RPK Back In Hands Of The Mega-Wealthy

Kentucky Supreme Court Chief Justice John Minton Jr. urged state lawmakers Friday to raise the salaries of justices and judges, saying they have not had “a measurable increase” in pay for 10 years. [H-L]

Oh, now Rand Paul has a black friend or something. It’s probably Ben Carson or some other person who has no concept of white privilege. [HuffPo]

State Rep. Jim Wayne says he continues to recover – slowly but steadily – in his battle with cancer and plans to return to Frankfort next week for the first time since the spring. He also said he expects to be able to return to the Capitol for the 2016 legislative session. [C-J/AKN]

During his first full week as Speaker, Paul Ryan gave a glimpse of how he’ll run the House differently than his predecessor, John Boehner. [The Hill]

From last week but more relevant today. Just a reminder – the people screaming about alleged voting machine rigging have no clue what they’re talking about. They’re the folks who get everything they know about politics from MSNBC and have no concept of what goes on in Kentucky. [Page One]

When they were kids, Simon Cherry and Ramsey Badawi both wanted to be astronomers, unlocking mysteries in far off galaxies. That didn’t work out for them. The pair still plan on unlocking mysteries but this time inside the human body. [Reuters]

In an effort to help Kentucky farmers, the University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture, Food and Environment is getting into the wholesale market. Their goal though is not to compete with local farmers, but to be able to provide training to allow those farmers to enter the market themselves. [Richmond Register]

When William T. Riley III became the police chief of this small city west of Detroit this summer, he found a department that bore little resemblance to the city it served. Nearly three-fourths of Inkster’s 25,000 residents are black. Its mayor and all six City Council members are, too. Yet in a newly released Justice Department survey, it was listed among the nation’s least representative police forces, with 21 white officers and five black officers. [NY Times]

Governor Steve Beshear announced on Thursday that Barren County Clerk Joanne London has received a grant totaling $20,280 from the Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives (KDLA) to preserve and manage local government records. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Former secretary of state Hillary Clinton, who is running for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination, was campaigning in South Carolina this weekend and sat down with journalist Roland Martin for an interview in which she talked about a number of topics, including one that has not featured in any of the Republican and Democratic debates: charter schools. [WaPo]

Officials of Morehead State University along with members of its Board of Regents, local and state legislators held a dedication ceremony Thursday, Nov. 5, for Lundergan Hall at the Derrickson Agricultural Complex on KY 377 north of Morehead. [The Morehead News]

Everything in Frankfort is corrupt as hell and there is no such thing as integrity there. [WFPL & Center for Public Integrity]

In case you thought the Republican Party of Kentucky was going to actually accomplish something? It no longer has a full-time chairman. A wealthy figurehead does not a functioning party make. Mac Brown is the next chairman of the Republican Party of Kentucky. [H-L]

Prescription drugs kill more people in the U.S. than any other drug, but heroin overdose deaths have exploded, leading the Drug Enforcement Administration to declare both as the most threatening drugs. [HuffPo]

Democrats Still Playing The Blame Game

SurveyUSA has finally been kicked to the curb! [H-L & C-J/AKN]

Letcher Circuit Judge Sam Wright III defeated Court of Appeals Judge Janet Stumbo in the race for Eastern Kentucky’s 7th District Supreme Court seat. [H-L]

If France can do it, the United States can do it. France will end its ban on blood donations by gay men, its health minister said Wednesday, calling the move the end “of a taboo and discrimination.” [HuffPo]

Republican Matt Bevin has scheduled no press conference or public events on the day after his huge victory in the governor’s election that raises implications for every major issue facing the state, including healthcare, education and pensions. But the transition process is already taking shape in Frankfort. [C-J/AKN]

A few hours before their afternoon shift at the Marshall County Mine last spring, hundreds of coal miners were summoned to a mandatory meeting with their new boss, Bob Murray, CEO of Murray Energy Corp. At a training facility in Moundsville, West Virginia, the chief executive of the nation’s No. 1 underground coal producer sported his signature sweater vest and struck a confrontational tone. [IBT]

Opinions issued by a federal appeals court Monday will allow two major air pollution-related lawsuits in Louisville to move forward. [WFPL]

This is basically why everyone is skeptical of whatever it is the U.S. Justice Action Network is doing in D.C. with the Koch money. It’s a story political journalists couldn’t resist. Reporters at the New York Times, Politico, Yahoo News, and other outlets have been rhapsodizing lately about how the ultra-conservative billionaire Koch brothers are “braving the spotlight” and joining forces with “tree-hugging liberals” to dedicate themselves to the cause of ending America’s over-incarceration crisis. Meanwhile, however, Koch money continues to finance election-year efforts that promote tough-on-crime politics. [The Intercept]

