Of Course Racism Is A Big Problem

In 2006, senators of the University of Kentucky’s student government passed a resolution to remove a mural in Memorial Hall that showed scenes of state history, including black workers in a tobacco field, black musicians playing for white dancers, and a Native American with a tomahawk. They told then-President Lee Todd that it was degrading to ethnic and racial groups. [H-L]

More than half of Americans know someone who has abused prescription painkillers or died from an overdose, or has taken these medications themselves to get high, as the opioid epidemic continues to spread, according to a new poll. [HuffPo]

The chief justice of the Kentucky Supreme Court has delayed until next week his decision on whether to remove Jefferson Circuit Judge Olu Stevens from all criminal cases. [C-J/AKN]

Six decades after the Brown v. Board of Education decision that determined that segregating white and black children is unconstitutional, American schools are drifting back toward racial segregation. [ThinkProgress]

With most of its Phase 1 expansion plans complete, the soon to be renamed Madison Airport board unveiled its Phase 2 plans Monday, including a new terminal building. [Richmond Register]

The state of Arkansas must record the names of both partners in a same-sex marriage on the birth certificates of their children, a judge ruled on Monday. [Reuters]

Drugs and addiction in the workplace are common in this area, Mike Wirzfeld, an occupational-medicine administrator at Our Lady of Bellefonte Hospital told members of the Rotary Club of Ashland during a meetin Monday. [Ashland Independent]

Veteran European law enforcement officials, one of them Muslim, reflect on the roots of the Paris attacks, the tense aftermath and the debate about the effectiveness of counterterror forces. [ProPublica]

Oh, look, teevee lady has done another “investigation” that’s been done countless times. This time it’s a look at special deputies in Kentucky — something she learned about on Page One, according to her colleagues. Seems there’s a bunch of bad blood among those at WKYT. [WKYT]

About half of Americans, 49 percent, say that racism is “a big problem,” according to a new national poll conducted by CNN and the Kaiser Family Foundation. [The Hill]

The Tri-Cities was awarded the designation of Kentucky Trail Town at a ceremony held at the Betty Howard Memorial Coal Miner’s Theater in Benham on Monday. The designation is the culmination of several years of work on the part of the cities of Benham, Lynch and Cumberland. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

NPR’s Rachel Martin speaks with Anne Richard, Assistant Secretary of State for Population, Refugees and Migration, about the screening process refugees go through before entering the United States. [NPR]

Students and citizens lined Chestnut Street on Monday to affirm their unity in the wake of racial and homophobic slurs and harassment directed toward Berea College students during homecoming weekend this month. [H-L]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. (You get $25 — enough for a couple months of service to determine whether you like it) [Ting]

Rand Paul Is A Tiny, Simple Xenophobe

Louisville Gas and Electric Co. and Kentucky Utilities Co. are asking regulators to allow them to own and operate charging stations for electric vehicles. [H-L]

After the Islamic State (ISIS) claimed responsibility for Friday’s wave of attacks that killed more than 130 people in Paris, the hactivist collective Anonymous declared war on the terrorist faction and its supporters. [HuffPo]

Gov. Steve Beshear says his staff is reviewing thousands of pardon applications sent to his office over the past eight years, but he said he has not yet decided whether he will issue any pardons before leaving office at midnight Dec. 7. [C-J/AKN]

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected an anti-abortion group’s bid to force the federal government to reveal more information about a $1 million grant it made in 2011 to women’s health provider Planned Parenthood in New Hampshire. [Reuters]

Carter Caves may be the “best kept secret of the park system,” according to its park manager, but it may also be Carter County’s best-kept secret for how to truly open up recreational tourism in the northeast region of Kentucky. [Ashland Independent]

The justices reopen the abortion debate by agreeing to decide whether the state’s restrictions on clinics and abortion doctors go too far. [ProPublica]

The Cave Region Trails Initiative Steering Committee took steps toward seeking more input as it works to develop a master plan to connect trails in and around 11 communities bordering Mammoth Cave National Park during its meeting at the Cave City Convention Center on Thursday night. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The most-read story on the BBC News website on Sunday was about a terror attack – but not the one currently dominating the news. [BBC]

