We’re Not Even 100 Days In Yet…

The University of Kentucky has received $11.2 million from the National Institutes of Health to finance a new center that studies the links between obesity and cancer. [Linda Blackford]

Whiny little Mitch, indeed. Kentuckians have known this for years but it’s fun to watch the rest of the world find out just what a butthurt little baby these people are. [HuffPo]

A researcher at the University of Louisville is stepping up her study into whether coal ash from power plants may be making children in Louisville sick with a new study backed by federal research dollars. [C-J/AKN]

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau announced Monday that it filed a lawsuit against Weltman, Weinberg & Reis, accusing the debt collection firm of falsely representing in millions of collection letters that attorneys were involved in collection for overdue accounts. The firm collects on overdue credit card, installment loans, mortgage loans, and student loans debt nationwide, but only files lawsuit in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, New Jersey, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. [Consumerist]

At 8:36 p.m. Monday night, Glasgow Police Chief Guy Howie released information on the woman who was found dead Monday morning on the rooftop of a building located on the west side of Glasgow’s public square. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Lost amid the uproar over the Trump administration’s crackdown on undocumented immigrants is a change coming to the legal immigration system that’s expected to be costly for both U.S. companies and the government itself. [ProPublica]

New preschool and vocational school buildings are at the top of a construction priority list the Boyd County Board of Education is expected to adopt Wednesday. [Ashland Independent]

Donald Trump has congratulated Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on his victory in Sunday’s referendum that gave him sweeping new powers. The US president’s phone call contrasts with European concern that the result – 51.4% in favour of the changes – has exposed deep splits in Turkish society. [BBC]

With a meeting on his proposal for a new, comprehensive approach to the drug epidemic only a week away, Madison Judge/Executive Reagan Taylor got the opportunity to present his ideas directly to U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell as he met Monday with local leaders. [Richmond Register]

If this doesn’t scare the crap out of you, nothing will. How does the surge in drug overdoses compare with other causes of death in the U.S.? [NY Times]

In the first project of its kind, a Kentucky coal company is partnering with a global renewable energy giant to explore putting a major solar installation on a former mountaintop removal coal mine. [WFPL]

Racism motivated Trump voters more than authoritarianism. Which surprises absolutely no one who isn’t in denial. [WaPo]

Knox County and Barbourville Independent schools were closed Tuesday after a threat was called in Monday night to a West Coast police agency, according to a statement from the school system. [H-L]

Donald Trump, like most New Republican Nazis, doesn’t actually know who is running North Korea. [HuffPo]

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Frankfort Police & Franklin Co Sheriff Both Sound Beyond Terrible And Worthy Of Dismantling

The Frankfort Police detective found at fault by an independent review for his interactions with a female informant and his actions during the 2015 homicide investigation she was later a suspect in, will be put on an unpaid six-month suspension. [H-L]

Donald Trump’s former campaign manager Paul Manafort will register with the Department of Justice as a foreign agent, according to reports by The Associated Press and NBC News. [HuffPo]

Jefferson Circuit Judge Judith McDonald-Burkman unsealed a lawsuit Monday alleging two Louisville police officers sexually abused a former Explorer Scout and that the police department concealed it. And then they got indicted like woah. [C-J/AKN]

Forty-four percent of Kentucky voters say they approve of the 30-year Senate veteran, while 47 percent disapprove, making him the only senator with a net negative approval rating. [Morning Consult]

The state’s General Fund tax receipts fell 11.4 percent in March compared to a year ago, a decrease of $99.2 million but for the first nine months of the fiscal year remain 1.2 percent over last year. [Ronnie Ellis]

The Associated Press traced $1.2 million in secret payments from a pro-Russian political party to Paul Manafort’s firm in the United States. Manafort was Donald Trump’s campaign chairman. [AP]

More than three-fourths of Kentucky adults on Medicaid were eligible only because Kentucky expanded its Medicaid program in 2014, according to a study done for the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky. [Richmond Register]

