Your Friday Evening Dept. Of Derp

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis continued to withhold marriage licenses from local residents Thursday, a day after a federal appeals court upheld an order telling her to end her protest. [H-L]

McDonald’s, Burger King and every other company that relies on a franchise business model just suffered the legal setback they’ve been fearing for years. [HuffPo]

As West Africa’s Ebola epidemic dissipates, Fort Campbell’s 101st Airborne Division is being recognized for its role in helping fight an outbreak that has killed more than 11,280 people, mostly in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. [C-J/AKN]

A new judge in Ferguson, Missouri, has halted court practices that were seen as a major factor in unrest over the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown a year ago. [BBC]

The Glasgow City Council Public Safety Committee has decided on its recommendations for changes to the city’s animal welfare ordinance. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Everything that is happening in the solar industry is happening in Nevada right now. [ThinkProgress]

Jack Conway, the Democratic candidate for governor, and his Republican opponent, Matt Bevin, don’t much like each other. [Ronnie Ellis]

Garbage has become an unlikely battleground in the abortion debate, as anti-abortion groups seek evidence of privacy violations in clinics’ trash. [ProPublica]

With several changes coming to The Register beginning in Sept. 1, readers and subscribers have questions and concerns. The staff of The Register would like to help answer those questions with an online Q&A. [Richmond Register]

Planned Parenthood has paid forensic experts to comb through undercover videos released by anti-abortion activists, and their report finds significant distortions and misleading edits. [NPR]

Thousands of Kentuckians went to the Kentucky State Capitol on Saturday to show support for Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis and her decision to stop issuing marriage licenses after the U. S. Supreme Court recognized same-sex marriage. [The Morehead News]

President Barack Obama on Thursday heralded the progress New Orleans has made rebuilding since Hurricane Katrina battered the area 10 years ago but said more needed to be done to overcome poverty and inequality. [Reuters]

Tanya Meeks wears a small silver urn on a necklace. On this day, it rested on a bright orange T-shirt with “Stop Heroin” printed across the front, and rubber bands hung from her wrist with hashtags that mirrored the shirt’s slogan. [H-L]

Sea levels worldwide rose an average of nearly 3 inches (8 cm) since 1992, the result of warming waters and melting ice, a panel of NASA scientists said on Wednesday. [HuffPo]

Rough Week In The Rand Paul World

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

Kim Davis is a miserable bigot and a judge put her in her place. [H-L]

Let’s all just bite our tongues and allow our eyes to roll back in our heads. Democratic state Treasurer Todd Hollenbach was the odd man out of statewide elections this year, unable to seek re-election because of term limits while some of the biggest names in Kentucky politics are campaigning for governor and attorney general. But the 55-year-old hopes to stay in public office as he filed Tuesday to run for district judge in the 30th judicial district of Jefferson County. [H-L]

When Republicans carry on about what a “disaster” the Affordable Care Act is, they rarely acknowledge that the law is helping millions of people get health insurance. But we don’t need Republicans to tell us these things. We have data. [HuffPo]

Guessing this probably isn’t good news for the Rand Paul world. [C-J/AKN]

For Central American migrants, the journey through Mexico has become a gauntlet of violence at the hands of criminals, drug cartels—and even the authorities. [The Nation]

Magistrate Larry Combs, who represents Berea and southern Madison County on the fiscal court, said Tuesday his district was not getting a fair share of the $875,000 the county received this year for rural roads from the state fuel tax. [Richmond Register]

Newly declassified snippets fo Haldeman’s diary highlight how much we still don’t know about Watergate and the Nixon Administration. [Jstor]

A trial date has been set in a lawsuit filed against the Glasgow Independent Schools Board of Education regarding a claim that the board violated Kentucky’s open meetings law. [Glasgow Daily Times]

China further devalued the yuan on Wednesday, adding more strains to Washington’s relations with Beijing after Tuesday’s surprise weakening of its currency drew condemnation from U.S. lawmakers. [WSJ]

The Kentucky Department of Insurance recently approved insurers’ requests for rate hikes. And all but one of the 13 insurers selling individual and small-group plans in the state are raising rates. [WFPL]

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), a Democratic presidential candidate, snatched his first major union endorsement on Monday from the nation’s largest organization of nurses. [The Hill]

Attorney General Jack Conway on Tuesday joined Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi and 15 other states in a legal action against the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for illegally invalidating the individual air quality protection plans in each of those states. Because he wasn’t pandering enough already? [Ashland Independent]

