McConnell Is Now Apparently Complicit

Mitch McConnell is now complicit in the Trump-Russia shenanigans. He yesterday rejected calls for a special prosector on the floor of the U.S. Senate. [CNN]

A mural at a Western Kentucky elementary school depicting two black children tending a garden while a tall white man plays a violin has upset some residents. [H-L]

Former President Barack Obama warned Donald Trump about hiring retired Army Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn during a meeting in November 2016, NBC and CNN reported Monday. [HuffPo]

A Louisville lawyer who heads the local chapter of the Federalist Society – a conservative legal group that has tried to move the national debate on gun rights and campaign finance to the right – will be nominated by Donald Trump to serve on the U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals. [C-J/AKN]

One of the most dangerous companies in the U.S. took advantage of immigrant workers. Then, when they got hurt or fought back, it used America’s laws against them. [ProPublica]

Federal lawmakers are moving ahead with a new approach to health care that includes changing the way insurers cover pre-existing health conditions. But the American Health Care Act that House Republicans voted to advance last week could bring back a program with which some Kentuckians may be familiar: high-risk pool health insurance. Until 2013, these high-risk pools operated in Kentucky and other states. And if the provisions of the final bill allow states to do away with coverage for pre-existing health conditions — which were made possible under President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act — they could be coming back. [WFPL]

From the moment the Republican-controlled House of Representatives approved a plan to overhaul the health care system, an onslaught of opposition to the bill has been focused on a single, compact term: pre-existing conditions. [NY Times]

“These are our neighbors needing help and our community partners who are in the trenches every day trying to meet the needs of kids and families,” said Kim Henderson, Gateway regional director. Henderson is one of fewer than 10 staff at Mountain Haven Emergency Shelter, which held its grand opening ribbon cutting ceremony on Friday. [The Morehead News]

When the state of Arkansas announced plans to carry out eight executions in an 11-day period in April, it drew intense international scrutiny that flared until well after the final lethal injection in the series at the end of the month. In part, this attention was fueled by the explanation, offered by state officials, that the timetable was necessary because the supply of one of the state’s lethal drugs was about to expire and authorities had to carry out death penalties for eight men convicted of murder before then. [WaPo]

The family court judge for Barren and Metcalfe counties who objects to presiding over adoption cases involving homosexual adoptive parents now concedes his general order recusing himself from all such cases is prohibited by the Kentucky Supreme Court. [Ronnie Ellis]

The Trump administration is so far ignoring pleas from both on and off Capitol Hill to denounce the suspected Russian-backed digital assault that appeared aimed to tilt Sunday’s French presidential election toward nationalist candidate Marine Le Pen. [Politico]

Wondering how to stick it to an already impoverished community of people? Here you go. This fiscal year, the Madison Fiscal Court is contributing $1.75 million in supplemental funds to operate the chronically overcrowded county detention center. Judge/Executive Reagan Taylor believes the county could recover nearly $790,000 of that if it charged inmates a daily $10 fee, in addition to the $20 booking fee it already charges. [Richmond Register]

Barely two days into crafting a new bill to roll back Obamacare, U.S. Senate Republicans were already on the defensive on Tuesday over the absence of any women in their core working group. [Reuters]

The attempted burglary of a statistics exam Tuesday by two University of Kentucky students wasn’t the first time someone had the idea. A similar case 30 years ago turned into one of the biggest cheating cases in UK history. [H-L]

Author Stephen King has been delivering chills for more than four decades with horror masterpieces such as “It,” “The Shining” and “’Salem’s Lot.” But King now believes there’s something more terrifying than anything he’s ever cooked up, and it’s living in the White House. [HuffPo]

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Bevin’s Housing Mess Isn’t Going Away

Not since Watergate. How else can one start an article about President Donald Trump summarily firing FBI chief James Comey? [Mother Jones]

A company that supplies natural gas to homes in Floyd County overcharged customers and must cut its price and make refunds, the Kentucky Public Service Commission said in an order issued Thursday. [H-L]

Los Angeles City Council just joined a growing number of American cities to pass a resolution pressing for an investigation into potentially impeachable offenses by Donald Trump. [HuffPo]

