heart disease or stroke associated with living in poverty is largest for women and people under age 50, according to a large new study. [Reuters]

Ashland Alliance President Tim Gibbs told the city commission its town is “just maintaining,” instead of either growing or shrinking economically. Gibbs said his joint-chamber of commerce for Greenup and Boyd counties, however, is trying to grow Ashland again — the most recent step in this direction being to achieve Work Ready certification. [Ashland Independent]

Several U.S. Senators and military lawyers say they are concerned by Col. Norm Allen’s attempts to thwart an investigation into why the U.S. Military built an unneeded luxury headquarters in Afghanistan. [ProPublica]

Glasgow’s city attorney responded Wednesday to a lawsuit filed by former Glasgow police chief Guy Turcotte against the city and interim chief James Duff by saying the lawsuit will provide an opportunity for the public to look closer at Turcotte’s record with the Glasgow Police Department. [Glasgow Daily Times]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A new species of ancient human has been unearthed in the Afar region of Ethiopia, scientists report. [BBC]

FEMA has released the most recent numbers for persons receiving federal assistance since the severe storms in April. A total of 1,800 persons registered for aid in Kentucky and 116 were Rowan Countians. [The Morehead News]

After seven years on the outs, choice is back. For the first time since 2008, significantly more Americans identify as pro-choice (50 percent) than pro-life (44 percent), according to a Gallup poll released Friday. [Mother Jones]

Join BGT deTours on June 3 at 6:00* pm in Frankfort, KY for tours of the Old Governor’s Mansion and the Old State Capitol. [Click the Clicky]

In a signed letter submitted to the Department of Homeland Security on Wednesday, 136 House Democrats called on the Obama administration to end the practice of detaining Central American mothers and children in family detention facilities. [ThinkProgress]

This is what happens when good old boy rednecks ignore court orders, trample on mental health, act above the law. [H-L]

The FBI is operating a small air force with scores of low-flying planes across the U.S. carrying video and, at times, cellphone surveillance technology — all hidden behind fictitious companies that are fronts for the government, The Associated Press has learned. [HuffPo]

Let The Matt Bevin Funtimes Begin!

Daniel Boone National Forest officials have some advice on avoiding encounters with black bears. [H-L]

The United States might just be on the verge of a wind power revolution. Or, at least, the newest generation of wind turbines, featuring taller towers and longer blades, have the potential to push the country in that direction. [HuffPo]

Kentucky and Indiana are among the fattest states in the nation. [C-J/AKN]

How on earth can a majority of people support something that is secret? A majority of Americans support new trade deals, a Reuters/Ipsos poll showed on Wednesday, even as President Barack Obama struggles to win support for legislation key to sealing a signature Pacific Rim trade agreement. [Reuters]

Glasgow’s city attorney responded Wednesday to a lawsuit filed by former Glasgow police chief Guy Turcotte against the city and interim chief James Duff by saying the lawsuit will provide an opportunity for the public to look closer at Turcotte’s record with the Glasgow Police Department. [Glasgow Daily Times]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A human skull from a deep cave in northern Spain shows evidence of a lethal violent attack 430,000 years ago, a study shows. [BBC]

First Lady of Kentucky Jane Beshear didn’t seem to mind getting her hands dirty in order to promote agriculture at the dedication of a Governor’s Garden at Morehead State University on Wednesday. [Ashland Independent]

With new businesses sprouting up left and right, there’s a lot of talk these days about Detroit being on the comeback trail. [NPR]

An un-named source within the Laurel County school district told WKYT that South Laurel High School was threatened with legal action if they allowed prayer at their graduation this weekend. [WKYT]

Kevin Drum doesn’t write much about guns, which is why I’m going to keep on it a bit here and honor him by rolling out the red carpet for a bunch of grating 2A trolls to stampede into the comments thread. [Mother Jones]

