Another Huge Jail Expansion In Ashland

The Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund has approved a $500,000 combination grant and loan for hemp-processing equipment. [H-L]

The federal government and Gulf Coast states have reached an $18.7 billion settlement agreement with the oil company BP for the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico. [HuffPo]

What started as a toothache from a lost filling became a raging infection that landed Christopher Smith in the University of Louisville Hospital emergency room, then in intensive care on a ventilator and feeding tube. [C-J/AKN]

The bacterium Yersinia pestis has inflicted almost unimaginable misery upon humankind over the centuries, killing an estimated 200 million or more people and triggering horrific plagues in the 6th and 14th centuries. [Reuters]

All these years later and CentrePointe is still nothing. [WKYT]

Four U.S. Embassies got upgraded screening rooms last year, paid for by the lobbying arm of the big studios. The industry and the government say there were no strings attached. [ProPublica]

Kentucky has signed new contracts with five managed-care organizations to provide health care services to Medicaid eligible Kentuckians. [Business First]

While Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) quickly moved to donate the contributions he received from Earl Holt III to a fund established to help the victims’ families, this stands in stark contrast to his past handling of white separatist donors. [ThinkProgress]

Boyd County’s government is close to fully approving expansion of its current 200-bed jail in order to add 50 more beds that will open more space to accept federal inmates. [Ashland Independent]

The UK must take urgent action to prepare for the impacts of climate change in the UK, according to a report submitted to the government. [BBC]

Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis, divorced, is still screaming about the gays. [The Morehead News]

In a victory for opponents of partisan gerrymandering, the Supreme Court on Monday upheld the use of an independent commission to draw Arizona’s congressional districts. Writing for a narrow majority in the 5-4 ruling, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg touted the importance of direct democracy and making sure the power of the people is not hijacked by its elected representatives. [Mother Jones]

Last August, Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday issued a challenge to Kentuckians to read the state’s current academic standards in English/language arts and mathematics and suggest changes. [H-L]

Here’s something you probably didn’t know happened in California in the last few years, and maybe it’s something you never imagined could happen: In 2011, two high-ranking state regulators were fired from their posts for pissing off the oil industry. [HuffPo]

Frankfort Always Passing Pension Buck

Thursday’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling upheld the nationwide tax credit subsidies to help people buy health insurance through the Affordable Care Act. [H-L]

A fire broke out at a prominent black church in South Carolina on Tuesday night, the latest in a series of blazes at places of worship in the South serving the African-American community. A federal law enforcement source told the Associated Press that the fire was not the work of an arsonist, and that preliminary investigations show it was not intentionally set. [HuffPo]

In a historic ruling reshaping the definition of the American family, the Supreme Court on Friday invalidated bans on same-sex marriage in Kentucky and across the country, holding that gays and lesbians have the constitutional right to marry. [C-J/AKN]

In what may not be a coincidence, a string of nighttime fires have damaged or destroyed at least six predominately black churches in four southern states in the past week. [SPLC]

Much is put into creating ceramics. A sculpture or ware starts as nothing more than a lump of dirt. Then with care, technique, and creativity, it becomes a work of art. [The Morehead News]

You can prove slavery was bad six ways from Sunday, but people can still choose to believe otherwise if they want. Addressing racism isn’t just about correcting erroneous beliefs — it’s about making people see the humanity in others. [Vox]

Data from Kentucky’s 446 public water systems shows they consistently produce excellent quality water and are nearly always in compliance with the Safe Drinking Water requirements, according to the Kentucky annual Drinking Water Report. The report summarizes the compliance data and status of public water system compliance monitoring results. [Energy & Environment Cabinet]

Congressional Republicans are using the power of the purse to do battle against a series of controversial labor regulations from the Obama administration. [The Hill]

Kentucky’s longest serving U.S. Senator says last year’s lengthy and costly campaign showed him two things about how he says people feel about the country. [WKYT]

Scientists who have devoted years developing medicines to cure disease are now working for tobacco companies to make e-cigarettes. [Reuters]

These are your friends or your family. Please consider helping them step away from their xenophobia. [Page One]

There have only been 9 days this year when the police have not killed somebody. Some news outlets put the number as high as 500 dead in the past six months, according to both The Guardian and Killed by the Police.Net. The Washington Post’s own investigation showed nearly 400 dead as of the end of May. [WaPo]