Rand Paul, whose campaign is struggling with deep fundraising and organizational problems, has fixated on throwing grenades at GOP frontrunner Donald Trump, hardly the strategy of a thriving campaign. [Politico]

Some Somerset council members are not happy with the city’s lawsuit challenging the authority of the state auditor to do special examinations of city governments, but the court action will go forward. [H-L]

While many Republican presidential candidates continue to bash Planned Parenthood for controversial videos revealing its work on aborted fetal tissue research, frontrunner Donald Trump has decided zig where his rivals have zagged. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin Tanked The RPK’s Finances

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! [CLICK HERE]

The Kentucky Department of Education is seeking public feedback on dozens of proposed social studies standards. [H-L]

For me it was only after eight years of studying Greenland — installing and maintaining a network of on-ice climate stations and examining how much snow evaporates from the island — that I suddenly realized glaciology textbooks needed a major revision. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin is not good for the Republican Party’s finances. The Republican Party of Kentucky trailed far behind the Kentucky Democratic Party in fundraising through the first six months of this year. [C-J/AKN]

Look, this is the best thing you’re going to read all week. So just go read it. [VICE]

Two Boone County emergency dispatch workers sued the county, alleging a co-worker and supervisor used abusive language to minority callers and slept on duty, including during a police chase. [Cincinnasti.com]

President Obama took sharp aim at critics of the Iran nuclear deal on Wednesday, saying many of those who backed the U.S. invasion of Iraq now want to reject the accord and put the Middle East on the likely path toward another war. [WaPo]

The Greenup County Young Democrats club and local nonprofit Emmaus Respite and Resource Center have taken control of the county’s Meals on Wheels program. [Ashland Independent]

Later this month, Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. will escape for a family retreat to mourn his late son, Beau, but also to mull, as his dying son urged him to do, a campaign for president. Some of Mr. Biden’s friends and allies worry that he will decide it is a good idea. [NY Times]

A majority of the members of the Glasgow Management Control Board said Tuesday that based on documents approved by the city and the ambulance service director, there is no question about who is in charge of their dispatchers, regardless of which entity actually pays their salaries. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Democratic California Governor Jerry Brown on Wednesday sent a letter to all Republican presidential candidates pressing them to discuss their plans to deal with climate change. [Reuters]

Rand Paul got plenty of attention Saturday during the Fancy Farm Picnic in Western Kentucky. But it wasn’t the good kind. [WFPL]

On Tuesday, Allan Kauffman (D), mayor of Goshen, Indiana, posted a statement announcing that the City Council would not be voting on a proposed LGBT nondiscrimination ordinance that night. “Despite several attempts to tweak the ordinance amendment to respond to concerns expressed, they have not been enough to gain good consensus from City Council members,” he wrote. [ThinkProgress]

The battle over whether a company can force its workers to pay union dues landed in a Kentucky federal courthouse Tuesday as a handful of labor unions sought to persuade a judge to throw out a series of local laws designed to end closed shops. [H-L]

Critics of the Obama administration’s new rules for power plant emissions have been quick to describe them as “government overreach” and “flagrantly unlawful.” What they don’t say is that congressional inaction and a mandate from the Supreme Court drove the regulatory process to this point. [HuffPo]

UofL Messes Have Grown Since 2008

The University of Kentucky named longtime faculty member Lisa Cassis its vice president for research. [H-L]

The criminal justice system is “particularly skewed by race and by wealth,” President Barack Obama said on Tuesday in a speech at the NAACP Annual Convention in Philadelphia, citing a “long history of inequity in the criminal justice system in America.” [HuffPo]

Despite a consultant’s findings that University of Louisville President James Ramsey is paid above the market rate, the board of trustees’ compensation committee recommended Monday that he get a 6 percent merit pay increase and a bonus worth about $150,000. [C-J/AKN]

Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen urged lawmakers to tread lightly when it comes to overhauling the central bank, warning that proposed changes could undermine its ability to support the economy. [The Hill]

Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway issued a press release Tuesday warning flood victims to be aware of potential price-gouging scams in areas affected by recent storms. [Ashland Independent]

A regional cap-and-trade program has added $1.3 billion in economic activity to nine New England and Mid-Atlantic states since 2011, while decreasing their carbon emissions by 15 percent, according to independent analysis released Tuesday. [ThinkProgress]

Will Russell sure is milking you-know-what out of his arrest in an attempt to gain publicity. [Glasgow Daily Times]

This sad Eastern Kentucky situation has made international news. Search teams in Kentucky are looking for six people missing after heavy floods that already killed two people. [BBC]