Jack Conway on the nomination of Matt Bevin: I welcome Matt Bevin to the governor’s race as the Republican nominee. I look forward to a spirited race with my opponent and a conversation with voters over the next five months about the issues that matter most to Kentucky families. / This campaign is about standing up for their interests and values. It’s about moving Kentucky forward by creating good-paying jobs and growing our economy, investing in our education system at all levels, and building out our infrastructure. I’m the only candidate with a proven record of putting people over politics, and that’s a commitment I promise to keep. / Sannie Overly, our families and I are incredibly grateful to those who have opened their hearts and homes to us thus far, lending their friendship and support throughout this journey. We are excited to continue crisscrossing the state, visiting our counties and sharing our vision for Kentucky’s future with voters this summer and fall. [Press Release]

In a presidential campaign defined by billionaire sugar daddy donors, Rand Paul has a problem: He doesn’t seem to have one. [Politico]

A Lexington man was shot eight times during an officer-involved shooting in Richmond in September after he pointed a Taser stun gun at police, Kentucky State Police concluded in an investigation. [H-L]

Poverty, which affects a growing number of American students, begins its negative impact on learning as early as the beginning of kindergarten, according to a National Center for Education Statistics report released Thursday. [HuffPo]

Terry Holliday Threatened Fayette Co

Carl Richards, director of Madison County’s emergency management agency, was suspended indefinitely this week after an internal audit revealed the theft of $341,757 from a federally funded emergency preparedness program, county Judge-Executive Reagan Taylor said Wednesday. [H-L]

Support for same-sex marriage has reached an all-time high, according to recent polls. A new survey from Gallup shows a record 60 percent of Americans now say they approve of legalized same-sex marriage. [HuffPo]

An assault case in Jefferson Circuit Court was dismissed Tuesday by a judge who ruled an assistant commonwealth’s attorney “altered” evidence that was “deliberately not disclosed and concealed” from the defense counsel. [C-J/AKN]

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration on Wednesday announced the results of a four-state crackdown aimed at stopping illegal distribution of addictive prescription medicines, such as opioid painkillers, that yielded 280 arrests. [Reuters]

An unnamed person, while under the influence of alcohol, stabbed a man with a piece of lattice while in Ashland on Saturday, according to Ashland Police reports. [Ashland Independent]

At a hearing in Washington, a renewed call for addressing the violence and neglect that plagues group homes for foster youth. [ProPublica]

While the Republican race for governor is getting most of the attention Wednesday morning, as fewer than 100 votes separated former Agricultural Commissioner James Comer and former U.S. Senate hopeful Matt Bevin, a Floyd County native has earned her place on November’s ballot. [Hazard Herald]

“Some of his weaknesses really didn’t get relitigated in this primary,” said Scott Jennings, a Republican strategist who has advised McConnell campaigns. “In a heads-up race against Conway, I fully expect them to relitigate cockfighting and everything else.” [NY Times]

Oh, look, another empty threat from Terry Holliday. The Kentucky Education Commissioner has warned that Fayette County Schools could face state actions if low-achieving schools don’t improve. [WKYT]

States lack accurate statistics on widespread heroin use. [NPR]

Kentucky’s economy is only sunny on paper. To suggest otherwise would mean you’ve never actually stepped foot outside the Golden Triangle or spoken with actual Kentuckians. [WFPL]

Organic farms act as a refuge for wild plants, offsetting the loss of biodiversity on conventional farms, a study suggests. Fields around organic farms have more types of wild plants, providing benefits for wildlife, say scientists. [BBC]

Why the hell is Sam Youngman pretending he doesn’t know why KC Crosbie thanked Danny Briscoe?! He’s the one who told anyone who would listen about his investigation of Scott Crosbie. Come on, Youngman, you’re better than that. [H-L]

Republican Jeb Bush said on Wednesday that the Earth’s climate is changing but that scientific research does not clearly show how much of the change is due to humans and how much is from natural causes. [HuffPo]

