Edelen Tucks Tail, Runs Quickly Away

Carolyn Bouchard, a diabetic with a slowly healing shoulder fracture, hurried to see her doctor after Matt Bevin was elected governor this month. Bouchard, 60, said she was sick of politics and had not bothered voting. But she knew enough about Bevin, a conservative Republican who rails against the Affordable Care Act, to be nervous about the Medicaid coverage she gained under the law last year. [H-L]

Authorities are investigating an hourslong standoff and shooting at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado Springs that left three dead, including an officer, as the community planned to hold vigils Saturday to honor the victims. [HuffPo]

Adam Edelen could challenge Rand Paul but he’s apparently still a political coward. If he doesn’t have the guts to pick himself up after losing, he doesn’t have what it takes to hold political office and he should permanently retire. [C-J/AKN]

In recent remarks Robert E. Murray, the chief executive officer of Murray Energy, the largest privately-held coal mining company in America, enthusiastically praised Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Tex., the chairman of the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology, for leading an investigation into prominent climate scientists and environmental officials. [The Intercept]

Steve Beshear took 33 out-of-state trips during his eight-year term for a total cost to taxpayers of nearly $500,000. The costs do not include Beshear’s security details. [AP/WTVQ]

Vowing to crack down on the nation’s pharmaceutical industry while expanding coverage to 95 percent of all people, Democratic presidential candidate Martin O’Malley on Tuesday laid out his healthcare plan. [The Hill]

Hoo boy, you’re gonna love the latest episode of Al Mohler’s gay panic meltdown. Bill Goodman sure knows how to let buttcramps be buttcramps. [KET]

U.S. presidential hopeful Donald Trump’s support among Republicans has dropped 12 points in less than a week, marking the real estate mogul’s biggest decline since he vaulted to the top of the field in July, according to a Reuters/Ipsos poll. [Reuters]

State Rep. Tanya Pullin, D-South Shore, is one of three nominees for an Administrative Law Judge position in the Department of Workers’ Claims, and her potential appointment poses yet one more risk to the already teetering Democratic majority in the state House of Representatives. [Ronnie Ellis]

When you go to the hospital for an operation, did you know your surgeon might also be performing a procedure on another patient, in a different operating room, over the same scheduled time period? [ProPublica]

A comprehensive government drug study concludes Middle America’s drug problem will get worse before it gets better. Mexican drug cartels are rapidly expanding operations to meet the demand for heroin, according to a report issued by the Drug Enforcement Administration. [Ashland Independent]

Of COURSE Mitch McConnell has sneakily attached a campaign finance rider to the spending bill! He wants to expand the amount of cash political parties can spend in coordination with candidates. [Politico]

William Sisson, president of Baptist Health Lexington, has waited for this hospital expansion for a long time, more than 20 years. Now, the finishing touches are being put on the Baptist Health Lexington expansion, otherwise known as the North tower, for which ground was broken in 2010. [H-L]

Colorado Springs, the town where three people were killed and nine injured in an attack on a Planned Parenthood facility on Friday, is a hub for Christian evangelicals who are opposed to abortion. [HuffPo]

Puppies & Rainbows At Retirement Systems

Couples from Rowan County, Kentucky today filed a brief in U.S. District Court supporting their prior assertion that the Rowan County clerk’s office failed to comply with orders directing deputy clerks to issue marriage licenses without interference by Clerk Kim Davis. [ACLU]

The debate on whether some Kentucky school districts start the school year too early is playing out in Scott County. [H-L]

The Environmental Protection Agency proposed tougher new limits on Tuesday on smokestack emissions from nearly two dozen states that burden downwind areas with air pollution from power plants they can’t control. [HuffPo]

Kentucky’s largest retirement plan for state workers faced more declines in funding over the past year even as the state continues to pump additional money into the system. [C-J/AKN]

