The Kim Davis Media Circus Continues

Shouts of joy erupted outside the Rowan County Courthouse Friday morning as William Smith and James Yates obtained a marriage license in Rowan County Friday morning from deputy county clerk Brian Mason. [H-L]

U.S. job growth rose less than expected in August, which could dim prospects of a Federal Reserve interest rate hike later this month, even as the unemployment rate dropped to a near 7-1/2- year low of 5.1 percent and wages accelerated. [HuffPo]

The city is asking residents to help Louisville’s homeless veterans take better care of their feet as more former military service members living on the street come forward. [C-J/AKN]

Many in the West are backing an effort to keep the greater sage grouse off the endangered species list. By saving the bird, they feel they can save the culture and customs of the West as well. [NPR]

In case you missed it: Rand Paul’s top guy, Mr. Morality who was “called by God” is all over Ashley Madison. [Page One]

Murder rates have increased sharply across the US in 2015, with at least 30 cities reporting a rise in violence. [BBC]

Residents offered their two-minute takes in Lexington Thursday on a thousand-page federal coal mining regulation that’s been years in the making. [WFPL]

It was a show of respect to Native Americans when President Obama on Sunday restored the name of the nation’s tallest mountain, formerly called Mount McKinley, to Denali. So it makes a lot of sense that presidential candidate Donald Trump didn’t like it. [ThinkProgress]

Rowan County residents James Yates and William Smith Jr. were the first same-sex couple to obtain a marriage license in their home county. It was also the first license issued in the office since a controversial U.S. Supreme Court ruling in June. [Ashland Independent]

Holding hands, James Yates and William Smith Jr. entered the media-filled courthouse shortly after 8, and began the process of applying for a marriage license for at least the sixth time. By 8:15, the couple had obtained their license. [Jim Higdon for the WaPo]

James Yates and Will Smith Jr. walked out of the Rowan County Courthouse this morning at 8:30 a.m. with their marriage license. [The Morehead News]

The US military has reopened a criminal investigation into some of the most serious accusations of war crimes against US forces in Afghanistan since 2001. [The Nation]

Fascinating how quickly the powerful few give up on talks of holding the University of Louisville Foundation accountable. [H-L]

The GOP presidential candidates love to warn voters of the threat of Islamic terrorists. Not a day goes by without Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) bemoaning the threat of “radical Islamic terrorism.” But amid all of the fear-mongering about terrorists, it might be wise for presidential candidates to be able to identify the names of actual terrorists, like the head of the Islamic State, Abu Bakr al Baghdadi, and the head of al Qaeda, Ayman al Zawahiri. [HuffPo]

Your Friday Evening Dept. Of Derp

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Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis continued to withhold marriage licenses from local residents Thursday, a day after a federal appeals court upheld an order telling her to end her protest. [H-L]

McDonald’s, Burger King and every other company that relies on a franchise business model just suffered the legal setback they’ve been fearing for years. [HuffPo]

As West Africa’s Ebola epidemic dissipates, Fort Campbell’s 101st Airborne Division is being recognized for its role in helping fight an outbreak that has killed more than 11,280 people, mostly in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. [C-J/AKN]

A new judge in Ferguson, Missouri, has halted court practices that were seen as a major factor in unrest over the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown a year ago. [BBC]

The Glasgow City Council Public Safety Committee has decided on its recommendations for changes to the city’s animal welfare ordinance. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Everything that is happening in the solar industry is happening in Nevada right now. [ThinkProgress]

Jack Conway, the Democratic candidate for governor, and his Republican opponent, Matt Bevin, don’t much like each other. [Ronnie Ellis]

Garbage has become an unlikely battleground in the abortion debate, as anti-abortion groups seek evidence of privacy violations in clinics’ trash. [ProPublica]

With several changes coming to The Register beginning in Sept. 1, readers and subscribers have questions and concerns. The staff of The Register would like to help answer those questions with an online Q&A. [Richmond Register]

Planned Parenthood has paid forensic experts to comb through undercover videos released by anti-abortion activists, and their report finds significant distortions and misleading edits. [NPR]

Thousands of Kentuckians went to the Kentucky State Capitol on Saturday to show support for Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis and her decision to stop issuing marriage licenses after the U. S. Supreme Court recognized same-sex marriage. [The Morehead News]

President Barack Obama on Thursday heralded the progress New Orleans has made rebuilding since Hurricane Katrina battered the area 10 years ago but said more needed to be done to overcome poverty and inequality. [Reuters]

Tanya Meeks wears a small silver urn on a necklace. On this day, it rested on a bright orange T-shirt with “Stop Heroin” printed across the front, and rubber bands hung from her wrist with hashtags that mirrored the shirt’s slogan. [H-L]

