Coal Pandering’s Worse Than Child Abuse, Right? Surely It’s Worse Than That. Or Maybe Elder Abuse?

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway tried to reinforce his friend-of-coal credentials Thursday, pledging to promote the industry and look for tax incentives to boost production as he distanced himself from a president routinely blamed for coal’s downturn. [H-L]

If you want to stop violence against people, stop violence against animals. [HuffPo]

Because of course they are. Some of Kentucky’s most vulnerable people — frail, elderly and disabled individuals in nursing homes — have been threatened, ridiculed, slapped, injured or sexually abused, but the state’s nursing home industry is seeking relief from what it calls heavy-handed state oversight. [C-J/AKN]

The lack of accurate information about police-involved shootings is roiling the nation’s law enforcement community, leaving officials unable to say whether high-profile killings are isolated events or part of an alarming trend, FBI Director James B. Comey said Wednesday. [WaPo]

What this means is Mark Hebert is prolly spilling the hooker tea. A former University of Louisville basketball player has given investigators a version of events that indicates strippers were in the players’ dorm on at least one occasion, a source close to the investigation told WDRB News. [WDRB]

Leading theologians from the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) are making news this week for again speaking out against ex-gay therapy, also known as reparative or conversion therapy. But what these theologians have been saying at the annual Association of Certified Biblical Counselors (ACBC) conference about how to respond to LGBT people belies the supposed progress of rejecting these harmful, ineffective treatments. [ThinkProgress]

A federal judge won’t drop charges against two of the six accused in a scheme to sell millions of dollars of untaxed cigarettes from a storefront in Russell, according to court records. [Ashland Independent]

A few days ago, the RAND Corporation published an opinion piece that raised questions about Surgeon Scorecard, our searchable online database of complication rates for surgeons performing several elective operations. We appreciate the authors’ intentions and plan to take some suggestions into account as we prepare Surgeon Scorecard 2.0. [ProPublica]

Barren Circuit Judge Phillip Patton has issued an order today agreeing with the decision of the Kentucky Office of the Attorney General that the Glasgow Independent Schools Board of Education violated the Open Meetings Act with its closed session on March 30, when it discussed a potential property agreement. [Glasgow Daily Times]

U.S. stocks ended higher on Thursday with the S&P 500 closing at a seven-week high as investors saw further signs of dovishness in the Federal Reserve’s September meeting minutes which shed light on its decision to keep interest rates near zero. [Reuters]

If Madison County institutes a needle-exchange program in an attempt to control infections such as HIV and hepatitis C among inter-venous drug users, it will benefit from the lessons learned by its neighbor to the north. [Richmond Register]

US presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has outlined her plan to curb Wall Street abuses. [BBC]

Preservation Kentucky will present its Excellence in Preservation Awards on Saturday at a particularly notable historic site: Traveler’s Rest, home place of Isaac Shelby, the first and fifth governor of Kentucky. [H-L]

Senior U.S. lawmakers have begun probing possible intelligence lapses over Moscow’s intervention in Syria, concerned that American spy agencies were slow to grasp the scope and intention of Russia’s dramatic military offensive there, U.S. congressional sources and other officials told Reuters. [HuffPo]

Kim Davis Just Won’t Effing Quit It

Despite Kentucky’s socially conservative streak, more than half of the state’s voters think Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis should have to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [H-L]

In a speech last week, Federal Reserve Board Chair Janet Yellen inadvertently told us why Congress should set a 4 percent unemployment target for the Fed in its conduct of monetary policy, as is proposed in a new bill put forward by Michigan Representative John Conyers. The context was Yellen’s dismissal of such a target. [HuffPo]

Don Childers and others affiliated with Childers Oil Co. combined to give $4,000 to the Kentucky Democratic Party this summer while Governor Steve Beshear’s administration was negotiating a secret settlement with the company over a 2011 spill of diesel fuel into the North Fork of the Kentucky River. [C-J/AKN]

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) is the favorite to succeed John Boehner (R-OH) after his surprise resignation as the House Speaker last week. The appointment of McCarthy, who represents a heavily Latino district, to preside over a more radically conservative Republican caucus could have implications for immigration reform. [ThinkProgress]

