Rand’s Crew To Abandon Matt Bevin?

Can you believe Jack Conway thought it was appropriate to fight this nonsense? [H-L]

Education Secretary Arne Duncan is stepping down in December after 7 years in the Obama administration. [HuffPo]

Privately, Rand Paul’s people tell a far less kind story about Matt Bevin. Calling it a “minor thing,” U.S. Sen. Rand Paul said on Saturday it doesn’t matter that Matt Bevin doesn’t support his presidential campaign. [C-J/AKN]

Polls released Sunday morning show real estate mogul Donald Trump holding his leads in the early voting states of Iowa and New Hampshire, although those leads are smaller than one more ago. [The Hill]

Maybe David Byerman, the new director of the Legislative Research Commission, is a fan of singer-songwriter Sam Cooke. On his first day on the job, Byerman, 44, the former secretary of the Nevada state senate, promised his new employees that change is gonna come. [Ronnie Ellis]

One Vatican official said there was “a sense of regret” that the pope had ever seen Kim Davis, a Kentucky county clerk who went to jail in September for refusing to honor a U.S. Supreme Court ruling and issue same-sex marriage licenses. [Reuters]

The Russell City Council will host a special meeting Monday morning to take a final vote on a slight increase in property taxes. [Ashland Independent]

Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul said Saturday that his home state of Kentucky needs a governor willing to stand up to the federal government he aspires to lead from the White House. [ABC News]

Isn’t it fun watching the cowardly shitbirds at the Bowling Green Daily Toilet Paper lose their marbles over Jack Conway not hating the gays? If that’s the worst they can come up with after all the crap Matt Bevin has pulled, he’s a damn saint. And you know we think Jack Conway’s the slimiest cat turd in the sandbox. [Bowling Green Daily Toilet Paper]

On any given day, in any police department in the nation, 15 percent of officers will do the right thing no matter what is happening. [Vox]

What do you expect from a drunken party school? Now your tax dollars will be used to attack and belittle the person seeking relief. Western Kentucky University is being sued after a hazing scandal that shut down the school’s swim team. [WAVE3]

There was plenty in the complex deal to benefit bankers, lawyers, executives and hedge fund managers. Patriot Coal Corp. was bankrupt, but its mines would be auctioned to pay off mounting debts while financial engineering would generate enough cash to cover the cost of the proceedings. [ProPublica]

The archbishop, who was exiled to the United States in 2011 after losing a high-altitude Vatican power struggle that became public in an infamous leaks scandal, now finds himself at the center of another papal controversy. This time, the Vatican is suggesting that Viganò is responsible for giving papal face time to Kim Davis, the Kentucky clerk whose refusal to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples has made her a heroine to social conservatives. [H-L]

A Fox News host has come under fire this week for suggesting that Ahmed Mohamed, the 14-year-old Texas high schooler who was arrested last month for bringing a clock he built to school, was “not as innocent as he seems” because he was once allegedly caught “blowing soap bubbles” in school. [HuffPo]

Latest KY Homeland Security Cash Grab

Earlier this week Steve Beshear’s office announced that $2.7 million in State Homeland Security grants were doled out for 117 projects around the Commonwealth. They’re to be used for “essential” communication, physical security, cyber security and first responder equipment. Which means small law enforcement agencies will get a mountain of cash to buy military-grade toys. Tanks, humvees, noise canons, drones, remote-controlled robots and such.