Sitting on the hard wooden benches inside the fifth-floor courtroom in the Charleston federal courthouse for eight hours, Monday through Friday, for the past month has been uncomfortable for everyone observing the criminal trial of former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship. [Richmond Register]

Here comes Little Randy Paul flying his bigot flag. Now he wants to halt refugee visas. Small people do small things. [The Hill]

Harlan Appalachian Regional Hospital representatives spoke to the Harlan Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday during their regularly scheduled meeting to explain the Wound Care Center and its services. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

Political leaders in the United States must not turn away Syrian refugees as part of a religious test, an emphatic President Barack Obama declared Monday, entreating public officials “not to feed that dark impulse inside of us.” [Politico]

Because there aren’t already enough reasons to think Tommy Turner and his crew are backwater as hell. The Hodgenville City Council has unanimously voted to allow the words “In God We Trust” to be lettered on the town’s police cars. [H-L]

And the Republicans nationally, like many in Kentucky, are beginning to fly their racist flags high. Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump would consider shuttering some mosques in the United States after last week’s deadly terror attacks in France. [HuffPo]

All Eyes On Appalachia As Stivers Embarrasses, Abandons His Suffering Constituents

Construction on a Noah’s Ark attraction in northern Kentucky is sailing along, and the builders say they’re ready to announce an opening date. [H-L]

The prevailing view that addiction is a disease, just like depression or diabetes, is wrong, according to a leading neuroscientist. Marc Lewis, the author of Memoirs of an Addicted Brain and The Biology of Desire, insists that addiction is not a disease and that presenting it as such is harmful. [HuffPo]

Oh, man, Dan Johnson really let Jack Conway have it in his letter to the editor. [C-J/AKN]

America’s poorest white town: abandoned by coal, swallowed by drugs. In the first of a series of dispatches from the US’s poorest communities, we visit Beattyville, Kentucky, blighted by a lack of jobs and addiction to ‘hillbilly heroin’. [The Guardian]

Gov.-elect Matt Bevin’s pledge to scale back the Medicaid expansion and dismantle Kynect, Kentucky’s award-winning health insurance exchange, has caused concern among health clinics. [Business First]

Senate Republicans are divided over how far to go with an ObamaCare repeal bill that they plan to send to the president’s desk by year’s end. [The Hill]

Bob Stivers, one of the most gluttonous hypocrites in Frankfort, represents one of Kentucky’s poorest regions. So here he is advocating FOR killing health care by claiming the savings will help shore up the troubled pension system. Still wondering why his staff have slowly abandoned him over the past few years? Now you know. [CN|Toot]

The advertisement portrays the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau as a roomful of bureaucratic automatons mercilessly stamping “DENIED” on loan applications, beneath Soviet-style banners depicting CFPB’s director, Richard Cordray, and its principal architect, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass. But the ad does not disclose that the group sponsoring it is led by lobbyists for Navient, a student loan company that the CFPB is currently investigating for allegedly cheating student loan borrowers. [The Intercept]

Kentucky’s latest quarterly coal report shows new recent lows in the state’s coal employment and production. During the third quarter of 2015, Kentucky’s mines employed only 9,356 workers — a more than 50 percent decline from this quarter in 2011. Coal production is also at the lowest point since the 1960s. [WFPL]

David Bass, who served 21 years in the U.S. Army, says he tried medical marijuana in a moment of desperation. He suffered from chronic pain and PTSD as a result of multiple active duty tours in Iraq, and his doctor at the VA gave him intense narcotic and psychotropic drugs. [ThinkProgress]

The Glasgow-Barren County Tourist and Convention Commission became one of two tourist commissions that have agreed to help fund the salary of an administrative assistant who will help with the development of a master plan to connect area trails. [Glasgow Daily Times]

At the end of June, ProPublica and The Virginian-Pilot kicked off an investigation into the potential effects of Agent Orange on the children and grandchildren of Vietnam War-era veterans. [ProPublica]

