Daily Scary Briefing Dept.

From the Everybody is Freaking Out About Gays in the Restroom Dept. Are you suffering from public-restroom closet-case gay-sex hysteria? Welcome to America’s newest freakout. ABC News can help! [ABC]

Rational thinking. Steve Beshear believes the decision of offering domestic partner benefits should be left up to universities. Who knew the gays shouldn’t be excluded from receiving health care benefits that they pay for? Or that we shouldn’t legislate discrimination? [WHAS11]

The story that won’t die. Everyone and their mother have to write about Attorney General Greg Stumbo opposing Fletcher’s illegal university appointees. This time it’s the Post. [CP]

Nickel and dimed. The US Dollar has fallen to another three-week low versus the Euro. Declined against all 16 major currencies. We have the amazing Bush housing plan to thank for it. That could never affect Kentucky, though, could it? [Bloomberg]

Making us proud. Former Court of Appeals Judge, now an attorney in Prestonsburg, David Barber tried to arrange a fight between his son and a boy who disagreed with him. Allegedly. [H-L]

Let’s play nice. And maybe tell the truth? The Glasgow Daily Times wonders why both sides of the aisle played nice for the special session. Then goes on to totally ignore the corruption that is the energy bill, praising the tons of jobs for our young people. Yeah, all 300 jobs for our young people! Yeah. That’s the issue we should be talking about when it comes to the special session all right. [GDT]

Southern circuit. Kentucky’s Hart-Lunsford Pictures is sponsoring a film series at the Kentucky Center. The Southern Tour of Independent Filmmakers kicks off the series with “Ritual Etchings” on Sept. 5th. If you’re near Louisville? You can’t beat $6.50. [Kentucky Center]

It’s Raining Men!

An intrepid reporter sent us an e-mail this morning with some very important questions about toilet cruising Senator Larry Craig and his wide stance. They suggested we ask them of various congress critters around Kentucky.

  • “Should a congressman have to resign over a game of footsie?”
  • “Have you been to the Minneapolis/St. Paul International Airport recently? Do you know stall 4 in Terminal C?”
  • “When Sen. Craig resigns, do you think they should play ‘It’s raining men’?”
  • “Shouldn’t Sen. Craig resign just because he looks like a sex offender?”
  • “Do you think they know of homosexuals in Idaho?”
  • “If Senator Craig is gay, do you think a potato can be gay?”

We think these brilliant and pertinent questions should have been asked of Rep. Yarmuth when he appeared on WHAS11’s noon show yesterday. (Attention Renee Murphy: we were praying you’d ask if he had a wide stance!)

Page One is very interested in finding the answers to these questions. If you have answers to any of them, please let us know so that intrepid young reporter can get more of the story.

[audio:http://pageonekentucky.com/audio/rainingmen.mp3]

UPDATE: Some people have no sense of humor.

Hebert Goes to Aurora

You’ve seen Gov. Ernie Fletcher’s ads about Steve Beshear and the horrors of casino gambling. You’ve read the reports of Aurora residents and officials sharing their disdain for the governor. And you’ve heard us say aw Beshear should probably have done.

Well… Mark Hebert visited Aurora last week and filed the following report today:




Seems he had a difficult time trying to find anyone with anything negative to say about casinos and their effect on Aurora. The police chief himself (and the facts) said there has been no crime increase associated with the casino.

Steve Beshear owes him a big thank-you for reporting the facts.

Army possibly nearing equality?

Zahora - NPR - IraqMilitary policies don’t keep women off the front lines anymore. NPR’s Jack Zahora for All Things Considered reports that sixty-one women have been killed by hostile fire in Iraq and discusses important new roles women are more often beginning to play in combat zones– despite Pentagon policies.

Go Listen!

Zahora is a rising star at NPR and has covered Iraq quite a bit. Give more of his work a listen while you’re at it. More Kentuckians should familiarize themselves with his reporting as 2008 draws near.

Back in the Game

I came late to the journalism party. Days after my 36th birthday, I reported for my first day of work at a real newspaper – Business First of Louisville.

So it’s been a decade since I first felt the adrenaline rush of breaking a news story, of beating the competition (at that time, the Courier-Journal), of seeing my name on Page One of the paper. There was a surprising thrill to painting a picture in words of a conflict that the subjects didn’t want to see in the paper.

After nearly four years, I left for what I thought were greener pastures in the dot-com world. But that’s another story for another day.

Read moreBack in the Game