How Many Friends/Donors Will He Pardon?

Fayette County schools superintendent Manny Caulk has hired a Kentucky Department of Education associate commissioner with 18 years of experience in state government to oversee the district financial services, budget and staffing, and human resources departments. [H-L]

President Barack Obama is accusing Republicans who oppose allowing Syrian refugees into the U.S. of being scared of widows and orphans. He says the political posturing “needs to stop.” [HuffPo]

Louisville area Ford workers on Tuesday resoundingly rejected a proposed national contract. [C-J/AKN]

In 2012, GOP presidential candidates accused President Obama of waging a war on the coal industry. Three years later, coal is largely taking a back seat in the Republican race for the White House. [The Hill]

The Kentucky School Boards Association is all up in the latest Jefferson County Public Schools controversy. On the one hand, people who serve their time ought to be able to give back to society and hold down gainful employment. Especially when they’re as honest and forthcoming as this woman. On the other, JCPS looks stupid for getting into mess after mess like this. [KSBA]

U.S. consumer prices increased in October after two straight months of declines as the cost of healthcare and other services rose, evidence of firming inflation that further supports views that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates next month. [Reuters]

Gov. Steve Beshear hinted Tuesday he’ll restore voting rights for many non-violent ex-felons before leaving office on Dec. 7. [Ronnie Ellis]

Hillary Clinton’s top deputy will be on Capitol Hill on Tuesday to continue the campaign’s outreach to African-American Democrats. [Politico]

Kentucky earned a “D” on the March of Dimes Premature Birth Report Card, and Warren County’s preterm births are worse than statewide rates. [BGDN]

Poverty does not treat men and women equally, especially in old age. Women 65 years old and older who are living in poverty outnumber men in those circumstances by more than 2 to 1. And these women are likely to face the greatest deprivation as they become older and more frail. [NPR]

Gov. Steve Beshear and state librarian Wayne Onkst said in federal court filings late last week that the state will recognize as valid marriages of couples who received altered licenses issued by the Rowan County clerk’s office. [Ashland Independent]

The federal privacy law known as HIPAA doesn’t cover home paternity tests, fitness trackers or health apps. When a Florida woman complained after seeing the paternity test results of thousands of people online, federal regulators told her they didn’t have jurisdiction. [ProPublica]

On Friday night around 7 p.m., while the world looked on in horror as terrorists in Paris made flesh our collective nightmares, Rand Paul took to Twitter. With uncertainty, fear and carnage gripping the globe, Kentucky’s junior U.S. Senator, in the cellar when it comes to presidential polls, was focused — on Marco Rubio. [H-L]

After a series of attacks in Paris by the Islamic State group killed 129 people on Friday, several prominent Republican politicians called for the U.S. to stop taking in refugees from Syria, arguing that authorities might unwittingly allow terrorists to enter the country. [HuffPo]

Hillary Clinton Reaches For Coal Country

Kentucky Republicans basked in their statewide election victories on Saturday but warned conservatives to guard against the types of mistakes that plagued the party the last time they were in power. [H-L]

When it came time to think seriously about endorsing a presidential candidate for 2016, Paul Feeney says it wasn’t a hard decision for members of his union. [HuffPo]

Seeking to defend his signature achievement, Gov. Steve Beshear on Friday made an impassioned appeal to Gov.-elect Matt Bevin not to dismantle Kentucky’s expansion of health care under the Affordable Care Act. [C-J/AKN]

Whistleblowers are always accused of helping America’s enemies (top Nixon aides accused Daniel Ellsberg of being a Soviet spy and causing the deaths of Americans with his leak); it’s just the tactical playbook that’s automatically used. So it’s of course unsurprising that ever since Edward Snowden’s whistleblowing enabled newspapers around the world to report on secretly implemented programs of mass surveillance, he has been accused by “officials” and their various media allies of Helping The Terrorists™. [The Intercept]

The Beshear Machine has finally started making plans to shut down. The Secretary of Kentucky’s Energy and Environment Cabinet has officially submitted his resignation to Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear. Secretary Len Peters’ last day in his position will be Dec. 7, which is also Beshear’s last day in office. [WFPL]

Technology and social media companies are pushing out an ever-increasing amount of data to tally up which 2016 presidential candidates are winning the race for most mentions online. [The Hill]

The Boyd County Board of Education hired a construction firm and approved plans Wednesday for a $25 million renovation of its middle school. [Ashland Independent]

Lockheed Martin Corp has been awarded a contract worth nearly $969 million to build 17 C-130J military transport aircraft, the Pentagon said on Tuesday. [Reuters]

Rowan Fiscal Court Tuesday accepted a bid for the demolition of the site of the new Rowan County Detention Center. [The Morehead News]