Ann Stewart, executive director of the Glasgow-Barren County Tourist and Convention Commission, has been reappointed to serve another term on the Kentucky Travel Industry Association’s board of directors. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The Secret Service reportedly leaked sensitive personal information to the press about Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Jason Chaffetz as the Utah Republican was investigating the beleaguered agency. [Politico]

Steve Beshear’s lawyers are using the words “absurd,” ”forlorn” and “obtuse” to describe the legal arguments a county clerk has used to avoid issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [WAVE3]

Can we quit it with calling Drew Curtis “quirky”? It’s an insult from a bunch of old-ass white men and seems to get thrown around a lot lately. The only people who think he is quirky are people who have no idea what “URL” means. And can we quit acting like the RGA pulled out because Bevin sucks? Sure, he sucks, but the RGA’s man on the ground said six months ago their budget was $3 million. RGA never thought Bevin could win, really. Which is worse than abandoning him now. [Larry Sabato]

Kentuckians are continuing to default on federal student loans at one of the highest rates in the nation. [WFPL]

Rand Paul’s (R-Cookie Tree) daddy hauled in more money in one day than he’s raised in three months. Surprising that anyone thinks his presidential campaign is anything more than a stunt to raise his senate campaign profile. [Mother Jones]

Attorneys for a Magoffin County judge have asked the Kentucky Supreme Court to review a lower court decision that would force the judge out of office for election fraud. [WKYT]

In an interview with NPR, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani says his country will use its added billions of dollars from the nuclear deal for boosting the Iranian economy. [NPR]

This year’s Historic Paris-Bourbon County house tour Sunday is at the boyhood home of one of Kentucky’s most interesting and least known Civil War generals, who ended his short life as an American diplomat in South America. [H-L]

Thirteen people were killed and as many as 20 were wounded Thursday in a shooting at a small community college in Roseburg, Oregon, according to multiple reports. Another day, another mass shooting. [HuffPo]

Matt Bevin Is Trying To Lose The Race

Attorney General Jack Conway maintains a nominal five-point lead over Republican Matt Bevin with just more than a month to go in Kentucky’s race for governor, according to a new Bluegrass Poll. [H-L]

Is Matt Bevin trying to lose the race for governor? Yes. But so is Jack Conway. [More H-L]

The U.S. plans to increase the number of refugees it takes from 70,000 to 100,000 over the next two years. New York, Los Angeles and 16 other cities have urged President Barack Obama to accept even more refugees from Syria. [HuffPo]

The Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet agreed this month to keep secret a proposed settlement of its lawsuit against an Eastern Kentucky oil company that had been repeatedly cited for contaminating the North Fork of the Kentucky River. [C-J/AKN]

The Environmental Protection Agency has released a final version of updated rules intended to keep farmworkers from being poisoned by pesticides. [NPR]

The Glasgow City Council passed a new city ordinance regarding the humane treatment of animals following a second reading at Monday’s meeting, setting limits to how long dogs may be tethered to a single point and specifying the equipment to be used and the manner in which tethering can legally occur within city limits. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Royal Dutch Shell has stopped Arctic oil and gas exploration off the coast of Alaska after “disappointing” results from a key well in the Chukchi Sea. [BBC]

Steam rolled off a large tray of sorghum juice as it simmered at 235 degrees, filling the Old Mill Park with a smell unique to the cane plant. Last weekend marked the 45th annual Sorghum Festival. Despite the gloomy weather, a large crowd walked though downtown West Liberty enjoying the local craft bazaar, parade, homemade snacks, fair food and of course — freshly made sorghum. [Ashland Independent]

Earlier this month, the Brookings Institution, a centrist think tank, published a provocatively titled paper that posited, “Do we already have universal preschool?” Revitalizing the fierce debate over early childhood education, the paper concluded that 70 percent of children already have an option for pre-K, infuriating many who have been making pushes for public funding of universal pre-K. [ThinkProgress]

James Comer said he plans to start a business and return home to Monroe County once his term is over in December. What he didn’t mention is toying with a run for congress. [WHAS11]

Immigrants and their descendants will drive U.S. population growth over the next half century, transforming the country into one where no racial or ethnic group is a majority, a Pew Research Center report released on Monday said. [Reuters]

Whether this hilarious take from organized labor about Matt Bevin’s running mate is true or not? You already know she’s a piece of work. [AFL-CIO]

One of the three super PACs supporting Rand Paul’s presidential campaign has stopped raising money, dealing a damaging blow to an already cash-starved campaign. And the guy running his campaign into the ground? His name is Doug Stafford. [Politico]

Freedom of religion isn’t reason enough to deny any American their constitutional rights, President Barack Obama said Sunday as he addressed members of the LGBT community, one of his major sources of political and financial support. [H-L]

Ivo Caers confirmed for us Table 21 was never reported to the FDA. … We know now what’s behind the tables: The little girls with the lactating breasts … and the little boys even under ten who have gynecomastia. My word. [HuffPo]

KY Is F’d On All Fronts. But How Badly?

