Corruption? Fine. Prostitution? FREAK OUT!

How long will it take this guy to turn a blind eye to the things people like Joshua Powell have done in the name of education? Will he clean house? Let’s not hold our breath, now. [H-L]

A deal that allows thousands of companies to transfer data from Europe to the United States is invalid, the highest EU court said on Tuesday in a landmark ruling that follows revelations of mass U.S. government snooping. [HuffPo]

The veteran journalist who co-authored a book filled with explosive allegations against the University of Louisville men’s basketball program said Monday that the escort he wrote with is “pretty damn credible.” [C-J/AKN]

GOP strategists say McConnell’s strategy for protecting vulnerable incumbents is to show that the Republican Congress knows how to govern, especially in battleground states such as Ohio and New Hampshire, where swing voters will decide the outcome. [The Hill]

A former inmate at the Boyle County Detention Center has filed a lawsuit, saying he received “significant bodily injuries” while being detained at the jail. [WKYT]

Amtrak has told U.S. lawmakers that it will suspend service on its national network in mid-December unless Congress extends a Dec. 31 deadline for implementing advanced safety technology, according to an Oct. 5 letter from Amtrak reviewed by Reuters. [Reuters]

A Massey Energy safety official warned former CEO Don Blankenship about the severity of the safety violations at Massey mines, according to a June 2009 memo the prosecution plans to use to show the “warlike” relationship between Massey and the Mine Safety and Health Administration. [Richmond Register]

Hillary Rodham Clinton’s campaign is grappling with a pressing and difficult question: How can she contrast herself to Bernie Sanders in next week’s Democratic presidential debate and beyond, without employing the sort of attacks that could boomerang to harm her? [NY Times]

Residents of Russell will see an increase in property taxes after City Council voted to approve the ordinance Monday morning. [Ashland Independent]

Powerful interest groups are already lining up to oppose various provisions in the Trans-Pacific Partnership — the sweeping trade agreement reached Monday by the United States, Japan and 10 other Pacific Rim nations — in hopes they can sway the votes of enough wavering lawmakers to have the deal rejected by Congress. [WaPo]

Members of the Rowan County Historical Society, Rowan County Arts Center Board, Morehead Tourism Commission, Rowan County Veterans Foundation, Morehead Theatre Guild and other concerned citizens met Thursday to discuss a proposal to tear down two historic structures. [The Morehead News]

John Boehner’s speakership is not ending quietly. With less than four weeks left in his decades-long congressional career, Boehner is maneuvering to shape the House Republican Conference on his way out. [Politico]

Kentucky’s education commissioner is appointed by the state board of education, but a state lawmaker wants to change that. State Rep. Kenny Imes, R-Murray, has prefiled a bill for the 2016 General Assembly that would require the commissioner to be confirmed by the state Senate. For another option, he said, he’s also drafting a bill that would require the education commissioner to be elected by a statewide public vote. [H-L]

A top U.S. commander said Tuesday that the bombing of a Doctors Without Borders hospital in northern Afghanistan was accidental — but the humanitarian group, also known as Médecins Sans Frontières, claims otherwise. [HuffPo]

It’s Official: Jack In 2010 Is Jack In 2015

“Grace under pressure. Country and institution before self,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Friday, describing his impressions of retiring Speaker John A. Boehner, R-Ohio. [H-L]

Bigoted fame whore Kim Davis lies again: Now she’s claiming Kentucky Democrats don’t hate the gays as hard as Kentucky Republicans. We all know they hate the gays equally. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin was supposed to be Republican he could beat in this race but as each day goes by, that’s looking less and less like a sure thing. [C-J/AKN]

Renewable energy has for the first time surpassed coal in supplying the UK’s electricity for a whole quarter, according to government statistics released on Thursday. [The Guardian]

Independent Stave Company announced last week that its fifth American oak stave mill – located on Cranston Road (KY 377) – now is fully operational as the second largest such facility in the world. [The Morehead News]

Advocates for abolishing the death penalty are hopeful that Pope Francis’s visit this week will give their cause a jolt of momentum. [The Hill]

The efforts of the Berea College Farm to reduce energy and waste and serve students and the community have been recognized as one of the top in the country. [Richmond Register]

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo renewed his call for national gun control legislation on Saturday as he delivered a eulogy for the top state attorney who was fatally wounded by a stray bullet in Brooklyn earlier this month. [Reuters]

Where the devil is Jack Conway? It’s customary for those who want to be governor to get out among voters and tell them why they should vote for him. Conway’s Republican opponent, Matt Bevin, is traveling the state talking to prospective voters, but unless you sneak into a Conway fundraiser as I did last weekend, it’s hard to find the Democrat. [Ronnie Ellis]

With their top object of scorn, John Boehner, about to leave the scene, conservatives are already training their ire across the Capitol on Mitch McConnell. [Politico]

A change to the Glasgow city ordinance pertaining to the humane treatment of animals that narrowly passed a first reading Sept. 14 is on Monday’s agenda for a second reading by the Glasgow City Council. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Pope Francis has urged a large gathering of world leaders at the United Nations in New York to respect humanity’s “right to the environment”. [BBC]

Republican presidential candidate Bobby Jindal is calling on the GOP’s top senator to step down. [H-L]

When poor defendants appeared in court over an unpaid fine, the ACLU found that judges did not assign them a lawyer, seek to determine whether they could afford their fine or inform them of their rights. [HuffPo]