An unnamed hacker leaked documents to the news site The Intercept revealing a major data breach by the prison phone company Securus Technologies. At least 70 million call records from prisoners in 37 states over two years were released, including thousands of calls that never should have been recorded and stored in the first place: confidential conversations between attorneys and their incarcerated clients. [ThinkProgress]

The Glasgow Water and Sewer Commission got an unqualified, clean report on the audit of the Glasgow Water Co.’s financial statements for the fiscal year ending June 30. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Humans have been exploiting honeybees for almost 9,000 years, according to archaeological evidence. [BBC]

Hillary Clinton’s proposal to help miners and communities hurt by a drop in coal production and jobs covers a range of approaches, including grants to train workers and help small businesses, support for energy-efficiency programs and stepped-up efforts to reclaim abandoned mine lands. [H-L]

When Alex Malloy caught a cab in Manhattan just after 11 p.m. on Friday, he did not expect anything out of the ordinary. [HuffPo]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. [Ting]

The Next Governor Will Likely Ignore It

Kentucky’s next governor will inherit about $30 billion in public pension debt from departing Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear — more than twice what the state government spends in a year, and up 40 percent since voters re-elected Beshear in 2011. [John Cheves]

The real problem is too many young people still can’t afford a college education. [HuffPo]

Maybe next time he’ll try city council instead of big dogging in the race for goober. Independent Drew Curtis said he would vote for Donald Trump, which frankly seemed like an odd choice for the progressive, populist candidate from Lexington. By Friday, he was walking that back in a tweet. [C-J/AKN]

Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign has won the endorsement of the National Education Association (NEA), the teachers union said in a statement Saturday. [The Hill]

Anyone who spends time in the alternate universe that is Kentucky politics hears some version of this line over and over: “This is the strangest governor’s race I’ve ever seen.” [Ronnie Ellis]

President Barack Obama said on Friday that he has asked his team to look for new ways to enforce existing regulations to keep guns away from criminals in the wake of the mass shooting in Oregon. [Reuters]

Shipping containers can travel all over the world. Now, one has landed in a Kentucky woman’s yard, and it is being turned into her new home. [WDRB]

In Alabama, a positive drug test can have dire repercussions for pregnant women and new mothers. Their newborns can be taken from them. They can lose custody of their other children. They can face lengthy sentences in the most notorious women’s prison in the United States and thousands of dollars in fees and fines. Yet the hospitals that administer those drug tests — and turn the results over to authorities — are exceedingly reluctant to disclose their policies to the public. [ProPublica]

It’s the type of decline Southcentral Kentucky counties are thrilled to incur. Barren, Allen, Metcalfe, Monroe, Edmonson and Hart counties have enjoyed a drop of more than 1 percent in jobless rates over the last year, a study released by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics in September showed. [Glasgow Daily Times]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A great swathe of Pluto that features a strange rippling terrain is perhaps the highlight of the latest image release from the New Horizons mission. [BBC]

The report cards are in — not for students, but districts and schools across the state. Scores recorded by the Kentucky Department of Education in the Unbridled Learning College and Career-Readiness report released Thursday morning show that the Madison County Schools district “outperformed all seven surrounding county school districts as well as Berea Independent Schools,” an online release from MCS noted. [Richmond Register]

As Governor of the USA’s worst state, Florida, Jeb Bush embraced his inner Veto Corleone. His 2,549 line-item vetoes cut millions of dollars from social programs, health centers and projects backed by people who crossed him. [Mother Jones]

It’s almost funny watching education reporters act surprised that school districts pretend to improve with self-evaluations. It’s like no one believes school district administrations can be more corrupt than Frankfort. Along with hard work, more favorable self-evaluations played a role in Fayette County Public Schools’ improved performance in Kentucky’s accountability system in 2014-15, acting senior director of academic services Marlene Helm. [H-L]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) doubled down on his support for tighter gun control legislation on Thursday in the wake of the mass shooting at an Oregon community college. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin Is Trying To Lose The Race

Attorney General Jack Conway maintains a nominal five-point lead over Republican Matt Bevin with just more than a month to go in Kentucky’s race for governor, according to a new Bluegrass Poll. [H-L]

Is Matt Bevin trying to lose the race for governor? Yes. But so is Jack Conway. [More H-L]

The U.S. plans to increase the number of refugees it takes from 70,000 to 100,000 over the next two years. New York, Los Angeles and 16 other cities have urged President Barack Obama to accept even more refugees from Syria. [HuffPo]

The Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet agreed this month to keep secret a proposed settlement of its lawsuit against an Eastern Kentucky oil company that had been repeatedly cited for contaminating the North Fork of the Kentucky River. [C-J/AKN]

The Environmental Protection Agency has released a final version of updated rules intended to keep farmworkers from being poisoned by pesticides. [NPR]

