The Morehead Jail Mess Rages On

There could be very little money to help Fayette County’s low-performing schools in the tentative 2015-16 budget set for approval by the school board on Tuesday. [H-L]

The U.S. has spent an unprecedented amount on incarceration and rehabilitative programs over the past decade, yet the rate of prisoners returning to jail has largely gone unchanged. But curbing those figures may have little to do with additional funding, and more so with tweaking reentry logistics. [HuffPo]

A Kentucky appeals court has upheld a ruling that prevents the developers of the Bluegrass Pipeline from using the power of eminent domain to purchase property easements. [C-J/AKN]

Genetic information from a 35,000-year-old wolf bone found below a frozen cliff in Siberia is shedding new light on humankind’s long relationship with dogs, showing canine domestication may have occurred earlier than previously thought. [Reuters]

Maybe they shouldn’t be building a monster of a new jail that costs umpteen million dollars? Rowan County Fiscal Court Tuesday authorized County Attorney Cecil Watkins to file suit against the Kentucky Department of Corrections (DOC). [The Morehead News]

Analysts, commentators and politicians are increasingly viewing President Barack Obama’s strategy on Iraq as one step forward and two steps back – or worse. [BBC]

Glasgow Mayor Dick Doty announced Thursday that the field of candidates for the city’s chief of police position was whittled to six from nearly 20 this week by members of a focus group Doty appointed. [Glasgow Daily Times]

The New York Times put a 1,700-word piece on its front page Tuesday that accuses the EPA of violating federal laws on grassroots campaigning. The paper ran the story despite knowing the accusation is not true, a fact that is buried deep in the article. [Think Progress]

The “wow” is back at Eastern Kentucky University’s Hummel Planetarium. Recent equipment upgrades have made the 27-year-old facility an even more attractive option for campus uses, for school groups from around the region, and to the public, officials said Thursday. [Richmond Register]

From the Department of Things Ken Ham Wouldn’t Understand… A scientific discovery in Kenya, first reported in April, challenges conventional wisdom about human history, say the scientists who made the discovery and are now releasing the details. [NPR]

So, what happened? Saturday is the deadline set by the Kentucky Department of Environmental Protection for the landfill to come into compliance with an agreed order issued in January of 2014 regarding odor problems. [Ashland Independent]

Charter Communications announced early Tuesday that it will acquire Time Warner Cable — a little over a month after a proposed deal between Comcast and Time Warner was killed by regulators. [The Hill]

How to fail: Matt Bevin edition. Bevin, as he has since last November, blamed the media for creating a perception that he didn’t support U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell after losing to him in the primary last year. [H-L]

The Illinois Senate approved a bill Thursday that would remove criminal penalties for the possession of small amounts of marijuana. [HuffPo]

Is Lex Envious Of The Lou Shootings?

If Matt Bevin’s ignorance and code words leave you with a bitter taste in your mouth, you’re not alone. [H-L]

As Congress prepares to give President Barack Obama expedited powers to “fast-track” trade deals through Congress, many U.S. steel mills and skeptics of Obama’s trade agenda are worried about steel dumping, the term commonly used to describe countries selling steel below market price. [HuffPo]

State contractors, Steve Beshear appointees to important state boards, and two directors of R.J. Corman Railroad Group were among the big givers to the Kentucky Democratic Party in April. [C-J/AKN]

In the dead of night, they swept in aboard V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft. Landing in a remote region of one of the most volatile countries on the planet, they raided a village and soon found themselves in a life-or-death firefight. It was the second time in two weeks that elite US Navy SEALs had attempted to rescue American photojournalist Luke Somers. And it was the second time they failed. [The Nation]

If the city administration’s budget plan is adopted, Richmond Tourism will no longer be the lead organizer and funder of three popular events. [Richmond Register]

Presidential hopeful Sen. Rand Paul (R-Under the Bridge) ceded the Senate floor just before midnight Wednesday after more than 10 hours. [The Hill]