  • $1.17 million (44% of funds) approved for first responder equipment
  • $1.25 million (46% of funds) approved for communications equipment
  • Just $278,000 (10% of funds) approved for physical and cyber security initiatives, a laughable drop in the bucket

To give you an idea of just how unseriously cyber security is taken in Kentucky, despite so many claims to the contrary, here’s a look at those funds:

  • City of Winchester — Clark County — $25,000
  • Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government — Fayette County — $7,000
  • Franklin County Fiscal Court — Franklin County — $6,000
  • Kentucky State University — Franklin County — $20,000

Highlights of the largest grant amounts:

  • Cambell(sic) County Fiscal Court — Campbell County — Infrastructure Equipment — $90,800
  • Jefferson-Louisville Metro — Jefferson County — Infrastructure Equipment — $112,200
  • Lewis County Fiscal Court — Lewis County — Infrastructure Equipment — $48,000
  • City of Maysville — Mason County — Radio — $66,00
  • City of Olive Hill — Carter County — Physical Security Enhancement — $25,000
  • Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government — Fayette County — Physical Security Enhancement — $34,000
  • City of Bowling Green — Warren County – Physical Security Enhancement — $26,000
  • Bluegrass Area Development District — Harrison County — Power equipment — $38,000
  • City of Morganfield — Union County — CBRNE (Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosive) — $20,000
  • Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government — Fayette County — Explosive Device Mitigation/Remediation — $100,000
  • City of Paris — Bourbon County — PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) — $50,000
  • City of Lebanon Junction — Bullitt County — PPE — $23,000
  • Jefferson-Louisville Metro — Jefferson County — PPE — $50,000
  • Trigg County Fiscal Court — Trigg County — Search and Rescue — $73,000
  • Barren County Fiscal Court — Barren County — Search and Rescue — $50,000

Click here (Warning: PDF Link) to review the entire list of awards and here (Warning: PDF Link) to review the list of equipment that may be purchased, according to DHS.

KSBA-Thayer Slap Fight Heating Up

The debate over when to begin the school year in Kentucky is revving up. The Kentucky School Boards Association board of directors is opposing a proposal by two lawmakers — Senate Majority Leader Damon Thayer, R-Georgetown, and state Sen. Chris Girdler, R-Somerset — that would prevent schools from starting classes each year earlier than the Monday closest to Aug. 26. [H-L]

Hillary Clinton on Tuesday announced she wants to eliminate the “Cadillac tax,” a key feature of the Affordable Care Act that economists love and pretty much everybody else says they hate. [HuffPo]

Coal-fired power plants will need to make sure they don’t exceed new limits on toxic effluent into waterways like the Ohio River or others across Kentucky and Indiana. [C-J/AKN]

The Irish were slaves too; slaves had it better than Northern factory workers; black people fought for the Confederacy; and other lies, half-truths, and irrelevancies. [Slate]

Hundreds of thousands of people who enrolled in health insurance coverage through the federal marketplace established by the Affordable Care Act lost coverage this year because of problems with their immigration and citizenship status. But for immigrants who have settled in Kentucky, there has been no similar enrollment problem or wave of cancellations, state officials say. [WFPL]

The Obama administration is poised this week to issue a final rule on ozone levels that business groups contend would be the single most expensive regulation ever imposed by the U.S. government. [The Hill]

Sheriff Bobby Jack Woods said, after nearly a year into his first term, his greatest accomplishment so far is fostering inter-department law enforcement cooperation with Boyd County agencies. [Ashland Independent]

U.S. airport security agents discovered a record 67 firearms in luggage passengers intended to carry on to airplanes during one week in September, according to the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). [Reuters]

Here comes more mainstream tripe ignoring the very real mental health issues at play. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The U.S. government has labeled as specially designated terrorists two French fugitives who during the past 15 years have risen from street crime to alleged front-line roles in the Charlie Hebdo attacks and terrorist violence in Tunisia and Syria. [ProPublica]

Preliminary reports show that student enrollment is down slightly for the fall semester at Morehead State University. [The Morehead News]

The U.S. veteran obesity rate has reached 80 percent, surpassing that of the general population. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) says that more than 165,000 veterans who use its health care services have a body mass index higher than 40, a threshold that interferes with basic physical functions and leads to chronic illness. [ThinkProgress]

Republican Presidential candidate Rand Paul will campaign with Kentucky’s Republican nominee for governor in Frankfort on Saturday. [H-L]

The federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said Tuesday it is weighing new rules governing the $1.3 trillion student loan market after releasing a stinging report documenting “widespread failures” in an industry largely overseen by the Obama administration. [HuffPo]