It has been two months since a head on crash destroyed Scott County Habitat for Humanity’s only pickup and delivery truck. [WKYT]

Instead of thanking Barack Obama, as these outsiders suggest, Matt Bevin should be thanking Kentucky Democrats for being to the right of national Republicans. It’s always some asshole outsider pontificating on Kentucky as if they’ve been here more than twice in their life. [WaPo]

The votes have all been counted, and Harlan County’s choice for circuit court clerk is incumbent Democrat Wendy Flanary. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

It is rare to hear a candidate for the United States Senate so earnestly quote rock lyrics. Rarer still, lyrics from a Canadian progressive-rock band. But Rand Paul quoted “The Spirit of Radio” by Rush — a group whose members were similarly influenced by the writings of Ayn Rand — everywhere he went during the Republican primary in Kentucky in 2010. [NY Times]

A Perry County man from the community of Chavies is facing multiple theft charges after Hazard Police say he stole a police cruiser. [Hazard Herald]

Hillary Clinton leaned as far as she ever has into making gun control a central focus of her presidential campaign on Tuesday, releasing a somber new 30-second television advertisement calling for more stringent gun policies. [Politico]

Ryan Quarles, a Republican state representative from Georgetown, will be the new commissioner of agriculture. [H-L]

Though 8,000 Detroit residents were foreclosed on this year, they’re finding inventive ways to deal with an ongoing crisis. Tynetta Sneed, 32, had been settled for years in a modest white bungalow, down the street from her mom and brother, when she got a notice saying that her house was going into foreclosure. [HuffPo]

Nobody’s Satisfied With 2015 Candidates

Ultimately, less than half of Kentucky’s voters are satisfied with their choices for governor this year, but that number is slightly worse for Bevin than it is for Conway. [H-L]

Both the Democratic and Republican National Committees have agreed to give their blessing to a presidential town hall set up by activists in the Black Lives Matter movement. But organizers within the network have said that gesture isn’t enough. They want the parties to devote one of their official — and more high-profile — debates to racial justice issues. [HuffPo]

Two Republican lawmakers announced bills Wednesday that would increase legislative oversight of the state pension systems for public employees and teachers. [C-J/AKN]

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Granny) is now viewed negatively by a majority of Republicans, a new poll says. [The Hill]

Republican gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin stopped briefly in Ashland to talk to voters during a zip around the state in a final push before next week’s election. [Ashland Independent]

Their lips are moving. They’re lying: Ben Carson, Rand Paul and the right-wing’s truthiness problem. When Rand Paul, Ben Carson and Ted Cruz start citing history and “facts,” best double-check them right away. [Salon]

A divided Kentucky Supreme Court has upheld the validity of a fee assessed by Campbell County to pay for 911 services. [WHAS11]

A manhunt for a fugitive accused of opening fire at police officers three times in two different states continued for a sixth day Thursday, continuing a search that has closed schools and stretched across a wide swath of this region. [WaPo]

Kentucky’s Supreme Court has ruled that state mine-safety laws and regulations did not apply to a subcontract worker who died while installing a massive garage door on a mine-site building in Muhlenberg County. [WKYT]

Let’s take a look at this again. Peabody Energy, the nation’s largest coal company, is seeking release from a pledge to pay into a health insurance fund. [ProPublica]

Candidates for Kentucky’s offices of governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general and agriculture commissioner were recently asked to respond to written questions from the Daily News. [BGDN]

The US Navy scrambled four F/A-18 jets to intercept Russian warplanes which flew near a US aircraft carrier off the Korean peninsula, officials say. [BBC]

Democrat Jack Conway raised more than $900,000 in the first two weeks of October to increase his fundraising lead over Republican Matt Bevin by $5 million. [H-L]

Lots of people seem to think the dominant storylines about Wednesday night’s Republican primary debate are Marco Rubio’s smooth delivery, Jeb Bush’s weak attempt to knock Rubio off his game, and the supposed incompetence of the CNBC moderators. [HuffPo]

Kim Davis Just Won’t Effing Quit It

Despite Kentucky’s socially conservative streak, more than half of the state’s voters think Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis should have to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [H-L]

In a speech last week, Federal Reserve Board Chair Janet Yellen inadvertently told us why Congress should set a 4 percent unemployment target for the Fed in its conduct of monetary policy, as is proposed in a new bill put forward by Michigan Representative John Conyers. The context was Yellen’s dismissal of such a target. [HuffPo]

Don Childers and others affiliated with Childers Oil Co. combined to give $4,000 to the Kentucky Democratic Party this summer while Governor Steve Beshear’s administration was negotiating a secret settlement with the company over a 2011 spill of diesel fuel into the North Fork of the Kentucky River. [C-J/AKN]