As Fox Business News was cutting away to commercial almost an hour into Tuesday night’s Republican debate, U.S. Sen. Rand Paul could be seen walking toward the moderators. [H-L]

Undercover video recorded by an animal rights activist at one of the largest U.S. pork producers appears to show pigs being beaten and dragged across the slaughterhouse floor as workers cheer and throw blood-soaked towels at one another. [HuffPo]

Need cheap mobile phone service? Maybe even for a backup cell phone? I’m talking $6/mo cheap? Use our Ting referral code and we’ll all get a sweet credit. [Ting]

UofL Sex Scandal Isn’t Going Away

In the ever expanding universe of Kentucky bourbon, it can be hard to keep up with new distilleries and new things to sample. But it is so much fun trying. [H-L]

Whether or not you think Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) won Tuesday night’s Democratic debate, it’s clear his campaign’s bank account did. [HuffPo]

Oldham County officials plan to move forward with a vote on becoming a wet county, despite previous questions about whether they’d collected enough voter signatures to hold a special election. [C-J/AKN]

University of Louisville is investigating claims that a former staffer hired escorts to have sex with basketball players and recruits. [NPR]

The Cumberland Ranger District of the Daniel Boone National Forest is known for the Red River Gorge and Cave Run Lake. It stretches across Rowan, Bath, Menifee, Morgan, Powell, Wolfe, Estill, and Lee counties. [The Morehead News]

Sheldon Adelson, one of the Republican Party’s most sought-after contributors, is leaning increasingly toward supporting Marco Rubio — and the Florida senator is racing to win the backing of other uncommitted megadonors who have the potential to direct tens of millions of dollars his way and alter the contours of the Republican primary fight. [Politico]

Charles “Chuck” Doolin of Dry Fork was 5 years old when his father bought a new tractor. “This tractor here,” he said, as he stood beside the 1954 TO 30 Ferguson on East Washington Street on Saturday, “was delivered new there to my daddy in 1955. … It came from Fred Smith Motor Co. right here in Glasgow, Kentucky.” [Glasgow Daily Times]

Police officers Bryan Norberg and Graham Kunisch each had lasting physical problems after being shot while on the job in 2009. Now, because of their civil lawsuit against the store that sold the gun, the incident may have a lasting legal impact too. On Tuesday, a jury ordered gun store Badger Guns to pay $6 million for its role in an illegal gun sale, which ultimately led to both officers getting shot in the face. [ThinkProgress]

Jack Dunlap did not want to build a memorial when he planned a flag display for the front of his home, although he did honor military memories by design. [Ashland Independent]

The board that certifies orthopedic specialists will use ProPublica’s Surgeon Scorecard to help assess the competency of its surgeons, the organization’s top administrator said today. [ProPublica]

Nestled underneath a canopy of trees with falling leaves swirling around him, James Bonta of Barefoot Royals Studio looks comfortable at his pottery wheel as he shapes his creations amid the hustle and bustle of the Kentucky Guild of Artists and Craftsmen Fair Saturday. [Richmond Register]

The U.S. Supreme Court appeared divided Tuesday over whether it has jurisdiction in a case challenging a state’s sentencing of a minor to life in prison without parole. [The Hill]

Toyota, under ambitious environmental targets, is aiming to sell hardly any regular gasoline vehicles by 2050, only hybrids and fuel cells, to radically reduce emissions. [H-L]

A Russian scientist says he’s discovered the world’s smallest free-living insect — and the critter sure is tiny. [HuffPo]

Floyd County Will Make You Go Hmmm

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says an Ohio County property contaminated with arsenic is about to get cleaned up. [H-L]

Eight years after the Virginia Tech massacre led to tighter security at colleges across the U.S., some schools make “active shooter” training mandatory for incoming students, while others offer little more than brief online guidance on what to do if there’s a gunman on the loose. [HuffPo]

About 100 anti-abortion protesters decried the federal funding of Planned Parenthood during a rally Saturday, waving sometimes graphic signs in front of the Second Street clinic while neighborhood residents, some clearly disconcerted, looked on. [C-J/AKN]