A former Carter County paramedic pleaded guilty Tuesday to charges that she diluted pain medication belonging to Carter County Emergency Medical Services, according to court records. [Ashland Independent]

The number of Americans filing new claims for unemployment benefits rose slightly more than expected last week, but the underlying trend continued to suggest the labor market was tightening. [Reuters]

Weeks after a video that rocked the county and brought into question the authorities of county officials was uploaded to Facebook, state officials have decided to take the first steps into looking into the case. [Hazard Herald]

If Jack Conway falls, it won’t be because of President Barack Obama and Kentucky racism. It’ll be because of Jack’s poor political decision making and the handful of shitty people he surrounds himself with. If he wants to win, he’ll turn over a new leaf (like he did with refusing to fight against marriage equality) and he’ll abandon the typical KDP tripe. [Politico]

A jury trial was set to begin June 1 for the alleged murder of two-year-old Nathaniel Jones but like the past six years, it will be delayed again. Tiea Jones and her former boyfriend, Brian Gallagher, were indicted in 2010 for murder and criminal abuse, first degree. [The Morehead News]

The latest estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau show the 15 cities with the biggest population increases were in the South and West — with two exceptions: New York City and Columbus, Ohio. [NPR]

A man was shot and wounded early Wednesday while walking through Martin Luther King Park, Lexington police said. [H-L]

It wasn’t that the intelligence community was giving the administration wholesale faulty intelligence. It was that the administration was lying to the American people about what the intelligence actually showed. [HuffPo]

Afghanistan Sure Is A Terrible Mess

Kentucky’s Republican voters narrowly chose Ryan Quarles to represent the GOP in the race for commissioner of agriculture in a down-to-the-wire finish Tuesday night. [H-L]

A faction of Republicans in the House of Representatives wants to stop poor people from buying junk food with food stamps. [HuffPo]

During the recent Kentucky shoot for “Moveable Feast with Fine Cooking,” there was no “Cutthroat Kitchen,” and nobody got “Chopped.” Rather, two local chefs wandered among buffalo grazing in Goshen, grilled bison brisket, bison skirt steak and fresh asparagus under tents at a Finchville farm, and relished the scent of slow-fermenting bourbon at Woodford Reserve distillery in Versailles. [C-J/AKN]

The third of four key U.S. congressional committees on Tuesday approved funding for 12 additional Boeing Co fighter jets in fiscal 2016, increasing the prospects that the company will keep its St. Louis production line running past the end of 2017. [Reuters]

The evening started with a rainbow that arced perfectly behind the commencement stage. And it ended with a fireworks display in the Friday night sky above Richmond. [Richmond Register]

This is a story about how the U.S. military built a lavish headquarters in Afghanistan that wasn’t needed, wasn’t wanted and wasn’t ever used—at a cost to American taxpayers of at least $25 million. [ProPublica]

Fairview school superintendent Bill Musick violated and impeded state education law by allowing non-teachers to teach students, interfering in hiring, withholding staffing allocations, transferring employees without posting vacancies and allowing two administrators to perform duties for which they were not certified, according to a report by the state Office of Education Accountability. [Ashland Independent]

The phrase “Aids epidemic” awakens distant memories in most of Europe, Australia or the Americas, where infection rates have generally been in decline for years. But as former UK Health Secretary Lord Fowler explains, the phrase is not used in Russia either – despite failed policies that have allowed infection rates to soar. [BBC]

Effective Monday, Glasgow Police Sgt. Bradley Lewis was placed on administrative leave with pay, according to a Glasgow Police Department press release. [Glasgow Daily Times]

A new survey of financial professionals tends to confirm the widely held belief that the financial industry has an ethics problem. [NPR]

Negative impacts of development have significantly impaired water quality and stream bank stability in the Triplett Creek watershed. [The Morehead News]

The White House has released its rural child poverty report. [External PDF Link]

Building and maintaining a linear park through downtown Lexington could cost upwards of $75 million, city officials told the Urban County Council on Tuesday. [H-L]

Throngs of students hit the streets of San Juan, Puerto Rico, last week to protest Gov. Alejandro García Padilla’s proposal to cut some $166 million from the budget for the island’s public university system — roughly one-fifth of the system’s total funds. [HuffPo]

It’s Post-Primary Hangover Time!