Rowan Fiscal Court hopes to cash in on state road and bridge funds before the end of the year. [The Morehead News]

The Supreme Court was definitive in its decision to legalize gay marriage nationwide, but what is far from clear is whether U.S. companies must offer corporate benefits to same-sex spouses. [Reuters]

Visitors to all five national parks in Kentucky can earn a special free commemorative patch in recognition of the National Park Service 2016 centennial. [WKYT]

Labor leaders said there was a clear understanding that no national unions would make an endorsement before July 30. But the American Federation of Teachers jumped the gun. [Politico]

It took only a few minutes for nearly everything James Martin owned to swirl away in a muddy torrent. [H-L]

For a while the Wisconsin governor, running for the GOP nomination for the presidency, has been engaging in his own version of dog-whistling to homophobes, as he and the GOP struggle with the reality that the base of their party is still in the Stone Age on LGBT rights, while most Americans support equality. [HuffPo]

Corrupt Guy Dies, Media Gushes

Lester H. Burns Jr., a one-time candidate for governor and one of Kentucky’s most colorful, best-known defense attorneys before going to federal prison in the 1980s, has died. [H-L]

War-time suicide attempts in the Army are most common in newer enlisted soldiers who have not been deployed, while officers are less likely to try to end their lives. At both levels, attempts are more common among women and those without a high school diploma, according to a study billed as the most comprehensive analysis of a problem that has plagued the U.S. military in recent years. [HuffPo]

Lawyers for the Sierra Club and LG&E on Thursday argued for two hours over the meaning the word “occasional” in a federal court hearing stemming from a pollution lawsuit filed last year involving the Mill Creek power plant. [C-J/AKN]

Sen. Charles Grassley is demanding the American Red Cross explain how it spent nearly half a billion dollars raised after the 2010 Haiti earthquake. [ProPublica]

Fourteen schools will now offer free breakfast and lunch to the entire student population during the upcoming school year. The total includes all but four schools (Madison Central and Madison Southern high schools, B. Michael Caudill Middle and White Hall Elementary), which is a broad difference from last year. Only five schools previously offered the free lunch plan. [Richmond Register]

U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton will meet privately this month with leaders of the nation’s largest labor federation as she seeks to prevent a revolt by union members infuriated by her cautious stance on a looming trade deal, labor sources told Reuters. [Reuters]

Health officials, confronted with a shocking increase in heroin abuse, are developing a clearer picture of who is becoming addicted to this drug and why. The results may surprise you. [WFPL]

As the world enters into a sixth great extinction, scientists are racing against the clock to save genetic evidence from plants around the world. [BBC]

Kentucky has added two towns in the southern part of the state to those designated as “Trail Towns.” [WKYT & Press Releases]

The Obama administration faces an uphill battle when it seeks to convince a panel of federal judges to let the president’s executive actions on immigration take effect. [The Hill]

Um… Officials say a West Virginia man had been keeping two deer in captivity at his home for at least a year. [Ashland Independent]

Jeb Bush’s unprecedented $114 million haul makes it official: Big money rules American presidential politics. [Politico]

Has Lexington turned into the new Louisville with all the robberies and shootings? [H-L]

The U.S. Office of Personnel Management said on Thursday that hackers had stolen sensitive information – including Social Security numbers – of about 21.5 million people who have undergone background checks for security clearances since 2000. [HuffPo]

Beshear To Clerks: Ya Buncha Fools

The number of heroin overdoses at five northern Kentucky hospitals has continued to climb, but officials aren’t sure if that’s because more people are calling 911 for help, or more people are using heroin. [H-L]

Fox 2000 is developing a movie about the plaintiff in the June 26 ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court case that effectively legalized same-sex marriage. [HuffPo]

A Kentucky clerk of court said the state’s Democratic governor told him he should either issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples or resign from office. [C-J/AKN]

House Republicans are threatening to subpoena documents related to an ObamaCare program at the center of their lawsuit against President Obama. [The Hill]

Population is falling in more than half of Kentucky’s 120 counties, with rural areas bearing the brunt of losses from lagging birth rates and people moving elsewhere. [WDRB]

The National Treasury Employees Union (NTEU) said on Wednesday it has sued a federal government hiring agency over recent cyberattacks, alleging it violated constitutional privacy rights of NTEU members by failing to keep their personnel records safe. [Reuters]

Loretta Garmon has worked at Phillips IGA for 40 years, running the cash register most of the time, but also stocking shelves and carrying groceries to customers’ cars. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The US Army is to reduce the size of its force by 40,000 soldiers over the next two years, according to US media. [BBC]

