Your Friday Evening Dept. Of Derp

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis continued to withhold marriage licenses from local residents Thursday, a day after a federal appeals court upheld an order telling her to end her protest. [H-L]

McDonald’s, Burger King and every other company that relies on a franchise business model just suffered the legal setback they’ve been fearing for years. [HuffPo]

As West Africa’s Ebola epidemic dissipates, Fort Campbell’s 101st Airborne Division is being recognized for its role in helping fight an outbreak that has killed more than 11,280 people, mostly in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. [C-J/AKN]

A new judge in Ferguson, Missouri, has halted court practices that were seen as a major factor in unrest over the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown a year ago. [BBC]

The Glasgow City Council Public Safety Committee has decided on its recommendations for changes to the city’s animal welfare ordinance. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Everything that is happening in the solar industry is happening in Nevada right now. [ThinkProgress]

Jack Conway, the Democratic candidate for governor, and his Republican opponent, Matt Bevin, don’t much like each other. [Ronnie Ellis]

Garbage has become an unlikely battleground in the abortion debate, as anti-abortion groups seek evidence of privacy violations in clinics’ trash. [ProPublica]

With several changes coming to The Register beginning in Sept. 1, readers and subscribers have questions and concerns. The staff of The Register would like to help answer those questions with an online Q&A. [Richmond Register]

Planned Parenthood has paid forensic experts to comb through undercover videos released by anti-abortion activists, and their report finds significant distortions and misleading edits. [NPR]

Thousands of Kentuckians went to the Kentucky State Capitol on Saturday to show support for Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis and her decision to stop issuing marriage licenses after the U. S. Supreme Court recognized same-sex marriage. [The Morehead News]

President Barack Obama on Thursday heralded the progress New Orleans has made rebuilding since Hurricane Katrina battered the area 10 years ago but said more needed to be done to overcome poverty and inequality. [Reuters]

Tanya Meeks wears a small silver urn on a necklace. On this day, it rested on a bright orange T-shirt with “Stop Heroin” printed across the front, and rubber bands hung from her wrist with hashtags that mirrored the shirt’s slogan. [H-L]

Sea levels worldwide rose an average of nearly 3 inches (8 cm) since 1992, the result of warming waters and melting ice, a panel of NASA scientists said on Wednesday. [HuffPo]

The Gays Are Ruining Everything In KY

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

When the U.S. Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage this summer, Kentucky and many other states tweaked their marriage license forms to give no hint of a person’s gender. [H-L]

GOP presidential candidate Mike Huckabee supports Paraguay’s decision to deny an abortion to a 10-year-old rape victim, he revealed in an interview Sunday. [HuffPo]

Previously sealed evidence filed in two cases related to a Central Kentucky bourbon and steroid organized crime ring has been released following a Franklin Circuit Court judge’s ruling. [C-J/AKN]

The Pentagon’s massive new Law of War Manual drew criticism from the New York Times editorial board on Monday for its section on how to treat journalists, which the Times said would “make their work more dangerous, cumbersome and subject to censorship.” [The Intercept]

More than 100 volunteers combed Boonesborough Beach on Saturday morning, picking up litter. They also picked up trash on the Clark County side of the Kentucky River. [Richmond Register]

Government employees have an obligation to follow the letter of the law despite their religious convictions—or else resign the offices they hold. [The Atlantic]

There have already been 10 suicides in Boyd County investigated by the coroner’s office, according to Coroner Mark Hammond. Four of these happened just in the month of July; two on the same day. [Ashland Independent]

With a rise nationally in fatal heroin overdoses, the White House on Monday will announce a plan pairing law enforcement officials with public health workers in an effort to emphasize treatment rather than prosecution of addicts, the Washington Post said. [Reuters]

A few times a year, Anna Lucio leaves her office and heads back to her roots. “Everybody’s got their own way of seeing it,” she said. Lucio grew up on a piece of land in Kentucky that welcomed the shade needed for Ginseng. “The first time we went in the woods- It’s that excitement that you can be able to find it, and even if you’ve seen a million, you’d be like, ‘Oh! I found one!'” [WKYT]

American Red Cross CEO Gail McGovern has long portrayed her organization as a beacon of openness, once declaring “we made a commitment that we want to lead the effort in transparency.” But when the Government Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress, opened an inquiry last year into the Red Cross’ disaster work, McGovern tried to get it killed behind the scenes. [ProPublica]

The Mayor of Shepherdsville was arraigned Tuesday morning on a prostitution charge. Shepherdsville Mayor Scott Ellis was not in court and was represented by his attorney. [WDRB]

Since last week’s indictments of three top political aides to Ron and Rand Paul, new details have emerged about the Ron Paul campaign’s scheme in 2012 to buy the endorsement of Kent Sorenson, who was then an influential Republican state senator in Iowa. [Mother Jones]