Student Loan Servicing Is A Mess

Here’s another Louisville/Kentucky movie to get excited about. [Variety]



William Hilton Paul, son of U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., pleaded guilty Tuesday to driving under the influence in Lexington. [H-L]

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on Thursday launched a broad review of the often murky business of student loan servicing, questioning whether the roughly 40 million Americans with student debt are being treated fairly under a patchwork of rules and market forces that could leave them vulnerable to abuse. [HuffPo]

Many small towns in Appalachian Kentucky look a lot like Austin, Ind.; a picture of rural America with its shop-lined Main Street and stubble-filled cornfields — and the unlikely epicenter of the largest HIV outbreak in Indiana’s history. [C-J/AKN]

U.S. retail sales were flat in April as households cut back on purchases of automobiles and other big-ticket items, the latest sign the economy was struggling to rebound strongly after barely growing in the first quarter. [Reuters]

The Kentucky Association of Counties (KACo) is adding cyber liability to its insurance coverage provided to member counties beginning July 1. [Ashland Independent]

What happens when you’ve been kicking the fiscal can down the road for years, but the road suddenly hits a dead end? That’s what Chicago – and the state of Illinois – are about to find out. [ProPublica]

A differing of understandings of which classification the Glasgow Municipal Airport has in regard to the volume and type of its traffic was the focus of a discussion that took at least 90 minutes Monday at a meeting of the airport’s board of directors. [Glasgow Daily Times]

There are 19 Republicans seriously considering launching campaigns for president, and 10 numbers on a phone. That causes a big problem for pollsters using automated polling technology, one of the most common forms of public polling. [Politico]

Louisville Metro Police officers in the Fifth Division will begin wearing body cameras in June. [WFPL]

A former chief justice from Georgia decried capital punishment Tuesday, dubbing it “morally indefensible” and void of business sense. [Think Progress]

Kentucky’s highest court says a fraternity house should be considered a private residence in a search-and-seizure case stemming from a college student’s drug conviction after police found marijuana in his room. [WKYT]

The global pharmaceutical industry is being called on to pay for a $2bn innovation fund to revitalise research into antibiotics. [BBC]

Federal prosecutors are opposing former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship’s request to go home to Las Vegas for Memorial Day. [H-L]

Asking the Department of Defense to consider allowing young undocumented immigrants to enlist proved a bridge too far Thursday in the Republican-led House of Representatives. [HuffPo]

Thinking People Hate Jamie Comer

The Herald-Leader endorsed Hal Heiner over Jamie Comer, which is likely to push Comer over the edge behind closed doors. [H-L]

Honey bees, critical agents in the pollination of key U.S. crops, disappeared at a staggering rate over the last year, according to a new government report that comes as regulators, environmentalists and agribusinesses try to reverse the losses. [HuffPo]

Rand Paul would be the clear choice of Kentucky Republicans if the presidential primary were held today but, among registered voters, would have only an even chance of defeating Democrat Hillary Clinton in a general election, according to the latest Bluegrass Poll. [C-J/AKN]

After only one hour of floor debate, and no allowed amendments, the House of Representatives passed legislation that seeks to address the NSA’s controversial surveillance of American communications. However, opponents believe it may give brand new authorization to the U.S. government to conduct domestic dragnets. [The Intercept]

Ha! Daniel Grossberg has an ad highlighting Jacob Conway’s blackmail/extortion/threat attempt. [Click the Clicky]

Former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley (D) will reportedly announce on May 30 — or possibly sooner — whether he will seek the White House next year. [The Hill]

In one of the more dubious claims of the election season, three of the four Republican candidates for governor are claiming to be running a “positive campaign” amid abuse allegations and attack ads. [WAVE3]

The U.S. House of Representatives approved a bill on Wednesday that would ban most abortions after 20 weeks, a measure strongly opposed by the White House. [Reuters]

The Richmond City Commission named a fire chief and a codes enforcement director Tuesday night, filling positions vacated by retirements. [Richmond Register]