There’s a scientific consensus that by 2050, the United States can expect to see an increase in flooding, heat waves, droughts and wildfires due to climate change. Now, scientists at Climate Central and ICF International have produced the first Preparedness Report Card for the United States, highlighting how states are preparing for the projected disasters. Spoiler alert: Kentucky is ill-prepared. [Vocativ]

A member of the band “Survivor” has sued Mike Huckabee’s presidential campaign for allegedly violating the copyright of the 1980s’ hit, “Eye of the Tiger.” A lawsuit filed in Chicago federal court Wednesday says the Republican’s campaign played it at a Kentucky rally for a county clerk who refused to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. The song that featured in the movie “Rocky III” played as Kim Davis departed jail with the former Arkansas governor. [WKYT]

The American Medical Association on Tuesday called for a ban on advertising prescription drugs and medical devices directly to consumers, saying the ads drive patients to demand expensive treatments over less costly ones that are also effective. [Reuters]

Kentucky State Troopers and Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Officers will help brighten the holiday season for families in need this year through the sixth annual Cram The Cruiser food drive, which begins Friday and continues through Dec. 11. [Richmond Register]

Before a SWAT team stormed a tenement in the Belgian city of Verviers in January, police used listening devices to monitor their targets inside: Belgian jihadis who had returned from Syria to attack a local police station in the name of the Islamic State. [ProPublica]

Even though candidates couldn’t officially file until last week, the U.S. presidential election has been in full swing for months, with some candidates already having dropped from the race. Kentuckians should be aware, however, that that’s not going to be the only race on their 2016 ballots. Certain legislative seats at the local, state and national levels will be up for grabs as well, and next November will bring some school board elections, too. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Starting a new job is always tough — no matter the profession. But the first year for a new teacher can be brutal. [NPR]

The big news in the hometown of Kim Davis? A church is changing its name. [The Morehead News]

Mosques in the US and Canada have experienced an increase in vandalism and threats since the Paris attacks, say campaigners. [BBC]

Berea College issued a statement Wednesday in response to incidents in which racial and homophobic slurs were allegedly directed to students over the past homecoming weekend. [H-L]

Payday loan sharks strike again. Every good idea in American politics eventually becomes a vehicle for corporate lobbying. [HuffPo]

Refugee Freakout Continues For Racists

Gov. Steve Beshear launched a program Monday to help Kentuckians move from a life of drug abuse and addiction to one of sobriety and productivity. [H-L]

Attorney General Loretta Lynch said Tuesday there was “no data” to support the notion that the national debate over the use of force by police has made the country less safe, an idea that has sometimes been referred to as the “Ferguson effect.” [HuffPo]

Just what Kentucky’s working poor need! Once they lose access to health care, they can pay more taxes for the crap that Greg Fischer and his rich daddy want to build and/or destroy. [C-J/AKN]

Five ways conservative media are exploiting the terrorist attacks in Paris to hype misinformation. [MMFA]

Here’s the latest column Greg Stumbo’s LRC staffers have written for him. In the late 1990s, Gov. Paul Patton rolled out a simple but effective campaign summarized by two words: “Education pays.” [Floyd County Times]

Refugees aren’t just slipping into the US. Screening takes two years, and it’s nearly impossible for people to pass. [Vox]

The situation is under investigation by the state department of corrections but the jailer says what happened is just another sign of how bad the drug situation is. [WKYT]

Confusing refugees with terrorists is morally unacceptable and, as a matter of strategy, misguided. [NY Times]

Copper thieves are responsible for a power outage that affected nearly 1,500 Kentucky Power customers in Pikeville Monday night, including the local hospital. [Hazard Herald]

Australia’s Carmichael coal mine project has been under major scrutiny by large conservation groups and prominent Australians for months. Now, progressive think tank the Australia Institute has found just how damaging the emissions from burning coal at the mine could really be. [ThinkProgress]