Some executives dream of retiring to a big boat on a big body of water, and that is just what James Street did. Since retiring as Eastern Kentucky University’s vice president for administration in July 2013, Street and his wife, Stacey, have spent a lot of time on their 34-foot Beneteau 331 sailboat on Kentucky Lake and their Catalina 22 on Cave Run. [H-L]

People who live in low-income urban areas tend not to have access to the green spaces that are more easily found in rural and suburban communities. But the lack of connection with nature in concrete jungles is changing, according to NPR’s Paige Pfleger. Across the country, various eco-non-profits are populating community centers and high schools with communal gardens. [HuffPo]

WATB Kim Davis Gets Even More Whiny

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis, who is being sued for refusing to issue marriage licenses because of her religious opposition to same-sex marriage, is now suing Gov. Steve Beshear for infringing on her religious freedom. [H-L]

The Department of Veterans Affairs announced plans on Monday to begin revising how it grants disability benefits for veterans who lived at Camp Lejeune, a Marine Corps base in North Carolina, during the 30-plus years that toxic chemicals tainted the base’s drinking water. [HuffPo]

Myliah Rose Davis slept on a blanket in her mother’s lap, her tiny hands moving every now and then, as if orchestrating a dream. [C-J/AKN]

Thomas Jefferson’s vision of democracy has endured in one of the defining documents of U.S. history. But the 607 slaves who toiled in his Monticello estate have left few traces to remember them by. [NPR]

A Blue Grass Chemical Activity mobile laboratory detected a low-level mustard vapor reading during weekly routine analysis of the chemical weapons stockpile at the Blue Grass Army Depot. [Richmond Register]

A Wisconsin Supreme Court ruling on Gov. Scott Walker’s campaign practices clears the way for state candidates to work more closely with legally independent political groups and their enormous war chests. The big unanswered question is how ripples from the case might spread beyond the state’s borders. [ProPublica]

It wouldn’t be a genuine Fancy Farm Picnic without colorful characters and barbs delivered by various politicos, and this year was no different. [Ronnie Ellis]

The Securities and Exchange Commission on Wednesday made it official: Public companies will soon have to say exactly how their chief executives’ payday compares with a typical employee’s. [WaPo]

Two county jail projects underway in Kentucky – Rowan and Oldham – are near mirror images in terms of proposed size, budget, and where both counties currently stand in constructing their facilities. [The Morehead News]

An outside group that sought to mar Senator Rand Paul’s presidential campaign kickoff with a television advertisement linking him to President Obama’s Iran policy is going on the air with a new spot about the candidate and the recent nuclear deal. [NY Times]

Chad Lewis works on his family’s farm in the Horse Cave area – where they raise pasture-fed cattle, pigs and chickens – and also as a barista at Mojaboax Coffee Co. on West Main Street in Glasgow. When Lewis, 20, has time between those responsibilities, he works as an artist. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Sunday marks the one-year anniversary of Michael Brown’s death at Officer Darren Wilson’s hands in Ferguson — the spark that ignited a national movement of protest against police violence and racial inequality. One year later, that movement is nowhere near finished. The cameras may have left, but dynamic grassroots programs are changing Ferguson while no one is watching. [ThinkProgress]

Ninety days ago, city officials gave developer Dudley Webb 90 days to try to make a deal with an unidentified investor to rescue his long-stalled CentrePointe project. [H-L]

Real estate mogul Donald Trump supports shutting down the government as a way to defund Planned Parenthood, potentially setting the bar for the rest of his fellow GOP presidential candidates currently trailing him in the polls by a large margin. [HuffPo]

Greg Fischer: Still Not Remotely Transparent

A religious group is threatening to sue the state of Kentucky over a year-old policy that prohibits anti-gay comments to youths at the state’s juvenile detention centers. [H-L]

Disastrous sea level rise is an issue for today’s public. [HuffPo]

Of course Greg Fischer’s stunt broke state law. Did anyone ever expect this man to truly be transparent? To truly be up-front? Please. Not even the Brown Family is in his corner. First-rate shyster that the Democrats are afraid to oust. The news director of WAVE-3 is accusing Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer of violating Kentucky’s open meetings law after banning photographs and video footage during a press briefing to review new designs for the downtown Omni Hotel project. [C-J/AKN]

The Senate on Sunday rejected a GOP-led amendment to repeal ObamaCare that fell several votes short of a 60-vote threshold to advance. [The Hill]

Pension spikes have become the city’s newest finance problem, and the board of commissioners is wondering how to handle this unbudgeted expense. [Ashland Independent]

The Associated Press is making thousands of hours of archival news footage available on YouTube. [NPR]