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) is the favorite to succeed John Boehner (R-OH) after his surprise resignation as the House Speaker last week. The appointment of McCarthy, who represents a heavily Latino district, to preside over a more radically conservative Republican caucus could have implications for immigration reform. [ThinkProgress]

Ann Stewart, executive director of the Glasgow-Barren County Tourist and Convention Commission, has been reappointed to serve another term on the Kentucky Travel Industry Association’s board of directors. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The Secret Service reportedly leaked sensitive personal information to the press about Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Jason Chaffetz as the Utah Republican was investigating the beleaguered agency. [Politico]

Steve Beshear’s lawyers are using the words “absurd,” ”forlorn” and “obtuse” to describe the legal arguments a county clerk has used to avoid issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [WAVE3]

Can we quit it with calling Drew Curtis “quirky”? It’s an insult from a bunch of old-ass white men and seems to get thrown around a lot lately. The only people who think he is quirky are people who have no idea what “URL” means. And can we quit acting like the RGA pulled out because Bevin sucks? Sure, he sucks, but the RGA’s man on the ground said six months ago their budget was $3 million. RGA never thought Bevin could win, really. Which is worse than abandoning him now. [Larry Sabato]

Kentuckians are continuing to default on federal student loans at one of the highest rates in the nation. [WFPL]

Rand Paul’s (R-Cookie Tree) daddy hauled in more money in one day than he’s raised in three months. Surprising that anyone thinks his presidential campaign is anything more than a stunt to raise his senate campaign profile. [Mother Jones]

Attorneys for a Magoffin County judge have asked the Kentucky Supreme Court to review a lower court decision that would force the judge out of office for election fraud. [WKYT]

In an interview with NPR, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani says his country will use its added billions of dollars from the nuclear deal for boosting the Iranian economy. [NPR]

This year’s Historic Paris-Bourbon County house tour Sunday is at the boyhood home of one of Kentucky’s most interesting and least known Civil War generals, who ended his short life as an American diplomat in South America. [H-L]

Thirteen people were killed and as many as 20 were wounded Thursday in a shooting at a small community college in Roseburg, Oregon, according to multiple reports. Another day, another mass shooting. [HuffPo]

Kim Davis Goes Full Fox Fame Whore

Weighing in on an open-records case involving some of Kentucky’s most vulnerable residents, a divided state Supreme Court ruled Thursday that an advocacy group failed to qualify for access to documents related to the deaths of some people in the state’s care. [H-L]

A young girl from California delivered a message about immigration reform to Pope Francis on Wednesday and received a blessing in return for her efforts. [HuffPo]

What was that, again, about not wanting the spotlight? Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis said in an interview Wednesday with Fox News that she was prepared to stay in jail as long as necessary to defend her decision on marriage licenses. [C-J/AKN]

Growth in the U.S. manufacturing sector showed no month-over-month change during September, staying at August’s sluggish pace which was the weakest in almost two years, according to an industry report released on Wednesday. [Reuters]

The development of a homeless shelter is something officials with the Glasgow Service Unit of the Salvation Army have discussed at its board meetings. [Glasgow Daily Times]

In Alabama, anti-drug fervor and abortion politics have turned a meth-lab law into the country’s harshest weapon against pregnant women. [ProPublica]

The two women running to be Kentucky’s next lieutenant governor squared off in a debate sponsored by the League of Women Voters on Wednesday evening at Midway College in Versailles, mostly sticking to campaign talking points. But there were a few fireworks toward the end. [Ronnie Ellis]

Few things strike fear into the hearts of politicians like a disgruntled grandparent entering a voting booth. [ThinkProgress]

Good-paying jobs exist in Kentucky, but employers are having difficulty finding workers skilled enough to fill positions, according to Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway. [Ashland Independent]

Millions of kids, some as young as 5, now get their schooling online. Just one problem: Nobody knows how well it works. [Politico]

Kelly Bowman knew he was going to be a Kentucky State Police trooper when he was a little boy. His career has always brought him home. [The Morehead News]

The U.S. government says the fingerprints of five times as many people as originally believed were included in the data hacked from Office of Personnel Management computers earlier this year. [NPR]

Every Republican presidential candidate who could be in the room with Pope Francis during the pontiff’s address Thursday to Congress – that is, every senator – was there. Except one. [H-L]

With less than two weeks before the start of the new Supreme Court session, Justice Antonin Scalia is still lamenting Obergefell v. Hodges, the June ruling that legalized same-sex marriage nationwide. [HuffPo]

It’s Post-Primary Hangover Time!