Fees will be waived at several recreation areas in the Daniel Boone National Forest this weekend to celebrate National Public Lands Day. [H-L]

Plans by President Barack Obama’s administration to allow thousands more refugees into the United States faced stiff opposition on Monday in the U.S. Congress, where Republican lawmakers demanded the right to review, and reject, the effort, citing fears of terrorism. [HuffPo]

Ten Kentucky children died last year from abuse and neglect and another 32 suffered life-threatening injuries, according to the latest annual report of such statistics from the Cabinet for Health and Family Services. [C-J/AKN]

Time Warner Cable Inc’s shareholders approved the company’s $56 billion takeover by Charter Communications Inc, according to preliminary votes at a special shareholder meeting. [Reuters]

A new report shows fewer children in Kentucky died from abuse and neglect last year, but the state remains among the top 10 worst states for child abuse. [WLKY]

Recently filed court documents show the makers of Tylenol planned to enlist the White House and lawmakers to block the Food and Drug Administration from imposing tough new safety restrictions on acetaminophen, the iconic painkiller’s chief ingredient. [ProPublica]

As temperatures start to cool down and the leaves begin to fall, Norma Justice and others are gearing up for the annual Flatwoods Fall Festival. [Ashland Independent]

The house that could save the world. The next generation of ultra-efficient houses will redefine how we fight climate change — and how we live. [Politico]

Gov. Rick Scott will fly to Kentucky early Tuesday for two days of private meetings in Lexington and Louisville with unidentified business owners about moving or expanding to Florida. There won’t be any warm welcome from the top executive of the Bluegrass State for Scott, who has already has lined up at least one Kentucky company to say it’s bringing jobs to Florida. [Palm Beach Post]

If we’re handcuffing autistic children at the elbows or throwing them in jail overnight, then we’re failing them. If we’re hitting kids with felony weapons charges for bringing fishing tackle to school, then we’re failing them. And if we’re using suspensions (which absolutely do not work) against students who build clocks, or twirl pencils, or write about pot, or chew their Pop-Tarts into the shape of a gun, then we’re failing them. [Click this Clicky]

Attorneys for Kim Davis are as backward as she and her ilk. [WKYT]

If you haven’t seen the Kim Davis interview on the teevee, you’re really missing out. She’s great at playing the victim and great and projecting. Just like Joshua Powell. Birds of a feather. [ABC News]

The University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville have won a $3.76 million grant to create a national center of excellence in micro/nanotechnology, one of just 16 awarded by the National Science Foundation. [H-L]

Is this Dong Trump’s Sarah The Quitter Palin moment? Probably not. Because we all know we haven’t seen the worst of him yet. [HuffPo]

Jack Again Avoids The Campaign Trail

HELP PROTECT OUR SOURCES! Stop the Montgomery County-Joshua Powell-Phil Rison insanity! Help us pay ridiculous the fees these shysters caused. [CLICK HERE]

One year ago, Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway met with a group of out-of-state trial lawyers who urged him to pursue litigation against the oil industry over a now-disused gasoline additive — methyl tertiary butyl ether, or MTBE — found to contaminate groundwater. [John Cheves]

Turd Cruz (R-Texas) declined to say on Saturday whether or not he believes that President Barack Obama is Christian. [HuffPo]

Louisville Metro Police have recorded 77 suicides this year, a 30 percent jump compared to this time a year ago and one more than the city totaled all of last year. The suicide total also far exceeds the city’s homicide total this year, which stood at 53 as of Sept. 17. Officials at the state and city level, however, admit Louisville’s suicide count could be higher given that the police do not investigate all deaths that turn out to be ruled suicides. [C-J/AKN]