You should check out this interactive map of last night’s vote results from across Kentucky. [H-L]

As much as journalists may fancy themselves superhuman observers of history, the truth is that we are as susceptible to trauma as the victims whose stories we tell. [HuffPo]

A Franklin County grand jury Tuesday indicted former Buffalo Trace Distillery security guard Leslie M. Wright, 34, of Frankfort, on charges of being paid to look the other way as barrels were stolen for what authorities say was a bourbon theft criminal syndicate. [C-J/AKN]

Kentucky hates old people. States with at least 40 percent of homes ranked on the bottom two rungs include North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York. [Newsweek]

The real reason Republicans running for governor didn’t have in-depth discussions is because two of the candidates were incapable. The other two, one a former state supreme court justice and the other, an evangelical extremist who is overcompensating like woah, have never been outside their respective bubbles. Ever. [Eye Roll]

After winning reelection and control of the U.S. Senate, Republican Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., appointed Hazen Marshall, a lobbyist for Koch Industries, as his new policy chief. [The Intercept]

A historic case against the iconic Wagner’s Pharmacy near Churchill Downs is likely to end, since the Kentucky Supreme Court has ruled that morbid obesity is not a state-protected disability. [Business First]

The White House on Monday called the fall of Ramadi to the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) a “setback,” but vowed the U.S. is determined to help retake the Iraqi city. [The Hill]

An online fundraising campaign was successful for the Louisville businessman who is set to buy Guntown Mountain, the Western-themed roadside attraction in Cave City. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Obese young adults may be more likely to have a stroke than people who aren’t overweight, a U.S. study suggests. [Reuters]

His first four and a half months in office have included two record-breaking winter storms, two instances of flooding, collapsed bridges and the arrest of a Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program employee on forgery and theft charges. “All that’s missing is for a plague of locusts to hit Madison County, and we would have faced all possible challenges,” Madison Judge/Executive Reagan Taylor said Friday in his first State of the County address. [Richmond Register]

Millions of Americans use GlaxoSmithKline’s purple inhaler. But whether Advair poses a higher risk of asthma-related death remains uncertain 15 years after regulators approved the drug. [ProPublica]

The University of Kentucky has begun a sweeping overhaul of its body bequeathal program after finding numerous problems with its administration and oversight, including a three to five year delay in burying the remains of people who’d given their bodies for scientific research. The overhaul includes eliminating the position of program director Gary Ginn, who is also the Fayette County Coroner. [H-L]

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg officiated a same-sex wedding over the weekend, and according to New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd, the Notorious R.B.G. gave a big shout-out to the U.S. Constitution. [HuffPo]

Jamie Comer Still Clinging To Life

The four Republican candidates for governor bad-mouthed one another in the early minutes of Monday night’s debate, then tried to move past the controversy that has enveloped the race for the past two weeks. What planet is Matt Bevin on? The race has been nasty for a year. [H-L]

Doctors performing late-term abortions would be required to take steps to give the fetus the best chance of survival, according to a Republican bill the House plans to debate this week. [HuffPo]

Terry Stephens, the Russell Springs businessman who spent $5 million on an unsuccessful independent campaign to elect Republican David Williams governor in 2011, has contributed another $100,000 to an independent effort to help James Comer win Tuesday’s Republican primary for governor. [C-J/AKN]

Wall Street is worried that Sen. Bernie Sanders’s vigorous calls for banking industry reform will pull Hillary Clinton to the left, as the two presidential candidates battle for the 2016 Democratic nomination. [The Hill]