One of the defining characteristics of democracy in the 21st century is that nearly every member of the public can watch the government in action. Through live broadcasts and daily TV news reports, citizens can see and hear the deliberations and decisions that affect their daily lives. [WAVE3]

The U.S. government is violating a 1997 settlement by detaining unauthorized immigrant children, and an order may be forthcoming to require the release of the minors and parents detained with them, a judge in California has ruled. [Reuters]

A death investigation is underway in Bell County after a man was bitten by a snake Sunday during a church service. [WKYT]

Studies have shown time and again that humans are pretty effective at driving other animals to extinction — but a new study published in Science this week suggests that when it comes to some species, that blame might have been misplaced. [ThinkProgress]

Climate change will begin to have a demonstrative effect on Kentucky’s economy within five years. [WFPL]

New York state recently announced an increase in the minimum wage for fast food workers, to $15 an hour. It’s the fruit of a three-year labor campaign. But there’s another group of workers out there that hasn’t had a real wage increase in decades. [NPR]

Wealthy libertarians are giving big to Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul. Three super PACs supporting the Kentucky senator say they raised a combined $6 million through June 30. [H-L]

President Barack Obama freed dozen of nonviolent offenders earlier this month to draw attention to the harsh and often unfair sentences given under mandatory minimum sentencing rules for drug offenders. [HuffPo]

A Look At Things In Casey County

Wondering what’s gone wrong with Casey Davis?

Just take a look at the front page of his hometown newspaper:


THE CASEY COUNTY NEWS

He’s a hero of the bible for being terrified of the gays.

The racist confederate flag-emblazoned General Lee received prominent positioning above the headline.

Some guy tried to run down a sheriff but no one jumped his car or emptied two clips on him. He received a bond. Spoiler alert: the guy was white.

Way to go, Liberty, Kentucky! You’re backward as all hell and stuck in 1956.

Remember Iraq? Still A Horrible Mess

About 550 engineers in the state Transportation Cabinet got raises averaging 20 percent last month in hopes of curbing high turnover and costly contracts for private engineers. [H-L]

Iraqi Shi’ite fighters and army troops made gains north of Falluja on Sunday but their efforts to seal off Islamic State militants in the city met heavy resistance, including suicide bomb attacks, army sources and militia fighters said. [HuffPo]

Aetna’s acquisition of Humana appears to be part of a merger frenzy as the five biggest U.S. health insurers look to get bigger. But any acquisition or merger of this proportion must overcome potential hurdles. [C-J/AKN]

Republican 2016 presidential hopefuls Scott Walker and Rick Santorum are suggesting a potentially controversial way to boost Americans’ job prospects: admit fewer legal immigrants into the United States. [Reuters]

The News-Enterprise has finally stopped discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation. [News-Enterprise]

When the official watchdog overseeing U.S. spending on Afghanistan asked the U.S. Agency for International Development recently for details about the 641 health clinics it funds there, the agency readily provided a list of geospatial coordinates for them. But when the office of the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) went looking for the $210 million worth of clinics, the majority of them weren’t there. [The Intercept]

Mitch McConnell didn’t offer a Commerce Lexington lunch crowd many surprises or much real news, but he offered a couple of insights into his own political thinking Thursday. [Ronnie Ellis]

New data on payments from drug and device companies to doctors show that many doctors received payments on 100 or more days last year. Some received payments on more days than they didn’t. [ProPublica]

Par for the course in the Beshear Administration but Democrats don’t want to talk about that. The hiring of a Kentucky cabinet official’s husband has been questioned by critics who say the hiring represents a conflict of interest and a misuse of funds that could be better spent on helping overworked and underpaid social workers. [WKYT]

Mitch McConnell is still an obstructionist but that’s something Republicans don’t want to talk about. [Politico]

Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul has fashioned himself as one of the fledgling legal marijuana industry’s greatest advocates on Capitol Hill. That’s why he’s in a prime position to ask cannabis business leaders for campaign donations. Last week, he did just that. [WFPL]

Bipartisan legislation that would make changes to No Child Left Behind will be up for debate in Congress this week. [ThinkProgress]

Let the racist bigots fly their flags. Makes it easier to identify people to cut out of your life. [H-L]

Hillary Clinton had an incredible response for a gay child who expressed fears about what his future might hold. [HuffPo]

Go Read This From The C-J Right Now

Click this link to go to the Courier-Journal right now.

Read that editorial.

Knowing that our own words are often misinterpreted or misunderstood, we read and re-read his comments. We tried walking a mile in the shoes of an obviously frustrated FOP president. But those shoes kept getting mired in one of the key byproducts of the backside at Churchill Downs.

MAGICAL!

Wow.

The editorial crew essentially said “horse shit” and it’s stirring an urge to re-subscribe.

UPDATE

Also go read this from Phillip Bailey.