State government began working on security improvements to the Anchorage mansion where Gov. Matt Bevin’s family is now living in late October, months before the home was purchased. [C-J/AKN]

The U.S. Defense Department is finalizing a lease on a privately owned apartment in New York’s Trump Tower for the White House Military Office to use for supporting Donald Trump without providing any benefit to Trump or his organization, according to a Pentagon letter seen by Reuters. [Reuters]

Kentucky’s youth usually get a bad reputation, but a new report indicates that most students aren’t focused on shirking the rules of the administration. [Richmond Register]

When teaching hospitals put pharmaceutical sales representatives on a shorter leash, their doctors tended to order fewer promoted brand-name drugs and used more generic versions instead, a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows. [ProPublica]

If somebody named Jim Tom in Eastern Kentucky is trying to remove members of a Planning Commission, you know something shady as hell is about to go down. Also, it’s Morehead, home of Kim Davis. While it’s a progressive little town? It’s still got quite a few good old boy holdouts. The community’s joint planning commission’s membership may soon be cut in half, according to Mayor Jim Tom Trent. [The Morehead News]

Scott Pruitt, the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, has removed himself from some of the most contentious cases facing it, including challenges to the Obama administration’s Clean Power Plan and a controversial rule related to the Clean Water Act. [NY Times]

The board of directors for the Barren County ambulance service taxing district met Charlie O’Neal, the new director of the Barren-Metcalfe County Emergency Medical Services, during their regular meeting Wednesday at the Barren County Government Center. [Glasgow Daily Times]

What started as a joke has turned into hundreds of applications to mail human ash to Republicans who voted to roll back Obamacare. [WaPo]

Yes, crime spikes in Louisville during the Kentucky Oaks and Kentucky Derby. Also, if you’re gonna write about law enforcement at Churchill Downs? Maybe put in the effort to get data and comments from the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office. JCSO had so many officers at Churchill Downs that individual horses had individual deputies assigned to them. Seems like that would be a no-brainer. [WFPL]

Eric Trump allegedly revealed in a 2014 interview that Russia funded the family’s golf resorts “all the time”. The President also reportedly told the same journalist that the family had “access to $100 million” for their newest course in North Carolina. [Independent]

A woman accused of threatening a Fayette County judge (Kathy Stein) and harassing an attorney appeared in court Friday. [H-L]

Rabbi Shmuley Boteach’s visit to the White House on Tuesday caused quite a stir, particularly after the former Republican congressional candidate and conservative columnist tweeted a photo revealing chief strategist Steve Bannon’s “to do” list. [HuffPo]

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Bigots Of A Feather Flock Together…

The New Na… er… Republican Party of Kentucky is making them dumber and more corrupt than the Kentucky Democratic Party ever did. State Rep. C. Wesley Morgan, R-Richmond, has been charged with breaking one of the half-dozen liquor laws he attempted to change during the 2017 General Assembly. [John Cheves]

This is called giving religious nutjobs the freedom to pervert, you know, religion. With politics. It’s beyond disgusting and prime for campaign finance corruption. [HuffPo]

Of course Matt Bevin appointed a Southern Baptist anti-gay bigot to a job making $240,000. Of course he put him in charge of reforming the adoption system. Matt Bevin has appointed an executive with Louisville’s Southern Baptist Theological Seminary as his “adoption czar,” awarding him a $240,000-a-year contract to lead reforms of Kentucky’s child adoption and foster care system. [C-J/AKN]

Angry U.S. lawmakers threatened United Airlines and other carriers on Tuesday with legislation to force improvements as they expressed disgust after a passenger was hauled down the aisle of an overbooked flight last month. [Reuters]

More than 13,000 Madison County residents are food insecure. While nearly 16 percent of Kentuckians are food insecure, the numbers are improving according to a new report by Feeding America. [Richmond Register]

Donald Trump’s comments about the Civil War in a recent interview, in which he diminished the impact of slavery ahead of the war and praised former President Andrew Jackson, echo sentiments of white nationalist media and signify yet another instance of intermingling between Trump and his nativist fans. [Media Matters]