The Glasgow City Council passed a new city ordinance regarding the humane treatment of animals following a second reading at Monday’s meeting, setting limits to how long dogs may be tethered to a single point and specifying the equipment to be used and the manner in which tethering can legally occur within city limits. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Royal Dutch Shell has stopped Arctic oil and gas exploration off the coast of Alaska after “disappointing” results from a key well in the Chukchi Sea. [BBC]

Steam rolled off a large tray of sorghum juice as it simmered at 235 degrees, filling the Old Mill Park with a smell unique to the cane plant. Last weekend marked the 45th annual Sorghum Festival. Despite the gloomy weather, a large crowd walked though downtown West Liberty enjoying the local craft bazaar, parade, homemade snacks, fair food and of course — freshly made sorghum. [Ashland Independent]

Earlier this month, the Brookings Institution, a centrist think tank, published a provocatively titled paper that posited, “Do we already have universal preschool?” Revitalizing the fierce debate over early childhood education, the paper concluded that 70 percent of children already have an option for pre-K, infuriating many who have been making pushes for public funding of universal pre-K. [ThinkProgress]

James Comer said he plans to start a business and return home to Monroe County once his term is over in December. What he didn’t mention is toying with a run for congress. [WHAS11]

Immigrants and their descendants will drive U.S. population growth over the next half century, transforming the country into one where no racial or ethnic group is a majority, a Pew Research Center report released on Monday said. [Reuters]

Whether this hilarious take from organized labor about Matt Bevin’s running mate is true or not? You already know she’s a piece of work. [AFL-CIO]

One of the three super PACs supporting Rand Paul’s presidential campaign has stopped raising money, dealing a damaging blow to an already cash-starved campaign. And the guy running his campaign into the ground? His name is Doug Stafford. [Politico]

Freedom of religion isn’t reason enough to deny any American their constitutional rights, President Barack Obama said Sunday as he addressed members of the LGBT community, one of his major sources of political and financial support. [H-L]

Ivo Caers confirmed for us Table 21 was never reported to the FDA. … We know now what’s behind the tables: The little girls with the lactating breasts … and the little boys even under ten who have gynecomastia. My word. [HuffPo]

The Kim Davis Circus Will Get Worse

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! Help us pay ridiculous the fees these shysters caused. [CLICK HERE]

The Kim Davis circus is never-ending but we’re gonna try to stop linking to all the crap. There’s no reason to give people like Mike Huckabee and Turd Cruz a bump. [Enough is Enough]

What? Fox warned against a trend that doesn’t exist? Surely not. Surely that’s not why your wingnut relatives are dumb as hell and scared all the time. [HuffPo]

When Whitney Westerfield tweeted out the nonsense about being jailed for her beliefs, Jake’s response exploded on Twitter. So it’s pretty clear Westerfield is a delusional buttcramp just like Kim Davis. [C-J/AKN]

A group of religiously affiliated nonprofit organizations in Indiana must comply with the Affordable Care Act’s provision allowing their employees to get insurance coverage for contraception, despite their religious objections, a federal appeals court ruled on Friday. [Reuters]

When James Duff started as a patrolman with the Glasgow Police Department more than two decades ago, officers were lucky if they had a radio that was fully enough charged to last through the shift, he said. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Every day we’re struck by terrible headlines concerning the refugee crisis in Europe: Austria finds 71 migrants dead in a truck. Hungarian police officers fire teargas at migrants. [Propublica]

Louisville housing advocates are concerned that the city is being shortchanged in the state’s distribution of federal Low-Income Housing Tax Credits, which are used to build or rehabilitate affordable rental housing. [WFPL]

In a state with a history of electing women to its highest offices, and on the 20th anniversary of her famous speech in Beijing, where as First Lady she declared “women’s rights are human rights and human rights are women’s rights,” Hillary Clinton defined the entire economic agenda of her 2016 campaign as a women’s issue. [Politico]

Kentucky will receive nearly $4 million in federal funds to combat prescription drug and heroin abuse. [WKYT]

When Congress returns from summer recess Tuesday, it will tackle the Iran nuclear deal, but that won’t be its only big issue. [NPR]

Got a hankering for the mouth-watering fried chicken served at Mammoth Cave Hotel? Well, you’ll probably have to wait. [BGDN]

In an investigation involving guns and drugs, the Justice Department obtained a court order this summer demanding that Apple turn over, in real time, text messages between suspects using iPhones. [NY Times]

Kentucky coal miners bled and died to unionize. Their workplaces became war zones, and gun battles once punctuated union protests. In past decades, organizers have been beaten, stabbed and shot while seeking better pay and safer conditions deep underground. [H-L]

More than 200,000 Syrian refugees living in Jordan learned via text message that the U.N. food aid they rely on to survive is getting completely cut. [HuffPo]

Your Friday Evening Dept. Of Derp

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis continued to withhold marriage licenses from local residents Thursday, a day after a federal appeals court upheld an order telling her to end her protest. [H-L]