Your Morning Dept Of Awful Things

Jack Conway stuck to the script and Matt Bevin continued his seemingly spontaneous campaign during an hour-long debate before the rabid fans of Big Blue Nation on the state’s most popular sports talk radio show. [H-L]

U.S. airstrikes hit Taliban positions overnight around a key northern city seized by insurgents this week as Afghan troops massed on the ground Wednesday ahead of what is likely to be a protracted battle to retake Kunduz. [HuffPo]

It wasn’t a miscommunication until they were called on the carpet. People trying to communicate with the Kentucky Division of Water on new water quality standards using email were told this week to buy a stamp and send their comments via snail mail. [C-J/AKN]

A bipartisan group of senators on the Judiciary Committee is preparing to unveil a criminal justice overhaul proposal as early as Thursday. [NPR]

Jack Conway, Kentucky’s Democratic Attorney General who is running for governor, and Greg Stumbo, Kentucky’s Speaker of the House, are in the same party and are on the same side when it comes to coal, which they both defend. But they don’t always agree. [Ronnie Ellis]

Pope Francis met privately in Washington last week with Kim Davis, the county clerk in Kentucky who defied a court order to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, a Vatican spokesman confirmed on Wendesday. [NY Times]

Last week, I was proud to join with the father of Kentucky State Police Trooper Joseph Cameron Ponder and other legislators as we stood together to advocate for additional safety measures for law enforcement. [Greg Stumbo]

LaserLock Technologies, a firm that sells anti-counterfeiting products, won a powerful congressional ally on Capitol Hill after recruiting a Kentucky congressman’s wife. Representative Ed Whitfield, a senior Republican lawmaker from western Kentucky, personally submitted company documents on behalf of LaserLock to the congressional record in support of legislation crucial to the firm’s business. [Lee Fang]

The former chairman of the Republican National Committee is upset he was quoted in a television ad for Kentucky gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway. Duncan – who is from Inez, Ky., and now heads the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity – told WYMT his comments were taken out of context. “The comments that I made were as the chief executive officer of the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity. It had nothing to do with the Republican National Committee,” Duncan said Tuesday night in a phone interview. [WYMT]

U.S. bombs somehow keep falling in the places where President Barack Obama “ended two wars.” [The Intercept]

Laurel County is back to being the worst place on earth. A woman has been arrested after sheriff’s deputies say they found a man’s body inside a freezer at her Laurel County home. [WKYT]

It could have been Hillary Clinton’s tweet that did it. Just after the US government had given the go-ahead for Shell to restart its exploration in Alaska, the Democratic presidential candidate took to the social media site. [BBC]

Every community in Kentucky should be serving alcohol and selling it by the package because it’s not the dark ages. Berea voters on Tuesday approved the sale of alcohol by the drink in certain restaurants. [H-L]

After enduring a marathon House hearing on Tuesday during which GOP representatives frequently interrupted her, Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards accused them of political grandstanding and using the hearing to demonstrate how “they are obsessed with ending access to reproductive health care for women in America.” [HuffPo]

Monday’s Debate Was Totally Terrifying

Remember all that crap in 2011? We hear Allison Martin was involved, which should surprise absolutely no one. Desperation in the Conway world always ends with them personally attacking critics when they have no one to blame but themselves. Thank goodness we recorded every conversation that wasn’t off-the-record we ever had with Jack… including the dozens of coffees and cookies with Allison at Blue Dog. [Fun Stuff]

Former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship hits the courtroom for a criminal trial Thursday, facing charges that he conspired to break safety laws and lied to financial regulators about safety practices at the site of the deadliest U.S. mine explosion in more than four decades. [H-L]

Congress may currently look like a bit of a mess after coming to the cliff of a government shutdown and backing away, but December will be the real test for the legislature. [HuffPo]