Ben Carson says it would be a mistake to elect a Muslim as U.S. president. “I would not advocate that we put a Muslim in charge of this nation,” Carson said in an interview televised on NBC’s “Meet the Press” on Sunday. “I absolutely would not agree with that.” [The Hill]

Jack Conway has taken some heat from some supporters for spending too much time fundraising and too little on the campaign trail. [Ronnie Ellis]

Federal Reserve policymakers appeared deeply divided on Saturday over how seriously problems in the world economy will effect the U.S., a fracture that may be difficult for Fed Chair Janet Yellen to mend as she guides the central bank’s debate over whether to hike interest rates. [Reuters]

A restraining order filed against the owner of Funtown Mountain by one of the lending institutions from which he sought funding to purchase the Cave City roadside attraction has been granted. [Glasgow Daily Times]

What’s fascinating is who McAuliffee is pushing back against: his former staffers and confidants. [Politico]

For 30 years the Haldeman Community Center board has hosted the annual Gourd Festival to raise funds to support their endeavors. [The Morehead News]

After the sixth suicide in his old battalion, Manny Bojorquez sank onto his bed. With a half-empty bottle of Jim Beam beside him and a pistol in his hand, he began to cry. [NY Times]

Somi Babar huddled Thursday morning with a group of mothers, peering at the white exterior walls of the Louisville Islamic Center. [WFPL]

In a small state like Iowa with so many presidential candidates on the ground, the homegrown political talent to support those campaigns is stretched thin. [NPR]

Kentucky State Police are investigating the death of the Bell County Magistrate Saturday in the Bell County Jail. Earlier this month, Ricky Goodin, 51, of Pineville, was charged with solicitation to commit murder. [H-L]

Are they fools or fascists? Probably the former, but there was a disturbing cast to the second GOP debate, a vituperative jingoism reminiscent of the xenophobia that periodically scars western capitalist societies in moments of disarray. [HuffPo]

Tonight’s “Debate” Should Be Terrible

And you thought the return of football season was exciting. Well, there are other showdowns kicking off this week that promise their own thrills. [H-L]

Along the Rio Grande, a program designed to reduce cross-border wait times is shrinking the barrier between El Paso and Juarez. [HuffPo]

It’s your last chance to get your questions in before Tuesday’s Bluegrass Poll Gubernatorial Debate. [C-J/AKN]

Before Jeb! Bush unveiled his tax! plan! on Wednesday, he met in Manhattan with Stephen Moore, an economist at the conservative Heritage Foundation. Also there were Steve Forbes (whose family owned Forbes Magazine until they sold it last year to Hong Kong-based investors) and Larry Kudlow (a CNBC contributor and the worst economic prognosticator since Irving Fisher). [The Intercept]

What event requires more than 120 gallons of milk, 70 pounds of margarine, 130 dozen eggs and 175 pounds of cornmeal? The 2015 Spoonbread Festival. [Richmond Register]

Thousands of public sector workers demonstrated on Friday against an austerity plan to help pull Puerto Rico out of a massive debt crisis, saying the private sector should take more of the pain. [Reuters]

Issues regarding Funtown Mountain, a carnival-themed roadside attraction in Cave City, continued on Monday with it being a primary topic of discussion among members of the city’s code enforcement’s board of directors, and with one of the lending agencies that helped fund the property purchase filing legal action in Barren Circuit Court. [Glasgow Daily Times]

A ProPublica analysis of newly available federal data shows that some of the nation’s wealthiest colleges are leaving their poorest students with plenty of debt. [ProPublica]

Rowan Fiscal Court opened bids on two critical bridge projects in a special meeting last week. [The Morehead News]

Here’s Rand Paul (R-Cookie Tree) hypocritically blaming Democrats for a potential government shutdown. [ThinkProgress]

The Russell City Council is tasked with deciding whether or not to maintain the current property tax rate or change it, but they are seeking public input before making a proposal. [Ashland Independent]

Look, if you’re a presidential candidate and you sing on the campaign trail? You’re probably just going to need to go away. [WaPo]

The Fayette County school board heard details Monday about the 2015-16 budget that will total more than $442 million. That is an increase of $20 million, or 4.8 percent, over the previous year, district budget director Julane Mullins said. [H-L]

Once the favored establishment candidate, GOP presidential candidate Jeb Bush has seen his poll numbers drop and, consequently, a dip in campaign donations. [HuffPo]