It’s slightly sad when elected officials can’t comprehend what the freedom of religion does and does not entail. Whitley County Clerk Kay Schwartz is a Christian and she says issuing same-sex licenses would violate her freedom of religion. [WKYT]

In 2000 the world’s leaders agreed on an ambitious plan for attacking global poverty by 2015. [NPR]

Here’s Steve Beshear’s full statement: This morning, I advised Mr. Davis that I respect his right to his own personal beliefs regarding same-sex marriages. However, when he was elected, he took a constitutional oath to uphold the United States Constitution. According to the United States Supreme Court, the Constitution now requires that governmental officials in Kentucky and elsewhere must recognize same-sex marriages as valid and allow them to take place. One of Mr. Davis’ duties as county court clerk is to issue marriage licenses, and the Supreme Court now says that the United States Constitution requires those marriage licenses to be issued regardless of gender. Mr. Davis’ own county attorney has advised him that his oath requires him to do so. / While there are two or three county court clerks still refusing to perform their duties, the rest of the county court clerks are complying with the law regardless of their personal beliefs. The courts and the voters will deal appropriately with the rest. / I will not be calling any special session on this topic and costing the taxpayers hundreds of thousands of dollars doing so. Any proposal about the process of issuing marriage licenses that meets the standards of the Supreme Court ruling should be carefully thought out and could be considered in the regular session in 2016. [Press Release]

The Supreme Court says midazolam works fine for lethal injections. Experience says otherwise. [Mother Jones]

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet is going in the right direction in raising salaries of hundreds of engineers to curb high turnover and costly contracts for private engineers, several state lawmakers said Tuesday. [H-L]

CVS Health Corp said it was withdrawing its membership from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce after media reports that the trade group was lobbying globally against anti-smoking laws. [HuffPo]

Frankfort Always Passing Pension Buck

Thursday’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling upheld the nationwide tax credit subsidies to help people buy health insurance through the Affordable Care Act. [H-L]

A fire broke out at a prominent black church in South Carolina on Tuesday night, the latest in a series of blazes at places of worship in the South serving the African-American community. A federal law enforcement source told the Associated Press that the fire was not the work of an arsonist, and that preliminary investigations show it was not intentionally set. [HuffPo]

In a historic ruling reshaping the definition of the American family, the Supreme Court on Friday invalidated bans on same-sex marriage in Kentucky and across the country, holding that gays and lesbians have the constitutional right to marry. [C-J/AKN]

In what may not be a coincidence, a string of nighttime fires have damaged or destroyed at least six predominately black churches in four southern states in the past week. [SPLC]

Much is put into creating ceramics. A sculpture or ware starts as nothing more than a lump of dirt. Then with care, technique, and creativity, it becomes a work of art. [The Morehead News]

You can prove slavery was bad six ways from Sunday, but people can still choose to believe otherwise if they want. Addressing racism isn’t just about correcting erroneous beliefs — it’s about making people see the humanity in others. [Vox]

Data from Kentucky’s 446 public water systems shows they consistently produce excellent quality water and are nearly always in compliance with the Safe Drinking Water requirements, according to the Kentucky annual Drinking Water Report. The report summarizes the compliance data and status of public water system compliance monitoring results. [Energy & Environment Cabinet]

Congressional Republicans are using the power of the purse to do battle against a series of controversial labor regulations from the Obama administration. [The Hill]

Kentucky’s longest serving U.S. Senator says last year’s lengthy and costly campaign showed him two things about how he says people feel about the country. [WKYT]

Scientists who have devoted years developing medicines to cure disease are now working for tobacco companies to make e-cigarettes. [Reuters]

These are your friends or your family. Please consider helping them step away from their xenophobia. [Page One]

There have only been 9 days this year when the police have not killed somebody. Some news outlets put the number as high as 500 dead in the past six months, according to both The Guardian and Killed by the Police.Net. The Washington Post’s own investigation showed nearly 400 dead as of the end of May. [WaPo]

Kentucky’s retired state workers’ pension fund is a mess. It’s the most underfunded of any in the country, and it’s sinking dangerously close to running out of money. Yet state lawmakers, the men and women responsible for budgeting those pensions, don’t have quite the same worry about their own money. [H-L]

Meanwhile, Kentucky can’t even get medicinal marijuana right. Oregon ended marijuana prohibition at midnight Wednesday, joining Colorado, Washington state, Alaska and the District of Columbia in legalizing recreational use of the drug. [HuffPo]