The Kentucky Auditor of Public Accounts Adam Edelen released the 2014 audit of the former Harlan County Sheriff Marvin Lipfird’s office on Friday. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Fields along the Mississippi River Delta once gleamed white in the autumn with acre upon acre of cotton ready to be picked. But to see the decline of a cash crop once nicknamed “King Cotton” one need look no further than the 300 acres (121 hectares) that Michael Shelton farms in Clarksdale, Mississippi, about 75 miles (120 km) down river from Memphis. [Reuters]

A new mobile activity center that will educate students about agriculture will be on the road to eastern Kentucky after the first of the year. [H-L]

Astronomers have spotted what they believe is the most distant object in the solar system — a dwarf planet floating some 9.5 billion miles from the sun. [HuffPo]

Rand Paul Is A Tiny, Simple Xenophobe

Louisville Gas and Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities Co. are asking regulators to allow them to own and operate charging stations for electric vehicles. [H-L]

After the Islamic State (ISIS) claimed responsibility for Friday’s wave of attacks that killed more than 130 people in Paris, the hactivist collective Anonymous declared war on the terrorist faction and its supporters. [HuffPo]

Gov. Steve Beshear says his staff is reviewing thousands of pardon applications sent to his office over the past eight years, but he said he has not yet decided whether he will issue any pardons before leaving office at midnight Dec. 7. [C-J/AKN]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected an anti-abortion group’s bid to force the federal government to reveal more information about a $1 million grant it made in 2011 to women’s health provider Planned Parenthood in New Hampshire. [Reuters]

Carter Caves may be the “best kept secret of the park system,” according to its park manager, but it may also be Carter County’s best-kept secret for how to truly open up recreational tourism in the northeast region of Kentucky. [Ashland Independent]

The justices reopen the abortion debate by agreeing to decide whether the state’s restrictions on clinics and abortion doctors go too far. [ProPublica]

The Cave Region Trails Initiative Steering Committee took steps toward seeking more input as it works to develop a master plan to connect trails in and around 11 communities bordering Mammoth Cave National Park during its meeting at the Cave City Convention Center on Thursday night. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The most-read story on the BBC News website on Sunday was about a terror attack – but not the one currently dominating the news. [BBC]

Sitting on the hard wooden benches inside the fifth-floor courtroom in the Charleston federal courthouse for eight hours, Monday through Friday, for the past month has been uncomfortable for everyone observing the criminal trial of former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship. [Richmond Register]

Here comes Little Randy Paul flying his bigot flag. Now he wants to halt refugee visas. Small people do small things. [The Hill]

Harlan Appalachian Regional Hospital representatives spoke to the Harlan Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday during their regularly scheduled meeting to explain the Wound Care Center and its services. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Political leaders in the United States must not turn away Syrian refugees as part of a religious test, an emphatic President Barack Obama declared Monday, entreating public officials “not to feed that dark impulse inside of us.” [Politico]

Because there aren’t already enough reasons to think Tommy Turner and his crew are backwater as hell. The Hodgenville City Council has unanimously voted to allow the words “In God We Trust” to be lettered on the town’s police cars. [H-L]

And the Republicans nationally, like many in Kentucky, are beginning to fly their racist flags high. Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump would consider shuttering some mosques in the United States after last week’s deadly terror attacks in France. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin (R-Turd) Now Fears Refugees

YET ANOTHER University of Louisville official is under investigation for allegedly squandering hundreds of thousands of dollars! [The ‘Ville Voice]

Former Morgan County Judge-Executive Tim Conley’s appeal of his guilty plea in a corruption case should be dismissed, a federal prosecutor has argued. Conley waived his right to appeal his plea and conviction as part of the deal, in which the government dismissed some charges, Assistant U.S. Attorney Charles P. Wisdom Jr. said in a motion. [H-L]

Apparently, if you are a Democratic presidential candidate, there is no longer such a thing as being too strict about gun safety. All three candidates were locked in a fierce battle to prove their gun control bona fides at the Democratic debate at Drake University in Iowa on Saturday night. [HuffPo]