Sea levels worldwide rose an average of nearly 3 inches (8 cm) since 1992, the result of warming waters and melting ice, a panel of NASA scientists said on Wednesday. [HuffPo]

Rand & RPK Melted Everybody’s Brain

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Magoffin County Judge-Executive Charles “Doc” Hardin has hired a man with a felony vote-buying conviction to be an administrative assistant in his office. [H-L]

Jeb Bush said while he supports granting birthright citizenship to the children of immigrants, the policy needs “greater enforcement” to prevent “abuse.” [HuffPo]

These poor, dumb people think their religion is under threat because their government isn’t permitted to discriminate on the basis of hate. Get it together, you jackasses, because you’re really harming what little bit of a positive image Kentucky was developing. [C-J/AKN]

Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) can run for both the White House and to keep his Senate seat in 2016, the Republican Party in Kentucky decided Saturday. [The Hill]

Richard Nelson, founder and executive director of the Commonwealth Policy Center, told the group of people who came Thursday evening to hear him at Immanuel Baptist Church that our culture is in a moral freefall and in a period of spiritual darkness. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The Kentucky GOP’s central committee voted Saturday to adopt a presidential caucus system next year, clearing the way Republican Sen. Rand Paul to run for president and reelection at the same time. [Politico]

This is written on Friday, the day before Kentucky Republicans were to decide whether to conduct a presidential caucus next year rather than a primary. [Ronnie Ellis]

While Donald Trump’s recent position paper on immigration dominates headlines, a new study of unauthorized immigrants in the U.S. digs into the latest numbers. [NPR]

The EPA recently announced the Clean Power Plan, which entails stricter emissions standards for states, and the Power+ Plan, which promises $1 billion in federal money to help coal country towns get back on their feet. I support both these plans wholeheartedly. They’re good for Kentucky communities, good for the economy, and good for the environment. [Drew Curtis]

Two American women have passed the gruelling training programme of the US Army Rangers – one of the military’s most elite special operations forces. [BBC]

Alison Daddy’s Name Grimes on Rand Paul and RPK this weekend: “It is unfortunate that today a few insiders were able to disenfranchise over 1.2 million Republican voters. One candidate should not be able to buy an election. Democracy demands that all eligible Kentuckians be a part of the election process. That didn’t happen today and won’t happen with a caucus.” [Press Release]

The phone rings just as Katrina Fingerson and Latoya McClary are about to leave to start their shift at the Goddard Riverside Community Center. [ThinkProgress]

It was like a Klan rally with an extra dose of fat, white homophobia. Headlined by Bob Stivers and Matt Bevin, of course. [H-L]

Americans use prescription drugs and they know these medicines help people, but they still don’t care much for pharmaceutical companies and think the industry is too money-hungry, according to a new survey. [HuffPo]

Even The Muslins Love The Environment

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A federal judge on Wednesday set an Aug. 31 deadline for his delay in ordering Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis to resume issuing marriage licenses. [H-L]

More than $1 billion in U.S. military equipment quietly began flowing to the Lebanese military over the last year. [HuffPo]

The operators of the massive, troubled and stinky landfill near Ashland, Ky., announced Tuesday that they will phase out all rail deliveries of out-of-state trash by the end of next year. [C-J/AKN]

The month before he killed 16 Afghan civilians in a shooting rampage, Army Staff Sergeant Robert Bales bloodied the nose of an Afghan truck driver in an assault that was not reported to his camp commanders, according to a report released on Tuesday. [Reuters]

During a visit with education leaders in Louisville on Tuesday, the Republican nominee for Kentucky governor talked about preschool, teacher pensions and charter schools. Matt Bevin met with the group of about 20 educators and community officials at the Jefferson County Public Schools Van Hoose Education Center for over an hour, outlining some of his goals for education in the state. [WDRB]

Birthright citizenship is enshrined in the 14th Amendment, but Donald Trump and other candidates are keeping alive the idea that some Americans should not have equal rights at birth. [The Nation]

The members of the Kentucky Coal Association want a private audience with the two major-party gubernatorial candidates, and it looks like they will get it. [Hopkinsville New Era]

Islamic leaders issued a Climate Change Declaration calling for world governments to adopt a new international climate agreement that would phase out fossil fuels and limit global warming to 1.5°C to 2°C. The collective statement of the leaders from 20 countries lays out a deadline for wealthy and oil-producing nations to phase out all greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. [International Business Times]

Kentucky’s preliminary July unemployment rate rose slightly to a seasonally adjusted 5.2 percent from a revised 5.1 percent in June 2015, and remained below the national rate, according to the Office of Employment and Training (OET), an agency of the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet. [Press Release]