The US House of Representatives votes to end the National Security Agency’s bulk collection of Americans’ phone records. [BBC]

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued a notice April 17 stating it plans to prepare an assessment on the environmental impacts of the Kinder Morgan natural gas pipeline repurposing project. [The Morehead News]

Here’s what would actually happen if Rand Paul eliminated the Department of Education. We wouldn’t have a federal department to administer Pell Grants to students. There wouldn’t be any oversight over states when they break civil rights laws. There wouldn’t be a department to check on rampant inequality between low-income school districts and wealthy districts. We would have inconsistent education data, as the quality of data would vary among the states. There would be more gender discrimination within schools. There would be no way to hold schools accountable for the funds they receive. [Think Progress]

Steve Beshear’s administration has spent $195,400 on private lawyers to defend Kentucky’s same-sex marriage ban in court, with more legal bills expected, according to records released Wednesday. [H-L]

Way to go, Bardstown, for your racist jackasses. It’s comments like these that can indirectly harm the bourbon industry. In a press conference Monday, Nelson County Sheriff Ed Mattingly, who is white, expressed relief — not only that the incident didn’t lead to more serious injuries, but also that Fenwick’s skin wasn’t darker. [HuffPo]

Another Corrupt Judge Gets Revealed

Rand Paul has hinged his fledgling presidential campaign on polls showing him ahead of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in some swing states, but the latest Bluegrass Poll suggests Paul might have a hard time beating Clinton in his own backyard. [H-L]

Pike Circuit Judge Steven D. Combs violated ethics standards in a number of instances, the Kentucky Judicial Conduct Commission has charged. [More H-L]

Americans may largely agree on the charges filed against Baltimore police officers in the death of Freddie Gray, but they remain deeply divided over the way his case, and others like it, have been covered by the media. [HuffPo]

Kentucky Kingdom amusement park could receive up to $3.75 million in tax-recovery incentives to be spread over the next decade. [C-J/AKN]

The history of the most iconic American whiskies isn’t always reflected in the names that appear on their labels. [The Atlantic]

Citing concerns for public safety and the environment, the Madison County Fiscal Court unanimously adopted a resolution expressing opposition to the proposed conversion of gas pipeline. [Richmond Register]

The Oklahoma attorney general’s office misrepresented the facts behind a key argument about the availability of certain execution drugs in its filings at the U.S. Supreme Court, BuzzFeed News has determined. [BuzzFart]

Glad to see Riggs Lewis is shopping around the information we uncovered. Yet more proof that the Comer crew is using the Marilyn Thomas incident politically. They’ve had that information about Michael Adams’ ties to Jeff Hoover since early 2014. [Ashland Independent]

A coalition of conservative groups want to make sure Congressional Republicans don’t let up on the fight to eliminate what they call D.C.’s exemption from ObamaCare. [The Hill]

A total of $300,000 is the amount the Rowan County Board of Education had to find last year to balance the budget and this year the district faces the same fiscal shortfall. [The Morehead News]

Republican Jeb Bush said on Tuesday that “mistakes were made” in the Iraq war, moving to disavow a controversial statement he made in support of the 2003 invasion ordered by his brother, then-President George W. Bush. [Reuters]

Multiple coroners in Kentucky have gone years without meeting the training standards that are set forth in Kentucky law. [WKYT]

The heart of the batting order is due up in the House Appropriations Committee beginning Wednesday: four major spending bills that will capture all the contradictions in the new Republican budget over the next month. [Politico]

The only people standing behind Jamie Comer are people like Anne “KT’s Old Fashioned” Northup, Dan “FEAR THE GAYS and Let My Daughter Illegally Run For Office” Seum, Julie “Let Me Pad My Pension” Denton and similar shysters. [H-L]

House Republicans are again attacking measures aimed at protecting U.S. troops from predatory lending practices, two weeks after a similar GOP effort failed. [HuffPo]