Kentucky’s retired state workers’ pension fund is a mess. It’s the most underfunded of any in the country, and it’s sinking dangerously close to running out of money. Yet state lawmakers, the men and women responsible for budgeting those pensions, don’t have quite the same worry about their own money. [H-L]

Meanwhile, Kentucky can’t even get medicinal marijuana right. Oregon ended marijuana prohibition at midnight Wednesday, joining Colorado, Washington state, Alaska and the District of Columbia in legalizing recreational use of the drug. [HuffPo]

Pay Attention To What’s Happened In MI

Emmanuel “Manny” Caulk, described by Fayette County Public Schools officials as “a transformational educational leader with a calling to advance equity for all children,” was named the district’s next superintendent Saturday. [H-L]

Federal and state investigators are looking into a fire that destroyed a predominantly black church in South Carolina. Recent fires have already caused damage to predominantly black churches in Charlotte, North Carolina and Macon, Georgia. In those instances, investigators say the fires were deliberately set. [HuffPo]

Conway worked in the governor’s office for six years, ran for Congress from Louisville and is in his eighth year as attorney general, so it’s hard to believe that he didn’t know how African Americans felt about the Jeff Davis statue. If he didn’t, he gets demerits for failing to pay attention. [C-J/AKN]

Last summer, facing a spike in the number of Central American migrants fleeing violence and poverty at the southern U.S. border, the Obama administration sped up deportation proceedings of asylum-seeking mothers and children and increased family detention capacity at the four main detention centers located in Pennsylvania, Texas, and New Mexico. [ThinkProgress]

Kentucky Homeplace Director Mace Baker announced earlier this month the addition of a new office, staffed with a full-time community health worker (CHW), to serve Perry County. Carole Frazier, a CHW from Hazard, Ky., will accept clients Monday through Friday at the new location in room 478 at the UK Center of Excellence in Rural Health on Morton Blvd. [Hazard Herald]

Scientists finally have a complete picture of what one of nature’s most bizarre animals looked like. [BBC]

Unsolved murder cases are just as frustrating for investigators as they are for family members and the public, Richmond Police Chief Larry Brock said Tuesday. [Richmond Register]

Americans born between 1982 and 2000, known as millennials, now comprise one quarter of the country’s population. At 83.1 million, millennials outnumber the 75.4 million baby boomers. [NPR]

Members of the Harlan County Board of Education will spend part of their summer examining the school district’s jobs and related salaries. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Something is rotten in the state of Michigan. [Bill Moyers]

Two national issues resonated loudly in Kentucky last week: the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling on subsidies for health insurance on the federal health exchange and calls to re-examine symbols of the Confederate South displayed on public property. [Ashland Independent]

Police have opened an investigation into the killing of an unarmed black man by law enforcement officers outside Baltimore, authorities said on Saturday, two months after the city was rocked by protests over the death of another African-American who was taken into custody. [Reuters]

Fayette County will remain in its current 17-county federal workforce development area that controls millions of federal workforce training dollars. [H-L]

Now, from impoverished reservations in the West, to Congress and the White House in the East, there is a growing bipartisan movement to document and address the lack of resources and opportunities in Native communities. [HuffPo]

People Still Losing Their Simple Minds

Redefining marriage for the nation, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Friday that same-sex couples have a constitutional right to wed one another. The 5-4 decision in Obergefell vs. Hodges reverses a Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals decision that upheld state bans of same-sex marriage in Kentucky, Ohio, Michigan and Tennessee. Lower courts in all four states had struck down the bans as unconstitutional. [H-L]

Paleontologists in South Africa have announced the name for a new dinosaur species, but they didn’t have to do any digging to find the creature’s bones. [HuffPo]

The charitable fundraising arm of the National Rifle Association — the NRA Foundation — is applying for a special license plate in Kentucky to help collect donations from the state’s myriad gun enthusiasts. [C-J/AKN]

U.S. President Barack Obama said on Friday that for too long Americans have been “blind” to the “unique mayhem” caused by gun violence in this country. [Reuters]

The Supreme Court’s decision that all states must validate marriages between same-sex couples did not surprise Kentucky county clerks. [Ashland Independent]

The authors of the 1968 Fair Housing Act wanted to reverse decades of government-fostered segregation. But presidents from both parties declined to enforce a law that stirred vehement opposition. [ProPublica]