Just a few years ago, Louisville’s Family Health Centers were on the brink of closing clinics and laying off staff. More than half the patients at the network of seven community clinics had no health insurance. Operating losses for the clinics, a medical safety net for the poor, had reached $2.5 million. [C-J/AKN]

The Federal Reserve is emerging as one of the most popular punching bags on the GOP campaign trail. [The Hill]

Here comes Backward Bevin! Way to go, Kentucky, you’ve elected an actual dog turd. Echoing the stance of several Republican governors, Matt Bevin on Monday said he opposes the resettling of Syrian refugees in Kentucky. [WFPL]

Capital punishment in the United States has moved into the slow lane, with the number of executions and new death sentences likely to hit lows not seen for more than 20 years. [Reuters]

Mayor Jim Tom Trent on Thursday signed a proclamation declaring November as Adoption Awareness Month in the City of Morehead. [The Morehead News]

Astronomers have identified the most distant object yet in the Solar System. Observations with Japan’s Subaru telescope reveal the likely icy body to be some 15.5 billion km from the Sun – about three times further away than even far-flung Pluto. [BBC]

Tucked away in the back roads of Rowan County lies a piece of Morehead State only a few know exist. Since 1967, the Derrickson Agricultural Complex, also know as the University Farm, has been a part of the Department of Agricultural Sciences. Recently, 24 agriculture students have been given the privilege of living in the newly built Lundergam Hall that rests in the middle of the farm. [Ashland Independent]

Almost 20 percent of the people in low-income communities who die of colon cancer could have been saved with early screening. And those premature deaths take a toll on communities that can least bear it. [NPR]

The Kentucky State Police is urging all motorists to be aware of the increased dangers posed by deer wandering onto roadways during November and December. [Richmond Register & Press Release]

20 percent, or 1 in 5, were reporting patients to credit agencies or placing liens on their properties or garnishing wages, practices that aren’t supposed to happen if hospitals are following the rules. [WaPo]

Marriage licenses altered by Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis this summer don’t meet the state’s legal requirements, but they still should be considered valid, lawyers for Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear told a federal judge Friday. [H-L]

Federal and state prosecutors are poised to announce a settlement with Education Management Corporation, one of the nation’s largest for-profit college chains, that would resolve allegations it defrauded taxpayers out of $11 billion, according to people familiar with the case. [HuffPo]

Hillary Clinton Reaches For Coal Country

Kentucky Republicans basked in their statewide election victories on Saturday but warned conservatives to guard against the types of mistakes that plagued the party the last time they were in power. [H-L]

When it came time to think seriously about endorsing a presidential candidate for 2016, Paul Feeney says it wasn’t a hard decision for members of his union. [HuffPo]

Seeking to defend his signature achievement, Gov. Steve Beshear on Friday made an impassioned appeal to Gov.-elect Matt Bevin not to dismantle Kentucky’s expansion of health care under the Affordable Care Act. [C-J/AKN]

Whistleblowers are always accused of helping America’s enemies (top Nixon aides accused Daniel Ellsberg of being a Soviet spy and causing the deaths of Americans with his leak); it’s just the tactical playbook that’s automatically used. So it’s of course unsurprising that ever since Edward Snowden’s whistleblowing enabled newspapers around the world to report on secretly implemented programs of mass surveillance, he has been accused by “officials” and their various media allies of Helping The Terrorists™. [The Intercept]

The Beshear Machine has finally started making plans to shut down. The Secretary of Kentucky’s Energy and Environment Cabinet has officially submitted his resignation to Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear. Secretary Len Peters’ last day in his position will be Dec. 7, which is also Beshear’s last day in office. [WFPL]

Technology and social media companies are pushing out an ever-increasing amount of data to tally up which 2016 presidential candidates are winning the race for most mentions online. [The Hill]