Monday’s debate between Democrat Sannie Overly and Republican Jenean Hampton was as remarkable for the questions that candidates wouldn’t answer as for the questions they would. Overly completely whiffed on a question about why she sought to have her deposition sealed in the case of former State Rep. John Arnold, who was accused of sexually harassing women who worked in the state legislature. And Hampton didn’t endeavor to answer what she meant when she recently said that she thinks the federal Head Start program is designed to “indoctrinate” children. [C-J/AKN]

Cuban President Raúl Castro took to the floor of the United Nations General Assembly on Monday to demand that the U.S. end its decades-long embargo. [The Hill]

At least two people will be vying to be appointed into the seat that will be vacated in just more than two months by Circuit Judge Phillip Patton when he retires effective Dec. 1. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The FBI will report more data on shootings involving police officers in the future, the head of the agency said on Monday as he released a report showing violent crime fell in 2014, continuing a 20-year trend. [Reuters]

Looking for the next American Pharoah? The place to be is at the annual Keeneland September Yearling Sale in Lexington, Kentucky, which ended this weekend. More than 2,700 yearlings were sold at this year’s Thoroughbred yearling auction, which is a cornerstone of the $39 billion horse industry. [Business First]

Sen. Charles Grassley is demanding more information about the American Red Cross and its “apparent unwillingness to fully cooperate” with a government investigation into its disaster relief work. [ProPublica]

Carter County Sheriff’s Office deputies are searching for a missing teenage girl from the Olive Hill area, according to a press release. [Ashland Independent]

The nation’s largest mortgage lenders are violating the terms of a punitive 2012 settlement that was meant to prevent unfair and unnecessary foreclosures that destroyed communities and pushed working families from their homes. [Politico]

Federal inspectors issued 193 citations and 13 orders at U.S. mine operations in August. [WLEX18]

For months, the presidential campaign of Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) has quietly been courting libertarian-leaning supporters — people who once supported Ron Paul and ostensibly would have been inclined to back his son, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) in the 2016 race. On Tuesday, Cruz released a video showing eight former Ron Paul liberty movement supporters — a number of them from Iowa — who are now backing Cruz. The campaign announced that former Congressman Bob Barr will chair a Liberty Leaders for Cruz” coalition comprised of libertarian-leaning Republicans. [WaPo]

A judge has ruled against a neighborhood group’s efforts to reverse the rezoning of land for an underground limestone quarry in Clark County. But an attorney for the Southwest Clark Neighborhood Association said an appeal is “likely.” [H-L]

Iraqi Foreign Minister Ibrahim al-Jaafari said Friday that he would like more U.S.-led coalition airstrikes against the Islamic State in Iraq. [HuffPo]

Lil Randy Pretends To Be Serious Again

Ed Whitfield is retiring, which Republicans have gossiped about for months. Now Jamie Comer can do more than toy with a run. He’ll have to make a quick decision because other Republicans are ready to jump in. [Deep Thoughts]

The University of Kentucky’s College of Health Sciences has received a $4.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense to research injury prevention in U.S. Special Forces. [H-L]

Relations between Afghanistan and the U.S. are better than ever, Afghan Chief Executive Abdullah Abdullah said Friday at the Council on Foreign Relations. [HuffPo]

Most public employees in Kentucky — including those of state government and Metro Louisville — will see a bit less in their paychecks starting in 2017 when the Internal Revenue Service will begin applying Social Security and Medicare tax to the employees’ contributions to their retirement funds. [C-J/AKN]

A photographer has snapped the ancient post offices and abandoned mailboxes of the South as symbols of the once invaluable postal system’s gradual disappearance as she documents the US Postal Service’s struggle to survive in the 21st century. [Daily Mail]

State Sen. Whitney Sweaterfield (R-Gay Panicked), Republican candidate for Kentucky attorney general, was the guest speaker at Tuesday’s meeting of the Rowan County Republican Party at the public library. [The Morehead News]

Races for the top House Republican leadership spots began firming up Monday as Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) made official his bid for the Speakership, and Rep. Tom Price (R-Ga.) won two key endorsements for the No. 2 GOP post. [The Hill]