If Kentucky landowners didn’t previously have a legal leg to stand on against energy giant Kinder Morgan’s plan to repurpose Tennessee Gas pipeline, they might have it now. [The Morehead News]

The House of Representatives passed a bill Wednesday that would delay and weaken the federal government’s proposed regulations on power plant emissions. [ThinkProgress]

Lt. Max Graves gives a new meaning to the phrase “protecting the children.” While it is ultimately the duty of law enforcement to protect the community, one of his main duties is to ensure the safety of students inside the school. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

The newest gay rights icon wears a drab black robe and got his job from Ronald Reagan. [Politico]

Police say a tiny amount of bath salts…mixed with a form of methamphetamine called “Ice” is enough to send a person into fits of rage and almost instant insanity. [WKYT]

The famous lemurs of Madagascar face such severe threats to their survival that none of them may be left in the wild within 25 years. [BBC]

A room of government retirees grilled Republican gubernatorial nominee Matt Bevin for more than an hour Friday afternoon in Lexington, but many left unconvinced that his “tough love” proposals would fix the state’s cash-strapped pension systems. [H-L]

An ancient reptile that doesn’t have a shell is an important link in the evolutionary history of the turtle, according to new research. [HuffPo]

Northern Kentucky Wingnut Freaks Out

Luke Barlow and Jim Meade of Bardstown met 48 years ago and married in 2009 in Iowa. But, as Barlow said 90 minutes after the Supreme Court declared their marriage legal in Kentucky, the two men had never held hands in public here. [H-L]

When President Barack Obama learned that the Supreme Court had rejected a major lawsuit against his signature health care law, White House photographer Pete Souza was there to capture the moment. [HuffPo]

Gov. Steve Beshear on Friday named Carol Martin “Bill” Gatton as an “honorary member of the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees for so long as he shall live.” [C-J/AKN]

The U.S. Supreme Court’s declaration on Friday of a right to same-sex marriage resolved a momentous question, yet the ruling left many others unanswered and is likely to spark future legal battles over gay rights. [Reuters]

Jail time was averted, at least for now, by an Amish father and son who refuse to pay fines for violating an Auburn city ordinance requiring owners to prevent waste from horses from falling on city streets. [BGDN]

North Carolina and Tennessee are the latest states to side with telecoms, which have long lobbied against allowing cities to become Internet providers. [ProPublica]

A Northern Kentucky clerk said no to all marriage licenses Friday after the U.S. Supreme Court declared that all states are required to marry gay couples and recognize marriages from other states. [Cincinnasti.com]

In Charleston, South Carolina, Civil War history and accounts of plantation life are a huge part of the town, and state, culture. An entire tourism business thrives off of showing visitors parts of this history – reenactments of Civil War battles, tours of mansions once owned by slave-owners, and staged scenes of home life for aristocrats of the period. It would be difficult for a culture that sees the Confederate flag as a symbol of Southern pride instead of slavery, not to manifest itself at school. [ThinkProgress]

In a rolling Kentucky pasture, the first few wooden ribs of a giant Noah’s ark tourist attraction have begun to sprout up. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

NPR’s Audie Cornish and Rachel Martin read the concluding paragraph in Justice Anthony Kennedy’s opinion in Friday’s Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage. [NPR]

Berea Mayor Steve Connelly and a group of local representatives have launched the Berea Age-Friendly Survey 2015 to gather public input on making the city more Age-Friendly. [Richmond Register]

Every single US state fails to comply with global standards for police use of lethal force. [Mother Jones]

Rand Paul is looking for big green from the marijuana industry. Paul, Kentucky’s junior senator and a candidate for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination, is scheduled to attend a fundraising reception next week at the National Cannabis Business Summit and Expo in Denver. [H-L]

President Barack Obama is a major fan of Sir David Attenborough, the celebrated British naturalist and TV host who has created and narrated numerous science and nature documentaries for the BBC. [HuffPo]

SCOTUS Says Millions Keep Health Care

Pope Francis’ call for urgent action to combat climate change isn’t having much influence on members of Congress from the coal state of Kentucky, who are working this week to block the centerpiece of the president’s agenda to limit the greenhouse gases that are warming the planet. [H-L]