Bon Secours Kentucky Health System CEO Kevin Halter has been elected and installed as chairman of the Kentucky Hospital Association’s board of Trustees for the association’s 2015-16 year. [Ashland Independent]

The United States has released $35.5 million to help communities hit hard by the decline in coal mining to diversify their economies and retrain displaced miners, U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez said on Monday. [Reuters]

After resuming its open meeting on Monday night following a closed session to discuss the future acquisition or sale of real property, Cave City Mayor Dwayne Hatcher asked the city council for permission to proceed with negotiations with “industrial work” up to $40,000. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Researchers in the US have revealed a secret of the success of invasive fire ants – they can excavate any type of soil. Three-dimensional scanning revealed that the insects were able to build their complex nests regardless of the size of grains they needed to move. [BBC]

Community Farm Alliance and the Eastern Kentucky Food Systems Collaborative are accepting submissions for a local food guide to highlight eastern Kentucky restaurants, farmers markets, CSA’s (Community Supported Agriculture), and agri-tourism events. Owners and patrons are invited to submit their local food business to the guide via an online survey. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

The House Appropriations Committee found itself at ground zero in the budget wars Wednesday, as Republicans proposed new cuts from legal services for the poor even as outside events forced more second guessing about reductions in transportation and housing programs. [Politico]

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has announced an award of nearly $7.5 million in National Emergency Grant funds to the Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program, Inc. (EKCEP) to provide training and employment services to help out-of-work Eastern Kentuckians affected by the region’s economic struggles retrain and return to the workforce. [Hazard Herald]

Cesar Vargas has a resume most young Americans would envy. He graduated from a Brooklyn high school that counts Sens. Chuck Schumer and Bernie Sanders among its alumni. He made honors in both college and law school. But because he was brought to the United States from Mexico illegally when he was 5 years old, he can’t fulfill one of his dreams: joining the armed forces. [NPR]

Jim Ratliff is a glimmer of what could be possible to diversify jobs in Eastern Kentucky, a region hurt by a sharp downturn in the coal industry that long underpinned the economy. [H-L]

The Obama administration on Monday granted conditional approval to Shell to begin exploratory drilling in the Arctic, which the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management said would be “subject to rigorous safety standards.” [HuffPo]

Tom Eblen Hit The Nail On The Head

On the campaign trail this spring, the two Republican candidates for state attorney general talk more about current officeholder Jack Conway and the lone Democrat running for the job, Andy Beshear, than they do about each other. [H-L]

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush (R-Slightly Smarter Dubya) would have authorized the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq, putting the likely 2016 presidential contender on the same page as his brother George W. Bush, the president who actually did so. [HuffPo]

In her autobiography “A Trail of Feathers,” Tracey Damron gives spiritual explanations for many eventful turns in a life that led her inside the world of Kentucky Republican politics. But her explanation for the breakup of a seven-year marriage to Will T. Scott is an earthly one. [C-J/AKN]

Democrats are chiding Republican leaders in Congress as standing in the way of improvements to ObamaCare that enjoy bipartisan support. [The Hill]

A heron lifted off from a branch overhanging the Little Sandy River and it immediately reminded Chuck Chambers of the time he watched a similar bird on the Elk River in West Virginia. [Ashland Independent]

Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner faces a formidable challenge in his bid to reform public worker pensions by changing the state constitution, and even if he succeeds the move may not resolve the state’s pension funding woes for years to come. [Reuters]

Everyone who was supposed to turn in a financial interest statement to the Glasgow Board of Ethics did so, and it was in a timely manner, said City Clerk Tommie Birge, to whom the statements must be submitted. [Glasgow Daily Times]

Sen. Bernie Sanders hates the Supreme Court Citizens United ruling and if he becomes president he’ll make sure his Supreme Court nominees vote to overturn it, he said Sunday. [Politico]