President Obama’s renewed push for executive action on gun control is almost certain to be challenged in court, experts say, setting up another high-stakes battle over the Second Amendment. [The Hill]

The Cave Region Trails Initiative Steering Committee met for the first time Thursday night after receiving word it had been awarded a grant by the National Park Service to receive technical planning assistance in the development of a master plan it can use as a guide to connect trails in and around 11 communities in Barren, Edmonson, Hart and Warren counties. [Glasgow Daily Times]

A bankruptcy plan for Patriot Coal Corp. would have thrown into question the medical coverage of 208 miners, wives and widows. [ProPublica]

Morehead State University Student Life Tuesday hosted a second community meeting to open lines of communication in hopes of uniting the university, the city and the county. [The Morehead News]

Whale Rock. It’s got quite a story to tell. When scientists first saw it in images returned from Nasa’s Curiosity rover on Mars, they really weren’t sure what to make of it. [BBC]

Rob Napier, a displaced coal miner, has an accent that is the audio equivalent to chummy handshake. His speech and phrases are folksy and polite, until he starts talking about what Washington and Charleston, W.Va., are doing to the coal industry. [Richmond Register]

We’ll go ahead and ruin this one for you: Pawpaws are disgusting. [NPR]

Sensibility is winning out over bravado in terms of how local high school football players and coaches view concussion risk, according to the physician tasked with evaluating and treating players from 23 local high schools and three universities. [Ashland Independent]

California Governor Jerry Brown on Friday signed into law the state’s first comprehensive regulations of medical marijuana, two decades after legalization fueled a wild west of disparate local rules, a gray market in cultivation and concerns about the ease of obtaining the drug. The package of three laws, viewed by some as a possible framework for the eventual legalization of recreational marijuana in the most populous U.S. state, would establish a Bureau of Medical Marijuana Regulation and oversee such activities as cultivation and dispensary licensing. [Reuters]

For more than two decades, the Floyd County public schools and the state of Kentucky were at war. [H-L]

Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson defended his controversial comments that the Holocaust could have been prevented if only the Jewish people in Europe had been armed. [HuffPo]

Coal Pandering’s Worse Than Child Abuse, Right? Surely It’s Worse Than That. Or Maybe Elder Abuse?

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway tried to reinforce his friend-of-coal credentials Thursday, pledging to promote the industry and look for tax incentives to boost production as he distanced himself from a president routinely blamed for coal’s downturn. [H-L]

If you want to stop violence against people, stop violence against animals. [HuffPo]

Because of course they are. Some of Kentucky’s most vulnerable people — frail, elderly and disabled individuals in nursing homes — have been threatened, ridiculed, slapped, injured or sexually abused, but the state’s nursing home industry is seeking relief from what it calls heavy-handed state oversight. [C-J/AKN]

The lack of accurate information about police-involved shootings is roiling the nation’s law enforcement community, leaving officials unable to say whether high-profile killings are isolated events or part of an alarming trend, FBI Director James B. Comey said Wednesday. [WaPo]

What this means is Mark Hebert is prolly spilling the hooker tea. A former University of Louisville basketball player has given investigators a version of events that indicates strippers were in the players’ dorm on at least one occasion, a source close to the investigation told WDRB News. [WDRB]

Leading theologians from the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) are making news this week for again speaking out against ex-gay therapy, also known as reparative or conversion therapy. But what these theologians have been saying at the annual Association of Certified Biblical Counselors (ACBC) conference about how to respond to LGBT people belies the supposed progress of rejecting these harmful, ineffective treatments. [ThinkProgress]

A federal judge won’t drop charges against two of the six accused in a scheme to sell millions of dollars of untaxed cigarettes from a storefront in Russell, according to court records. [Ashland Independent]

A few days ago, the RAND Corporation published an opinion piece that raised questions about Surgeon Scorecard, our searchable online database of complication rates for surgeons performing several elective operations. We appreciate the authors’ intentions and plan to take some suggestions into account as we prepare Surgeon Scorecard 2.0. [ProPublica]