Greenup County Sheriff Keith Cooper’s office was flagged for thousands of dollars in “disallowed disbursements” from its drug enforcement account in a second consecutive audit released Tuesday. [Ashland Independent]

Mark Green’s nomination for Army secretary is going downhill fast, with comments from his past fomenting opposition to him. Green has drawn fire for his remarks on LGBT people, Islam, Hispanics, the Second Amendment and creationism. More than a half-dozen advocacy groups have decried his nomination, and even transgender celebrity Caitlyn Jenner has criticized him. [The Hill]

The state’s top budget official is predicting state revenues will fall $113.2 million short of budget predictions for the year which ends June 30. [Ronnie Ellis]

FBI Director James Comey said on Wednesday it made him “mildly nauseous” to think his announcement of the reopening of an investigation into Hillary Clinton’s emails affected the 2016 presidential election, but he had no regrets and would make the same decision again. [Reuters]

The American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky “is exploring all options” to address Judge Mitchell Nance’s order recusing himself from hearing adoption cases involving gay parents. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Of course the Trump Disaster installed an anti-immigration group leader as an ombudsman at the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. [ProPublica]

A Kentucky personal injury lawyer accused of stealing more than $100,000 from clients has pleaded not guilty. [H-L]

Mike Pence declared victory for the anti-abortion movement Wednesday night, boasting that Donald Trump has “literally filled” his administration with politicians who oppose reproductive rights. [HuffPo]

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Bevin In Charge = $113 Million Shortfall

A federal appeals court has reinstated a claim for damages against Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis for refusing to grant marriage licenses to same-sex couples during the summer of 2015. [John Cheves]

In late August 2014, Tom Frieden, then director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, traveled to West Africa to assess the raging Ebola crisis. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin is so terrible at leadership that Kentucky’s going under again. Kentucky’s budget director is predicting the state will suffer a $113 million revenue shortfall when the state’s fiscal year ends June 30. [C-J/AKN]

The burden of substance abuse disorders can fall heavily on the families and friends of those who battle addictions. But society also pays a great deal through increased crime. Treatment programs can reduce those costs. [NY Times]

Surprise! The fat, old, white racists of the Bowling Green Daily News are still panicking over President Barack Obama and are trying to suggest he’s still gonna take yer guns. It’s this special brand of stupid that keeps Kentucky in the dark ages. [BGDN]

Trump on Tuesday called for a “good shutdown” in September to fix the “mess” in government. [The Hill]

Mary Beth Burkes lives in Buchanan County, Va., a depressed coal-mining region where 1 in 4 families lives in poverty and where her autistic son gets extra help in the after-school program at his school. [WFPL]

A pro-Donald Trump biker gang’s physical handling of protesters at a weekend rally could add to the president’s legal woes, with one attendee considering a fresh lawsuit as protesters already suing over violence at rallies last year plan to cite the recent events as proof of an ongoing pattern. A federal judge late last month ruled that Trump’s calls of “get ’em out of here!” may have constituted “incitement to riot” at a March 2016 rally in Louisville, Kentucky, at which three protesters allege in a lawsuit they were assaulted by Trump supporters. [Politico]

The sequel to a successful spy film will focus heavily on bourbon distilling, and Louisville-based Brown-Forman Corp. is taking advantage of the exposure. [Business First]

A Texas police department has changed a key detail in the shooting of an unarmed black teenager, amid mounting calls for the officer to be arrested. [BBC]

The University of Kentucky announced on Monday afternoon that Commonwealth Stadium will become Kroger Field. [WKYT]

African-Americans are generally living longer than in 2000, but health disparities mean they are still more likely to die at a younger age on average than whites, a federal study showed on Tuesday. [Reuters]

A federal judge has ruled that Lexington cannot enforce a recently passed ordinance that restricts where advertising and other unsolicited printed materials can be delivered. [H-L]

Sebastian Gorka, a deputy assistant to President Donald Trump who generated controversy for his alleged ties to a Nazi-aligned group, is expected to accept a new role soon outside of the White House, according to multiple reports. [HuffPo]

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Kentucky Makes Embarrassing National News For Probably The Millionth Time