You should check out this interactive map of last night’s vote results from across Kentucky. [H-L]

As much as journalists may fancy themselves superhuman observers of history, the truth is that we are as susceptible to trauma as the victims whose stories we tell. [HuffPo]

A Franklin County grand jury Tuesday indicted former Buffalo Trace Distillery security guard Leslie M. Wright, 34, of Frankfort, on charges of being paid to look the other way as barrels were stolen for what authorities say was a bourbon theft criminal syndicate. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky hates old people. States with at least 40 percent of homes ranked on the bottom two rungs include North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York. [Newsweek]

The real reason Republicans running for governor didn’t have in-depth discussions is because two of the candidates were incapable. The other two, one a former state supreme court justice and the other, an evangelical extremist who is overcompensating like woah, have never been outside their respective bubbles. Ever. [Eye Roll]

After winning reelection and control of the U.S. Senate, Republican Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., appointed Hazen Marshall, a lobbyist for Koch Industries, as his new policy chief. [The Intercept]

A historic case against the iconic Wagner’s Pharmacy near Churchill Downs is likely to end, since the Kentucky Supreme Court has ruled that morbid obesity is not a state-protected disability. [Business First]

The White House on Monday called the fall of Ramadi to the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) a “setback,” but vowed the U.S. is determined to help retake the Iraqi city. [The Hill]

An online fundraising campaign was successful for the Louisville businessman who is set to buy Guntown Mountain, the Western-themed roadside attraction in Cave City. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Obese young adults may be more likely to have a stroke than people who aren’t overweight, a U.S. study suggests. [Reuters]

His first four and a half months in office have included two record-breaking winter storms, two instances of flooding, collapsed bridges and the arrest of a Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program employee on forgery and theft charges. “All that’s missing is for a plague of locusts to hit Madison County, and we would have faced all possible challenges,” Madison Judge/Executive Reagan Taylor said Friday in his first State of the County address. [Richmond Register]

Millions of Americans use GlaxoSmithKline’s purple inhaler. But whether Advair poses a higher risk of asthma-related death remains uncertain 15 years after regulators approved the drug. [ProPublica]

The University of Kentucky has begun a sweeping overhaul of its body bequeathal program after finding numerous problems with its administration and oversight, including a three to five year delay in burying the remains of people who’d given their bodies for scientific research. The overhaul includes eliminating the position of program director Gary Ginn, who is also the Fayette County Coroner. [H-L]

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg officiated a same-sex wedding over the weekend, and according to New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd, the Notorious R.B.G. gave a big shout-out to the U.S. Constitution. [HuffPo]

Student Loan Servicing Is A Mess

Here’s another Louisville/Kentucky movie to get excited about. [Variety]

William Hilton Paul, son of U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., pleaded guilty Tuesday to driving under the influence in Lexington. [H-L]

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on Thursday launched a broad review of the often murky business of student loan servicing, questioning whether the roughly 40 million Americans with student debt are being treated fairly under a patchwork of rules and market forces that could leave them vulnerable to abuse. [HuffPo]

Many small towns in Appalachian Kentucky look a lot like Austin, Ind.; a picture of rural America with its shop-lined Main Street and stubble-filled cornfields — and the unlikely epicenter of the largest HIV outbreak in Indiana’s history. [C-J/AKN]

U.S. retail sales were flat in April as households cut back on purchases of automobiles and other big-ticket items, the latest sign the economy was struggling to rebound strongly after barely growing in the first quarter. [Reuters]

The Kentucky Association of Counties (KACo) is adding cyber liability to its insurance coverage provided to member counties beginning July 1. [Ashland Independent]

What happens when you’ve been kicking the fiscal can down the road for years, but the road suddenly hits a dead end? That’s what Chicago – and the state of Illinois – are about to find out. [ProPublica]

A differing of understandings of which classification the Glasgow Municipal Airport has in regard to the volume and type of its traffic was the focus of a discussion that took at least 90 minutes Monday at a meeting of the airport’s board of directors. [Glasgow Daily Times]

There are 19 Republicans seriously considering launching campaigns for president, and 10 numbers on a phone. That causes a big problem for pollsters using automated polling technology, one of the most common forms of public polling. [Politico]

Louisville Metro Police officers in the Fifth Division will begin wearing body cameras in June. [WFPL]

A former chief justice from Georgia decried capital punishment Tuesday, dubbing it “morally indefensible” and void of business sense. [Think Progress]

Kentucky’s highest court says a fraternity house should be considered a private residence in a search-and-seizure case stemming from a college student’s drug conviction after police found marijuana in his room. [WKYT]

The global pharmaceutical industry is being called on to pay for a $2bn innovation fund to revitalise research into antibiotics. [BBC]

Federal prosecutors are opposing former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship’s request to go home to Las Vegas for Memorial Day. [H-L]

Asking the Department of Defense to consider allowing young undocumented immigrants to enlist proved a bridge too far Thursday in the Republican-led House of Representatives. [HuffPo]