The New York Daily News and ProPublica won the Pulitzer Prize for public service journalism on Monday for coverage of police abuses that forced mostly poor minorities from their homes, and the Charleston Gazette-Mail won the prize for investigative reporting on the spread of painkillers in West Virginia. [Reuters]

Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear made multiple stops around Ashland and Grayson on Monday where he shared accomplishments within his office and applauded local organizations for their work. [Ashland Independent]

What is at stake as Congress considers the E.P.A. budget? Far more than climate change. The Trump administration’s proposed cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency budget are deep and wide-ranging. It seeks to shrink spending by 31 percent, to $5.7 billion from $8.1 billion, and to eliminate a quarter of the agency’s 15,000 jobs. [NY Times]

One of the things the Cave City Tourist and Convention Commission wants to address in the future is how to increase the number of people who stay overnight in Cave City. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The FBI obtained a secret court order last summer to monitor the communications of an adviser to presidential candidate Donald Trump, part of an investigation into possible links between Russia and the campaign, law enforcement and other U.S. officials said. [WaPo]

Those certificates are pretty much meaningless if you want to have a long-lasting job and not some short-term bullshit. A scholarship program once hailed as a guarantee of free community college for all new high school graduates in Kentucky has been trimmed back to pay for only specialized work certificate programs. [Linda Blackford]

He effectively minimized and denied the Holocaust during Passover. It’s the second time the Trump crew has done that (whitewashed the Holocaust) since taking office. [HuffPo]

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Grimes Has Successfully Rebuilt Her Image

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Hard-hitting press-release journalism. Meanwhile, Montgomery County’s paid out mountains of cash in settlements and the nightmare is ongoing. [H-L]

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) said Sunday that he believes rhetoric from President Donald Trump’s administration is “probably partially to blame” for Syria’s deadly chemical weapons attack on its civilians last week. [HuffPo]

Instead of being whiny ass titty babies like the Democrats who enable Trump and normalize his racism… maybe it’s time to wake the heck up? If you’ve followed Adam Edelen at all, you know he’s keen on whitewashing the reasons Kentuckians supported Donald Trump. He and his cohorts still ignorantly claim it’s all economic but you know that’s not remotely the case. Kentucky Democrats will continue to lose while people like Edelen are at the helm of anything. It’s all up to Alison Grimes these days – now that she’s distanced herself from her father and proved she can speak her mind and stand up for what she (not consultants) believes in. [C-J/AKN]

Neil Gorsuch on Monday became the 101st associate justice of the Supreme Court and President Trump’s first high court appointee. [The Hill]

The plume of polluted water was black. In the satellite images, it snaked from the coal ash landfill at the D.B. Wilson Power Plant in Western Kentucky, about 40 minutes south of Owensboro. The water went through a ditch, until it reached a sediment pond. There, the images showed the black plume spreading through the murky green water, before it dissipated. [WFPL]

Internal State Department instructions to implement Donald Trump’s temporary travel ban on citizens of six Muslim-majority nations help demonstrate that the ban violates the constitution, the American Civil Liberties Union argued in court filings late on Thursday. [Reuters]

Mitch McConnell is hardly apologetic for his role in securing for conservatives the ninth seat on the U.S. Supreme Court, calling it “the most consequential decision I’ve ever been involved in.” [Ronnie Ellis]

When Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser, sought the top-secret security clearance that would give him access to some of the nation’s most closely guarded secrets, he was required to disclose all encounters with foreign government officials over the last seven years. [NY Times]

A new state law was passed at the most recent legislative session that will place the state in compliance with new federal travel standards by creating a new Travel ID driver’s license in 2019. [Ashland Independent]

Here’s the national media taking a look at racism and backwardness in Mt. Sterling. You know, the town we spent four years covering the biggest education scandal in Kentucky that the mainstream all but ignored. [WaPo]