On May 7, Leandro Braga and Deanna Chesser will graduate from Bluegrass Community and Technical College with associate degrees, big awards and scholarships to help them get four-year degrees at the University of Kentucky. [Linda Blackford]

U.S. congressional negotiators have hammered out a bipartisan agreement on a spending package to keep the federal government funded through the end of the current fiscal year on Sept. 30, a senior congressional aide said on Sunday. Aww, no wall for the racists. [HuffPo]

Nearly two years after a fire heavily damaged at least three of its buildings, city officials believe Whiskey Row may be on the cusp of becoming one of the “most engaging blocks in downtown Louisville.” [C-J/AKN]

Donald Trump still doesn’t understand why the Civil War occurred or who Andrew Jackson was. [TPM]

Attorney General Andy Beshear’s office has appealed a judge’s ruling that wiped decades-old convictions from a Kentuckian’s criminal record, arguing they aren’t eligible under the state’s new felony expungement law. [WFPL]

Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives said on Tuesday they were closer to agreeing on a reworked bill to overhaul the nation’s healthcare system but still lacked the votes to pass it, as President Donald Trump pressed lawmakers for a vote. [Reuters]

The weather has turned sunny, and warm, so now is the time for that afternoon drive along the beautiful countryside of Madison County and surrounding areas. It’s amazing what one can find on that drive. [Richmond Register]

Because Kentucky’s New Republican Party is filled with mouth-breathing (Hey, Mac!) bigots, the Commonwealth could become the only state with no abortion clinic. [NY Times]

A permanent health-care fix for 22,000 retired coal miners has been agreed to by a bipartisan congressional budget committee, ending months of anxiety for the miners and their families. [Ashland Independent]

The charter flight left on a Wednesday with eight Iraqis on board. By the following evening, the large Iraqi immigrant community in this Detroit suburb was roiled with rumors about why, with news of the departure morphing as phone calls spun into horror. Some people were talking again about whether they should go into hiding. [WaPo]

Dennis Curry and his future husband learned quickly that adopting kids wasn’t easy. [Glasgow Daily Times]

New data suggests incidents of anti-Semitic hatred have spiked compared to this time last year, an ominous shift that advocates say signals a multi-year increase of vitriol directed at American Jews. [ThinkProgress]

The chief of Transylvania University’s public safety department and the president of the university worked together to take down a knife-wielding man who attacked students in a campus coffee shop Friday morning. [H-L]

Donald Trump this weekend called North Korean leader Kim Jong Un a “smart cookie” in his latest praise of a controversial dictator. Last week he didn’t even know his name. [HuffPo]

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Naz… Republicans Slow To Notice Alison Grimes Slapped Them Nearly Two Weeks Ago

Lexington apparently was a stopover point for a plane with 40 pounds of meth and 80 bricks of cocaine that federal and state officials tracked Friday from California, according to federal court documents. Florida might have been the ultimate destination. [H-L]

Donald Trump’s former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, failed to disclose payments from Russia when applying for security clearance in 2016, lawmakers told reporters Tuesday. [HuffPo]

Google Fiber is a go in Louisville. But details on when the ultrafast network will be constructed and in what areas it will be first available will have to come later, Google Fiber said. [C-J/AKN]

U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has been reworking student lending since her appointment in February, raising concerns among Democrats that she will undo former President Barack Obama’s overhaul of college financial aid. [Retuers]

Bowling Green’s trio of automotive tracks brings thousands of cars and automobile enthusiasts who fill hotels, dine out and shop, representing a large segment of local specialty tourism. [BGDN]

Earlier this year, ProPublica and a coalition of newsrooms set out to chronicle and report on hate crimes in the United States. [ProPublica]

Republican U.S. Congressman Andy Barr faced 600 or so mostly angry constituents here Monday night at a town hall meeting dominated by questions about the Affordable Care Act and Republicans’ plan to replace it with their own plan. [Ronnie Ellis]

The Turkish man who gave Mike Flynn a $600,000 lobbying deal just before Donald Trump picked him to be national security adviser has business ties to Russia, including a 2009 aviation financing deal negotiated with Vladimir Putin, according to court records. [Politico]