The Boyd County Board of Education hired a construction firm and approved plans Wednesday for a $25 million renovation of its middle school. [Ashland Independent]

Lockheed Martin Corp has been awarded a contract worth nearly $969 million to build 17 C-130J military transport aircraft, the Pentagon said on Tuesday. [Reuters]

Rowan Fiscal Court Tuesday accepted a bid for the demolition of the site of the new Rowan County Detention Center. [The Morehead News]

An unnamed hacker leaked documents to the news site The Intercept revealing a major data breach by the prison phone company Securus Technologies. At least 70 million call records from prisoners in 37 states over two years were released, including thousands of calls that never should have been recorded and stored in the first place: confidential conversations between attorneys and their incarcerated clients. [ThinkProgress]

The Glasgow Water and Sewer Commission got an unqualified, clean report on the audit of the Glasgow Water Co.’s financial statements for the fiscal year ending June 30. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Humans have been exploiting honeybees for almost 9,000 years, according to archaeological evidence. [BBC]

Hillary Clinton’s proposal to help miners and communities hurt by a drop in coal production and jobs covers a range of approaches, including grants to train workers and help small businesses, support for energy-efficiency programs and stepped-up efforts to reclaim abandoned mine lands. [H-L]

When Alex Malloy caught a cab in Manhattan just after 11 p.m. on Friday, he did not expect anything out of the ordinary. [HuffPo]

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Morehead Is Seriously Over Kim Davis

More than $3 million has been awarded to provide heroin and prescription drug abuse treatment for Kentucky jail inmates and for an injectable treatment designed to prevent relapse as offenders leave custody. [H-L]

Top Republicans’ growing support for privatization of the Department of Veterans Affairs health care system is frightening some veterans groups. [HuffPo]

An estimated 20,000 undocumented residents in Kentucky were left in limbo this week after a federal appeals court upheld an injunction on President Obama’s executive action meant to shield millions from deportation. [C-J/AKN]

U.S. District Court Judge Richard Leon ordered the NSA to immediately stop vacuuming up domestic telephone records on Monday, writing that “the loss of constitutional freedoms for even one day is significant harm.” But the order was limited to one plaintiff in the case: a California lawyer and his law firm. [The Intercept]

If each U.S. state were its own country, Kentucky would have the seventh-highest incarceration rate in the world, according to a recent analysis by the Prison Policy Initiative. [WFPL]

Surprise! Bloated, wealthy Republican refusing to have a conversation about race. [The Hill]

Progress is finally being made on two long-delayed county road/bridge repair projects. The Madison Fiscal Court meeting in Berea on Tuesday morning approved an agreement to accept $200,000 in state discretionary funds to redo work on a portion of Old Wilderness Trail done about two years ago that did not “hold up.” [Richmond Register]

Thousands of protesters took to the streets across the U.S. on Tuesday to demand a $15-an-hour minimum wage and union rights for fast food workers, a campaign intended to attract support from national political candidates ahead of the 2016 elections. [Reuters]

Members of the Grayson City Council met Tuesday night to further discuss the option of the city creating a smoke-free workplace environment. [Ashland Independent]

For at least one sergeant in the U.S. military, this year’s Veterans Day may take on more significance than any other day to commemorate military service members. [ThinkProgress]

Wondering how the hometown paper of Kim Davis is covering her shenanigans these days? Just barely. Because Morehead is not Kim Davis. Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis has been denied an appeal to reverse rulings made by U. S. District Judge David L. Bunning after she refused to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [The Morehead News]

Donald Trump has defended his hardline stance on immigration, a day after it was attacked by fellow Republican presidential candidates on national TV. [BBC]

The image that went viral last month of rapper Macklemore sleeping with his infant daughter next to him made Dr. Susan Pollack cringe. [H-L]

The G20 countries spend almost four times as much to prop up fossil fuel production as they do to subsidize renewable energy, calling into question their commitment to halting climate change, a think tank said on Thursday. [HuffPo]

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