The elegant black cat glided across the carpeted living room floor, a far cry from her previous home in war-torn Afghanistan. [Richmond Register]

Democrats heard the argument throughout the Senate’s bitter debate over Neil Gorsuch: Don’t filibuster this Supreme Court nominee — save your leverage for President Donald Trump’s next pick, the one who could change the court’s balance of power for a generation. [Politico]

Apparently, Andrew Wilkinson found religion when he got sent to prison. Isn’t that how it always goes? The corrupt political class goes to prison, claims to find Jesus and meemaw and poppop on the street buy it like it’s going out of style? At least this guy has his shitty dad to blame and Jack Brammer to help him whitewash recent history. [H-L]

Republican Governors keep vetoing legislation that would make voting easier because that’s the Republican way. They can’t let thinking people, poor people, old people or brown people vote if they can help it. [HuffPo]

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A New Week Of D.C. Nightmares Begins

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Someone should ask Hoskins about his month-long vacation in Palm Beach around the time of filing. The state hopes to prevent a man facing a $2.65 million fine for the illegal disposal of radioactive waste from erasing that penalty in bankruptcy court. [H-L]

A U.S. Navy strike group will be moving toward the western Pacific Ocean near the Korean peninsula as a show of force, a U.S. official told Reuters on Saturday, as concerns grow about North Korea’s advancing weapons program. [HuffPo]

Carroll County sends people to prison at a higher rate than any other Kentucky county, the Courier-Journal reported in October. And its tough-as-nails commonwealth’s attorney, James Crawford, made no apologies for it, saying he’s a “firm believer if there is a wrong, there has to be a corresponding punishment.” But when Sheriff Jamie Kinman pleaded guilty Monday to official misconduct for stealing painkillers, including from a terminal cancer patient while in uniform, Crawford recommended a deal that makes it unlikely Kinman will spend even a day in jail. [C-J/AKN]

No doubt, the footage from the attack is hard to take. But you have to wonder why Trump’s humanity was not similarly touched by the children killed in the 2013 Ghouta chemical attack, the stomach-churning allegations of systematic torture of children by Syrian forces, the many children killed by the Syrian regime’s barrel bombs, or the now iconic photo of a dazed little boy covered in dust in an ambulance in Aleppo, not to mention the also iconic image of a drowned Syrian refugee boy on a beach in Turkey. While all this was going on, Trump was arguing that the U.S. should be working with Assad, who he called a potential “natural ally.” [Slate]

This is the funniest thing you’ll read all day and it’s not remotely accurate. Morehead’s a great little town but most LGBTQ-friendly in Kentucky? Not in anyone’s imagination. It’s dangerous to suggest such to outsiders. It’s not safe to be out in Morehead or anywhere else in Eastern Kentucky. Especially if you’re an outsider or don’t come from a known or powerful family in the mountains. [The Morehead News]

Policies that promote school integration by race and class took a significant hit last week when the U.S. Department of Education announced that it was killing a small but important federal program to support local diversity efforts. [The Atlantic]

Mitch McConnell is hardly apologetic for his role in securing for conservatives the ninth seat on the U.S. Supreme Court, calling it “the most consequential decision I’ve ever been involved in.” [Ronnie Ellis]

The C.I.A. told senior lawmakers in classified briefings last summer that it had information indicating that Russia was working to help elect Donald J. Trump president, a finding that did not emerge publicly until after Mr. Trump’s victory months later, former government officials say. [NY Times]

Rand Paul wasted little time in expressing his opinions about President Donald Trump’s decision to strike a Syrian airfield with more than 50 cruise missiles. [Richmond Register]

Meanwhile, the garbage Republicans in Frankfort like Ryan “I Wasn’t Driving Drunk In That Parking Lot And Am Cool With Employing My Brother” Quarles and crew are spinning this as a positive. Because you can’t fix their special brand of stupid. At least there’s a chance their children won’t turn out as wretched as them. [WaPo]