Some local law enforcement officers wonder why the fund used to provide training and salary supplements has grown but the stipend they receive hasn’t for more than 10 years. [Ronnie Ellis]

Barring extraordinary events, Richard Glossip will be executed on Wednesday, despite deep uncertainty about whether he is actually guilty of the crime that led to his murder conviction. [ThinkProgress]

Philip Bianchi knew something had gone wrong. Bianchi, a second-generation funeral director and Harlan County’s elected coroner, set out last November with a team that included the Kentucky State Police to exhume the remains of a young woman found murdered in 1969. [WFPL]

Rand Paul says he is “absolutely” in the presidential race for the long haul, despite sagging poll numbers and his early debate struggles. [Politico]

As you can see, Louisville loves killing its people. Totally compassionately, of course, says Greg Fischer. [WHAS11]

Scientists think they can now tie dark streaks seen on the surface of Mars to periodic flows of liquid water. [BBC]

The Kentucky Economic Development Finance Authority earlier [last] week approved tax incentives for companies including Georgetown’s Creform Corp., FedEx Ground Package System and Air Hydro Power. [H-L]

They lost their daughter to a mass shooter and now owe more than $200,000 her killer’s ammunition dealer. [HuffPo]

The RGA Has Bailed On Matt Bevin

The Republican Governor’s Association has stopped running TV ads for Matt Bevin in Kentucky with a little more than a month to go until Election Day. [H-L]

Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush said “free stuff” won’t be part of his plan to appeal to black voters, echoing comments Mitt Romney made during the 2012 presidential election. As The Washington Post first reported, Bush was asked at a Republican dinner on Thursday in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, how he plans to reach out to black voters. [HuffPo]

For the millionth time… if you’re gonna cover suicide, flipping include resources. [C-J/AKN]

President Bill Clinton dismissed the controversy surrounding his wife Hillary Clinton’s private email server as a meaningless distraction, comparing it to his administration’s “Whitewater” controversy. [The Hill]

For the first time in months, the controversy that lit up televisions across the country in Rowan County stimulated a peaceful gathering. [The Morehead News]

A Miami jury convicted a man who faces up to 35 years in prison for growing marijuana in a bedroom of his house in what he says was an act of love to help his wife who is recovering from breast cancer, local media reported. [Reuters]

Though many on Capitol Hill claimed the resignation of U.S. Speaker of the House John Boehner was a supprise, Kentucky Congressman Thomas Massie, one of Boehner’s harshest critics, said, “I know exactly why he left.” [Ashland Independent]

A new report released Thursday provides a detailed look at the graduation rates of low-income college students. At many colleges, low-income students graduate at much lower rates than their high-income peers. [ProPublica]

Barren Circuit Court Judge Phil Patton heard witness testimony and attorney arguments relating to a lawsuit filed by city resident Freddie L. Travis against the Glasgow Independent Schools Board of Education during a bench trial on Thursday. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Doctors in Texas say that a three-year-old girl is possibly the youngest person to ever be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. [ThinkProgress]

I spent my first weekday in Germany in the Ruhr Valley: this region used to be one of the country’s main industrial and coal mining areas. But as the mines and steel plants have closed, cities like Gelsenkirchen and Essen are contemplating how to reinvent and revitalize themselves. [WFPL]

The Pope’s plea to tackle climate change is likely to get a cool reception from some key energy politicians in the US. [BBC]

Jamie Comer says Kentucky will be the epicenter of industrial hemp in the U.S. But it probably won’t be. Why? Frankfort. [H-L]

What was that, again, about Kim Davis not being a fame whore or milking this for cash? Kim Davis, the Kentucky county clerk who went to jail this month for refusing to follow the law and issue a marriage license to a gay couple, was given an award at Friday night’s conservative Values Voter Summit. Tony Perkins, of the Family Research Council, presented Davis with a “Cost of Discipleship Award” that compared her with Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks and Abraham Lincoln because, like them, she “pursued justice at great personal cost.” [HuffPo]