The latest and possibly the last serious effort to cripple Obamacare through the courts has just failed. On Thursday, for the second time in three years, the Supreme Court rejected a major lawsuit against the Affordable Care Act — thereby preserving the largest expansion in health coverage since the creation of Medicare and Medicaid half a century ago. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin used $800,000 more of his own money to fuel his successful stretch run in the Republican primary for governor. [C-J/AKN]

Britain has carried out drone strikes only in war zones in Afghanistan, Iraq and Libya. The documents raise the possibility that in addition, British intelligence may have helped guide American strikes outside conventional war zones. [NY Times]

Members of the Harlan Independent Board of Education voted to partner with UNITE and AmeriCorps in the creation of a position for what will be equivalent to a “teacher’s aide” at a recent meeting. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

President Obama hosts two active duty trans servicemembers at the White House as pressure grows to let them serve openly. [Politico]

Operating costs of the Madison County Detention Center for the fiscal year ending June 30, exceeded its budget by about $500,000. [Richmond Register]

U.S. President Barack Obama reaffirmed in a phone call with his French counterpart Francois Hollande on Wednesday Washington’s commitment to end spying practices deemed “unacceptable” by its allies. [Reuters]

Carter County USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) Executive Director Gera Ferguson, announced that the nomination period for local FSA county committees began on June 15, 2015. [Ashland Independent]

The U.S. military acknowledges the negative health effects of Agent Orange on Vietnam veterans — but what about their children? [ProPublica]

The Industrial Development Economic Authority board approved in a special-called meeting to create a new budget category and more money for park work in the city and the county. Executive Director Dan Iacconi proposed Tuesday to the IDEA board for Glasgow-Barren County to create a category in the operating fund titled drainage and erosion control related to Highland Glen Industrial Park. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Acting on climate change will have major economic, environmental, and health benefits, according to a report released Monday by the Environmental Protection Agency. [ThinkProgress]

Caitlyn Jenner’s presence on the glossy cover of the July issue of Vanity Fair magazine incited a powerful moment of visibility for the transgender community, including the one in Lexington. [H-L]

Medical marijuana has not been proven to work for many illnesses that state laws have approved it for, according to the first comprehensive analysis of research on its potential benefits. [HuffPo]

Don’t Forget Who Wrote Rand’s Book

Fayette County Public Schools superintendent candidate Emmanuel “Manny” Caulk said he would bring the skill set of a CEO to the district. [H-L]

Millions of people gained health insurance last year as Affordable Care Act benefits took effect, according to the first official accounting by the federal government. [HuffPo]

Rand Paul called for removal of the confederate flag but he still had a racist, confederate flag-wearing wingnut write one of his books. [C-J/AKN]

Ban gifts and pay trustees? From May 3 to May 7 of this year, hundreds of pension trustees from around the nation gathered at the National Conference of Public Employee Retirement Systems’ annual conference in New Orleans. The gathering, billed as educational, also featured representatives of dozens of financial firms eager to expand their business. [International Business Times]

Trial has begun for a former state lawmaker accused of secretly paying tens of thousands of dollars to a mine inspector in 2009 and 2010 “so he could have that inspector in his back pocket if he needed it,” according to a federal prosecutor. [Ashland Independent]

More Americans are renting — and paying more — as homeownership falls. [NY Times]

The Glasgow Police Department was recently awarded a $3,000 matching grant through the Kentucky League of Cities and purchased several pieces of equipment with it. [Glasgow Daily Times]

An overwhelming majority of Americans say they believe protests against unfair government treatment make the United States a better country. Unless, that is, the protesters are black. [WaPo]

Supporters of a new law that will expand the use of ignition interlocks say it will save lives. [WAVE3]

The Ebola epidemic in Guinea that began early last year has set back the country’s fight against malaria, say experts. [BBC]

Kentucky State Police Post 8 Morehead is conducting a felony investigation in the Clearfield area of Rowan County and is requesting the public’s assistance. [The Morehead News]

Global equity markets and the dollar slipped on Wednesday as skittish investors sought the safety of less risky assets as the possibility of a Greek debt default loomed a little bit larger. [Reuters]

The Urban County Council voted unanimously Tuesday to move forward with the purchase of body cameras for Lexington police officers. A final vote on the $600,000 allocation is expect in a couple of weeks. [H-L]

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi waved the white flag on Wednesday, telling her caucus she would support passage of a key measure tethered to President Barack Obama’s broader trade agenda. Her support all but guarantees that the measure will succeed, thereby handing Obama a major victory on trade. [HuffPo]