Morehead-Rowan County-Lakeview Heights Joint Planning Commission Wednesday discussed ways to address storm water control after another major flood hit Rowan County in early April. [The Morehead News]

Scientists say they have exposed a scandal at the heart of Ancient Egypt’s animal mummy industry. A scanning project at Manchester Museum and the University of Manchester has revealed that about a third of the bundles of cloth are empty inside. [BBC]

Kentucky boasts four automobile assembly plants — two in Louisville and one each in Bowling Green and Georgetown. State leaders estimate that Kentucky is home to more than 400 auto-related businesses, when you count suppliers and other supporting businesses. [Business First]

The Labor Department’s latest report shows employers created 223,000 jobs in April and the unemployment rate went down another notch to 5.4 percent. [NPR]

Things started changing in the 1980s with “pro-business” policies and “trickle-down” economic theories that resulted in the highest level of wealth inequality in nearly a century, not to mention the greatest economic crisis since the Great Depression and a slow, uneven recovery. [Tom Eblen]

Low-income students in Kentucky and Texas are graduating high school at almost the same rates as their middle-class and affluent peers, defying a long U.S. trend. [HuffPo]

Stealing KY Bourbon Is Like Kidnapping

Court documents filed Thursday say that Gilbert “Toby” Curtsinger, the alleged ringleader in the thefts of bourbon from Buffalo Trace Distillery in Frankfort and Wild Turkey in Anderson County, was suspected of stealing years before detectives discovered bourbon barrels in March at his Franklin County home. [H-L]

An openly gay Eagle Scout said he’s been axed by the Boy Scouts — and he believes it’s because of his sexual orientation. [HuffPo]

Pee alert… At a breakfast meeting in Northern Kentucky last week, state Agriculture Commissioner James Comer told local Republican officials and business leaders who have endorsed his candidacy for governor that he will win the general election in November. [C-J/AKN]

Forests can play a vital role in supplementing global food and nutrition security but this role is currently being overlooked, a report suggests. The study says that tree-based farming provides resilience against extreme weather events, which can wipe out traditional food crops. [BBC]

More than a decade after the first plans were put to paper, the Chavies Wastewater Treatment Plant is officially open. [Hazard Herald]

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration will hold a public meeting this summer to address drug company concern that restrictions on what they can say about off-label use of drugs violate their First Amendment right to free speech. [Reuters]

Southeast Kentucky Community & Technical College has announced its plan to join a national movement to address smoking and tobacco use at community college campuses throughout the United States. Through a grant from Legacy, the national public health organization responsible for the national truth® smoking prevention campaign, SKCTC will encourage students, faculty and school administration to adopt a 100 percent smoke-free or tobacco-free policy. [Harlan Daily Enterprise]

In a little-noticed brief filed last summer, lawyers for the House of Representatives claimed that an SEC investigation of congressional insider trading should be blocked on principle, because lawmakers and their staff are constitutionally protected from such inquiries given the nature of their work. [The Intercept]

A spring-cleaning day is scheduled at Cumberland Falls State Resort Park in southeastern Kentucky. [WYMT]

The U.S. economy added 223,000 jobs in April, bringing the jobless rate to a seven-year low after slow growth in the first three months of 2015. [The Hill]

The personal, messy accusations in the Republican primary for Kentucky governor have likely opened the door for Louisville businessman Matt Bevin, a fact that some in the GOP fear. [WAVE3]

Here are the best stories we’ve come across over the past few months about the ever-increasing role of money in politics. [ProPublica]

The University of Kentucky Board of Trustees is expected to discuss a proposed new policy Friday afternoon that would return alcohol to campus in limited ways. [H-L]

Rand Paul said the attack in Garland, Texas, was “an example of how we do need to secure our border,” but neither of the attackers crossed the southern border to gain access to the U.S. Both were Americans who were believed to have been radicalized in their hometown of Phoenix. [HuffPo]