Barren Circuit Judge Phillip Patton has issued an order today agreeing with the decision of the Kentucky Office of the Attorney General that the Glasgow Independent Schools Board of Education violated the Open Meetings Act with its closed session on March 30, when it discussed a potential property agreement. [Glasgow Daily Times]

U.S. stocks ended higher on Thursday with the S&P 500 closing at a seven-week high as investors saw further signs of dovishness in the Federal Reserve’s September meeting minutes which shed light on its decision to keep interest rates near zero. [Reuters]

If Madison County institutes a needle-exchange program in an attempt to control infections such as HIV and hepatitis C among inter-venous drug users, it will benefit from the lessons learned by its neighbor to the north. [Richmond Register]

US presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has outlined her plan to curb Wall Street abuses. [BBC]

Preservation Kentucky will present its Excellence in Preservation Awards on Saturday at a particularly notable historic site: Traveler’s Rest, home place of Isaac Shelby, the first and fifth governor of Kentucky. [H-L]

Senior U.S. lawmakers have begun probing possible intelligence lapses over Moscow’s intervention in Syria, concerned that American spy agencies were slow to grasp the scope and intention of Russia’s dramatic military offensive there, U.S. congressional sources and other officials told Reuters. [HuffPo]

Kim Davis Just Won’t Effing Quit It

Despite Kentucky’s socially conservative streak, more than half of the state’s voters think Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis should have to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [H-L]

In a speech last week, Federal Reserve Board Chair Janet Yellen inadvertently told us why Congress should set a 4 percent unemployment target for the Fed in its conduct of monetary policy, as is proposed in a new bill put forward by Michigan Representative John Conyers. The context was Yellen’s dismissal of such a target. [HuffPo]

Don Childers and others affiliated with Childers Oil Co. combined to give $4,000 to the Kentucky Democratic Party this summer while Governor Steve Beshear’s administration was negotiating a secret settlement with the company over a 2011 spill of diesel fuel into the North Fork of the Kentucky River. [C-J/AKN]

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) is the favorite to succeed John Boehner (R-OH) after his surprise resignation as the House Speaker last week. The appointment of McCarthy, who represents a heavily Latino district, to preside over a more radically conservative Republican caucus could have implications for immigration reform. [ThinkProgress]

Ann Stewart, executive director of the Glasgow-Barren County Tourist and Convention Commission, has been reappointed to serve another term on the Kentucky Travel Industry Association’s board of directors. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The Secret Service reportedly leaked sensitive personal information to the press about Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Jason Chaffetz as the Utah Republican was investigating the beleaguered agency. [Politico]

Steve Beshear’s lawyers are using the words “absurd,” ”forlorn” and “obtuse” to describe the legal arguments a county clerk has used to avoid issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples. [WAVE3]

Can we quit it with calling Drew Curtis “quirky”? It’s an insult from a bunch of old-ass white men and seems to get thrown around a lot lately. The only people who think he is quirky are people who have no idea what “URL” means. And can we quit acting like the RGA pulled out because Bevin sucks? Sure, he sucks, but the RGA’s man on the ground said six months ago their budget was $3 million. RGA never thought Bevin could win, really. Which is worse than abandoning him now. [Larry Sabato]

Kentuckians are continuing to default on federal student loans at one of the highest rates in the nation. [WFPL]

Rand Paul’s (R-Cookie Tree) daddy hauled in more money in one day than he’s raised in three months. Surprising that anyone thinks his presidential campaign is anything more than a stunt to raise his senate campaign profile. [Mother Jones]

Attorneys for a Magoffin County judge have asked the Kentucky Supreme Court to review a lower court decision that would force the judge out of office for election fraud. [WKYT]

In an interview with NPR, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani says his country will use its added billions of dollars from the nuclear deal for boosting the Iranian economy. [NPR]

This year’s Historic Paris-Bourbon County house tour Sunday is at the boyhood home of one of Kentucky’s most interesting and least known Civil War generals, who ended his short life as an American diplomat in South America. [H-L]

Thirteen people were killed and as many as 20 were wounded Thursday in a shooting at a small community college in Roseburg, Oregon, according to multiple reports. Another day, another mass shooting. [HuffPo]