More than 30 entities sent representatives to Monday’s pre-proposal meeting for a county “healing center” to combat drug addiction. The turnout “totally exceeded expectations,” Madison Judge/Executive Reagan Taylor said. [Richmond Register]

Behind the Trump administration’s sudden urgency in dealing with the North Korean nuclear crisis lies a stark calculus: a growing body of expert studies and classified intelligence reports that conclude the country is capable of producing a nuclear bomb every six or seven weeks. [NY Times]

Kentucky Christian University continues to pursue a merger with Cincinnati Christian University although the original plan to cement a management consultancy agreement earlier this year and finalize the pact sometime in the fall was abandoned in the face of financial obstacles, according to KCU President Jeffrey Metcalf. [Ashland Independent]

The White House setting perplexed lawmakers who have grown accustomed to such briefings taking place in a secure location on Capitol Hill, where there is more room to handle such a large group. [WaPo]

Wondering how to tell if Alison Grimes is getting under the skin of deluded homophobes like Scott Jennings and Jeff Hoover? Well… they noticed – nearly two weeks after it was published – that Grimes chapped their asses over right-to-work and being generally full of shit. They started melting down on Twitter and attempting to act as if a handful of jobs in East Bugtussle is evidence that right-to-work is magical. Spoiler alert: Their Trump chickens are slowly coming home to roost. But here’s that Grimes op-ed. [H-L]

Arkansas on Monday night carried out the first double execution in the U.S. since 2000 despite concerns that the first of the two was “inhumane.” [HuffPo]

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Bevin’s Medicaid Mess Goes National

Will Hazard become the nation’s hub for drone research and development? No. It won’t. There. Saved you a click and time reading. [H-L]

Seven baffling moments from Donald Trump’s Associated Press interview. He’s dumber than you could have ever imagined. [HuffPo]

Just in case anyone needed another reason to avoid the Tim Faulkner Gallery, here’s him equating actual Nazis with people fighting racism. And the newspaper just casually hinting at it. [C-J/AKN]

Grifters are gonna grift. A U.S. State Department website published an article this month about President Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, stoking criticism from prominent ethics experts. [Reuters]

A Georgia congressman who joined Martin Luther King Jr. in the historic Selma march will speak at Berea College’s commencement ceremony on Sunday, May 7. Rep. John Lewis helped organize the march in Selma, Alabama, in 1965 that demanded an end to voter registration discrimination. [Richmond Register]

A State Department website has removed a blog post about President Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort following criticism over ethical concerns. [The Hill]

Suggestions for changes to the Glasgow-Barren County Industrial Development Economic Authority’s inter-local agreement were discussed in detail Friday morning, after which IDEA’s board of directors voted to allow chairman Owen Lambert to compile the suggestions into a list and present it to the board’s attorney for inclusion in a new document to be reviewed by the board and eventually adopted. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Oh, look, the big city folks finally realized what Matt Bevin and his fellow New Republicans are trying to do with Medicaid in Kentucky. [ThinkProgress]

Lawmakers from coal-mining states are pushing to extend health benefits for more than 22,000 retired miners and widows whose medical coverage is set to expire at the end of April. [WFPL]

Former acting attorney general Sally Yates, fired from Donald Trump’s Justice Department in January, and former director of national intelligence James Clapper are set to testify on Russian meddling in the 2016 election at a May 8 hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee. [Politico]

For a boulder that has tried its best to mind its own business, the Indian Head Rock can’t seem to keep out of the limelight. [Ashland Independent]

Mike McCabe’s neighbors in rural Gillespie, Ill., consider him lucky. After being out of work for a year, he landed a job in January making cardboard boxes at a nearby Georgia-Pacific plant for $19.60 an hour. [NY Times]

Three men conspired to bring 80 pounds of cocaine and 40 pounds of methamphetamine by plane from California to Blue Grass Airport, a criminal complaint filed in federal court says. [H-L]

Harassment, vandalism and other hostile acts against Jewish people and sites in the U.S. increased by 34 percent last year and are up 86 percent through the first three months of 2017, according to data released on Monday. [HuffPo]

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