New disclosures about the National Security Agency’s partnership with AT&T could reignite constitutional challenges to the spy agency’s efforts to wiretap the Internet. [ProPublica]

The hardest thing Phillip R. Patton has had to do in his 14-year tenure as a circuit court judge, he said, was “probably sentencing 16-year-old youthful offenders to live in the penitentiary.” And he’s had to do that several times with youths that were tried as adults, he said. [Glasgow Daily Times]

For the first time this presidential election cycle, six Republican candidates will be forced to talk about education — an issue that has taken a backseat to others for the last few election cycles. [Politico]

Rand Paul is ratcheting up pressure on Kentucky Republicans who will vote Saturday on whether to hold a presidential preference caucus next year. [H-L]

Scientists at Ohio State University say they’ve grown the first near-complete human brain in a lab. [HuffPo]

Hopefully Everyone Goes To The State Fair

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Former state lawmaker Steve Nunn’s inmate account, which includes some of the proceeds from his legislative pension, is subject to garnishment by the family of the woman he pleaded guilty to killing in 2009. We hear funds that friends and relatives place in his account for incidentals are also being taken. [H-L]

Hillary Clinton has told the AFL-CIO she wants to improve Social Security benefits for women and lower-income seniors, offering a glimpse of the Democratic presidential front-runner’s thinking on a topic she has rarely addressed on the campaign trail. [HuffPo]

Changes are in the works to make the 2015 Kentucky State Fair, which opens Thursday, a bigger draw by offering new promotions, discounts and a strong concert lineup. Maybe the fair folks could bother actually promoting the event for a change? It takes more than a Kroger and newspaper push to get people interested in 2015. [C-J/AKN]

Forensic archaeologists on Friday began excavating a highway embankment in eastern Pennsylvania, looking for more bones believed to be from impoverished victims of the worldwide Spanish flu pandemic in 1918. [Reuters]

In an effort to counter the cost of state mandated salary increases, the Berea Independent Board of Education unanimously voted to increase the local ad valorem tax and tax on real property to 89.1 cents per $100 of assessed value. [Richmond Register]

NASA reports this was the hottest July on record. So we are now in “bet the mortgage” territory that 2015 will be the hottest year in NASA’s 125-year temperature record. [ThinkProgress]

The tug of war between Big Run Landfill and area residents fed up with noxious odors coming from it is not over, even following the announcement Tuesday that the company will phase out the importation of out-of-state garbage by rail. [Ashland Independent]

A planet 100 light-years away resembles an infant version of Jupiter, astronomers say. [BBC]

A college professor and a local businessman have entered the race to replace Bill Redwine on the Rowan County Board of Education. [The Morehead News]

Two years after the United States deployed the Patriot missile defense system to Turkey, a NATO ally, the system will be withdrawn, the countries announced today. [NPR]

Federal Bureau of Investigation and Kentucky State Police personnel executed a search warrant at the Cave City dental practice office of Chris Steward on Monday morning, Steward’s attorney confirmed later in the evening. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Forget Donald Trump. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush is the favorite to win the GOP presidential nomination, according to Paddy Power, the Irish betting site. Trump trails Bush and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker in Paddy Power’s rankings, though Trump might be the better bet. At 9-2 odds, a $100 bet on Trump would win $450. [The Hill]

The number of endorsements from local governments in Eastern Kentucky and elsewhere is growing for an idea to spend $1 billion over five years in an effort to help areas hurt by a sharp downturn in coal jobs. [H-L]

After forty years of rising income and wealth inequality, some of America’s rich seem worried that maybe things have gone too far. In a recent New York Times Op Ed (August 9), for example, Peter Georgescu, CEO emeritus of the multinational public relations firm, Young and Rubicon, wrote that he is “scared” of a backlash that might lead to social unrest or “oppressive taxes.” [HuffPo]

The Gays Are Ruining Everything In KY

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When the U.S. Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage this summer, Kentucky and many other states tweaked their marriage license forms to give no hint of a person’s gender. [H-L]

GOP presidential candidate Mike Huckabee supports Paraguay’s decision to deny an abortion to a 10-year-old rape victim, he revealed in an interview Sunday. [HuffPo]

Previously sealed evidence filed in two cases related to a Central Kentucky bourbon and steroid organized crime ring has been released following a Franklin Circuit Court judge’s ruling. [C-J/AKN]

The Pentagon’s massive new Law of War Manual drew criticism from the New York Times editorial board on Monday for its section on how to treat journalists, which the Times said would “make their work more dangerous, cumbersome and subject to censorship.” [The Intercept]

More than 100 volunteers combed Boonesborough Beach on Saturday morning, picking up litter. They also picked up trash on the Clark County side of the Kentucky River. [Richmond Register]