Matt Bevin on Friday appointed Timothy Ray “Tim” Coleman, of Morgantown, as Circuit Judge for the 38th Judicial Circuit, Division 1 of Kentucky—representing Butler, Edmonson, Hancock and Ohio counties. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Remember Afghanistan? We’re still there. A U.S. soldier was killed while conducting operations against Islamic State in Afghanistan late on Saturday, a U.S. military spokesman said in a message posted on Twitter. [Reuters]

If there’s one thing I know for sure, it’s that I would never ever trust the Cabinet for Health and Family Services with children in need. Another? Kathy Stein ought to step down from the bench and return to practice as an attorney. Sure, Republicans have been fishing for literally anything to hang over her head. But she’s been next to terrible in defending herself or explaining what’s occurred. Being unable to stand up to Republicans – even when you’re an impartial judge – is a sign of dangerous weakness. [H-L]

Muhammed Ali Khan tried to do one of the most boring, responsible things an American taxpayer can do: set up a government-guaranteed retirement savings account. He was rejected because the Treasury Department thought he might be a terrorist. [HuffPo]

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Hillbilly Elegy Is Republican Bullshit

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When Americans remember the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., they like to recall his “I Have A Dream” speech from the 1963 March on Washington. It is beautifully aspirational — and no longer controversial. [H-L]

Republicans have spent most of the past seven years vowing to protect people with pre-existing conditions, even as they have pledged to get rid of the Affordable Care Act. [HuffPo]

City air pollution officials suspect the area near the CEMEX cement plant in southwest Louisville might violate the federal health standard for sulfur dioxide, a pollutant that’s especially hard on children, the elderly and people who suffer from asthma. But they won’t know for at least three years. [C-J/AKN]

Donald F. McGahn II, now Trump’s White House counsel, made $2.4 million as a lawyer with a client list loaded with deep-pocketed conservative groups, from Americans for Prosperity, backed by the conservative billionaires Charles G. and David H. Koch, to the Citizens United Foundation. [NY Times]

Hillbilly Elegy is bullshit. Della Combs Brashear had had enough. She backed her Cadillac long-ways across the road in front of her house, lit the Virginia Slim in her mouth, pulled her .38 pistol from her purse, and waited, stone-faced and determined, for the next coal truck to come along. [Ivy Brashear]

Former Obama national security adviser Susan E. Rice said Tuesday that she “absolutely” never sought to uncover “for political purposes” the names of Trump campaign or transition officials concealed in intelligence intercepts, and she called suggestions that she leaked those identities “completely false.” [WaPo]

Boyd County avoided losing its four-judge structure after a statewide judicial redistricting plan failed to pass through the General Assembly, but the plan will likely be reintroduced next year. [Ashland Independent]

A U.S. appeals court on Thursday upheld a preliminary injunction against Ohio’s lethal injection process for executions. [Reuters]

Attorney General Andy Beshear has once again gone to court seeking to intervene in open records disputes between a Kentucky university and student-run college newspapers. [Ronnie Ellis]

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes (R-Calif.) on Thursday said he will temporarily step aside from his committee’s investigation into Russia’s meddling in the 2016 presidential election. [The Hill]

Two people who spent years in a Kentucky jail after being wrongfully charged with murder have sued 10 police officers from three departments, alleging a conspiracy to frame them by planting evidence to protect a confidential informant. [Richmond Register]

Senate Republicans invoked the “nuclear option” to gut the filibuster for Supreme Court nominees Thursday, a historic move that paves the way for Neil Gorsuch’s confirmation and ensures that future high court nominees can advance in the Senate without clearing a 60-vote threshold. [Politico]

Funny how this story doesn’t mention an anti-trust investigation, isn’t it? It’s like McClatchy wants to suck more than Gannett these days. [H-L]

It’s the New Republican way. Late last month, federal prosecutors indicted ex-Rep. Steve Stockman and two of his aides, charging that the Texas Republican and his confidants ripped off charities, laundered money, lied to regulators and misled wealthy donors before, during and after his failed 2014 primary campaign against John Cornyn, the second-ranking Republican in the Senate. [HuffPo]

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Kentucky Republicans Sold Your Privacy Rights

Wondering how much money it took for Kentucky Republicans in Washington to sell your internet privacy?