McDonald’s, Burger King and every other company that relies on a franchise business model just suffered the legal setback they’ve been fearing for years. [HuffPo]

As West Africa’s Ebola epidemic dissipates, Fort Campbell’s 101st Airborne Division is being recognized for its role in helping fight an outbreak that has killed more than 11,280 people, mostly in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. [C-J/AKN]

A new judge in Ferguson, Missouri, has halted court practices that were seen as a major factor in unrest over the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown a year ago. [BBC]

The Glasgow City Council Public Safety Committee has decided on its recommendations for changes to the city’s animal welfare ordinance. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Everything that is happening in the solar industry is happening in Nevada right now. [ThinkProgress]

Jack Conway, the Democratic candidate for governor, and his Republican opponent, Matt Bevin, don’t much like each other. [Ronnie Ellis]

Garbage has become an unlikely battleground in the abortion debate, as anti-abortion groups seek evidence of privacy violations in clinics’ trash. [ProPublica]

With several changes coming to The Register beginning in Sept. 1, readers and subscribers have questions and concerns. The staff of The Register would like to help answer those questions with an online Q&A. [Richmond Register]

Planned Parenthood has paid forensic experts to comb through undercover videos released by anti-abortion activists, and their report finds significant distortions and misleading edits. [NPR]

Thousands of Kentuckians went to the Kentucky State Capitol on Saturday to show support for Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis and her decision to stop issuing marriage licenses after the U. S. Supreme Court recognized same-sex marriage. [The Morehead News]

President Barack Obama on Thursday heralded the progress New Orleans has made rebuilding since Hurricane Katrina battered the area 10 years ago but said more needed to be done to overcome poverty and inequality. [Reuters]

Tanya Meeks wears a small silver urn on a necklace. On this day, it rested on a bright orange T-shirt with “Stop Heroin” printed across the front, and rubber bands hung from her wrist with hashtags that mirrored the shirt’s slogan. [H-L]

Sea levels worldwide rose an average of nearly 3 inches (8 cm) since 1992, the result of warming waters and melting ice, a panel of NASA scientists said on Wednesday. [HuffPo]

Rough Week In The Rand Paul World

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Kim Davis is a miserable bigot and a judge put her in her place. [H-L]

Let’s all just bite our tongues and allow our eyes to roll back in our heads. Democratic state Treasurer Todd Hollenbach was the odd man out of statewide elections this year, unable to seek re-election because of term limits while some of the biggest names in Kentucky politics are campaigning for governor and attorney general. But the 55-year-old hopes to stay in public office as he filed Tuesday to run for district judge in the 30th judicial district of Jefferson County. [H-L]

When Republicans carry on about what a “disaster” the Affordable Care Act is, they rarely acknowledge that the law is helping millions of people get health insurance. But we don’t need Republicans to tell us these things. We have data. [HuffPo]

Guessing this probably isn’t good news for the Rand Paul world. [C-J/AKN]

For Central American migrants, the journey through Mexico has become a gauntlet of violence at the hands of criminals, drug cartels—and even the authorities. [The Nation]

Magistrate Larry Combs, who represents Berea and southern Madison County on the fiscal court, said Tuesday his district was not getting a fair share of the $875,000 the county received this year for rural roads from the state fuel tax. [Richmond Register]

Newly declassified snippets fo Haldeman’s diary highlight how much we still don’t know about Watergate and the Nixon Administration. [Jstor]

A trial date has been set in a lawsuit filed against the Glasgow Independent Schools Board of Education regarding a claim that the board violated Kentucky’s open meetings law. [Glasgow Daily Times]

China further devalued the yuan on Wednesday, adding more strains to Washington’s relations with Beijing after Tuesday’s surprise weakening of its currency drew condemnation from U.S. lawmakers. [WSJ]

The Kentucky Department of Insurance recently approved insurers’ requests for rate hikes. And all but one of the 13 insurers selling individual and small-group plans in the state are raising rates. [WFPL]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), a Democratic presidential candidate, snatched his first major union endorsement on Monday from the nation’s largest organization of nurses. [The Hill]

Attorney General Jack Conway on Tuesday joined Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi and 15 other states in a legal action against the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for illegally invalidating the individual air quality protection plans in each of those states. Because he wasn’t pandering enough already? [Ashland Independent]

Rand Paul, whose campaign is struggling with deep fundraising and organizational problems, has fixated on throwing grenades at GOP frontrunner Donald Trump, hardly the strategy of a thriving campaign. [Politico]

Some Somerset council members are not happy with the city’s lawsuit challenging the authority of the state auditor to do special examinations of city governments, but the court action will go forward. [H-L]

While many Republican presidential candidates continue to bash Planned Parenthood for controversial videos revealing its work on aborted fetal tissue research, frontrunner Donald Trump has decided zig where his rivals have zagged. [HuffPo]