Government employees have an obligation to follow the letter of the law despite their religious convictions—or else resign the offices they hold. [The Atlantic]

There have already been 10 suicides in Boyd County investigated by the coroner’s office, according to Coroner Mark Hammond. Four of these happened just in the month of July; two on the same day. [Ashland Independent]

With a rise nationally in fatal heroin overdoses, the White House on Monday will announce a plan pairing law enforcement officials with public health workers in an effort to emphasize treatment rather than prosecution of addicts, the Washington Post said. [Reuters]

A few times a year, Anna Lucio leaves her office and heads back to her roots. “Everybody’s got their own way of seeing it,” she said. Lucio grew up on a piece of land in Kentucky that welcomed the shade needed for Ginseng. “The first time we went in the woods- It’s that excitement that you can be able to find it, and even if you’ve seen a million, you’d be like, ‘Oh! I found one!'” [WKYT]

American Red Cross CEO Gail McGovern has long portrayed her organization as a beacon of openness, once declaring “we made a commitment that we want to lead the effort in transparency.” But when the Government Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress, opened an inquiry last year into the Red Cross’ disaster work, McGovern tried to get it killed behind the scenes. [ProPublica]

The Mayor of Shepherdsville was arraigned Tuesday morning on a prostitution charge. Shepherdsville Mayor Scott Ellis was not in court and was represented by his attorney. [WDRB]

Since last week’s indictments of three top political aides to Ron and Rand Paul, new details have emerged about the Ron Paul campaign’s scheme in 2012 to buy the endorsement of Kent Sorenson, who was then an influential Republican state senator in Iowa. [Mother Jones]

Some executives dream of retiring to a big boat on a big body of water, and that is just what James Street did. Since retiring as Eastern Kentucky University’s vice president for administration in July 2013, Street and his wife, Stacey, have spent a lot of time on their 34-foot Beneteau 331 sailboat on Kentucky Lake and their Catalina 22 on Cave Run. [H-L]

People who live in low-income urban areas tend not to have access to the green spaces that are more easily found in rural and suburban communities. But the lack of connection with nature in concrete jungles is changing, according to NPR’s Paige Pfleger. Across the country, various eco-non-profits are populating community centers and high schools with communal gardens. [HuffPo]

Way To Go, State Board Of Education

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Rand Paul has transferred $250,000 to the Republican Party of Kentucky as a down payment on the presidential caucuses he has asked the party to conduct next March, Paul told members of the state party’s central committee Monday in an email. [H-L]

The U.S. Department of Defense is sending a team to military installations in Kansas and South Carolina to investigate the possibility of relocating some Guantanamo Bay prisoners to U.S. soil, media outlets reported on Saturday. [HuffPo]

Changes are in the works to make the 2015 Kentucky State Fair, which opens Thursday, a bigger draw by offering new promotions, discounts and a strong concert lineup. [C-J/AKN]

The National Security Agency’s ability to spy on vast quantities of Internet traffic passing through the United States has relied on its extraordinary, decades-long partnership with a single company: the telecom giant AT&T. [NY Times]

The Barren County Board of Education will consider up to a 4 percent increase in the county property tax rate after voting unanimously against a motion to maintain the current tax revenue rate during Thursday’s regular meeting. [Glasgow Daily Times]

This past week saw a lot of changes in the world markets, with China’s currency devaluation and approval of another Greek bailout. [NPR]

A former Silver Creek Elementary School Parent-Teacher Organization treasurer was sentenced to five years in prison Thursday. [Richmond Register]

Less than a month after one of the University of Cincinnati’s police officers shot and killed an unarmed driver who was not a student during a traffic stop, the school said on Friday it would resume off-campus patrols. [Reuters]

A woman who lived in Kentucky is facing felony abuse charges in Michigan after police found her disabled sister living in filthy conditions while locked in a closet. [WKYT]

After a ProPublica investigation of USA Discounters’ lending practices last summer, a barrage of lawsuits, regulatory inquiries and changes to Defense Department policies followed. [ProPublica]

The Kentucky Board of Education violated the state’s open meeting law earlier this year in its quest to find a firm to assist in searching for a new education commissioner. [WDRB]

Former Florida governor and GOP presidential candidate Jeb Bush had an awkward conversation about Common Core education standards this week, calling the initiative’s name “poisonous” while attempting to appeal to conservatives who oppose the program — even though he supports it. [ThinkProgress]

Mitch McConnell said Monday that he hopes Congress can override a veto of a resolution that disapproves of President Barack Obama’s nuclear deal with the Iranians, but he acknowledged that the president has “still got a great likelihood of success.” [H-L]

This will freak Ken Ham out… Apes may be much closer to human speech than we realized. [HuffPo]