According to The Verge – so you know it’s way more money than listed because they can’t even get peoples’ names correct – it didn’t take too much.

  • Thomas Massie: $2,750
  • Brett Guthrie: $81,500
  • Jamie Comer: $14,750
  • Hal Rogers: $12,500
  • Andy Barr: $28,400
  • Mitch McConnell: $251,110

That’s what the Republican Party of Kentucky supports. Minus Rand Paul. They support killing your privacy. Selling your private data to the highest campaign bidder.

They all deserve a square kick in the nuts next time you see them. Because they don’t care about individual liberty. They don’t believe in freedom. They never practice what they preach. Be it girlfriend-beating, paying for abortions or selling you out? That’s what those folks love to do. All while playing members of the church choir on teevee.

Yes, McConnell Was Harmed On Health Care

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Flamboyant Social Security lawyer Eric C. Conn, who won disability checks for thousands of people in Eastern Kentucky but caused heartache for many former clients after he was accused of cheating on cases, pleaded guilty Friday in a federal fraud case. [H-L]

The Republican-led Congress moved to dismantle yet another corporate regulation on Wednesday, in a move that safety experts say will make it easier for employers to hide serious workplace injuries from the government. [HuffPo]

Shae Hopkins may be a walking hypocrite but she’s right about the importance of KET. [C-J/AKN]

A unanimous Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that disabled students are entitled to far more than a bare-bones education, raising instructional standards for millions of children but potentially raising costs for local taxpayers. Although the specific decision overruled was decided in 2015, the phrase the justices rejected derives from a 2008 ruling by Judge Neil Gorsuch, President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, who had been defending that very decision at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing when word of Chief Justice Roberts’s opinion reached the Hart Senate Office Building. [WSJ]

Bonsai! The very name evokes images of faraway lands and beautifully landscaped gardens. For Ashland resident John Whitt, a childhood love of reading encyclopedias led him to discover Japan and its miniature trees. He learned the art of bonsai and continues working with the plants through Bonsai by John. [Ashland Independent]

The top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee said Wednesday that there is now “more than circumstantial evidence” that Trump’s associates colluded with the Russians to interfere in the U.S. election. [CBS News]

On March 15, family and friends’ visits with inmates at the Barren County Detention Center went digital. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The Trump administration’s gradual erasure of LGBT people from the work of the federal government is still underway. This week, the Department of Health and Human Services arbitrarily decided to just stop counting LGBT people in two critical surveys, eliminating vital data collection that could be used to help address the health disparities that LGBT people are known to experience. [ThinkProgress]

In 2006, before a perceived “war on coal,” before most Kentuckians had heard of Barack Obama, there were 16 casualties in the Kentucky coal fields — five at Darby Mine in Harlan County as a result of a methane gas explosion. [Ronnie Ellis]

Trump has gotten a hard lesson from his first legislative debacle: Leadership takes more than being able to close a deal. [WaPo]

Kentucky’s new law requiring doctors to conduct an ultrasound exam before an abortion, and then try to show fetal images to the pregnant women, came under withering attack Thursday in federal court. [Richmond Register]

The US has said its policy of “strategic patience” with North Korea is over and suggested it might decide to take pre-emptive military action. [BBC]

If you’re saying Mitch McConnell is untouched by the Republican health care mess, you’re lying. [H-L]

Donald Trump’s frequent travel, large family and unusual living situation are apparently weighing heavily on the Secret Service’s budget. The agency recently requested an additional $60 million in spending for fiscal year 2018, according to a Washington Post report on Tuesday. [HuffPo]

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